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DULUTH T^VF.lVTlVa HT^RAEIKS 






MINNESOTA 
ICAll 




TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



RPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR TUESDAY MORNING, MARCH 10, 1908. 

*• . - ■■ — — ^^^—^^^^^^^■^^^'^ 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



MURDERER 
OFJRIEST 

Placed on Trial for His 

Life in Denver 

Court. 



JAPS HAVE FAR GREATER | n yoom; |m b 
NAVY NOW THAN THEY HAD | SEPMTEBF 
BEFORE THE RUSSIAN WAR 



Attorney for Alia Will 
Offer Plea of In- 
sanity. 

T>rnvrr, March a.-Anticipating the 
presence «'f a large crowd at the «p<^n- 
ing of thf trial today of Giuseppe Alia, 
the Sicilian, who in cold blood mur- 
dered Fathtr L*o Hehirichs u£ St. 
Elizabeth's church while he was giving 
the sacraments on Sunday, Feb. 23. 
Shoriff Alexand.-r Nlsbet hud stationed 
deputies along the walks and In the 
entrance leading from the jail to the 
courtrcxjm, and also in the courtroom 
Itself This precaution was taken t.- 
frijs'trate any attempt at mob violence 
although the ottieers .»f the law did 
not rea-lly lock for any outbrenk of tnin 

\lia's cHPf wns the first en the crim- 
inal docket and Judge Gretley H. 
Whiteford who in taking his turn on 
the rrimir.al bench, had ordered pres- 
ent an opfH panel of liK) veniremen. 
Plea WUI Be Insanity. 

It w:is expected that the tlefense of 
Attorney Robert H. Widdecomb, rep- 
resenting Alia by appointment of the 
court, would advance the theory "t in- 
sanity, in the hope t)f »aving the bfe 
of his client, and to be prepared for 
combatting this defense the prost cu- 
tion had summoned eight of the mos. 
Kkillful l.rain specialists in the city t" 
be present for the purp<.st of observing 
the defendant, and thus be In readi- 
ness to give expert opinion as to his 
sanity. The defense had arranged also 
f(n thr«-e alienists to serve their side. 

Attorm y Widdecomb indicated early 
In the examination of veniremen that 
he would make the (lut-stion of a pros- 
pective juryman's allegiance to the 
Roman Catholic faith tht cause for 
challengmg him as to his tiualifica- 
tion to serve. 

When Alia was taken from the jail 
to the courthouse, he was under guard 
of Sheriff Nisbet and four de-put ies, 
each .armed with a brace of revc-lvers. 
His men had explicit Instructions to 
kiep the jail ground cleared, and to 
arrest any one who showed any evi- 
dence of "intention to attack the pris- 
oner, or nny one that might try to st;r 
ur the crowd tc making a demonstra- 
tion. Sptctators in the courtroom 
weie f.rdered v-losely scrutinized, and 
all suspiclc us characters were excluded 
from the building. The trial was called 
prf mptiy at 10 o'clock. 

thoOsandT" 
of delegates 

Arrive in Pittsburg to At- 
tend Big Missionary 
Convention. 

Pittsl'urg, March !>.— Fiv. sim( ial trains 
tonnpmg Uelegat. s- troni Canada and the 
north, east, south aad west of this-- coun- 
try, arrived here today for the tlrst in- 
teiiiational convention of the Youn.^ 
Peoples Missionary movement which 
conv»nes ture tomorrow na^rning for a 
three day.«-' session. The Ueletratts now 
Jn tlie citv numlier over J,(iiiii and ut least 
MO additional represi ntaiives of mis- 
sionary sechtieg will arrive helore niKht. 
Some of tlie ablest sptaktrs of mission- 
ary and tducatlonal them»-s in Great 
liritain, funada and thi- United Slates. 
Japan. China and India, will address 
the eonventlon at the day and evening 
sessions. Tnese addresses will prtseni 
the problems m the heme and foreign 
mission field- ajul the progress and need 
fof a more awgresslve campaign of mis- 
sionary education in the churches of the 
world. 

Th" purpose of the convention is to 
consider an Immediate advance move- 
jrient .n the mission fields at home and 
abroad: t4) realize the success of the 
present campaign ot missionary etlucu- 
tlon and the neeesslty of a more thor- 
f)U.t;h and far-reaching e<buational move- 
ment liy mission boiirds. s<Kieti»'S and 
chiirfhes comp<)Ked of U.imo.iHW yo;m.< 
people aial Sunday school memhers of 
the Cnlti (1 States and i'anad:i, and per- 
haps half that mimher addithmal in 
Great IJrilain. 

Thi immensity of the plans for the 
convention maki s it Impossible to issiu! a 
propram. l>aUy hulletins will be printed 
and disrrllnitrd in t!ie convintion hall. 

GOES TO DEATH 
WITH A SMILE 



Italian Shows Extraor- 
dinary Composure at 
His Execution. 

Ossinlng, N. Y., March 9. — Antonio 
Strollo, an Italian who killed Antonio 
Torscilla In Van Cortlandt park, Xew 
York, last August, for the purpose of 
robbery, went to death in the electric 
chair at Sing Sing prison today with 
a smile after a cheery gooy-byc to 
those who had been summoned to wit- 
nes.s the execution. .SiroUo showed the 
most extraordinary composure. When 
he entered the death chamber with a 
light, springy stop, his face was beam« 
Ing and the smile was never abseni 
for an instant, until his features were 
covered by the death helmet. Four 
contacts were made before the man 
was pronounced dead. 

SCOHK OF KIltKMH.N Hl'HT. 
Chicago. Man-h 9.— A sore of fiicmea 
were injured, three perhaps fatally, bv a 
fire .arly teiday which distroyed Apollo 
hall, a three-story structure at l'>6-262 
Rlue I.sland avenue. The cause of the firo 
is unknown. The total damage is es- 
timated ul SSa.OU). 




Sk^JM^********«MIMNHIMIHMf«*aWf#*^ 





LOKD TWEEDMOUTH, 
First Lord of the Admiralty, Who 
Has Got Into Trouble by Making 
Public a Letter From Emperor 
William. 



I PENITENTIARY IS | 
I HUGE OPIUM DEN % 

% * 

1 Lincoln. Neb., March 9— The % 
\ Nebraska penitentiary is not a 4 
% reformatory, but a huge opium ^ 
% den. according to Dr. R. E. Gif- i 
% fen, prison surgeon, in a report 
^ to Governor Sheldon, made 
% public last night. Dr. Giffcn. 
* who was formerly connected * 
^ with Blackwell's Island prison | 
$ and Bellevue hospital. New ^, 

York, reports that of the 41.2 ^ 
prisoners confined in the insti- $ 
tution there are between loc \ 
and i.so addicted to the mcr- -^ 
phine habit, and that morphme % 
is being regularly supplied to % 
% the prisoners by outside per- * 

2 sons, who are unknown. ^ 



Have 204 Vessels at Pres- 
ent Time Against 153 
Before. 

Twice as Many Battle- 
ships and a Third 
More Cruisers. 

Captured Several From 

Russia and Have Built 

a Number. 



Tokio, March !».— Some reliable fig- 
ures are now at hand showing the 
pre.sent strength of the Japanese navy 
a£ compared with its strength when 
the war broke out. The total sum- 
mary, briefly stated, follows: 

One hundred and fifty-three vessels 
of all descriptions, representing a ton- 
nage of 2-S3,742 tons, before the war, 
an<l 204 vessels and r.l5,0S2 tons at the 
present day. Further scrutiny of the 
figures sh{»W8 that Japan today pos- 
sesses more than twice the number of 
battleships that she had before the 
war. a third more armored cruisers, 
three more other cruisers, nearly three- 
times as many destroyers, but three 



9 — 



WIRELESS MESSAGE FROM 
BAHTLESHIPS IN PACIFIC 
RECEIVED AT PENSACOLA 



NO FURTHER 
PUBLICITY 



Will be Given Letter From 

Emperor William to 

Tweedmouth. 



Acting Premier Asqulth 

Quickly Dispels Any 

Such Idea. 



(Continued on page 9. fifth column.) 

appeaTfrom 
judge's order 

Dismissing Receivers of 

Oriental Bank Made 

by Jackson. 

New York, March. 9.— A formal notice 
of appeal from Justice O'Gorman'e order 
of Saturday dlsmisBinu the receivers of 
the Oriental Uank wa« filed bv Attorney 
General Jackoon today. A few minutes 
after the notice of appeal had been filed 
Justice O'Gorman, in the supreme court, 
denied an application made by coansel 
of the bank for settlement of his order 
of Saturday approving the agreein* nt 
with the Metropolitan Trust company for 
the payment of depositors. The bank's 
counsel Wimted the court to resettle his 
order fc« a,« to set forth that Attorney 
Oeneral Jackson consented to it. Justice 
O'Gorman suggeist. d as the attorney 
gent ral'h application for a stay pending 
an appeal was- to be ar.nuod tomorrow 
before the appellate division It might be 
well to not only argue that question but 
to ask that court to hear the full case on 
Its merits. In the meantime, the Car- 
negie Trust comp.iny held fast to all the 
boi.ks and assets of th< bank, whkij 
Justice O'Gorman's ordvr of Saturday 
directed them to relinquish. 



St. Paul, Minn., March 
(Special to The Herald.)— An 
alleged confidence man, giving 
the name of Henry Peterson, 
was taken to Minneapolis last 
night from Benson, minn., to 
answer the charge of swindling 

a young man out of $aoo. He ^ 

met the young man at the Great ^ 

Western depot, and, after get- * 

ting his confidence, confided % 

that he needed $155 to pay^the ^ 

freight on a threshing macnine ;^ 

to Benson. The young man ^ 

was taken to Benson and ;^ 

shown a farm, which Peterson ^ 

claimed to own, and this settled \ 

it, for Peterson got the loan. % 

Later he secured another $50 to ^ 

cover the cost of shipping a ^ 

windmill and then disappeared. ^ 

The younp; man told his story ^ 

to the police, and Peterson was ^ 

;jk found at Benson, * 

THIRD FLOORS OF 
SIXTEEN SCHOOLS 

in Milwaukee, Without 
Fire Escapes, Order- 
ed Vacated. 

Milwaukee^ Wis.. March 9.— The third 
floors of sixteen of Milwaukee's public 
schools were ordered vacated today by 
Building Inspector Edward V. Koch, 
because of the absence of fire escapes. 

The order was served on President 
A. S. Lindemann of the school board, 
and was issued by direction of Mayor 
Becker. Inspector Koch will today 
investigate the condition of private 
and pariK'hial schools, and If any are 
found wanting in lire escape eyuip- 
ment, they will be required to dose 
until they conform to the law. 

School Closed at Empire, Ohio. 

Wfcllsville. Ohio, March y.— The large 
public school at Empire, eight miles 
from here, has been cUfSed by direction 
of Mayor Griffith until the board of 
education has made * teratlons for the 
safety of the chitdren. Necessary 
stairways will have to be constructed, 
and the building improvetl in many 
wayr. bef<jre the municipal authorities 
will permit the building to be used for 
school purrK>se6 again. 



Came Across Ocean and 

Land to Florida 

Station. 



Vessels Are Now Off the 

Mexican Port of Ac- 

apulco. 

They Expect to Reach 

Magdalena Bay on 

March 12. 



Washington, March 9. — About the 
last place that the navy department 
expected to hear from the Atlantic 
battleship fleet for at least six months 
was on the Atlantic coast, yet this is 
what has happened. The navy de- 
partment today received a telegraphic 
message from its wireless station at 
Pensacola, which had been In direct 
communication with the battleship 
fleet, a most remarkable performance, 
considering that the wireless impulses 
were obliged to traverse the Gulf of 
Mexico, then cross overland the state 
of Texas, part of Mexico, and again 
traverse several hundred miles of 
ocean. This particular message was 
from Rear Admiral Thomas, in com- 
mand of the second division, and was 
as follows: 

"Have you any important news 
from home?" 

Fleet Ix>cated. 

An additional dispatch received by 
Pensacola from Rear Admiral 
Thomas, dated on board Minnesota, at 
8 o'clock last night, is as follows: 

"The po.sition of the fleet at this 
moment is latitude 14.37 north, 
longitude 102.01 west. 

Admiral Plllsbury, chief of the navi- 
gation bureau, states that the fleet is 
less than 900 miles from Magdalena 




KING ALFONSO 
Of Spain, Who Insists on Going to 
Barcelona Tuesday, Although An- 
archists Have Threatened to Kill 
Him. 






GAVE AWAY MONEY; | 
NOW ASKS CHARITY | 



EXLISTED MEN NOW 

HAVE 'ONE HOUSEWIFE." 

■Washington. Match 9.-The recent ord- 
er which Hupplies to an army recruit 
upon his enlistment a full kit of toilet 
articles, has run the gauntlet of judicial 
construction and has been sustained. As 
a result, this in what the enlisted man 
e(ts In addition to his regular outtlt: 

Razor, brushes for hrdr, to<^)tb. shaving 
and shoes, comt. polish for black and 
tan shoes, two towels. toll<'t soap, whisk 
broom and iSFt, but not least, "ono 
housewife," The housewife is expiamed 
t,) r.< a neat little ca«e containing thread, 
needle, buttons and patches. 



(Continued on page 4, first column.) 

FRANKUNMiNE 
CLOSED BY FIRE 

It is Believed AH the 

Miners Got Out 

Safely. 

Hancock, Mich., March 9.-(Speclal to 
The Herald.)— Fire has broken out In 
No. 5 shaft of the Franklin mine at the 
twenty-eighth level and the mine has 
been closed. Searching parties are in 
the mine, but c-annot get near the seat 
of the fire because of the smoke. It is 
believed all the miners got out safely. It 
1«» supposed an over-heated timber 
caught fire from a miners lamp. 



Worcester, Mass., March 9. — % 

i Dr. John Wellesley, well known ^ 

% here as a cancer expert and g 

4; a philanthropist, has applied for ^ 

% admission to the poorhouse at ^ 

% the age of 83. A year ago Dr. ^ 

* Wellesley decided that he could ^ 
% not live more than six months, ^ 
% and he therefore gave away all % 
% his property, retaining only ;^- 
% enough money to keep him dur- V 
% ing the half-year. The amount % 

* has been used, and he has no ^ 
% relatives and nothing to live on; ^ 
% he asks the county authorities * 

* to care for him. % 



Lxmdon. March ».— The hope that the 
letter sent last month by Emperor 
William of Germany to Lord Tweed- 
mouth, first lord of the admiralty, in 
which, it has been charged, his majesty 
attempted to influence Great Britain's 
naval legislation, and the British min- 
ister's reply thereto, would be made 
public, for the benefit of the pe<ple 
was «iulckly disptlled by Mr. Asciuith. 
chancellor of the exchequer, in the 
house of comm<ms, this afternoon. 

In a ct»uple of curt sentences, Mr. 
.■\s(iuith, who was acting as premier, 
told A. J. Balfour and his other ques- 
tioners that iie had nothing to add to 
his statement of Friday, and that so 
far as he knew. Lord Tweedmouth had 
nothing to add to his declaration, be- 
yond the fad that immediatelV upon 
the rec'ipt of Kmperor William's let- 
ter the tlrst lord of the admiralty 
showed it to Sir Edward Grey, the 
foreign secretary, who agreed with the 
recipient that the letter had no official 
character and should be treated as a 
private c»>mmunlcatlon, "It Is c4early 
of the question," continued Mr. 



I MINNESOTA'S PRIZE-WINNING PUPIL | 



Asjjuit'h. "^o lay private and j>ersonal 
correspondence on the table." 

A iiue.«tion from Amelius H. H. L(K>k- 
wood, cVmservatlve. as to whether it 
was iMsslble for a communication on 
such an important <iuestion, to be re- 
girded in any way as private, drew a 
still more curt "yes," from Mr. As- 
quith, and when he was asked to give 
the house an opportunity to discuss 
Lord Tweedmouth's conduct, the act- 
ing ht ad of the government maintained 
a chilly silence. 



.\RREST OF M.W 

At .laiiesville May Solvi' MystiM-y of 
Attacks on >\ omen. 

Milwaukee, Wis., March P.— An Kven- 
ing Wisconsin special from Janesville 
says: With the arrest of a Norwegian 
«vidently Insane, who gives hip name 
as Otto Knde Wallln. the local police 
niav have the solution of the recent at- 
tacks on Janesville women. Wallln was 
arrested at 1:30 o'clock this morning after 
II call had been sent In to the police sta- 
tion annoucing that a burglar was try- 
InK to enter a residence In the First 
ward. 

On his person was found a rare selec- 
tion of junk. Including six women's 
p.iketbooks and half a dozen knives and 
several mens pocketbooks. He wore two 
suits of clothc.«. Including a brown can- 
vas c<Kit with fur about the neck, which, 
with his physical doscriptK>n, practically 
answers that of the man suspected of at- 
tacking several women In this city dur- 
ing lust fall and winter. The police are 
sweating hmi out. 




ALFONSO IS 
NOTAFRAID 

King Will Visit Barcelona 

in Spite of Many 

Protests. 

Anarchists Said to Have 

Decreed Death of 

Spain's Ruler. 



Barcelona, March 9.— Gen. Linares, 
the captain general of Catalonia, Is 
confident that the visit of King Al- 
fonso to Barcelona will pass off safely. 
His majesty Is expected tomorrow 
morning. Gen. Linares declares the 
population of this city Is anxious to 
show itb loyalty to the king, whose 
courage in coming after the repealed 
bomb outrages here is greatly ad- 
mired. Nevertheless, the captain gen- 
eral is sparing no precautions to safe- 
guard his majesty. The official pro- 
gram of the visit has not been allowed 
to be printed, and the houses along the 
streets through which the king is to 
pass have been thoroughly searched. 
But, 111 view of the fact that for twen- 
ty years past, Barcelona has been a 
stronghold of Republicanism, and the 
center of violent Carllst agitation, 
brought about by the withdrawal of 
the ancient privileges of Catalonia, at 
the time the government was central- 
ized at Madrid, after the French model, 
an enthusiastic popular reception is 
not expected. 

The peril to the king does not come 
from the Republicans, whoso organiza- 
tion, yesterday, formally declared 
against a hostile manifestation, but 
from the anarchist wing of the Car- 
lists, which is conducting a campaign 
of bomb operations, as reprisals for the 
alleged ill-treatment of their comrades 
who are confined in the Mont Juich 
prLson. 



DIAMONDS 
FORWOMAN 

Bought by Shrewd Swind- 
ler Proved to be His 
' Undoing. 

Had Obtained $10,000 

on a Deposit of $1,- 

000 in Bank. 



San Francisco, March 9.— "With * 
qapilal of $1.0<:tO, Edward D. Smith, 
who was arrested here yesterday, is 
charged with having swindled three 
banks out of a total of 110,000. Ac- 
cording to the police, Smith opened an 
account with the Canton bank of San 
Francisco a short time ago, depo.siting 
$1,000. He allowed this amount to rest 
practically intact, invariably repaying 
the little sums he withdrew. Then, 
having worked into the confidence of 
the offlciels of the Canton bank, Smith 
is said to have gone to New York and 
deposited in one of the banks in that 
city a check for $5,000 drawn against 
the Canton bank. 

From New York he is said to have 
gone to Aberdeen. Wash., and de- 
posited a similar check in one of the 
banks there. Then he began to draw 
on both accounts, the two banks hav- 
ing learned that he had an account 
with the Canton bank, but evidently 
being Ignorant of the amount of his 
deposit. 

Draws $10,000 From $1,000 Deposit, 
He succeeded in drawing JIO.WO irom 
his deposit of $1,000. according to the 
police, and had it not been for his 
desire to buy diamonds for seme wom- 
an in all pre.bability he would have 
succeeded in getting back his orig- 
inal capital. 

Last Saturday he purchased a large 
diamond from a Jewelry store and ten- 
dered a check for $500 drawn against 
the Canton bank. The management of 
the store refused tc accept it until an 
investigation had been made, and be- 
coming suspicious, informed the police. 
A detective hastened to the Canton 
bank, w^here he learned of the swin- 
dle and Immediately arrested Smith. 
The police say that the man has 
lately been released from San Qucn- 
tln prison, where he served a term for 
a previous swindle amounting to $30,- 
000 The name Smith, they say, is an 
alias and it is alleged that he belongs 
to a prominent family in this c.ty. 
The police are now hunting for the 
woman, who is thought to be an ac- 
complice. 



Ministry Opposed to Visit. 

Madrid, March 9.— It developed here 
today that a .section of the Spanish 
ministry is bitterly opposed to King 
Alfonso'.s going to Barcelona, which is 
described as a "wasp's nest," but the 
king, with a display of the old Bour- 
bon courage, has refused to be dis- 
uaded. He considers It his duty to go 
and Is confident that his visit to Bar- 
celona Avill appeal to the chivalrous 
spirit of the .'Spanish people, and have 
a good effe^ct. 

A dispatch has been received here 
from the Spanish minister to Switzer- 
land, saying that the anarchists of 
^neva have decreed the death of King 
Alfonso and Premier Maura. 



TWO ASPHYXIATED. 
Chicago, March 9. — Theodore Engle- 
breck, 70 years of age, and his wife, 
Anna, 75 years of age, were found 
dead in their room at the home of their 
daughter, Mrs. Anna Bostrum, 479 Ra- 
cine avenue, today. Death had been 
caused by asphyxiation by illuminat- 
ing gas. The police are of the opin- 
ion that the couple, dLscouraged by 
the loss of their home by fire last 
Saturday, entered into a suicidal pact 
with each other. 



BILL TO RELIEVE 
BRIDGE COMPANY 

From Payment for Tim- 
ber Used on Rainy 
River Bridge. 

Washington, March if.— (Special to The 
Herald )— In \.'n*i omnibus claim bill re- 
ported to the senate last week, is an 
item directing the secretary Of the '"- 
ttrior 10 cancel the proceedings •"'■"''-; 
tuted by the con.missioner of the land 
office for the recovery of $6.27« alleged 
to be due the I'nited States by the Mmno- 
pota & Ontario Bridge ci mpany on ac- 
count of timber used in the construction 
of the Minnesota and Ontario bridga 
across Rainy river, at Baudette. Minn., 
the said Minnesota & Ontario Bridge com- 
pany having five vears previously to thu 
institution of said proceedmps a bc.n.fc 
fide and innocent purcha.«er of said tim- 
ber from parties then doing business at 
Baudette. but whose whereabouts are now 
unknown, and the said Mmne.«ota & 
Ontario Bridge company is hereby re- 
lieved of any obligation to pay to the 
"United States government the amount 
hereinbefore pet forth. .^.i^^ 

Another item earn,? an appropriation 
foV P«avment of $1,015 to H. . R Kmp of 
Grand Rapids. Minn., to reimbur?e h-ni 
for moneys collected from him on con^ 
tracts for cuttinpc timber in the inaian 
reservation, in Minnesota, in excess of 
the value of the timber. 

The clkims of the following rc-idens 
of Minnesota are also provided fo^- g ??;^^ 
M Case Filmore county. $191; FreUei.cK 
Cinrbecht, Ramsey county, $3i4: Warrea 
O. Onan. Clay count y, $39. 

THEOirNESE 
SLAVETRAFFIC 

Among Obscure Religouj 
Organizations is Be- 
ing Investigated. 

San Francisco, March 9.-Actlng on 
advices received from Enniskillen, Ire- 
land, the police began an investigation 
of all obscure religious organizations 
last night in an effort to locate one 
particular sect which, they had been 
informed, was making use of Its religi- 
ous methods to win over unsuspect- 
ing ifirls for the Chinese slave iratnc. 

The band was driven out of the Bnt- 
l.<.h Isles last December. Chief Biggy 
received Information yesterday from 
John A. Belfast, chief of police of En- 
niskillen, Ireland, stating that the or- 
ganization had won over three Eng- 
lish girls and was taking them to 
China, through San Francisco, with 
the avowed purpose of making them 
missionaries to their cause. Since their 
departure additional information was 
brought to light. Indicating that the 
religion was a mere guise, and that 
the sole intention of the movement was 
to gat the girls into China, where they 
would be sold as slaves. 



I- 



POLICE THREATENED. 
St Joseph. Mo., March 9.-Tnreaten:ng 
them with death if they harmed any 
Italians In St. Joseph, and warning them 
for love of fhelr wives and cnildren not 
to try to deport any Italians from here, 
letters. Identical in meaning, but vary- 
ing slighllv In wording, were received 
last Thursday morning by Chief of Po- 
lice William H. Franz and Inspector ot 
Detectives Charles H. Kelly. 




m 



I, 






THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 




HERALD'S WEST DILIJTH DEPX, 




.1. J. Moran, 
40S Central Ave. 



Kred Drilhern 
&405 Ramaey St 




■»T 



FOUBISTER 
ON^RPET 

Criticised by Club Mem- Six Youths Secure Liquor 



BOYS HAVE 
CAROUSAL 



bers for Voting for 
Brewery Licenses. 

Holding More Than One 

License Claimed to 

be illegal. 



in West Duluth 
Saloon. 



Three of Them Are Ar- 
rested by the 
Police. 



CIGARS OF OUALITV 



// is impossible to fool 
a smoker more than once. 
We don't even try to do 
tJut. IVben we sell a cii^ar 
we hope the value will be 
so^reatthat the pure baser 
will become a steady pa- 
tron. It is "ciiiars of qual- 
ity" that have built uh this 
business. Thty will con- 
tinue to build it. A look 
at our array of brands is 
sufficient to convince any 
smolier that we should have 
his steady patronage. 

A. T. CEPERLY. Mgr. 
Sia WELST SUPERIOR ST 



The question of granting saloon 
licensts to breweries, held the mem- 
bers of the W-.-st Duluth Kepubllcan 
rlub In u heated debate for a long 
time Saturday nltfht at their meet- 
ing. 

The question arose as o. result of 
Alderman J. K. Foubistcr of the 
Eightn ward voting in favor of grant- 
ing lioonses to the brewe: ics at the 
n»(^"tl;ig of the < ity council last Mon- 
day night. He was riitijijod by some 
of the members for ha.ii«g done so. 
Gviorge Millar .slued with Mr. Fou- 
bister on the matt.r. claming that it 
liad always be* n the cu.sL-.-m to give 
the breweries as many saloon licenses 
as thoy wanted, and the men in whos,- 
names these licenses had been i.ssued 
ha.i alway.s kept respectable places. 

Mr. Foubisler said that the only 
objection he could sec to the brew - 
< rios holding licenses was that it gavvi 
thoni a control of the business and a 
monopoly. 

Jo.seph Cochran made the state- 
ment that the law provides that a 
nvm .-an have but oiie saloon, an 1 
tliat according to the law, tlie mtn 
who run .saloons under Hcensi s taken 
oul under another man's name, as is 
nfitn the case where a i>rewery owns 
the .'^aloon Hcenso. are liable for vio- 
lati.-n of the law for selling liquor 
without a license. Mr. Cochran said 
that he had looked the law up. and 
was positive of his point. 

When asked for his opinion, L. A. 
Barnes said that he believed that It 
wH.s unlawful for one man to hold 
more than one llc-n.se, and therefore 
lie was agaln.st granting any to the 
breweries. , ^, ^ 

At that, Mr. Foubister stated that 
he was unaware that any such law 
exi.Hted. and If it did. he would 
certainly bring the attention of the 
council to it at the meeting tonight. 






Six boy.s, none of them over 19 
years old, had a beer drinking debauch 
Saturday night in an old shanty on 
the dump at the foot of Fifty-first 
avenue west. As a result of their 
keg party three of the gathering were 
taken in charge by the police, for Iv 
is claimed they were in no tit condi- 
tion to be aimlessly wandering about 
the street."! at 2 o'olocK Sunday morn- 
ing. 

According to the story told tiie po- 
lice the boys got togethtjr and by chip- 
ping in raised enough money to buy 
a keg of beer, from Doyle's saloon 
on italeigh street. They carried the 
keg lo an old shack on the dump, 
where they broke in and proceeded lo 
put away its contents. At 2 o'clock in 
the morning when the keg had been 
emptied they started home, but throe 
of them fell by tlie wayside and were 
gathered in by the ix)lice. Two of 
them win be taken befon; the Juvenile 
court and the other. Edwin Grondely. 
aged 18 years, was tried this mornmg 
at the municipal court, where he re- 
ceived a line of $10 or ten days for 
being drunk. 

The police are investigating the 
cases of the other boys, whose names 
they havf, and are looking up the 
matter of who .sold them the beer. 

The other five f)oys who helped pay 
for and drink the beer are ClarMUoe 
McLellen. aged 19 years: Charles Tow. 
aged IT; Ed Trombly. aged Pi; Samuel 
Ingman, aged r>, and ingwald Grandy. 
aged 16 years. 



West Duluth Bi'iets. 



OPPOSK LICENSE. 



Wanigas 



>\ ♦of 



MkK:^ 



►♦>V> 



^VA^'^vt* 



• €*jl> 



>f-^ 



♦^K^*: 



yLe<**T«^ 



•'^ ♦ .*' 



.>>**^ 



^♦;iK 






Wall S L?Sor Store. 

310 West Superior Street. 



Wiio?-You. Me?™Yes. 

You're right; I am the man 
that does expert dyeing, clean- 
ing, repairing, pressing and al- 
tering of ladies' and gentlemen's 
garments. 

G. D. HONE 

201 \<, West First St. 
Old phone 1854. New 1134-X. 



-Liquid Veneer- 



FURNITURE POLISH 

25c- Makes old tiiinijs new — 25c. 

KELLEY HDW. CO. 



Temperance People Will Oppose 
Application of Theodore Epper. 

Tli.^ rumor that Theodore Epper in- 
t.nd.-! to ask for a r-newal of the lio.n.s-^ 
for hl.s saloon, at 5'C9 Oran.l avenue, has 
resulted In a p.Hlllon. which is being 
oii.nilattNl among West Duluth people, 
requesting the city council not to grant 

"^EpDi-r's Uconse expired sliortly after 
th.- scandal wliich l->ok plaio in h s and 
VViUium Mulligan's saloons ^^boul the 
fir.st of la.st month. Under the clrcum- 
siancea whlcli placed his saloon in ttiJ 
luneliglu, Epper did not apply t'^r * .J"" 
uewal of Ids license. Now it is s.ud tliat 
he lia.s decided to ask for a license and 
nsunie hi.s liquor business on onnd ave- 
nue Tills lias .started an agitation amon« 
the" Women's Christian Teinperance un- 
ion and Ihey have frani.-d >*• ,P*-i'V-*"2; 
which is being readily signed by West 

^rt'tVs^ud^lhat the clergy and business 
,n,.n have taken a great Ini.Mv.st In the 
moveineiil and are preparing to '^'•■Ka * 
sten in r\\<- advanot-ment of tenvp.-rancc 
and Bradually eliminate all the saloons 
along Grand ave nue if possible. 

WEST 1)1 IXTH P.\STOKS 

Will Try to Promote Interest in 
Detention Home. 

•The Duties of Parents to Children" wlU 
he the subjeel discu.^sed froin every pul" 
Dlt in West Duluth next s-unday. The 
object of this is to furth.T the intorest 
n a detention horn,, for boys and g r .s 
who are in need of the IraininK hat 
th.y are not fortunate enouRh to net at 

"'l-he 'Xa^of having *.)me place where 
ohildr.'n not criminaLs. can be disciplined 
i a nin capabh- of handling such boys 
and Klrls rightly, has long been a plan 
Judg . Ensign-s. He has endeavored to 
ii lerest tlu- board of county oomniis- 
sioners lo purchase a site for such a 
home. 

\\ ant ^ew Members. 

Wvst Duluth mi'MilHi-.s ol the Y. M. C. 
A have started an enlhusl:^stic cam- 
paiKH lor n.w m-mbers lor that •'/^••J'; V 
kiulhope to hold up their end in «eltln« 
1 iwe new members lor the as.soidation. 
I'lu-y realize that it will necessarily he 
some time betore W.sl l>uUuh can hav 
us own V. M. C. A. and so are doing 
the next best thing, trying to get as 
manv ol the West Dululh boys as they 
can to Join the up-town club. 

Married Men Win. 

in spite of the «iisl that two out of 
tlrof of the Ivachelors' rinks won their 
games in their contests against ih^ mar- 
ried m.-mhers. Saturday nlyht ath the 
We'^tern curling club rink, th*? marrie.l 
members defeated them by a scc^e of 

'The rink.^ skipped by Ashley won from 
AIoDonaM. Vi to 7, and Meldahl defeated 
Fvtred hi to •">, both victories for th>» 
sin;?le men. but Macauley's rink putting 
It over Buckley's to the tune of :;o to 5. 
Hiving the married men a margin of 
three points in their lavor. , ,. , 

The Western Curling club have Invited 
three of the Duluth club's rink;? to come 
to West Duluth tonight and play three 
or their rinks. Two Duluth club rinks 
have accepted, Brewer and Dunlop, so 
thero will be inter-club games tonight. 

Doan's Regulets cure constipation, tone 
the stomach, stimulate the llv-r. promote 
digestion and appttite and easy passages 
of thf lK)wels. Ask your druggist* for 
them. 2.^ cents a box. 



Y^'Stprday a son was born to Mr. an.l 
Mrs. John Mattson of -ilO Nor'h liiiy- 
.sixLh avenue wst. ... . , ... 

M J. Kre.-mun of Hinckley Is visiting 
friends aivd att-'uding to bushiesa hUorost.s 
In West Dululh. , ,, „ _ 

Mrs H. v. Hillberg .vnd Mr.'*. B T. 
Johnson of Mmn.-apoUs. who have !)eyn 
ihf gu.sts of their sister. Mrs. u. 15. 
Carlson Slxty-litth avemu' w st. y.-st-ir- 
day returned lo their homes in Mmne- 

''^Wanted-tJirl for general housework. 
709 North FUty-sev.-nth avt-nue w.>st. 

The gen-T.dl oommtttee on the \\ .'Si uu- 
luth (^Mnm.•^•lal . !,ih banquet, whu-h is 
to be h^ld Wednesday night, will m-^.-t 
tonight at 7:30 o -dock at L. A^ Barnes 
offic! to close up th- detalLs of th»- ar- 
rangements they have already made tor 

'"nIiS^T^M: Prln.'ell of St. Paul Is visit- 
Ing In \Vest Duluth. . ,.,. 

William Skibor.s'-hy returne<l yesterday 
from tlu» south.-rn part of the .stat^'. 

Mr and Mrs. H, Allord of .Scanlon spent 
Snn.iay wiUi West Duluth tr;.-n«ls. 
"^Joim Rurk... who has b.^en working for 
,ever:.l months in Saull at- Maii^. rv- 
turned last night to Wust Duluth. and 
int-nds to spend the summer h;-re 

Sp-clal revival meetings will be held 
r-v-ry evening this week «t the W.-st- 
minster Pr.-..byterlan church. Tney wH 



Building Inspector and 
Fire Warden Are 
WorRing Together. 

Lodge Halls Are First to 
Come Uunder Exam- 
ination. 



Owners of every lodge, dance and 
amu.seinent hall, theater, public build- 
ing and hotel In the city will be prod- 
ded by the building Inspector and fire 
warden and laxities in the enforce- 
ment of the building urdluances. which 
ha\?e been allowed to exist in the past, 
will be entirely done away with in 
Duluth. Everybody must get into line 
with every possible precaution against 
loss of life by tire 

The terrible loss of life in the school 
tire at Oollinwood. near t'leveland. 
Ohio, last week, whicii emphasized the 
danger arising from doors which swing 
inward, has aroused the public in every 
city In the country, and the methods 
being followed by other cities, wlii also 
be employed in Duluth. so that every 
building may be made as safe as pos- 
sible. ,,, , 
According to Building Inspector Kiel- 
ley, there are no great irregularities 
in Duluth. "Tivery school In the city 
has d.x»rs svyinging outward, both Into 
the corridorh iUd into the .jp'n air. 
Public builtHag»» and office buildings 
have been k,«pt pretty well within die 
building oidiiiatice and there is no 
great danger th?:"ie. ■.,„n„ 
Owners and managers of public nails 
entertained a representative of ihe city 
today and submitted to Inspection. 
Conditions in «ume of the halls are 
not what they n«ght be. The Kalama- 
zoo hall, with its entrance through 
three narrow doors, all swinging m 
is due for souie changes, and otner 
lodge" halls, wldch are reached through 
narrow winding P-^f^^-^Ses and narro.s 
doors, will also be brought within ihe 
ordinance or closed up. , 

The inspection, which began tn a 
morning, will he extended. Ine nalis 
are bemg examined by '•«P':?-^"f' ^J^ 
„f the building inspector.-, and me 
,<^r.arrmen*s The exits must open on- 
fo^CoSrs and the .stairways must 
be .ir[he width spenmed 1"/^;^^ ;"^;.'^^- 
Ing ordinance. The doors to ^t^l^^^^> 
hall, which formerly «^vung In have 
ilr.itdy been changed on orders irom 
tlie building inspector. A^rrc 

After the different l^^^S^, ^";J '^^.^'^^h 
'i>il!< have b-^f^n examined and sacn 
changes ordered as may be aeemed 
Scessary. other buildings it. which 
gatherings are held, office building- 
and hot. 1.4 will come in :or examina- 
tion and by the tim*. it is completed, 
every building in Duluth will be as 
safe as the law .>in make it under the 
building inj tire limit ordinances. j 

The matter in»y al<?o come before } 
the council -this evening. 



Kodol i.s 'oday ih-.! oest knowii r-^medy 
for ill di.'?orders of th- stomach, suon as 
dv«»P''Psia. hWirt burn, sour stomacli and 
b-1 -hin^ of gas. Sold here Uy al. druggists. 



SyPEIRDOiB iEW 





C eondu.i.V in- R-'V W. J. LowrK th. 
pkstor who wll? be asslst-d by his broth- 
er Rev C W. Lowrie of Clo^uet. Rev. 
(^ 'w Lowrl- will pr-aeh tonight 
rilff (Verard Is visiting In International 

''^A'^'ian.-ing party wa.. given Saturd.iy 
night by the Swedl.sh-Flnniah Good Tcsmp- 
hus at VIotor's hall. r.,.mher 

A missionary program and a numtier 
of sr).clal r-adings have been arrange.l 
forThe m-ethiR of the Missionarv So- 
e lety of the Westmln-.t»-r Pr-sbyfenan 
church wldch will meet tomorrow afler- 
^!lni at 2:30 o'clock at S^^-X^'^iiv-S^ 
William I.angslow, 'f 1 J^'^'^'ll .^ '"L!,"'to 
av-nu- west. The ladles are aakeU to 
bring th-lr sewing ., 

M ss Ethel Brooks, who has been the 
guesf of West Duluth friends, returned 
v-sterday to her home in » loqu.d. 
' John Brogan of Ely, Mimi. Is In West 
Dululh, where he is bemg treated for thy 
rh-umatism. Mr. Bragon i.s an old West 
Duluth resident, 

Wanted-Pianist 

That . can sing. Mal.^ or female 
Call evenings.- B. T. Butler. 1<11 
Jefferson street. 



HUSBAND IN JAIL; 
FAMILY IN WANT 



7. B. ERD, 

Gold an.l Silversmith, 

3y £jsi' Suptrior St. 



SAYt 

Have vou tried that good smoke. 
MInnrMwtHf 10c Domestic Cig.ir. Also 
lluua Alma and Hoinentake. 5 centers. 
HandUd at whol-sah- by Neil J. Buck- 
ley. We s»'ll them. Ask for one of 
them next time. , , , 

"Why haven't you asked to hear 
plnved the Victor Record of Eileen 
Asthore Melodies from Chaun-ey Ol- 
cotfa play? 10-inch No. 5344-eOc. 

THE SPENCER PHARMACY CO. 



Because an erring husband spent 
his money across the bar, was ar- 
rested and is now serving a sentence 
of twenty days In jail. Mrs. John 
Gustafson and her little child are 
destitute at their hom<\ 314 West 
Fifth .street. Neighbors discovered 
their plight and notified the police 
this morning. Superint.ndent of the 
Poor A. P. Cook has been advised 
and he will relieve their distress. 

Gustafson was arrested last vV /^d- 
nesdav night, because he assaulted 
a Superior street hotel keeper on 
the Bowery The circumstances were 
such that the judge was not In- 
clined to be lenient and Gustafson 
went up on the hill for a tw-nty- 
day period. 

Neighbors discovered, this morn- 
ing that Mrs. Gustafson Is In actual 
want. She has no food or fuel, and 
she and her little child suffered 
int^-nsely from the cold of Saturday 
night and yesterday. The woman 
would not complain of her condition 
but kind people of the neighborhood 
have taken care of her for the time, 
and the proper authorities are now 
in charge. 

THREE WOMEN DROWNED. 
Greenville, S. C, March 9.— While boat- 
ing on the Appachalee river, near Qroers. 
ye«lerday. a skiff containing ten people; 
capsized, and three young women werj 
aiuwu«<l« 



WIVES ASK DlVORiES. 

Three Superior Women Have Tales 
of Domestic Trouble. 

Three women residing in -Superior 
filed papers in divorce actions Satur- 
day. Caroline 'Bergstrom, who has 
been married twenty-four years, claims 
that her husband, L.ouls Bergstrom. 
haa an -affinity^ on whom he lavishes 
his attentiona. She also charges cruel 
and Inhuman treatment of herself on 
the part of her husband. The couple 
have several children and Mrs. Berg- 
strom asks jt^^if ourt to give her cus- 
tody of them. 

Margaret Jones wants a legal sep- 
aration from E. Jones on the ground 
of desertion. 

Anna Torke iemands a legal sep- 
aration from Jay C. Torke on the 
grounds of non-support and abandon- 
ment. They were aiarrled in Janu- 
ary 1907, and the desertion Is said 
to liave occurred the following Septem- 
ber. 

Dies in a Saloon. 

Erick Olsen, aged 35 years. was 
found dead in a chair In the rear room 
of Larsen s saloon at 727 -Tower ave- 
nue Saturday noon. It is claimed that 
he had been hanging around the bar 
for some time and drinking, tam y 
troubles are said to have ^J^*^" P^J.'^y 
the cause of Olsen's heavy drinking 

of late. 

Skull Crushed by Ice. 

John Street, a laborer, is in a very 
critical condition at St. Mary s hos- 
pital as the result of being struck on 
the head by a lar«e piece of ice yes- 
terday morning. The accident was a 
peculiar one. Street was standing at 
the rear of the Knud«en-Fergus m 
commission house on Banks avenue 
while a cake of ^ice was being hoist- 
ed to the upper tioor of th^ building. 
When the load was about five or six 
feet over his head the tongs slipped 
and the Ice fell on Street and crushed 
him to the ground. It Is claimed that 
Street failed to ajep to one side while 
the ice was being hoisted, as had been 
the custom. 

Attempted Suicide. 

Oscar Johnson, a witnes:* in a case 
against Henry Newman, charged with 
robbery, attempted suicide In his cell 
at the police .-station yesterday. John- 
son tied the end of his blanket to the 
bars of his ''ell and was about to nang 
himself when the police Interferred. 
Johnson does not like the idea of be- 
ing locked up and has reached a de- 
spondent stage where It Is feared that 
he will become insane. The authorities 
will probably taHe steps to relea.se .ilm. 
but they wish to hold him in some 



Duluth 



3. M. <giiilmt0 tc da. 



CincinnaU 



"Correct Drsss For Wonun.' 



The Survival of the Fittest ! 

€|| In these strenuous days of business one must be "up and do- 
ing." This applies not only to the individual, but also to the 
business house — to stand still is to go backward. We believe 

in pushing ahead. We believe 
in the more strenuous and ag- 
gressive policy. • People of 
"now-a-days" demand it. So 
it is with merchandise. 

•If Women want things not 

only up-to-date but ahead of 

date, so to speak; things that 

are not only fashionable this season 

but w^ill be fashionable next season ! 

TiThat's the keynote. That's what 
vve mean when we say not only up-to- 
date, but ahead of date. 

in Our makers are creators of styles, originat- 
ing many, adapting many, but all original. You 
may find the things we offer at other establish- 
ments, but it will be a season later. 




•J If you have any doubt about this statement, 

see the things we show and those offered by 

Other stores in this community, and you'll not 

wonder why we've built up so splendid a 

business and why we are constantly adding 

to our clientele the community's most 

particular women. 

€11 Prices? No more than you'd expect 
to pay the usual store for the more 
common kinds. » 

Splendidly 
Tailored Suits 

In the various mannish styles 
and many new and effective ideas 
from abroad. Prices from $35.00 
to $90.00. 

THF FETCHING "TROTTEUR" DRESSES will be much worn for Afternoon, 
street I"dVvfJnT:ea°. These are ,no.t,v of i.,ngne, I-ou.ard. Tus.aU or 1 affe.a. .„ .he 

little semi-princcssc models. Prices from $23.50 to $135.00. , . ^. , „ 

The New "Merry Widow" Dresses of Foulard, which are the cyclonic hit of the sca- 

^^" ^ The W:ilt!t^"loom large in Fashion:s eye are the beautiful -^-ed Cl.iff... .^^^^^ 
1- Ki ToAVt-,* T arv \ets "Pretty" L ngeric and Tailored Styles. Prices. $-«.7D to $^O.uu. 
" New SWrts expK^t the beautfful simplicity of fine tailoring. They are of many styles 

inc,udi!?rplai '"roS La circular effcc. The gracefn. hang and per.ect fi, bemg .he 
most salient features. Pnces from $7.50 to $25.00. 

Saucv Little Suits for the Urger Girls and Small Women 

• . ,.,1 »hr»^-nieri« <itvles in the College cut. or willi the swagger 
c ■ J''"rVa?r''i;i\ rngettafg^ To, afjo 30 inches. These offer Cadet Blue, Xavy. 
l:Zn and thfiiglncheZ in softVorsted, Serge and English suiting weaves. Pnces, 

$15.00 to $29.50. 

Misses' and Children's Tub Dresses 

Mothers reali7e .hat the appearance of the child relentlessly reveals the character of 

Mothers realize .iwi ui c 1 1 , „ :„„ .renerat on in accordance with the dc- 

its home, therefore she stud.es to ■^/"s 'he grow ing fee Mercerised 

,„ands of the criticising and d^an-ling »o Id. JJj,^^P,„/,„bstantial or flimsy white suffs 

^Tfrr; thrmos?'cl!vr:tyTet 't m. e^ued. Prices from $1.50 to $16.50. 



Pure Blood 

Absolutely necessary for mental and 
pbysiial health and strength, vitality, 
vigor and vim. Is certain if you take 

Hood's Sarsapariila 

Liaaid or UbtoU, 100 Dos»s On« Dollar. , ' 



wav to tpp^ar against Newman. John- 

Newman and. it reieasea, v 

ably get out of t he city. 

Just a iittl*^ Cascaaweot is all that is 
nXv»s«a.rv Ui fflv*» y^^Jl" '>"-*^y ^^^" , » *! 

?^sT a7d pefvish.^ ^«"^**'lf,^^rv TeS;m- 
nt)r harmful Irugs and is highly recom 
mended. Sold by all draggiats^ 

kangaTgets 
twenty days 



William Kangas is believed to hav* 
acquired the heavy load he was car- 
rying when arrested Sunday after- 
noon through the theft of $60 from 
the pocket of George Olson, in a 
lower Lake avenue saloon. Evidence 
enough to convict him of the theft 
couldn't be secured, so Kangas got 
away with a twenty-day sentence on 
a drunk charge. 

It is said that Olson. Kangas and 
others were in the saloon, and Olson 
wa.s pretty drunk. When Olson came 
out of the drunk he found that his 
roll was missing, and two or three 
men told him that they had seen 
kanga.s take it from his pocket. He 
til ought there was about $60 In the 
roll. Kangas, according to the 
statements made to Olson, had ini- 
partially pa.ssed the money around, 
and proceeded to blow the greater 
part of it himself. He was so drunk 
when arrested Saturday that he 
couldn't tell his name. Olson couldn t 
remember anything about the rob- 
bery and he couldn't find his wit- 



nesses, so Kangas was booked uP «" 
th« drunk charge and escaped the 
con.sequences of the more serious of- 

John Hill, who is said to have re- 
ceived some of the money from Kan- 
gas. was arraigned on a charge of 
vagrancy. He pleaded not guilty, and 
his hearing was set for this afternoon 

at 2 o'clock. 

• • • 

On complaint of Conductor Andrew- 
Hanson, Sandy Johnson, a West Du- 
luth boy, 19 years of age, was arrested 
last night at 10.30. The conductor 
charged that Johnson was creating a 
disturbance on the car, and ^e was 
put off at the corner of Twentieth 
avenue west and Superior street, 
where Officer Olson took him in 
charge. He pleaded not ^"l"y tf^„* 
disorderly conduct charge thus ™°,^"" 
Ing, and his hearing was set for this 
afternoon at 2 o'clock. ^^utv 

Albert Olson, who pleaded guHty 
to a vagrancy charge, claimed to be 



DULUTH 
ELECTRIC 



BOTH PHONES 1880. 
327 WEST FIRST ST. 



one of "the army of the unemployed." 
He said he came down from Nevis, 
Minn., with a little money and a de- 
sire to work. He failed to land a 
job. his money wa.s spent, and he was 
hanging about saloons when arrested. 
He promised to get out of town, and 
wa.s relc-a.sed. 

Dan Sullivan, drunk, was arrested 
in the union station Saturday night 
and released on bail. He appeared In 
court this morning with a few brac- 
ers and a desire to talk. He told the 
old sickness story as an excuse for 
imbibing, and drew $3 and costs. - 

TO CURE A COLD IN OXB DAV. 

Take L.\X.\TIVe BKOMO guinine Tablets 
Druggists refund money if it fans to cure W. E 
GROVE'S siifnature i« on eadi box. r^c 



OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 

New York — Arrived: Steamer 

Florida, from Havre. 

Plymouth — Arrived: .Steamer 

Kaiser Wilhelm II. from New York. 
for Bremen. 



to save vou worry and dollars. 
I believe I can do both If. after 
carefully reading this, you will inall 
me a postal card naming a date 
when I can call and show you my 
superb line of new .spring- .suitings. 
Place your order for your suit for 
Easter' soon, as we are busy. 

D. M. MORRISON, 

MERCHANT TAILOR. 

8 LAKE A\ENIE SOUTH. 

DULUTH, MINN. 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



D. E. H.. 8-9-'C«. 



Wear The 



COLUMBIA 

• $3.50 

SHOE! 



SATISFIES EVERY INCH OF THE FOOT. 



CHURCPiFOR 
PARKjNnT 



If present plans are carried out, 
Park Point will be, provided with the 
first church in its Ulstafy, In the near 
future. The sum of ct367 has been 
lalsed. A building has been purchased 
en Connor's Point, ai\6 it will be moved 
across the bay, upon the Ice, and 
placed on the lot on Park Point, which 
is owned by the diocese of Duluth. 

The coat of the building. Including 
the moving, will be $1,000. The size of 
the structure is 34 by 24 feet. The dio- 
cese will convert the building into a 
churoh and parish home, which will be 
non-sectarian in character. It will be 
used for social as well as religious 
purposes. Sunday school sei-vices and 
evening mtctin^s will be held in the 
building. It is planned to have the 
building in readiness by Easter Sun- 
day. 

Although there are 2.000 people in the 
winter, and more than 3,000 people liv- 
ing on park Point In ^ the summer, there 
has never been a church or building 
devoted to religious services there. J. 
T. Wildin, Jack Hulquist, B. Buck- 
jvjinsier and C. R. Pattison compose 
the committee that has the matter in 
enlarge. Rev. A. H. Wurtele, who is at 
the head of the dioce.se, is also work- 
ing with the committee to raise funds 
to defray the cost of purchasing and 
moving the building. 

The efforts of the men have met with 
ready response, and It is believed that 
the parish will be ready for dedication 
within a short time. 



ed a watch from Simpson's clothing. 
The watch is valued at ?18. and a chain 
valued at $2 was attached. 

Officer Breaks Ribs. 

Officer Mike McDermott of the city 
police force is laid up with three broken 
ribs as a result of the icy condition of 
the sidewalks last night. The officer 
went up on Piedmont avenue to inves- 
tigate a report, and, while he was de- 
scending he slipped and fell against the 
railing near the sidewalk. His side 
struck the sharp etlge. and a physician 
discovered three ribs fractured. 

New Camp Organized. 

At a meeting to be held in Kalamazoo 
hall tonight. Camp John D. McEwen, 
the recently organized camp of the Span- 
ish-American war veterans, will close Its 
charter. The new camp starts out wltn 
a large membership and enthusiasm 
which promises to make the organiza- 
tion a permanent one. 

Administrator Sues. 

Suit wa.s iii.stilutod in miiniciiial court 
this morning by R. H. Haire, spec al ad- 
mlnisti-ator of the estate of Paul C us- 
ciotta. against Carl Cuselotta. a bic'.her 
of Paul Cusciotta. The latter d:ed int.vs- 
tate Feb. 12, and the administrator 
charges that Carl look possession of half 
of the store at 5(6 West Michigan street, 
owned by the deceased, and refused to 
relinquish it. The suit mvolves property 
worth about $250. 



Spring styles for men and 

now on exhibition. 



women 



Beautifying methods that injure the 
skin and health are dangerous. Be 
teautiful without injuring yourself, by 
taking Hollister's Rocky Mountain 
Tea. Ix>vely complexions follow its 
use. 3r.c, Tea or Tablets. Ask your 
druggist. 



Kberhart Will Speak ^ ^ _ 

Kiontenant Governor A. O. t.berhartl 
will speak at the regular meetmg of the 
Voung People's society of the Swedish 
l.utheran church Thursday night at the 
church. A special musical program and 
several literary numbers have 
arranged for the evening. 



also been 



Cook Is Captain. 

Max Cook was elected cuptain and n IH 
Hlrken manager of the Uuluth Central 
high school baseball team at a meeting 
of the Athletic association held today. 
Officers of the association were elected 
as follows: President, Will Crawford; 
vice president, Phil Poirer; treasurer. 
Dave Ouncan; secretary, Oscar Heiam; 
assistant secretarj', Harold Bowen; ser- 
geant at arms, Max Cook, Carl bhaplro; 
mascot. Dean Coventrj'*. 











MOTION WILL 
COME IP AGAIN 

Point of Rocks Resolution 

Will be Considered 

by Council. 

In a Joint letter to tlie city council to- 
night, the board of public works and 
City Engineer McGllvray will call tin- 
attention of the city body to a com- 
munication, whieh was sent by them 
last April, setting forth conditions at 
the Point of Ro«ks and estimatnig the 
amount of money, which would 
be rpquired to remove sufflelent 
rock from the Point of Rocks to re- 
cnforee the shore line at St. Croix av.- 
nue and protect that thoroughf.-ire 
from the action of the waves. 

Last Monday night. Alderman l-ou- 
blster introduced a resolution calling 
upon the board of public works to pro- 



ceed with the work in question, the 
expense to he paid out of the permanent 
Iniprovenient fund. as contemplated 
wlien the budget for tills year was pre- 
pared. The resolution was sldetracKetl 
l)V Alderman Ciomwell's anundment r< - 
iiuestlng the board and city engineer 
to report on tht; necessity for the work 
uiul estimate iho cost of It. 

The eommunieation last spring esti- 
mated that $2,00« would be required for 
Koeks at Fourteenth aven>;o west, an.l 
SI MW more for transporting the rock 
and piaelng it on St. Croix avenue. It 
was suggested that an arrangement 
•.Might be made with the street railway 
( ompaiiv, whereby the company would 
give the use of its work cars after the 
regular ears had stopped running at 
tiight and, by tlie construetlon of a tem- 
porary line on Morse street, from Lake 
avenue to St. Croix avenue, the roek 
might be carried by car direct to the 
place It was to be placed. 

The request of the council was con- 
sidered at the meeting of the- board this 
morning and tlie board decided thitt 
the information furnishea the eoun> jl 
last spring was sufficient to cover all 
the aldermen wanted to fvuow now. In 
apportioning fun<1s to the nubile im- 
provement fund last f.ili. the confer- 
ence committee considered the use of 
$.-iiK^O for removing rock from the Point 
of Itocks In ortler to make It safe, and 
Sl.tKO for" the St. Croix avenue work. 
Thus, the board considers that there is 



enough money on hand to carry out the 
work. If the council so orders, and 
Alderman Foublster's res(dution will 
probably come up ag'ain tonig'it. 

Sickening headaches, Indigestion, 
constipation, indicate unhealthy condi- 
tion of the bowel.s. Holllster's Rocky 
Mountain Tea makes the bowels work 
r.aturuily and restoie.-i your system to 
perfect health and happiness. 35c. Tea 
or Tablets. Ask your druggist. 



'Jhuing-Stcwarl; rriiiting, Binding, 

engraving; 310-12 W. 2nd St. Phones 114. 

C^Iainis Two Votes Illegal. 

James L. Cromwell, with whom George 
Blo<'del Is contesting the aldermanic 
chair in the Second ward, has filed In the 
district court affidavits In which It Is 
alleged that he has knowledge of two 
ballots which were illegally cast for 
Mr. Bloedel. The postponement of the 
trial until tomorrow was taken in ordf^r 
that Mr. Cromwell might have time to 
look up evidence. 

Death Claims leather Ilnitman. 

After an Illness of a month. Rev. 
Father Alphonse Hartman, formerly 
pastor of St. Jean Baptlste Catholic 
church in the West end. died yesterday 
at Kenora. Ont. Father Hartman was 
in charge of the St. Jean Baptisie 
parish during 1904 and 1905 and was well 
liked by the p«'ople of the congregation. 
He left Duluth In 1905 to becoffie su- 
perior of tlie parish of Kenora, Can., 
where he lived until the time of his 
death. He was 37 years of age and was 
born In Germany. 

M L. Park<'r Very Ix>w. 

M. 1... P'arker of 3'XO Minnesota avenue, 
who ha.s been ill for the last two years, 
took a decided change for the worse yes- 
terday, and his condition is said to be 
critical. 

Leetuiv by Judge Morris. 

Judge Page Morris of the federal court 
win discus.s "Modern Tendencies" at the 
meeting of the Men'.<» league of the First 
M. E. church, tonight. 



Will Hold Kleetion. 

Whether the new town of Gilbert shall 
be Incorporated Into a village according 
to the territorial liimits laid down by a 
large number of the electors in a peti- 
tion to the county board, will i>e deter- 
mined at an election to be held at the 
drug store of Sweet & Barrett on Lrf)t 
4. Block 11. Gilbert. Section 23. 58-17, 
Tuesday, April 7. According to the pe- 
tition, there are something over 400 people 
n^idlng in the propo.sed town and it is 
decided to incorporate into the village an 
area of 2,240 acres. 



New Really Company* 

The Empire Bealty company filed ar- 
ticles of incorporation this afternoon, with 
a capital stock of $50,000. Tlie incorrora- 
tors are A. H. and Frank Crassweller and 
E. F. Blu. 

Condemn Site. 

The city of Duluth has begun condem- 
nation proceedings to acquire the prop- 
erty at p'ourteenth street and First ave- 
nue east, desired for a rcservoii site. 



C. P. Ivovely Will Speak. 

C P Ixjvely of St. Liouis, Mo., national 
organizer for the Boot & Shoe Workers' 
union will address a meeting of the 
Women's Label league Wednesday even- 



"jPOO LME 



TROOPS WITHDRAWN 

FROM (iOLDFIELD, NEV. 

Qoldnekl, Nev., March 9.— Tlie United 
States troops that have been in Gk>ld- 
field for three months, vacated the 
camp Saturday and turned the respon- 
sibility of maintaining peace in the 
Goldfleld district over to the local po- 
lice authorities and the Nevada state 
p(>llce. The departing forces consisted 
of 114 men and five officers. 

Several ."^quads of state police arrived 
in Goldfiehl last week and established 
local headquarters in a building In the 
center of town. The district is peace- 
ful, as the strike was practically de- 
clared off last week. 



Jucobl Gels Ti'ophy. 

The St. Louis hotel trwphy jompetitlon 
at the Duluth tuillng rink was con> 
pleted Saturday night, when E. R. Jacobi 
defeated T. F. McGUvray's rink In the 
tj'ial game. There were two squads in the 
St Louis event. McGllvray and Jacool 
\v'\x\" the victors In Ihtir le'^pectlve 
squad. Jacobi's rink was too stiong for 
the ••Shadders," and they went down and 
out by a score of 12 to 7. 

May Aeeompany Governor. 

City Engineer Tiiomas F. McGllvray 
has received fn)m Governor John A. John- 
aon an Invitation to accompany the chief 
executive to Shiloh battlefield April 12, 
when the governor will dedicate the new 
Shiloh monument. The city engineer Is 
pleased with the prospect and will prob- 
ably accept. 

Says Ho Stole Wateli. 

Theodor' ' llelin was arraigned In muni- 
cipal court this morn'ng on a charge of 
petit larceny. He pleaded not guilty, and 
his hearing was set for tomorrow morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock. The complaining wit- 
ness is Andrew Simpson. He says he and 
Helln boarded together at 113 St. Croix 
avenue and that Saturday Helln extract- 



TO OL^SSGFY 



One C«nt a Word Each Disertlon — No 
Advertisement Xt^an Than 15 Cents. 

SIXTEENPHOTOS FOR 50c. SHOHT 
time only. Fenny & Adams, 131 West 
Superior street. rJew 'phone, 152S-X. 



FOR SALE - SILVER COMB WHITE 
and brown leghorns, in fine condition; 
can rent complete place. Millbrook 
Poultry farm, Duluth. 



Fashionable hair are.ssing, manicuring 
scalp and face treatments. Miss Kelly 
opposite Glass Block, upstairs. 

LADIES' TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing parlors. 24 West Superior 
street, upstairs. Knauf Sisters. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Knut Almos and Sina Sandlwck. 
Hans JardlneandMarla Anderson. 



BIRTHS. 



and 
Sixth 



Mrs. 
street, 







eoMPim ROOsiFoniisiiEiit 

HA& 

SKOtdAviW.MMlFinlSl 

The Latest Edition to ttie Victor Family 

Louis XV Victor Victrola 

(Emboli isluul Wi»h Gold.) 

A complete instniinent of the Victrola type, with concealed turntable, 
horn and albums for one hundred ami fifty records; having two small doors which 
permit the volume of sound to be increased or dimini.shed as desired. 

The artistic supremacy of the Louis XV period is embodied in this latest 

model Victrola. , , -i r 

The beauty of line, delicacy of proportion and the minute detail ot orna- 
mentation so characteristic of this most decorative of French styles, is herein 
exemplified in the combined wt^rk of artist and craftsman: all superfluous orna- 
mentation having been omitted, in order to attain a more elegant and refined 

artistic eflfect. . 

The entire cabinet is of selected Laguna mahogany, which possesses even 
richer figure than the celebrated San Domingo variety— the doors being "V" 
paneled with beautiful matched wood. 

The Louis XV period is further emjjhasized by elaborate carvings mounted 
with antique gold leaf, while all metal parts are gold plated to conform to the gen- 
eral scheme ; the eflfect of the whole being one of rare beauty, royal in appear- 
ance, yet without the least attempt at extravagant decoration, displaying rather 
the simple elegance which appeals so forcibly to exclusive patrons. 

\Ve cordially invite you to call at our Talking Machine Parlors at any time and see this beautiful 

instrument. , . , -.t- -. i i 

If you enioy good music, you'll not regret a few minutes spent here. \ isitors are always welcome. 

We're alv.avs glad to play for you. ^ . ., .„ , , t, i • 

If you already possess a \'ictor and appreciate good "Record Service, you 11 get the best at Bayha s. 

Try it. 




Rez- 
29, a 




New Automotile Coats 

Nobody can accuse us of rushing the season when we talk of 
these practical concerns of women for snowy or rainy days, with 
comfort, warmth and protection afforded. . • u i . »t,«c-r 

Some are made of the new 'Roseberry". cloth, which has these 
advantages: It is a Priestly guaranteed rain-proof material, with 
no rubber or other odor; it will not dry out or crack the way rub- 
berized silk and other fabrics will; it possesses wartnth, and come* 
in pretty colorings. Some of these coats have leather collars ai^d 
cuffs; others are entirely self material, neatly trimmed and still 
others are in imported cloakings, thoroughly cravenetted. Price* 
are $25.00, $27.50 and $29.50. 

Spring Suits 

Can't talk too often or too much of these, for every express 
opens up new marvels in the tailoring art, and new and beautilul 
fabrics that captivate a lover of such things. . , ^ , j- 

One suit, is •)! beav'.tif-.i! stri^ied materials, -wMth French dip, 
circular gored skirt and taffeta lining, and costs $45.00. Another 
suit has the coat skirted with scallops and has braid bound edges, 
semi-fitting effect, and new skirts at $42.50. Still another is of the 
new mannish sack coat style, and is real swagger for a trim figure. 
A variety of styles can be had at $25.00 to $39-50, to satisfy those 
whose ambitions arc not so high, or whose purse will not allow a 
larger invefiiricnt. . 

The Rajah suits are attracting unusual attention, for customers 
tell us that this is the only store ir* Duluth where such an assort- 
ment can be had, as yet. At $39-50, a real smart tailored model cat? 
be had. At $42.50, a trimmed suit of Rajah, beautifully lined and 
finished. The styles follow the cloth suits. 



i 



Ne^v Evening Coats 



Afternoon 
One is of 



We have just received twenty very swell models in 
and Evening Coats, intended strictly for dressy wear, 
real Renaissance lace, hand made. Others are of Battenburg, silk 
braid and black Chantilly lace, and are of a loose order that can be 
worn over fluffy dresses and waists. Another coat is of black satin, 
trimmed with Persian embroidery on collar and cuffs, three-quarter 
length. They're worth seeing anyhow, although the prices wont 
frighten you, as they arc extremely reasonable. 



for Informal 0( 



Dresses tor Intormal ^^ccasions 

Three new models are of taffeta and have real hand-crocheted 
lace surplice over-effect, and sell at $65.00. A number of other 
handsome models are here in taffeta, mcssaline and voiles, in price 
from $39.50 to $57.50. If you are looking for something less ex- 
pensive, we have a pretty little dress of taffeta, in checks, stripes- 
and plain colors, at $15.00 to $17.50, that will open your eyes as 
what can be had for that price. 



to 



Corsetdom Agog 



lorsetaom 

Peculiar term, but it's the only thing that quite expresses the 
excitement in our corset department, where a demonstration of the 
famous "Redfern Corsets" is now in progress. Worrisome prob- 
lems of form are quickly overcome under the tutorship and with 
the assistance of Mrs. L. G. Stebbins, an expert corsetiere, whose 
whole lifework is bound up in the art of corseting women who 
value style. It is a well known fact that New York women, in 
particular, and fashionable women elsewhere, in general, invariably 
have trim figures, yet in but a very small percentage of such case* 
are those figures such as Nature adorned them with. It's the cor- 
set that makes the figure, at least for the wearing of present-day- 
gowns. 

It is claimed by those who know that if the right Redfern 
Model has been selected, correctly laced, adjusted and fitted, it will 
not only fit properly and comfortably, but will outwear any other 
corset. 

No charge for this service — just a demonstration — that's all. 



ing at Flaaten's hall. Mr. Lovely w.-ia 
formerly labor commissioner of Ml^rsouri. 
and is said to be the best Informed man 
in the country on prison labor. 

Iii.<«ane Suspect. 

Matt Newberg of Hibbins was brought 
to Duluth this afternoon by D-puty S.-,erl:f 
Klngf. He will be examined b 'fore the 
probate judge. 

Ca}?o Is Dif^mlsscd. 

On motion of the county attorney, the 
case against John Judge, a Proctor sa- 
loonkeeper, chargi-d with keeping hi.^ 
place open on Sunday, was dismissed in 
municipal court this afternoon. 



GOLUFINE— Born to Mr. 

Samuel Goldfine, 1117 East 

Feb. tl, a girl. 
REZNIK— Born to Mr. and Mrs. M 

nlk, 2-'S Third avenue west, Feb. 

boy. 
SCARLETT— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Theo- 
dore A. Scarlett, St. Lukes hospital, 

March 6, a boy. _ , ^ 

SRIGLEY— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robert 

Srigley, 2722 Wes Twelfth street, March 

6, a boy. 
FORWAKD— Born to Mr. and Mrs. Roy 

R. Forward. 2701 West Fourth street, 

Feb. 12. a girl. ,.,.„ 

CAMPBELL— Jiorn, to Mr. and Mrs. Will- 
iam Campbell, 132 Souih Twenty-eigluli 

avenue west. March 6, a girl. 
MELROASE— Bom. to Mr. and Mrs. Ilanj 

Melroase. (5110 Cody street, March (J, a 

girl. 
SNEKVICK— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. John 

Snekvick, 3911 Halifax street, March a, 

o hoy 
NELSON— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Bernard 

Nelson. 5817 Wadena street, March 4, a 

girl. 
STEELE— Born« to Mr. and Mrs. Simon 

Steele, 4303 West Third street, Feb. 26, a 

bov. 
SLYCHIT— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. August 

Slychlt. 6 Thirty-ninth avenue west, Feb. 

27, a boy. ,. ^ .. 

BROTH EliTON— Born, to Mr. and Mr.^. 

John Brotherton, 232 Norlh Fifty-third 

avenue west, Feb. 23, a boy. 
ALBON— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Sweeii 

Albon 511 North Sixtieth avenue west, 

Feb. 2S, a boy. t, i. ♦ t 

HAMP— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. 

Hamrv 316 East Second street, March 7. 

a boy. 
OWEN— Born, to Mr. and Mr.s. Grant 

Owen, Fortieth avenue east and London 

road. Feb. 6, a boy. r- , 

EISCHEN— Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank 

Elschen, Rice Lake road, Feb. 10. a 

l>oy. 



C. W. Paine Dead. 

Word has been received in Duluth of 
the sudden death from heart failure of 
Charles W. Payne, agent of the Anchor 
line in Erie. Mr. Payne was quite well 
known In Duluth. He has been In the 
employ of the Anchor line since 1872. 

Defendants Ask New Trials. 

The Mt-rrill & Ring company. again=!t 
whom a vt-rdict was recently re:idered 111 
favor of Victor L. Jacobson. on his claim 
for damages for personal injuries, ha^' 
filed notice in the district court of a 
mot'' on to have the verdict set a^'de and 
vacated and a new trial granted. The 
W T. Bailey eompjtny has made a similar 
request in the case brought against it by 
Konstu R. Sarell. 



and $20,371^ asked. Cali>met & Arizona 
opened at $100, advanced to 1101 and 
closed at $100 bid and $100.50 asked. 
Anaconda opened at $33, went to $33.50^ 
and closed at $33.50 bid. 

Superior & Pittsburg sold at $12.25 
and $12.37%. and closed at $12.25 
bid and $12.37i^ asked; Denn-Arl- 
zona, at $3.50 and $3.62%, and closed 
at $3.50 bid and $3.62% asked; Globe, 
at $6.87% and $6.75, and closed at 
6.75 bid and $7 asked; Butte & Su- 
perior, at $1.26, and closed at $1.12Mi 
bid and $1.25 asked; Calumet & So- 
nora. at $6.75 and $7, and closed at 
$6.75 bid and $7.12% asked. Copper 
Queen of Idaho advanced from $1.75 
to $1.87%, with active trading, and 
closed at $1.75 bid and $1.87% asked. 

National sold at 56 and 55 cents. 



and closed at 53 cents bid and 



at 



cents asked, and Butte-Ballaklava, 
$7 and $7.25, and clo.sed at $7 bid. 

Black Mou!itain sold at $4.12%, 
and closed at $4 bid and $4.12^ 
asked 



Gets Default Judgment. 

Judgment hv default in favor of Fred 
B. Rossom against Rose M. E. Scott and 
others has been ordered by Judge Cant 
of the district court. The action was 
one brought by Mr. Rossom to clear 
title to some lands in Section 3. 59-20. 

Will Register Title to Mine. 

An application for registration of title 
to the Utical iron mine, near Hibbing, 
under the Torrens laws, was filed In the 
district court today by the West Mis- 
sabe Land company, through the office 
of Wa.=hburn, Bailey & Mitchell. Accord- 
ing to the applicaticn the last official as- 
sessment of the mine was made on a 
valuation of $247,570. This is one of the 
most valuable ore properties on which the 
owners of record have nought to acquire 
a Torrens title. 

Will Give a Concert. 

The concert which was to have been 
held under the direction of Mrs. David 
Adams at the Grace Methodist church 
last Friday evening will tak3 place 
Wednesday evening at 8 o'clock. 



Selected real estate mortgages 
W. M. Prlndle & Co. 



for sal** 



Will Build Summer Home. 

N. F. Russell of the Bridgeman- 
Russell coTnpany, has purchased a 
tract of land on the Tataiage river, and 
will build a house on the land for a 
•summer home. Mr. Russell intends 
stocking the stream with trout and 
converting the place into a regular 
villa. 

The house will be of logs, and will b* 
furnished up for a regular abode. Mr, 
Russell Int*^nfLs to have a large truck 
garden, where he can raise all the 
necessaries of life. The stream will b© 
improved and thoroughly slocked with 
flsh, guaranteed to provide sport for 
the most ardent fisherman. 



DEATHS. 



AL'RA-John Aura, aged 37 ytars died 
March 7, at St. Luke's hospital, of can- 
cer of the liver. „ , , , 

FREDERICKSON-Christ Frcderlckson. 
aged 30 years, died Feb. 27, at St. Mary \i 
hospital, of acute nephritis. 

MILOSTAN— Stans Milostan. aged 37 
years di'd March 5. at St. Mary s hos- 
Dltal, of acute nephritic. 



Good Printing; North-Land Printery. 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR. 




EISCHEN BROS.. 



WEST SUP. 







Largest Victor and Edison Dealers in Duluth. 



if 





BUILDING PERMITS. 

K permit was issued to J. Peterson 
for the construction of a concrete 
block foundation and an addition- 
al story on a building on the 
south side of Second street, be- 
tween Ninetenth and Twentieth 
avenues west, to cost 

A permit was Issued to K. Bartley 
for the construction of a stone 
foundation on the north side of 
Second street, between Eleventh 
and Twelfth avenues east, to 

cost A. ■■ ■ ; "A' ■ ■ 

A permit was issued to Carl Or- 
derud for the construction of a 
frame dwelling at Woodland 

Park, to cost •• 

A permit was issued to LundmarK 
& Franson for an addition and 
an additional story to the brick 
building en the south side of 
East Second street, between 
Tenth and Eleventh avenues 
ea«t, to cost 1*,000 



$600 



6l0 



$500 



Frederick M Anderson, chief clerk to 
Supt Blanchard of the Northern Pacific, 
left last night with a party of friends for 
Chicago and West Baden Springs for a 
two weeks' vacation. 

copperItocks 
in good rally 



Copper stocks had a good rally and 
closed stronger, after a weakness 
which extended over the earlier part 
of the session today. The opening 
was about unchanged, but prices went 
off during the first part of the day, 
gathering strength 
ever, which was 
the day. ^ ,. . 

North Butte opened at $51, declined 
to $50.25, rallied to $51.50 and closed 
at $51 bid and $51.25 asked. Amalga- 
mated opened at $51.7b, went as low- 
as $51.25, reacted to $52.87% and closed 
at $52.87% bid. 

Greene-Cananea opened at $8.25 and 
closed at $8.12% bid and 18.25 asked. 
Butte Coalition opened at $19.75, went 
to $20.12% and closed at $20.12% bid 



Prices Gut £way Down 

We have decided to cut out all 
agf^ncies and give the Public the 
benefit of 1-S cut In prices on all 
work brought to our shop. 
OTHBRS' PRICES: 

Cleaned BOe 

riraned and blocke^d 7Sc 

Remodeled f 1 JM) 

OLR CUT PRICES: 

rieanefl 25 

Cleaned and blocked 50e 

Remodeled fJ.OO 

NEW LOCAnSN— 
23 Second Avenue \%'eat. 

DULUTH NAT HOSPITAL, 

J. \%\ HLRD, Prop. 



of the 
at the close, how- 
at the top level of 



TJ/^E recommend 
^^ our line for 
Spring, 1908, to 
all who desire and 
appreciate new 
clothes. 

MEIJUIN CO^ 

TAILORS. 
404 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 




PEERLESS LAUftDRY CO., 

522-524 West Superior Street. 
B«lh Phoacs 428. 

Our Shirt and Collar Dept. 
Given Special Attention. 




THE DULUTH EVENING HBRALDi MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



IS SPLENDID FOR PEOPLE 
WITH STOMACH TROUBLE 



Five minutes after eating 

one 22 grain Triangule 

all Indigestion and 

Stomach misery 

goes. 

"When your atomach Is weaJc or lax:k- 
Ing in Ga.3tric juice, anything that you 
eat. no difference what it is. will sour 
on your stomach, raise the bile and 
acids to cover your food like oil on 
water, causing Indigestion. Dyspepsia. 
Stomach nervousness and Belching of 
sour poisons, which produce foul odors, 
Tinafv taste, bilious headache. Heart- 



burn. Intestinal griping and make you 
an r>hject of misery. This is stomach 
troul)le. which can not be overcome 
with ordinary digestive medicines it 
Is caused by fermentation of your food, 
which will be remedied at once »jy a 



harmless as candy, though each will 
digest and prepare for assimilation 
into the blood 3,000 grains of food. 

Indigestion is a result, not a cause 
of your trouble. If the atomach is 
sour and unhealthy, your fr>od be- 
comes tainted, and thafs what Is caus- 
ing the Indigestion and gas on stom- 
ach and other miseries. Pape's Uia- 
pepsin is an Antacid, most pow- 
erful digestive and thorough regu- 
lator for weak stomachs. These Tri- 
angules will digest any kind of food 
yuu put In your stomach and will 
cleanse the atomach and intestines In 
a natural way, which makes you feel 
fine five minutes afterwards. 

(Vny good Pliarmacy here will supply 
you with a case of Rape's Diapepsin 
for fifty cents, which contains com- 
plete curative Instructions; also tells 
the formula, so that you know exactly 
what you are taking. Just reading 
about Diapepsin will not help. You 
should go now and got a case Put 
your .Stomach In full health ai»d by to- 
morrow you win forget the misery of 
Stomach trouble. Your case Is no dif- 
ferent. It l.sn't Stomach nerves or 
Catarrh of the Stomach, or (.rasti itl.-*. 
Dyspepsia. It is Food 



or 



Food Fermentation— thafs 



rotting— 
all— and 



few^22-gmin Trtangule.s o^ ^iapep^^'"" fX, about five minuterto overcome 
o nrpnaratlon Tjleasant to take and as 1 taKes ao..u 



a preparation pleasan 



QDIET MILL 
ISJAIDED 

Police Stop Boxing Con- 
test in Rear of a 
Saloon. 

Participants. Seconds. Sa- 
loon Keeper and Ref- 
eree Are Arrested. 



fleet's position at this hour is latitude 
14 37 north, longitude 102.01 west. The 
weatl •• 3 fine and the ships are mo v- 
InK along at a speed of ten and one- 
half knots per hour. The fleet prob- 
ably will reach Magdulena bay «« 
March 12. two days ahead of their 



schedule. 



The cruise has been suc- 



cessful in every way. 



The ships are in 



nerfect condition and will be readj 
for r'cord target practice '"»,">«Jl^t^'y 
upon their arrival at Magdulena Bay. 



Fleet off AcapuUv). 

New York. March 9.-The position 
of the American battleship fleet as 
Klven in the wireless dispatch from th6 
Georgia Is off the Mexican 
Acapulco. 



JOHNSON'S 
CHANCES 

Of Getting Nomination 
for President Now Be- 
ing Canvassed. 

All States East of Ohio 

Will be Against 

Bryan. 



Minneapolis, Minn., March 9.— The 
Journal says: Wnere will John A. John- 
son stand m the Denver oonventlon. as 
a candidate for president? 

Now that Miniiesotas governor has 
been made a full-fledged candidate for 
national honors, by the action of Ids 
state commltlee. his Mlnnes<jta friends 
are wondering It there really la a chanoo 
to nominate him. The prospect of carry- 
ing other state delegations Is toeing can- 

The argument for Johnson is that he 
should be conceded the vote of his own 
state. If liryan had been willing to 
grant him the Minnesota delegation, he 
would have made Johnson a '•favorite 
son." As it is now, Bryan is rtghtlnK 
Johnson in Minnesota, and Johnson is 
perlectly justihed in flghtmg Bryan m 
any other state of the Union. Willi 
John-son In tho Held, there Is a strong 
p<.s.slbillty that Bryan will not be able 
to muster two-thirds of the convention. 

The size of Johnson's vote at Denver 
will depend largely on whether other 
camlidates appear. If only Bryan and 
Johnson are put in nomination, then ev- 
ery ant I- Bryan state would flock to John- 
son, and he would gel probably three or 



t<]^NG! ANOTHER 

Bi^ ^ale of Men's Sox 

Wednesday the Day 

WATCH FOR IT ! 




Where Style, Quality and Values Harmonize 
Superior J^.—LaK« A-Ot.— Michigan J*/. 



DeniOnKtratton Of 

ARMOUR'S EXTRACT OF BEEF 

We have arranged that for two weeks 
our customers may have free lessons in 
the cookery art by visiting the demon- 
stration of ARMOURS EXTRACT OP 
BEEP. Tho lady in charge will teach 
you how to make dainty and appetizing 
dishes that will tickle the palate, 
not on sale in our store. 



Goods 




HUNDREDS 

NOW 



port 



of 



Word l-Voni the Go<>n?ia- 

San Francl..co. March ».-The battle- 
ship fleet came into direct ommunlca- 
Hon with Mare Isl<"id yesterday, the 
iiTssaVe being the flrst thl.. coast^ has 
received fr.im the warships. torn 
mSnlcation was had by ^^^^J^Ll 
distance of 2.600 milea. the message 
Jelnt" the flrst this coast has receive^ 



OF WOMEN ARE 
BUYING BLACK SILK 
AT FREBMUTH'S BIG SALE! 

This is the first big snap we have been able to get hold of in two years. Jan. 9, 1906, was the date of our 
former Silk Sensation. This sale far eclipses it in extent and value. 

The Silk manufacturer, hard pressed for ready cash, had to let go. We purchased from him-direct from 
the mnis-the largest invoice of Black Silk ever brought to Duluth. We realized that the silks were as fine a 
lot as we ever put on our shelves. They're clean, fresh, snappy fabrics of the highest quality. 

They're on sale now. Take all you want. 
The price Is less than wholesale. 

m M m n ^nT\V?nC! if you cannot come to the store, write us. indicate the lot you want, and mail us money order for number 
]^/\f fj UKUlLlCi^ of yards desired, and we'll promptly ship the silk to you. 



Lot 1 — 34 and 36 inch 
rich, lustrous black 
Swiss Taffetas, never 
sold for less than $135 
a yard — on sale now at, 
per yard 



98e 



Lot 2 — 30-inch black 
Swiss Taffeta, full, lus- 
trous silk, that is some- 
time featured at 5i.i8 a 
yard — on sale now at, 
per yard 



88c 



Lot 3 — 26-inch black 
Swiss Taffetas, one of 
the most popular Si.oo 
black siiks on the mar- 
ket — now on sale at, per 
yard 



78c 



Referee George Thatcher had Just 
called a lively mill between "Kid Sl.ar- 
key- and "Tug Wils-ju" a draw Sat- 
urday night when nine policemen l^ursi 
into the ring at Victor l.ainont s saloon. 
Uli* West Michigan street, and aiieated 
the principal participants and promoters 

*" Kid' Sii'aikey and Tug Wilson and their 
se.-on.Js were held at Central station, 
but the others taken there were released 
alitor their names had been secured. 

The liRhl iield in the rear of L.aAlont s 
«alc«)n and betore a small crowd. Word 
Of the contest hud been pa.ssed around 
Industriously belor.i the conlust. but it 
faibtd to draw a big house, nev.-rtneless. 

The police got wind of the affair and 
kept watch at l-amonfs place. From 
th*ir hidlns piaees. lliey saw .several 
men nnter tlie rear door of trie saloon 
after midnifeht. When thty pushed tho 
door aside, the tight In the improvised 
ring had Just ended. 

This morning the principals, who gave 
thoir names as Henry I'olinaky ami Al- 
bert VVlUon, were arraigned In the 
municipal court on the charge of engag- 
ing in a »>oxlng exhibition, and Morris 
Paul, George W. Thatcher and Victor 
Laniont, were arraign, d on the charge of 
aiding and abetting the tight. Attorney 
Marx appeared for all of the prisoners. 
"Who entered a plea of not guilty. The 
hearing was set for next iMonday, and 
the prinilpals were held for 1^ bail, 
while the others each posted $!» ball for 
their appearance. 

The offieers who took part in the raid 
wore: IJeutenant.t Fritz and St hulte. 
Detective Irvine, Sergeants Gillen and 
WUf'ox. and Officer.^ Hannot, VVanvlck, 
H. Mason and M. MeOermald. 



?SSfthe battleship Maine of Ad.nlivU 
Fv^ns- lleet. Yesterday morning the 
op\Jator at tho wireless station a 
Mare Island, in resiwndlng to the call 
of his Itistramcnt. was surprl^-^^l J*' 
discover he was in Ji^^ct oommunl«i- 
tlon with the Maine. Though 2 600 
miles away, the mes.sage was clear 
Sare I-sland acknoA ledged receipt but 
further communication was cut off on 
account of other stations interrupting. 
Tho nr.«it words from the fleet an- 
nounced the death of Private flamuol 
Wagoner, marine corps 
Alabama, who died on Feb. 
pleuro-pneumonia. He was buried at 

The direct communication with the 
Maine followed closely on the receipt 
of tho relay mes.sage from the t on- 
necticut. picked up by the St. Louis. 



WIRELESS MESSAiiE 

FROM BATTLESHIPS 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



Bay. It is moving at the rate of lOVi 
knots per hour, which Is l'^ knots 
more per hour than was <'Stin»ated 
when the ships left Callao. This will 
place the ships in MagdaUna Bay 
on the morning of the 12lh— next 
Thursday — or two days ahead of sched- 
ule time. 



WIFE ALLEiJEI) ( Rl ELTY. 

Mrs. Jennie Hallpren Did Manual 
Labor for Hor Husband. 

Jennie Hallgren has started divorce 
proceedings in the dl.^trlct court against 
Andrew Hallgren. on the gnnind of cruel 
and inhuman treatment. She alleges that 
since their marriage several years ago 
she has been compelled to do hard man- 
ual labor, although not physically fitted 
to do .so and that the money she earned 
was used by her husband in securing a 
homestead. Mrs. Hallgren claims that 
she was at times v-My ill but that she 
was left at home uncared for and with- 
out proper medicines. 

It 13 alleged In the complaint that Hall- 
gren has a»>t>ut Sl.Sno due from a local 
lumber company for some timber that 
he sold and Mrs Hillgren has made the 
concern one of the defendant.-* with a 
view of holding up the payment of the 
money to Hallgren until the court deter- 
mines her case and her rights In the 
maitor. 



>les.saKr FYtmi tin* fJ»H>rgrln, 

On Roard T'nited States Steamship 
Georgia, 8 p. m., March 8, (Via I'nitea 
W'irele.^s Telegraph company. > — The 



STOHlv VISITS 1>KFC)T. 
Madison, Wis.. .March 9— A Woman giv- 
ing her name as Mrs. «)le (lunderson and 
her residence as Fond du Lac gave 
birth to a female child in the woman'.-* 
toilet room at thi> .station of the Chi- 
cago Xt Northwestern Rallroa.1 company 
here She was removed to the city hos- 
pital, where the dead body of the in- 
fant was round wrapped in a skirt in 
her sult<":\se. i:oroni.-r Lynch Is investl- 
KatltiR the case. 



EATING 

WITH HIS 
STOMACH 

That's what the man who bolts his food without thor- 
oughly chewing it, tries to do. 

This is particularly true when he uses soft, starchy 
foods, which seldom got the necessary digestion by the 
saliva, as nature intended, because most people swallow 
such foods as quickly as possible. This leads to weakened 
digestive organs, fermentation, imperfect nutrition, and 
sometimes appendicitis. 

Grape-Nuts 

must be chewed, and for this, as well as other reasons, 
this fo<^d has saved many from chronic intestinal troubles 
and all the misery that means. If there's one thing about 
Grape-Nuts of greater interest than its scientific food quali- 
ties, it is its remarkable practical adaptability to all weak- 
ened conditions of the digestive organs and its power to 
build them up quickly. 



'There's a Reason 



ff 



four hundred voltes out of the total of 
l.tn>8. Bryan must have 672 delegates to 
nominate. If Johnson and other candi- 
dates should muster more than a3tj, they 
would block the Nebraskan's nomlnat- 
iion. If Ohio should pre.sent Judaon Har- 
mon, and New York or New Jersey 
sliould take up Woodrow Wilson or Lieu- 
tenant Oovernor Chanler. if Delaware 
and other Kastern states voted for Judge 
Gray, Johnson's showing would be cut 
down. 

Jolin.«M>ii W'tmld Draw Field. 
It is easy, however, to ngure a com- 
bination by which Bryan c<juld be 
balk'd of the two-thirds vote, and In 
the end the opposition would be most 
likely to unite on Johnson. The John- 
son <lelegates, from .Minnesota at least 
could not be delivered to Ciray, Har- 
mon or Wilson. Without Johnson they 
would vole for Bryan. Of course that 
would not insure Johnson's nomination, 
for he, too, would Mnd it necessary to 
corrall two-thirds, and Bryan has John- 
son marked now on his list of undesir- 
able democrats. 

Democrats here assume that all the 
states east of Ohio will be against Bryan. 
That Includes New York with 7S votes, 
Pennsylvania with 68, New Jersey 24. 
Connecticut 14, Mas.sachusetts 32. Rhode 
a native of I Island x. New Hamp.shire S, Vermont 8. 
-9 of and .Maine 12. That makes 252 votes 
Those votes may yet all be cast tor 
Johnson Farther South there Is pros- 
pect for anl-Bryan votes in several 
states, Delaware with 6 and Maryland 
with 16 are counted on, and Virginia 
with 24 is very likely lo be anti-Bryan. 
Louisiana with IS votes Is said to be 
ready to come to Johnson. In the cen- 
tral states, Illinois Is a field that will 
very likely go against Hryan and under 
the unit rule cast '>4 votes against hlni. 
Add .Minnesota's 22 to this list, and it 
makes 392 votps, or fully 50 more than la 
necessary to head Bryan off. 

There Is al.so John.son sentiment in the 
West. Utah and Nevada are said to l>e 
for him, and possibly Colorado, W:».sh- 
ington may semi some John.s4>n dele- 
gates. If the opposition to Bryan Is 
fully organized, he may lose the delega- 
tions of .South Carolina, Alab.ima, Ken- 
tucky, West Virginia and Indiana. Ten- 
nessee i."i not impossible for John.son. 
Jolm.son Talk Not XotHlod. 
Governor Johnson Is letting his friends 
sp*»ak for him entirely. Some of the 
Kastern papers are asking for a definite 
matement from him to confirm the ac- 
tion of the state committee. That is 
laughed at here. "It was his state 
committee." said one Johnsi>n Democrat 
yesterday, "his private secretary pre- 
sided and some of his closest friends 
talked and worked lor the resolutions In 
the committee. If that doesn't make 
Johnson a candidate, then it takes more 
to launch a candidate for president than 
I supposed. Do we have to beat it into 
their heads with a club? 

It is quite likely that the governor will 
break his silence after the slate conven- 
tion May 14. if that convention Instructs 
for Johnsim. Then he wiill have some 
tangU>le support to take notice of. and 
can hardly do less than extend thanks 
for the mark of confidence It liap- 
pens tMldly enough that Johnson him- 
self will be In Washington when that 
convention meets. Tho coincidence was 
not discovered till the date was fixed. 
May 7 was first picked out, but at the 
last minute it was found that this came 
right on the heels of the St. Paul city 
tdectlon S<} It was thought best to make 
It a week later. On May 12 Governor 
Johnson dines with I'resident Roosevelt 
at the White House, and throe days that 
week he will be in attendance at the 
conference called by the president on 
the con.servatlon of national resources. 
I^rosiKH't of .Mliiiiosola Fight. 
Johnsons friends do not express th«j 
slightest doubt of the result of their 
tu.ssic with the Bryn men In May. They 
say that the anti-Johnson men will only 
muster a corporal's guard In the conven- 
tion at St. Paul. At the same time the 
Johnson forces will have to work hard 
in Hennepin and St. Louis counties, and 
al.so in several other counti«s of the 
state, such as Renville, Lyon, Waseca, 
F'illmore and Winona. There was a wild 
rumor yesterday that Bryan had set 
aside JltjO.OOii of his personal fortune to 
be spent in carrying Minnesota. No- 
body believes he would spend any such 
sum out of the Commoner's earnings, 
but »)ey<md a doubt he ha.s told his Min- 
nesota representatives to go ahead, and 
is going to back them up In the fight. 

The New York World has an interest- 
ing leading editorial on the Johnson 
situation. For the first time that paper 
defmitely sJiys that If Johnson is a can- 
didate he will probably get the dele- 
gate.'^ from New York, I'ennsylvanla, New 
Jersey and most of New Kngland. Here 
is the World editorial In full: 

"The Minne.sota state committee owes 
no apologies to Mr. Brj-an or lo anybody 
else for Us Indorsement of Governor John 
A. John.-^on for the Democratic nomina- 
tion for president. 

■"The committee's action was the most 
Intelligent and most hopeful thing that 
has happened in Democratic politics In 
months. The Minnesota Democrats have 
a candidate for president whom any 
state in the union might be proud to 
present fo a national convention. 
The Strongest Man. 
"The World hicUn.-s to the belief that 
Governor Johnson is the strongest man 
the Democrts could nominate. He would 
carry states that Bryan c.>uld not possiblv 
carry. He would give the I>emocrailc 
party a fighting chance In stales -In 
which Mr. Bryan's nomination would 
mean a Republican walk over. In the 
great debatable states of New Y'ork and 
New Jersey alone OJovernor Johnso.i 
would be at least IW.OOO votes stronger 
than Mr. Bryan. Indeed, there are well 
Informed New %'ork Democrats who think 
that Governor John».m might carry this 
state. In any event, his nomination would 
givi- new life, new hope, new courage and 
new fighting spirit to the Democrats m 
every section of the country. 

"If Mr. Bryan were not blinded by 
personal ambition and selfishness, he 
too, would receive th*- superior availabili- 
ty of oGvernor Johnson, who has no rec- 
ord of defeat and has l.een involved in 
nou" of the ancient feuds and vendeetlas 
of the party. If Mr. Bryan had the true 
Interests of the Deraocraiic party at heart 



Beautiful French Tapestries and Cretonnes 

Less than half what you'd pay 
for the very common lilnd. 



Importers* Samples- 
Special Sale— Don't Miss It! 



Every housewife in Duluth will be interested in this sale. \ou probably 
have several chairs or settees that a new covering would greatly improve. 
Here-s a chance to buy genuiue French Tapestry and Cretonne Coverings at 



Importers samples — a beautiful as- 
sortment of colorings. Cretonnes 
a yard — divided in three 



French Cretonnes 

that wouldl sell regularly at 75c and $1.00 
lots — namely : 

LOT 2 I I>OT 3 

27x32 Inches — Size 36x32 inches — 80 
20 pieces In the pieces to select from — 
jholce I your choice 



LOT 1 I 

Size 16x18 Inches. 250 'Size 
pieces la lot. choice \ only 
of any — 



lot- 



7'/3C each i 19c each i 30c each 

Cotton Tapestry ) \S. 



In light colors — 50 pieces to 
select from — in two lots. 



I,OT 7 — Assortment of large 

zes— each 

V ,.OT S — Fine assortment of 

f smaller sizes, at 

\ They're worth more than twice the 



95c 
48c 



price quoted. 



W7^__ _1» nPow^Acfv*! AC In ^^■'^^Ir silk and wool, and cotton 
rrCnCll iapt^»lltl^» — suitable for furniture coverings. 

pillows, table covers, etc. Beautiful pieces 1 14 yards each— 250 pieces 

to choo.se from — In six lots: 

LOT 1 I I-OT 2 

IVonch Taix'strles— 1 % French Tapestries — \% 

yards each — choice of yards each — special 
the lot price each 

$2.95 $3.50 



LOT 4 



LOT 5 



French Tai>e.stries— 1 H \ French Tapeslrles — 1 »4 

yards each — liner lot — yards each — choice of 
choice each the lot 

$1.49 $1.69 



French 

yards 
tho lot 


LOT 3 
Tapestries — 1 H 

each — choice of 

$3.95 


French 

yards 
the lot 


LOT 6 

TaiK'stries — 

each — choice 

$1.95 


14 

of 



he would be urging the nomination of a 
man like John A. Johnson, who could re- 
nnlte the shattered factions of the party 
md hold otit to the lK-inocra<-y some pros- 
pect of victory, however famt 

'As 11 i». Judged bv action of Mr. 
Brvan's sin)P«>rters in Mlnne»<^)ta the other 
day Mr jSr^an will exert all his power 
and influence to crush the Johnson can- 
didacy It is a challenge which the gov- 
ernor's friends need not hesitate to ac- 

*'*''* Xew-York For Johnson. 

"As lM»tween John A. Johnson and Will- 
iam J. Bryan. New York's seventy-elghc 
votes m the national convention will be 
cast for John A. Johnson. New Jersey 
Will undoubtedly follow the lead of New 
York so. we think, will Pennsylvania 
and the farger part of New Kngland. So 
will many other stales In which the in- 
telligent leadership of parly la sick of 
Bryanism. but has despaired of finding a 
real candidate to follow. 

"The World does not by any means 
regard Mr Bryan's nomination inevitable, 
nor consider the candidacy of a man like 
Johnson hopeless. If we did we should 
have little Interest in the fortunes of the 
Democratic party and should abandon it 
to it.s cranks, its seml-SoclaUsls and lis 
demagogues. , , , 

"But we refuse to concede that a tia- 
ti,.nal convention of l.OOe ordinarily In- 
telligent human beings confronted wita 
the certainty of defeat under Mr. Br^an 
and the possibility of ^'ictory under Gov- 
ernor Johnson, would deliberately elect 
again to follow Populism t o disa ster. 

No Use to Die. 

"I have fOTind out that there is no us? 
to die of lung trouble as long as you 
can get Dr. King's New Discovery '' says 
Mrs J P White, of Rushboro. Pa. I 
would not be alive today only for that 
wonderful medicine. It lo<i3ens up a 
cough quicker than anything else, ana 
cures luuK disease even after the case is 
pronounced hopeless." This most rel abl- 
remedy for coughs and colds, la grippe, 
asthma bronchitis and hoarseness. Is 
.sold under guarantee at all drug stores. 
5<)c and $1.00 Trial bottle free. 



TROUBLES 
OF POLAND 

Are Shown Up at Two 

Meetings in 

Dulutii 



Congressman Asked to 

Support Resolution 

in Congress. 



THRE MEN 
INDICTED 



Michael T. Kane, the United States 
marine corps recruit who was brought 
back from Mare Island about a month 
ago on the charge of voting illegally at 
the primary election last December, ha.s 
been Indicted under the same charge and 
will be tried during the present term of 
court. In case he enters a plea of not 
izulltv. It is alleged that he vOted at the 
Fourth precinct of the Sixth ward under 
an assumed name. , , . ,, t, «„ 

Kane will be defended by M. H. Me- 

He'nry Bolot. who shot and killed Ma- 



gloire Charbonneau. his landlord at West 
Duluth, a few weeks ago. was Indicted for 
murder In the secotid degree. 

The shooting happ« ned at a boarding 
house at a'^L'G Halifax street. Bolol hau 
boarded with Charbonneau for ten Vfa"- 
but for J»ome time previous to the shoot- 
Ine thev had not been on the best of 
terms Bolot claims that Charbonneau en- 
■ rT'hls ro(nn with an ax with murderous 
Intent, and that he, Bolot. fired In self- 

"^ FreFciark has been Indicted for grand 
Inroenv in the second degree. He is al- 
leged to have stolen Jewelry from Martha 
Zarelic to the value of $62. The theft is 
alleged to have taken place at Ely. 



Moderate 
Price 



Calumei 
Baking 
Powder 

tl.OOaOO will b« slTsn for 

I any sqImmdca iniurtooB to 

baftlth fonnd In Oalasir' 



Resolutions asking the United 
States and all civilized citizens to 
.save Poland from the persecutions 
and barbaric treatment inflicted upon 
the Poles In Prussia were adopted 
by the Poles of Duluth. who met at 
the PoILsh school, Fourth avenue 
east and Fourth street, and at Co- 
lumbia hall. Twentieth avenue west 
and Superior stret. yesterday after- 
noon. 

At the flr.st meeting, the members 
of St. Mary's Polish church adopted 
resolutions expressing, on the part of 
3.000,000 Polish-Americans, indigna- 
tion toward the treatment tendered 
the Poles In Prussia, both by the 
government and the people. The 
attention of America, as well as 
other civilized nations, was called to 
this violation of the treaty of Vienna, 
and of the laws of humanity. 

it Is claimed that since the an- 
nexation of part of Poland by the 
Prussian overnment every provision 
of the treaty of Vienna has been 
violated by the Pru.sslan govern- 
ment. It was stated that the Prus- 
sian government aimed at annihila- 
tion of Poland. It has forced the 
Poles to speak the Pru.sslan language, 
not only in the .schools, but al.so in 
the churches. It has usurped private 
property; it has not discharged the 
provisions of the Vienna congress; 
and it Is at the present time con- 
templating a new series of anti-Polish 
measures. 

The speakers were: A. Kolinda. 
John H. Norton, J. Bussa and Rev. K. 
Slerzputowski. 

Following is a copy of the resolution 
sent to Congressman Bede: 

"We, the Poli.sh citizens of the 
United States In Duluth. Minn., peti- 
tion you as our representative in con- 
gress, and beg you to aid in adopting 
the resolution extending synrpathy for 
the Polish in their native land, and 
condemning the Prussian government 
for Its barbaric action towards the 
Poles in tr\'ing to expatriate them. 

"We believe that in this case the 
fundamental principles of civilization 
are at stake, and for this reason we 
bfcliev-e that the representatives of the 
Aimerlcan people, in congress assem- 
bled, will adopt the above resolution. 

"Thanking you for previous services 

extended to our district, and wishing 

you success in your future efforts, we 

arc sincerely yours. 

•W LEWANDOWICZ, President. 

•S. C. MACHXIKOWSKI. Secretary. " 



STEAL WHEN 
NECESSARY 

Startling Remedy for the 

Bread Line is 

Suggested. 



The rather startling remedy of tak- 
ing what a man needs was suggested 
by a speaker at the meeting of the 
Question club yesterday afternoon, 
during a discussion on "The Bread 
Line." 

Rev. J. T. Moody of the Bethel ad- 
dressed the meeting, taking "The 
Bread Line" for his subject. He told 
of the men who visit the Bethel every 
morning for the free breakfast that 
is given them, and urged the necessity 
of securing work for them. 

When asked if he had a remedy to 
suggest, Mr. Moody said that right- 
eou.sness was the only remedy he 
knew of. 

One of the members of the audience 
then aro.se and quoted the words of 
the Chicago bishop, who when the 
question, "What shall a man do when 
he is hungry and out of work?" was 
put to him, is claimed to have replied 
that the man should go and take what 
he needed. . 

Mr. Moody vigorously assailed this 



Idea, and cited instances to show the 
honesty of the men in the bread line. 
One man, he claimed, had found a 
woman's watch and another had found 
a purse containing $45 in money, and 
both had turned the articles over to 
the Bethel authorities to be restored 
to their owners. 

Some of the members of the audience 
questioned the character of the men 
In the bread line. One speaker claimed 
that they were a lot of worthless Idlers 
who just drifted Into Duluth. Mr. 
Moody hotly denied this assertion, and 
said that it was not worthy of con- 
tradiction, as the man who made it 
had evidently never seen the bread 
line This morning to satisfy himself 
regarding the truth of It, Mr. Moody 
investigated and found that two-thirds 
of the men in the line had made Du- 
luth their headquarters for from one 
to ten yea'-s. 

The discussion lasted from a.ju 
o'clock until 6:15 and the outcome was 
the appointment of a committee or 
five who will appear before the coun- 
cil 'this evening, and ask the city 
fathers to do all in their power to find 
work for the unempl oyed in the city. 

Th« Lucky Quarter 

T« the one you pay out for a box or 
Dr King^^ New Lif^ V\\\^- T^bey bring 
you th- health that's more Precious than 
Jewels Try them for heaoaehe. bilious- 
ness, constipation and. "'^J,?,[,**h/Vhe^r^ 
disapp'jlnt you the price will be cheer 
fully refunded at al l drug stor es. 

SECTION HAND BANKRUPT 
Firgo N D.. March 9.-John Kuhn. 
a railroad laborer living at Tolna. Nel- 
son county, has filed a petition of vol- 
untary bankruptcy in the United States 
dlstrlrt court. He pl.aces his liabilities 
at $847.86 and his assets at $170, all of 
which are claimed as exemptions. 




You Will Find Us at 



312 



West First Street. 

While our new tile floor is being laid in 
our store in the Spalding hotel. 



TO MOTHERS' CONGRESS. 
St Paul, Minn.. March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— tJovernor Johnson yester- 
day has appointed Mrs. S. A. Ponthon 
of St Paul as Minnesota's represents- I 
live to the first International Congress 
of Mothers which motts at Washington, 
on March 10. Mrs. Ponthon left for 
Washington Sunday, so as to be present 
at the opening of the congress on rue«- I 



ESTERLY 



JEWELER 



da^. 




-^. — ■ ■■ - 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. MARCH 9, 1908. 






-— 




OF TIKI 




-iM^ 



FEAR LOWRY 
HAS CONTROL 

Suspicious Connection 

With Mississippi River 

& Electric Power Co. 



thcro was cvliifiut.- that tht y had eaUn 
some of tlio poison, but after followJng 
it for several mlleB the chMse wa.-i 
abandoned. Slpht wna Kained of three 
wolves. V>ut liidieat ioiiH pointed to there 
heine live or six In the paek. 



SEVEN SAI.OON MEN. 



Current Control in St. 

Cloud Company Has 

Been Acquired. 



Bt. Cloud, Minn., March ^.-(Sreeial to 
The Jlerald.)— Is the Mlssslsslppl River & 
Elt'ctrlc Power company a eorporail:>n 
owned and contrulUd hy the Twin City 
Rapid Transit company, or by the fo- 
calUd Lowry interest? is the question 
which is being asked. It Is n.sserted by 
partiei! elnlmlnK to be "on the Inside" that 
»uch was the ca^e. and that th< I'.uereHt.'^ 
which were formerly held by Archibald S. 
Wliltf. the N«w York-Cleveland trust 
ircignate, a son-in-law of p:iwain F. 
Mf-ore of thlK citv. president of Ih. hlr^l 
Katioiial bank, and whUh, it was an- 
noiine»d la.st s\itiiii)er, had been trans- 
ferred t<^ other puriles, are now. If not 
owned cniirlKht. at It-ast controlhd by 
Thomas Lowry of St. Paul and other 
caj.itHUats closely identified with luni. 

J 8 Jack of Montleello, whicii Is 
Lowry's summer home, has been engaged 
for the psiJit three months buying flowape 
rikhtp on both sides of the river all the 
way from Montleello to St. Cloud. In 
ever>' ca.sp where a deal was made the 
owner of the land from which flnwase 
was bought was tend« red a eheelt for the 
full amoimt. Any and nil ipiestlonv as to 
the Identity of those furnlt'hing the money 
were refu:^cd. , 

In this connection report comes from 
the South that j-reparatlons for nctiye 
operations on th.- dams whieh the Missis- 
sippi River * Electric Power compnny 
exr"-*-" tt> bnlld will begin with early 
spring and will continue without abate- 
ment One of the dams Is propos. d to b.- 
built at Montleello and another not far 
from Clearwater. Th< ctmipany new ow-n.i 
outright a continuous th-wjige rlglit, also 
the sites of the proposed dams. 

hingeOaRTng 
wolves bolder 

Gaunt Animals Coming 

Into Small Towns 

Searching for Food. 

Ontonagon, Mkh., Manh 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Wolves are becoming very 
bold In this section. Owing to tlie 
light snow fall they are finding U very 
aiffitult to satisfy their appetites, and 
are taking long chances. The other 
night thty killed a deer within a 
■toiie'a throw of the little settlement 
at Iron river. The deer was driven 
over the embankment near the irt'n 
biiiige. and after being killed was 
dragged up liie river a few hundred 
feet by the widves, wh« re a portion of 
It was devoured. The commotion at- 
tracted the ntt»ntion of those residing 
there, and stveral shots were fired at 
the iinlcials, but none te»ok effect. 

Btlieving that the w<dves would re- 
turn on the following night, the car- 
cass of the deer was poisoned and an 
Investigation the next moining showed 
that they bad bei^n working at it. 
trail of the wolves was taken up 



Of Sfambaush Are Hauled Up on 
Judicial Cirpet. 

Crystal Falls. Miih., March 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Justice of the Pea.e 
Pavidson began today to hear the casis 
of the seven sahtonkeepcrs of Slambaugh 
who were arrested last week at the In- 
stance of Rev. Mr. Rutlcdge, of the Antt- 
Saloon lea:;ue. 

The arre.-t of the Stambaugh saloon- 
keepers is the beginning of a crusade, It 
Is said, in Iron county that threai.-ns to 
put the fenr of the law into the hearts 
of liquor dealers wiihin its bounds. 

The movement started with the assist- 
ance of the ministers of the Swedish 
church at Stambaugh. Th-y are back- 
ing up Mr. Kutledge In the movement, 
and that is all that he needs to make 
things hum. It is understood that 
Iron River will be the next place at- 
tacked, and that Crystal Falls Is on Iho 
list and will surely get lis own very 
shortly. 

NEW DRY COMPLETED. 

By Oliver Mliiiii;? tompany at Sec- 
tion 21 is Finished. 

Ishpemlng, Mich., March 9.-(Spoclal to 
The Herald.)— Carpenter work on the new 
dry that the Oliver Iron Mining compiiny 
is having erected at Section 21 mine haa 
bf . n complete d. A concrt-te floor is beiiiK 
laid, ai'-d as soon as it Is fln.sh.d the 
^teel loekeis and other etjulpment will be 
installed. The new b<jllerhouse and plant, 
rccen'.lv erected, is now U\ cominl-si^m. 
A large puiup Is bilng In.stall. d at the 
TOO-foot level In the west shaft. 



child was dead when born, and pleaded 
not guillv, but later confessed and the 
jury recommended a lO-year sentence. 



Y. M. C. A. MEET SUCCESSFUL. 

R. B. Griflfith ^"Srand Forks Is 
Elected President. 

Grand Forks, N. D., March 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The fourth annual 
meeting of the Young Men's Christian 
atsociation of the state, here last week, 
one of the most successful meetings in 
the history of the organization, came to 
a clo.se Sunday. _ 

At the election of officers durlnfe the 
buslne.ss session Saturday the following 
were elected: President, K. B. Griffith. 
Grand Forks; first vice president, H. L». 
Rockwood, Valley City; second vice 
president. Dr. J. E. Uoyle, university; 
secretaries, Paul Garrett, Fargo, and F. 
II. llanklns, Mayvllle. 

Saturday night there was a banquet 
Fr-rved by the Liadiea' Aid societies of 
the various churches. Dr. \\'. N. Stearns 
of Grand Forks w.-vs toastmaster and the 
following toasts were responded to: 

Rev. F. E. R Miller, "The Association 
—A Social Factor"; Rev. J. H. Batten, 
"The Association— A Strong Arm ot the 
Church"; H. L.. Rockwood. "The Assacl- 
atlon— A Community Nece.sslty"; Prof. 
F. H. Koch, "Tiie Association— An Edu- 
cational B'actor"; Clarence Brownlee, 
"Social Service"; R. ki. Griftith, "The 
Association as a Business Man Sees It"; 
A. J. Elliot, "A Great Investment." 




A Victor in Your Home 

For $ I a Week! 

WouM veil let $1 a week stanci between you and your family 
and a Victor? You'll never miss the dollar, but going without a 
Victor when you can have it so easy is an awful "miss" — 

Why, do you know, what an immense amount of enjoyment 
a Victor wUl'bring into your home? If you don't, just take a little time 
and run in to our Talking Machine Parlors, and learn what this $1 a week 
will bring to your home. 




Visitors Welcome 

Visitors are always welcome at 
our Talking Machine Parlors, 
whether desiring to purchase or 
not. Drop in some day and hear 
some good music. 




mmm lOOSEFURIIlSIIEitS 

HA& 

SnoDd Av» W. Kd First % 




Our Stock 

Of Machines and Records is al- 
ways complete. We carry all 
sizes of Edison and Victor ma- 
chines, and complete catalog of 
all Records. 



CR00K8T0N SCHOOL BURNS. 



AFLOAT WITH DEAD BODY. 

Haiiouiii? Expeiionee of Fisher- 
man Who Nearly Perishes. 

Hi'Ughton, Mi<h.. March 9.— Eric Peter- 
son, a fisherman, has arrived here on his 
way to the hospiinl. after a harrowing 
exptrlenee of drifting thirty-six hours* In 
an open skiff on Utke Superior with a 
companion lying frozen to death In the 
bottom of the boat. Th»y were car^yln^; 
hom»- a boatload of provisions from Gay. 
when a northwest storm made their boa: 
unniaiuisable. ,. • , ,.._, 

Drifting helplessly before the wind Hft 
week Tuesdriv evening. Peterson called to 
his companiim, August Bell, to come 
closer for mutual warmth, only to dl-(Over 
that Hell was; froieri to death. _. .^^^ 

All TiKsdnv night and all day Wednes- 
dav and Wednesday night Peterson walk- 
ed" back ana forth in the 14-foot flat-bot- 
tom skiff, btatlng his arms to k.ep h.s 
l)lo<.d in circulatTr.n. Thursday morn ng 
his boat became fast In an Ice field that 
touched the shorer and he made his way 
to a lumber camp, leaving Bell a body in 
the boat. _______ 

oldIiesident buried. 



The 
and 



Calumet, Mlrh.. March 9-(SpeHa »'• 
The H.rald.)-The funeral of Abraham 
Krlcksou. one of the old residents of this 
section. Who dl.d Friday, was held this 
kfternoon from the Finnish Lutheran 
church. , _• . j„ 

Abraham Erickson passed away at his 
home in Rayml.aul'own of t"berc^,.lr»l^. 
He was comrelled to lake to his bed on 
Feb 26 and falhd rapidly. Mr. Krickson. 
who was in charge of the "dry" at th.- 
Hetla branch of the Calumet & Hecia 
mine came to Calumet forty years ago. 
He was 61 years c-Ul. 

infanthTde in pen. 

Inhuman Father Bepins His Ten- 
Vear Sentence at Bismarck. 

Bismarck, N. D.. Mar. h 9.-Sh( riff 
Drew of Dickey county, has placed In 
the penitentiary here. George Rtrohl 
v/ho will serve ten years for murder 
In the second degree. 

Htrohl and his wife w. re alone when 
a child was born, 
founti In a well, 
thrown by Strohl. 



Fire Is Snpposed to Have Been of 
Incendiary Origin. 

Crookston. Minn., March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The FranlUln school build- 
ing on South Ash slreet was totally de- 
stroyed by fire, early Saturday, causing 

a loss of }8,000, on which there was |5,100 
Insurance. 

The origin of the fire Is a mystery, 
but the prevailing opinion about the city 
is that some person deilbtrately set it on 
tire. This opinion has been adv^ced by 
several In dis<'ussing the Hrc. The ttre 
evidently started In the south wing of 
the building, which was the newer por- 
tion of the building erected several years 
ago to give additional room for the pu- 
pils. 

By the time the department arrived on 
the scene, the wholi? south wing wa."» 
ablaze and most of that wing was 
burned to t. e ground. The older portion 
of the building was gutted and there Is 
nothing left but a shell which Is of no 
value except for the few old boards 
which may be secured from what Is 
standing of the unbumed walls. The 
seats and all the furnishing of the school 
are totally destroyed. 



and the body wis 

wh.ro It had been 

Klrohl claimed the 



itV^^ 



)\i 



l)l 



! SY. 






w 



From the 

Dairy Region 
of Southern 
Minnesota 

Come the milk and grain fed 
hogs from which are selected 
Hormers 



ya%^» 



Hams and Bacon 

Short hauls to our Packing House 
eliminate the over-heating of hogs 
caused by the long trips to most of the 
large packing centers. 
Fresh country milk and grain feed produces a 
firm, sweet, tender meat in which the fat and 
lean are appetizingly proportioned, thus mak- 
ing possible that distinctive, mild, sweet flavor 
found only in Hormel's Dairy Brand Hams and 
Bacon. 

U. S. Government inspected. 



Ai\ your dealer for Dairy 'Brand and if he 
docs not supply you eend o« your name. 

GEO. A. HORMEL & CO. 

rORH PACKERS 

AUSTIN. - MINISESOTA 



BRA.NCHESi 

MtnneapolU St. Pa-Jl 



Dnluth 



WRONG MAX ACCUSED. 

Sam Haves Did Xot Sell Liquor to 
Red Lake Indians. 

Bemldjl, Minn., March ».— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Before H. A. Simons, 
I'nlted States commissioner, the ease of 
Sam Hayes of Island Lake, charged with 

having sold liquor to Indians on the Red 
Lake rest-rvatlon, has been dismissed, 
the evidence showing that Hayes was not 
>.iillty of the cliarge preferred, and that 
the narty who really sold the liquor was 
another "Sam," whose last name was not 
Hayes. 

Hayes was arrested "U'ednrsdau by 
Deputy United States Marshal Frank 
Tufts, and at his hearing l)efore H. A. 
Simons, United States commissioner, five 
Indian witnesses w<re examined, all of 
whom teslifled that Mr. Hayes was not 
the party who had sold them the liquor, 
and Mr. Hayes was discharged. 



Our $29.20 Victor 
Outfit 

VICTOR OVTFIT XO. 1 — This 
oiitflt consists ^:pO PO 
of Victor Ma- M'^C^*<^^ 
chine No. 1, with 1 dozen Victor 
10-lnch records of your own 
choosing. 

Trrins: $5 Ck^Ii and $5 a 
MuiiUi, or $1 a Week. 



THAWING FROZEN PIPES. 




Our $38.20 Victor 
Outfit 

VICTOR OrTFIT NO. 2— This 
outfit consist.-^ ^'^S^ PO 
of Victor Ma- q>00.<^V^ 

cholne No. 2, with flower horn 
and 1 dozen Victor 10-inch 
records of your own choosing. 
Terms: $6 Casli' and $6 a 
Montli, or $1 a Week. 



Our $47.20 Victor 
Outfit 

VICTOR OrTFIT NO. 3— This 
outfit consists <C/L'7 PO 
of Victor Ma- M^^^ .^i-V/ 

chine Wo. 3, with flower horn 
and 1 dozen Victor 10-inch 
records of your own choosing. 

Terms: $7 Cash and $6 a 
Month, or $1 a W'eek. 



Our $57.20 V^ictor 
Outfit 

VICTOR OUTFIT NO. 4 — This 
outfit consists ^R"^' ^f\ 
of Victor Ma- ^'^^ •^yj 

chine No. 4, 



with fine flower 
dozen 10-lnch rec- 



No 
horn and 
ords. 

Terms: $10 Cash and 
Month, or $1 a Week. 



$5 



An Edison in Your Home 

For $ I a Week! 

Perhaps you'd prefer the cylinder style machine— if so, you 
certainly want the machine that bears the name of Edison upon it. 
The payment each week of a single dollar will place one of these 
splendid entertainers in your home, and you'll enjoy it immensely, and 
never miss the dollar each week that pays for it. 




Our $19.70 Edison 
Outfit 

EDISON OfTUT NO. 1— This 

7i\ r:r„' $ 1 9-7o 

Gem Machine, with flower 
horn and 1 dozen Edison Gold 
Moulded Records. 

Terms: $-1 Cash and $4 a 
MonUi. OP $1 a Week. 



Our $29.20 Edison 
Outfit 

EDISON OUTFIT NO, 2 — Thia 

outfit consists ^OO P'O 
of Edison f^^^*(^y^ 
Standard Phonograph, with 
fiov.er horn and 1 dozen Edison 
Gold Moulded Records. 

Terms: $5 Caeh and $6 a 
Month, OP $1 a Week. 



Our $39.20 Edison 
Outfit 

EDISON Ol^FlT NO. 3— This 

outfit consists ^C^O ^C\ 
of Edison ^^^^.«S-Vr 
Home Phonograph, with flowor 
horn and 1 dozen Edison Gold 
Moulded Records. 

Terms: $6 Ca^-h and $5 a 
Month, OP $1 a Week. 



Our $59.20 Edison 
Outfit 

EDISON Ol^TFIT NO. 4— This 

outfit consists <CF^O ^O 
of Edison *:p*J.^.<^Vf 

Triumph Phonograph, with 
flower hern and 1 dozen Edison 
Gold Moulded Records. 

Terms: $10 Ca.*ih and $5 a 
Month. OP $1 a Week. 



Csuise Explosion Killing One .ind In- 
juring Another. 

Fargo, N. D., March 9.— The bciler of a 
water heatinn attachment to a kitchen 
range burst here Sunday, killing the 2- 
year-old eon of J. S. Collins and serlcui-ly 
iajurin<< Mr. Collins' 1-year-oUl daughter. 
The falh'r and mother escaptd injury. 
The water pipes froze Saturday nlglit. 
and when an attempt to thaw them out 
was made yesterday moral lig, the boiler 
burst and a piece of the metal struck the 
boy In the head. 

FLOOmvOOD BIUEFS. 

Floodwood, Minn.. March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— O. N. Johnson, who has 
spent the winter on his farm near MiU- 
berg, has returned to Forest Citv. Iowa, 
with his teams to prepare for tne su.ii- 
mr r's work on his farm at that place. 
Mr. Johnson expects to return to Flood- 
WLKjd in the coming fall. 

Mis3 Grace Knowles has left for Pierre. 
S. 1)., where she has accepted a position 
as comf'oslt'^'r on one of the leadinjf nows- 
pap<rs at tliat place. 

K. Tirri of Gowan. while employed In 
the Sten.slai.d Baw mill, had the misfor- 
tune to get the fingers of his left hand 
cut off in tlie saw last week. 

Mr.s. F. B. Gladden and son. Arthur, de- 
parted b'atunlay for Minneapolis, whtre 
they will make their fttture home. Mrs. 
Gladden haa made many warm friends 
during her rt-sidence here, who will regiet 
her departure. Mr. Gladden will remain 
in Floodwood for some time. 



more than double what, It was last 
year, on exactly the same prop- 
erty while no increase has been madt? 
m tht» a«i.cssed valnation of other prop- 
erty in the neighborhood. 

NORWAY IS BLOODED. 

Michigan Town to Tay Large Snm to 
Hear Singer. 

Marquette, Mich., March 9.— (Special 
to The IJerald.)— Tliough It will cost 
$1 000, the SBiuvU city of Norway, 
Dickinson county, is to hear Madam 
Schutnann-Heink sing. Ascertaining 
that the famous contraJlo was to cross 
Upper Michigan en route to the West, 
the people of the Menominee iron 
range town got busy, and by sub- 
scribing the sum stated, they have 
been enabled to secure the singer .or 
one appearance. This will be March 
<)6 Norway has a population of 5,(Wi'. 
Her stop there will be the only one 
that Madam gchiimann-Hemk will 
make in the peninsula. She sir^gs at 
St. Paul the following night. 



caueefl his death. Mrs. Thraemer had 
l>een cleaning out a trunk and had set 
a bottle en tne floor. Before she noticed 
it the child had grabbed the bottle and 
the contents which proved to be carbolic 

acid. The child wa.- «t^'"^'''^l>;^, ''",';"f,^ 
about the mouth and chin. The Utile 
one will in all probability recover. 



MAS VACATION COMING. 

Sllllwatfr. Minn., March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Martin Murray of thi:i 
city who has been in the employ of the 
St. 'Paur*& i>uluth road and its succes- 
sors, the Northern Pacific, for tony 
years, as foreman and section boss, hivs 
tendered his resignation and wUl take a 
much needed rest and vacation. Mr. 
Murray has alway.s been faithful to the 
trusts imposed upon him and retires with 
a record that is higiily creditable. 



IN HOUGHTON THIS YEAR. 

Memorial Day Exercif^es Will Be 
Held There May 30. 

Houghton, Mich.. MarcTi 9.-(Special 
to The Herald.)— The observance of 
Memorial day. May 3(\ tliis year will 
be in Houghton, Hancock having been 
selected last year, when the Hancock 
Na\-a.l Reserve had charge of the pro- 
graan. This year rhe new- Hoi«?i,t«" 
canw of the United Spanish \N ar \ et- 
erans will have charge of the days 
plans and will decid« in favor . of 
Houghton. . ^ 

The veterans have decided to wear 
the otflcial uniform of the order. 



is being 
churches 



circulated in 
throufehoiit 



the 

the 



sued, and 
Episcopal 
country. 
Menominie-Forty-seven cans of brook arrangemeSts for it having been com- 

^^ pleicd ■• •" 



the Republicans of the new county. 

Devils I^aKe, N. D— The organization 
of a ccmpriny of the National Guard In 
this eify is now practically a.ssured, all 



FREE DELIVERY 
COMES IN JUNE 

Cloquet People Rejoice 

Over Welcome News 

Prom Washington. 

Cloquet, Minn., M«J-ch 9.-^Spe.clal to 
The Herald.)— The patience of a long suf- 
fering public in this city for free de- 
livery is at last to be rewarded and 
there is general rejoicing over the good 

When the Inspector was in the city a 
few months ago, he stated that there was 
but a slight chance for the service to be 

established hers. With this s.tatement ,. ^-, 

the last hope vanished, and the subject Bismarck, N .D.-Reports of tax col- 
was dropptd for the time being. ; lections by the counties in the state 

Congressman J. Adam Bede and Post- g^f,^. ^herr. to be the heaviei^t made in 
master Hedfleld have, it appears, been p^^,ruary in recent years. The state au- 
sawlng wood and saying nothing. Mr. ! ^it^r is receiving reports from the county 
Red'ield at ^thls end of the saw and , ^grasurers and will draw this Uiomh lor 
Congressman Bede at the o-ther in Wash- .^e state's share of the payments - - ^ 



trout from the United St.^tes hatcherv 
Mancliester, Iowa, will arrive in Menoni- 
Inie next monith to be planted in the 
streams of Dunn county. Eighteen cans 
of pike and rainbow trout from the state 
hatchery will al.«o be sent here. 

La Crosse— Engineer H, A. Marvin and 
Fireman Samuel Semingsen of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy railway, who 
were injnured in a collliiion between 
freight engines at Victory Thursday night 
will both recover, 

Vlroqua— -By a coincidence Mrs. Law- 
rence Brennan of this city and her uiicic, 
Sam Enos of Stillwater. Minn., decideil at 
the same tiniC to surprise each other by 
a visit. They started at the same time 
and each arrived at the home of the other 
wUliout finding the person sought. 

Milwaukee— Mrs.*- J. Jeaneite. a patient 
at the Milwaukee hospital, is thought to 
have a most unusual deformity in the 
form of lungs with three lobes instead 
of the usual two. An operation is to be 
performed to relieve the woman of pain 
which she suiters by reason of the trouble 
in her chest and it may develou that her 
lungs are deicrmed. 



James D. Stenson will eb ihe 
captaiu of the company. 

L'eadwood. S. D.— When the South Da- 
kota Bankers' association metts her* 
next summer, they will find that one of 
the prinelpal features of the entertain- 
ment oroviued is an underground trip 
through the workings of the Hcmestak« 
mine, calietl the world'c gieatest gold 
mine. 




PENINSULA BRIEFS 



DAKOTAS IN BRIEF 



inKlon. Now comes the sudden and wel- 
come notification from tlie government 
authorities at Washington that the free 
delivery of mail service would be es- 
tablished here In June. n\^^-, J.':""^^,^^^: 
lar carriers and one substitute will bt 
emploved, and twelve letter boxes will be 
placed" in various pan s of the c uy. 

KILLS SELF ON TRAIN. 
Mad'.son. Wis.. Mareh 9.-Dan Hogat} 
of Pittsburg Saturday 
killed himself on 



^vhiph o-msists of blue blouse and gray near Janesvllie, Wis. A note ^n his p-c 
Irouaers. A nSmber of the members ^howtd he had contemplated suicide fo 



have already ordered them, and 
others are getting into Une. 



RED RIVERAS NAVIGABILITY 

Between Breckenridge and Grand 
Forks to Be Discussed. 



night shot and 

Northwestern train 

n his p-ck'-t 

' r a 



year. 



^^^ ^ ^ _ _ _ which 

will amou°nt to several hundred thousand 
dollars. , , 

Fargo N. D.— John F. Simon, a farmer 
residing at Obcron. Benson county, has 
filed a petition cf Involuntary bank- 
ruptcy in the federal court. He places 
his liabilities at $1,147.18 and his assets 
at $7,492. Most of his assets were 
clainied as exemrt. 

Mott N. D.— The new county of Het- 
tinger was the first to hold a conven- 
tion to elect delegates to attend the 
su-ite Republican convention to be held 
at Minot, May 15 According to the 
officlf:] opportlonment, five delepates and 
five alternates were elected to represent 



Houghton — A prominent lumberman 
states that there is an actual scarcity of 
men in the woods this spring, that the 
camps have Just about enougrh to kien 
up their operations and find it liard 
to secure men to Increase their forc<s. 

Hancock— Martin V. Hubbeli passed 
awav at tiie home of his son, Frank Hub- 
bell,' 2^4 Lake street, about 2 o'clock Fri- 
day afternoon. Mr. Hubbeli was 62 year* 
old and hatl been suffering from stomach 
trouble xlhe past three years. 

Lake Linden— Fred C Campbell, former- 
ly agent for the Mineral R-ange at Hub- 
bell, but recently chief clerk at the Lake 
Linden S'tation, has been appointed chief 
train disp.^tcher for the Keweenaw Cen- 
tral railroad. 

Calumet— Chop Yick. a Chicago Chine«e 
knight of the grip v/ho has been visiting 
among his countrymen In Calumet and 
other town* of the Copper country on 
business and pleasure the past few days, 
has left for him home. 

Hanc<!<k— Charles K. Ulrlch has gone on 
a business trip to Hesseintr. Iron River 
and Duluth, to be gone until the miduio 
of the week. 

Houghton— Walno A. Kuljo, the 3-year- 
old son of Mr. and Mrs. William Kuljo 
of the Arcadian, died Friday of scarlet 
fever. The funeral was held Monday af- 
ternoon, with interment in Lakeside ceme- 
tery. 

Hancock— A series of revival meet ngs 
will be Inaugurated this evening at the 
Hancock CV.ngregational church, m which 
the pastor. Rev. J. S. Gould, will br- as- 
sisted by Rev. William Steensma of 
Chassell. 



m 



M'GOVERN CANDIDATE. 

Milwaukee District Attorney Would 
Succeed Stephenson. 

Mllwuakee. Wis.. March 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— (District Attorney 
Francis E. McGovern is a candidate 
fcr Inited States senator, to succeed 
Senator Isaac Stephenson. He has 
issued the following formal announce- 
ment: 

"After careful consideration, and at 
the request of many frineds through- 
out the state, I have decided to become 
a candidate for the office of United 
States senator, to succeed Hon. Isaac 
Stephenson. I desire now formally to 
announce this candidacy, and to say 
that in the approaching- ^contest for 
the Republican nomination for this 
office, at the Sfiitember primary. 1 
shall be pleased to receive the support 
of all who favor my election. At a 
later time I shall make a statennent of 
the political principles and public mea- 
nurea upon which I shall invite sup- 
port." 

HOLY JUMPERS REFUSE 
TO LIQl IDATE THEIR TAXES. 

Wauliesha, Wis., March 9.— Claiming 
that they have been treated unfairly, 
the "Holy Jumpers" have refused to 
pay their taxes on the Fountain house 
property, and the return will be made 
by the city treasurer to the county 
treasurer as unpaid. They claim that 
the assessed valuation thla year is 



Crookston-Htrman Gass Jried to com- 
mit cuicide by slashing his throat w t h a \ 
Wkknife He is a well-known resident 
IS the city and his attemut to end his 
Fargo. N. D.. March 9.-(Special to The ' [1^,^"^..^^ I gerat surprise to h.s many 
Herald.)-A public hearing^ will _be^Jield friends jn the cuy^^^^^ ^^^ ^,,, | 

newspapers, one is called the Mahnomen 
Chiel^ edited by Eklitcr Kuhhn of the 
Ogemaw Arrow.- and the other is calked 
the Mahnomen Tribune edited by G. to. 
Krendford of North Dakota. „,.„. 

i DHroit-George W. Welles and_Wilham 




between Breckenridge, Minn., £"d^ Grand 
Fork'', N. D. This portlor^ of the river 
has been hitherto considered navigable 



MINNESOTA IN BRIEF J vp^^j^^ ^^^ Cascaret just as 

soon as you know that you need it 

Then you won't need a purgative. It is an easy 
and pleasant way to keep well. 



and has'been'TncTuded in the project for I Hlggine of Duluth were in town Tuesday. 

rt.iu .1.X3 Application ><a« ^>een made i m.^" i»-^ii« 

epartment to 
declared a nonnavlgabie 



lmproven>ent. Application hfs been made ^r.^ Wei 
to the war department to have the rlxer Kelley-H 
declared a nonnavlgable stream. Tiie „„„„ „„, 
question to be decided is whether it u 
desirable to abandon the project of Im- 
provement and allow the stream to be 
closed to navigation bV Ja'"^/,, ^^f^ 
bridges or other structures. All per- 
sons having imerest in the ma«er are 
requested to submit statements In writ- 
ing in order that the case may he prop- 
erly presented to the war department. 

LIBERAL FARGO MAN 

Sends Donation to Mrs. Anna Brad- 
ley of Salt Lake. 

Fargo. N. D., March 9.-( Special to The 
Herald.l-Touched by a Story of Jhe des- 
titute condition of W" "^""w..^^? f^I 
ley of Salt Lake City, acquitted of the 
charge of murdering -'Arthur Brown, 
former United States sector from Utah, 
a J^argo man sent Jier y- „ d,„^i.»„ 

The story related^ hof Mrs. Bradley 

had been deserted Iv h^J '^"■"^^LhI;'?^i 
because she had slain \}^ man who had 

"ThTdoSor- has h^M^ ^ ^^"^'^ °^ 
thanks from Mrs. K-adliy. 



CHILD DRINKS CARBOLIC 

ACID AND NEARLY DIES. 

St. Cloud. Minn.. March 9.-(8pecial to 
The Herald.)— The 2-y car-old son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Joseph 'Phraefner drank car- 
t)oUc add a few days ago, which nearly book. 



Welles is general manager of the 
ow-Thomson Hardware com- 
nanv and Mr. Higgins is a salesman for 
th^ kame concern, who will hereafter 
make DetrX his' headQuarters. taking 
the place of W. E. Gruse, who goes to 

^Bratnerd-Mrs. William McMuUen of 
DSu"th."who has been xisiting ^t the 
home of Mr. and rMs. F. "• ^ ''*""• 
left on the afternoon train for the bouta 

^Moorhead-The third number In the lec- 
ture course given at Concordia college 
tm- j4ar was a lecture Saturday by Dr. 
Granrudy professor of Latin at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. The subject of 
this lecture was 'Aneclent ^^f^ 

Pine City— Station Agent J. A. i'eter- 
Bon who has been in the South spend- 
ing' a three months' vacation, has re- 
tufned home Mr. Peterson says he hkes 
the South quite well, but if he ever goes 
away another winter. It will not be to 
the South, but to California and to th© 

Pacific coast. „ _. !..,„ 

Minneapolis-Mayor J. C- . Paynes has 
vetoed the plumbers' examination ordin- 
ance passed at the last meeting of the 
city council. It was introduced for he 
pufpose of placing some check on the 
Slumbers of the city, smce the state 
law regulating the competeiicy of th.s 
craft wae repealed at the last session 
of the legislature. ^ 



WISCONSIN IN BRIEF 



Foiv du Lac-Bishop C. C. Grafton^ new 
TlM> CathoUo AUaa" hfl* he«n !•- 



This is the day of the gentle in medicine. 

The cathartic pill is old-fashioned. Salts and castor oil belong 
to grandmother's time. 

The modern doctor deals mildly. 

Cascarets are effective, yet gentle. They don't irritate or 
gripe. They don't, like cathartics, waste the digestive fluids. 

Cascarets do only what some foods will do, what some fruits will do. 
what exercise does for the bowels. 

Their action is natural, not artificial. 

If you live cut-doors, excercise a great deal, and avoid rich foods, yoa 

don't need them. 

Otherwise you do. . 

The most helpful laxative ever devised is Cascareti. 

Then, they are candy tablets, pleasant to take. 

Then, they are convenient. The ten-cent box fits the vest pocket or the 

lady's purse. 

That is a vital point. 

The time to take a laxative is the minute you suspect that yon need It. 
Don't wait till you get home; don't wait till night. 

One Cascaret, taken promptly, wards off trouble. 



Cascarets are candy tablets. They are sold by all druggists, but never 
In bulk. Be sure to get the genuine, with CCC on every tablet. The 
price is SO cents, 25 cents and 

10 Cents per Box. im. 



f 

i 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AN INDKPENBENT NEWSPAPER. 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY. 



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can bethink ourselves to look to the lock on our own 

stable door. 

That is what we are doing in Duluth now, and if the 
work is well done— as it no doubt will be— conditions 
within a short time will be very much safer than they 
have ever been before, and the possibility of horrors here 
similar to those that have occurred elsewhere will be 
eliminated. 



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TO SUBSCRIBERS: 
It Is important when desiring the address of your 
paper changed to Rive both old and new addresses^^ 



MR. HEARST'S NEW ROLE. 

About four years ago,' at something like the stage 
preliminary to the presidential nominations of that year 
that corresponds to this, certain gentlemen of this and 
other states had a candidate behind whom they placed 
themselves with all enthusiasm, and whom they pushed 
for the Democratic presidential nomination with might 
and main. They wouldn't even consider Mr. Bryan as 
opposed to him; he was too tame. They said that every- 
body who opposed their candidate was working for 'plu- 
tocratic and predatory" interests, and had no patriotism 

In them. 

The name of their candidate was Hearst— William 
Randolph Hearst, of New York and San Francisco; of 
the New York Journal and the San Francisco Examiner. 

Recently the leaders of Mr. Hearst's Independence 
league met in Indianapolis. This organization, started 
first in a state or two, has spread until it has some sem- 
blance of a national party. It is not without power in 
the politics of several states, notably in New York and 
Massachusetts. The gallant leader of the league was 
not present, but the members had the pleasure of listen- 
ing to a communication from him, dated some time be- 
fore. When its reading was begun, the leaders settled 
down in great comfort and glee, with their systems tuned 
to receive tiie thunderous reverberations (jf the only real 
radicalism. Judge of their astonishment and dismay 
when they heard this: 

In ordtT to deserve and achieve this much suc- 
cess. howev»r. I tlihik that while wo should be 
ra<liral in our doinunda for rlKiit. we -sh-nild be con- 
uervatlve in our njetliort.s and .HL»solutuly sound in our 
niea-surea. • ♦ • 

1 rtrinly I -liove that all reforms shoiiud b^ made 
wiUi as littl- disturbaiuo of existing conditiond as 

fosaiJ)lo. Biisine.ss conditions are in a certain way 
Ike thw conditions under which life exists on this 
filanet. If loose conditions are too suddenly dls- 
iirbed, life is destroyed, and If business conditions 
are loo suddenly disturbed, prosperity is destroyed. 
• • • 

I do not believe that it would be wise at this 
time to fuitlier disturb l)U3incss conditions, and I 
tliliik the plan to issue a flexible currency through 
the banks is a good one and as much as we can 
accomplish In the near future. • • • 

An Immediate and radical revision of the tariff 
would lertainly upsei bu»lne.<ss Interests and prob- 
ably do more harnj tlian good. • ♦ • 

I am a business man myself and look at these 
matters from a business point of view. I am not an 
sxtremlst. and apart from my own opinions I do not 
think tlie opinions of the people generally are In 
favor of violent or extreme measures. 

Here's a lion who roars with engaging softness. The 
men who backed Hearst four years ago now assert that 
anybody that opposes Mr. Bryan is working for preda- 
tory plutocracy, and have intimated that Governor John- 
■on, whose fortune it has been to receive much favorable 
mention as a possible nominee, is far too conservative 
to be considered. Yet compared with the present mel- 
low meekness of their hero of four years ago. Governor 
Johnson is the wildest of radicals. Mr. Hearst does not 
even believe it would he safe to attempt a revision of the 
tarifY. He preaches calm consideration and careful con- 
servatism. 

Tell us. Brothers Hudson. Manahan, Bennett and 
Larrabee, is Mr. Hearst now become an agent of pieda 
tory plutocracy? 



WE ARE FORGING AHEAD. 

Michigan has succeeded, after many years of effort. 
in having a constitutional convention to go over its con- 
stitution and to bring it up to date. Most of the exist- 
ing state constitutions were adopted along with state- 
hood, and have only been changed by a few minor 
amendments since that time. Naturally, many of them 
are out of date. Minnesota's certainly is. Minnesota 
has seen its legislature reject a bill for a constitutional 
convention several times, but some time one will be 
passed, and the present fundamental law, a thing of 
shreds and patches, will be replaced by a new garment. 
Michigan has got its new garment done, if the people 
approve it. It is not so radical a departure from the 
old ideas as Oklahoma's constitution is, but it couldn't 
very well help going ahead some, and it has, though 
naturally every step of the way forward was bitterly 
fought by property interests, which were successful in 
defeating several proposals that the people were ready 
for, though the property interests were not. 

For one thing, the people can initiate constitutional 
amendments under this new constitution. They can't do 
it in Minnesota; they have to wait for the legislature to 
suggest them. But in Michigan, on petition of a frac- 
tion of th^ state's voters, amendments may be submitted 
to the people for their approval. This is the 'Socialistic," 
Populistic" initiative, grafted into the fundamental law 
of a conservative state. The Michigan legislature will 
not be able, at the behest of selfish interests, to prevent 
the people from changing their constitution. 

Another step in advance is the provision that purely 
local laws— what are known as "special laws"— must be 
submitted to a vote of the people of the locality con- 
cerned. .Again, the legislature may, if it desires, submit 
general statutes to popular vote. That is a shorter step. 
It leaves the choice to the legislature, when it ought to 
be with the people. But it is a step ahead of the old 
condition, under which the people had nothing to say 
about it all. except through their choice of law- 
makers. That condition still prevails in Minnesota. 

These are steps toward real democracy. Interested 
people will try to fool you by saying it isn't real democ- 
racy, but it is. Anything is real democracy that places 
more power in the hands of those directly interested— 
the people. Present systems in state and nation were de- 
vised to preve«it the people from having too much direct 
power, and those who stood between the people and 
their objects have abused their power. 

.Another radical and democratic provision is that 
which concedes to municipalities the right to assume the 
ownership and operation of public utility enterprises. 
The selfish interests got in their work here by hedging 
this provision about with the safeguard that only prop- 
erty-owners and taxpayers may vote on such proposi- 
tions. That is undemocratic and wrong, but the consti- 
tution provides in itself a way to change this objection- 
able and reactionary feature. 

The Michigan constitution shows thai we are mov- 
ing ahead, even though special privilege debates every 
foot of the way. 



HOTELtQOSSIP. 

"Hypnotism." t>egan R. T. Gray at tho 
St. Louis yesterday, 'ji* a most wonderful 
and peculiar man^AjKation of the x>ower 
of suggestion. UAler' Its Influence the 
apparently sleeplngBan^ unconscious mind 
will obey the conAiAnds of the person 
conducting the experiment. Sometimes, 
however, mistakes will occur. 

"Once over in Arcadil, Iowa, ong of 
Chose hypnotic workers ambled Into town. 
He wore his thatch lopg, with the edges 
uneven and ragged.' Uke Samson of o.d. 
he used his dome pad in his business. If 
you had shorn oii hi» locks, like Sam- 
sons steady did, when Samson was 
pounding his ear. he would have lot.t 
much or his charm as an entertainer, 
which same was true of Samson. 

"Well. sir. this gentleman with the 
flowing tresses arranged to give an en- 
tertainment in the town hall. He didn't 
liave any advance agents or assistants; 
he just went out and told people what he 
was goliis to do, and aavised them to 
come and see him ptTiorm. Ho made 
some flyers out of Bill Tlniberley's red Ink 
—Bill being postmaster— and plastered 
them around the to^n. 

"There hadn't been much doing in Ar- 
cadia for a right long spell, and when 
the chap with the Elbert Hubbard thatch 
stopped on the stage, after siting up 
whtther he had counted the tickets cor- 
rectly, there was quite a representative 
gathering whispering among themselves 
as to the wonderful stunts that the pro- 
fessor was going to do. You see hyp- 
notism was a comparative stranger to Ar- 
cadia, and we were all naturally curious 
to see what the geatle stranger was going 

to do. , ,. ^ V, 

•First he began to explain what hyp- 
notism really was. He said tliat it was 
the power of tlie will subjected. He am- 
plitiM and told how only a chosen few 
had tiie power to go forth and do th^-se 
thines. It was a kind of gift, he in- 
fornvd us. He told us. though, that, 
being a family man. with a kind and 
gentle disposition withal, there was no 
danger to any of us in pemuttlng him to 
get a mental half-uelson on our Idea 
germlnators. * ,, j . 

•'With that oi>enlng speech he caliea for 
volunteers. Everyone was kind of shy 
and hated to b<^ the first one to try tiiis 
new and wonderful discovery. Hmuly h^s 
coaxed Hill Timberley on to the rostrum. 
He liad hung around Bill s place more or 
less .since hitting town, so th- professor 
allowed as how he was dn terms or ra- 
mlliarity with tho postmaster Anyway. 
Bill aml>led awkwardly up to the p.ai- 



M. Poppe. St. Paul; J. H. Long. Youngs- 
town; R. J. Mclint". Minn-apolis; J. E. 
Peitibone. Chicago; \V. K. Gaston. Pitts- 
burg; Harris -F. Holland, Indianapolis; 
Fred Schult*, Hoboken; G. P. Feeley. 
Ntw York; W. F. Way. St. Paul; B. F. 
Brodie, Hlbbing: C. R. Tilyhman, New 
York: J. W. Gardner, Chattanooga; P. 
H. Layland, Chicago; t?. L. Robbins, 
Chicago; S. R. Malone. New York; W. 
H. Pake. Chicago; Wdlilam Ward, New 
York: Frank C. Bestln. Minneapolis; W. 
B. Bdwards, Boston. 

• « • 

At tho McKay: Henry Levlne. Minne- 
apolis; S. J. Johnson. Omaha; W. E. 
Perry, Omaha; John B. Lee. Jr., Minne- 
apolis; Frank Braeco, Tower- ack Brac- 
co. Tower; F. C. Thomson. Tower; Dr. 
Sheridan, Mantelle; H. E. Tolman, St. 
Cloud; A. F. McDermott. Minneapolis; 
O. P. Hines. Sklbo; O. L. Balthon, St. 
Paul; Mrs. Mary Morey. Chlsholm; 
Charles E. Robbins. Fargo; S. Davidson. 
St. Paul; W. L. Farhara. Princeton; T. 
F. Smith. Minneapolis; William H. 
Meyer. St. Paul; Joseph Keyes, Interna- 
tional Falls: C. F. Griffin. Two Harbors; 
J. W. Skeiton. Barnum; A. J. Fult>a. 
Minneapolis; J. Osborne and wife. Ely; 
N. DTicholm. Chicago; B. F. Murphy, St. 
Paul; 9. E. Dunn. Appleton; G. A. 
Stewart. McKlnley; \\". F. Marion, Chls- 
holm; E. A. Rydeen, Moose Lake. 




TWE NTY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 1888. 



•••William I. emperor of Germany, 
died this morning. He is succeeded by 
the Crown Prince Friedrich Wilhelm. 
his eldest son. 

•••The Turner society of Duluth 
has bought lots on Elast Third street, 
and has let the contract to Hagen- 
camp & Kingman, builders, for $10,- 
000 to put up a new and complete 
hall. It will be about 50x140 feet In 
size. It will be one of the best Turner 
halls in the state. 




LOCKING THE STABLE DOOR. 

The siii^ilc ray oi light that pierces the blackness of 
horror surrounding last week's disaster in CoUinwood, 
Ohio, when eight score child lives were sacrificed to civic 
slothfiilncss. is that it has caused a great bestirring of 
municipal aiithi)ritie> all over the country to see that 
conditions inviting such disasters do not prevail else- 
where. 

Such action is being taken in Duluth. and it is well. 
Buildmg ordinances, designed to afl'ord the greatest pos- 
sible protection to human life in cases of fire, were made 
to be enforced, not to be neglected in the interests of a 
sh<Aheful economy. Places where people congregate 
mu.-.t be thoroughly investigated, to see that conditions 
do not e.\isl tliat are menacing to human life. 

One item that will not be overlooked is the deadly 
door that opens inward instead of outward. No such 
dor should stand between the people inside a building 
and the safety of tlie open air. Its possibilities are tre- 
mendous. At the alarm of fire the first impulse of a 
crowd is to break blindly for the exits. When doors 
open inward, tlie flood of humanity invariably slams 
those doors shut against the escaping mass of people, 
and «lams the exit immediately and completely. The 
result is cither that many are killed in the crush, or that 
all of them arc caught in a trap and perish by fire. 

If our buildings can not be all made proof against 
fire, rigid regulations providing oasy access to the open 
air by lire escapes and by large and numerous exits are 
abscdiitety necessary. Furthermore, it is necessary that 
these regulation.s be strictly enforced at all times. It 
may involve some trifling additional expense in the 
construction of buildings, bi t that should not be con 
sidered as at all important compared with the necessity 
of prr»viding for the safety of human life. 



THEY WILL ACTUALLY WORK. 

There are certain committees in congress that have 
been dead letters for years. There are committeei on 
the expenditures in the various departments, for instance, 
that never hold meetings. They were used. largely, to 
give committee rooms to their chairmen, who were 
■'good fellows," who were "playing the game right" 
from the organization viewpoint, but who had not yet 
advanced to the point where they could have important 
chairmanships. The advantage of having the chairman- 
ship of such a committee was that it provided an office 
room. Until the new office building was erected, con- 
gressmen had to furnish their own offices, unless they 
had com.mittee chairmanships. So these committees 
were continued. 

But now there are offices for everybody, and commit- 
tee rooms arc not in demand. So the situation is differ- 
ent. But the committees are not going to be dropped. 
Recently somebody happened to think that it would be a 
better idea to make them work, instead. So the house 
has decided to give some of them authority to go ahead 
and perform the duties for which they were originally 
formed. No authority was needed; it was their duty to 
w.>rk; but they didn't work. Now they are going to. 
.\nd it is time. 

In 1816 the house appointed a committee on expendi- 
tures in the war department. Now there is a similar 
committee for each of the nine departments. They 
liaven't been working. They have approved the findings 
of the various auditors, and let it go- at that. But now 
they are going to work; actually going to work. They 
are going to look into these various expenditures. 

Funny nobody thought of doing that before. Surely 
it will be worth the while of congress to make an inves- 
tiagtion into these various departments and find how the 
money is spent. Somebody ought to do it. It doesn't 
look just right to have congress content itself with pro- 
viding the money, without caring what becomes of it. 
These committees were intended to provide congress 
witli a means of finding out exactly what is done with 
the money. After many years of idleness, they are going 
to look into it. 

There can be no objection to this obviously necessary 
industry. There may be no waste whatever in any of 
the department.s, but it would be rather queer if the com- 
mittees couldn't locate some somewhere. The depart- 
ments tend to petrify into set methods of doing business, 
and this involves extravagance and waste. It is the 
btjsiness of congress to see that there is no extravagance 
and waste. It has been its business ever since there was 
a congress, but apparently it did not think of attending 
to it until 1908. 

Well, better late than never. All will be forgiven if 

these committees make up for their long inaction by a 

-spurt of real industry. There is no end to the good they 

can do if they want to, and surely their consciences, 



• The professor did succeed in putting 
Bill to sleep. Some wre unkind enough 
to say that Bill just naturally fell off to 
sleep, without any help from the paving 
hands of the professor. Bill wa.s addicted 
to sleep, being the znost Inveterate snooz- 
tr in Arcadia. When the pr<Jf«^ss*>r want- 
.>d Bill to come out of the trance he had to 
.shake hlni and pttll hitu neariy off tho 
platform. Then some one in the back 
Dart of the room let <>ut a snort of laugb- 
ler That kind of filed the proteasor. 

•He told us that Hill was not wha. 
was called a -sympathetic subject. He 
didn't have any nervous or arllsUc tem- 
perament to work upon. Hi=» receiving 
batteries were choke.J with Indolence, 
while his spiritual machinery had hecoino 
rusted from being left out in tiie rain of 
unrepentent sin. which waa very un- 
grateful we thought, seeing as h>v. the 
orofesflor had used Bills ink and paper 
^o Piake notices oi his 3ntertainnient. 

••The next subject -[^us I>em Hume, a 
big rawboned. r-id-he^ded. hulk of a 
farmer boy. U Leni had one douilnaat 
.'haraoterisflc. next to his de.sire to 
avoid hard labor. It was his voracious ao- 
nelite. If he were Imprisoned Ir. tmut 
walla of victuals, he would eat hlmseit 
out and then asked to be locked UD again. 
His uiyp'^titB wasn't an amen kind. 

•'Somehow ih" profejisor got L.em. an 
.smiling and blusrflng up to ihe roou -if 
his brtck hair, up to the platform Than 
he proceeded to place him In the hypno- 
tic trance. Then the professor aaked us 
to tell him what he should maice I>-»n» do 
Some one shouted from the back <:>f t^;; 
hall that h^ would make L.em eat Then 
the shaggy top commanded Lioni to eai. 
• He thought*^ a o^^uple of apples was 
enough to demonstrate his P^^:'*V ,^'h: 
bans it u-as: but he had miiicalculated : he 
didn't -hink of how he was going to make 
Lem quit eating. That's where genious 
always goes astray. Those geniuses are 

»h')rlsighted. . . ,.^.^ »„., 

•Well L«m just devoured those two 
greenings like they was angeV.s fo.)d 
Then he began reach ng for "J,^*-, J«^ 
se^ this habit of eatmg »^ery thing In 
slirht was powerful and It stnoK to hini. 
e*n under the power of the hypnotic 
sh-ep. He yelled for food. 

••aome one was sent U> the grocery 
store for some cold victuals. L-jn was 
yelling Uke a Comanche when he return- 
ed with some cold ham and rye^ bread^ 



THE WEATHEK. 

March is proving 
Itself to be the only 
real winter month 
in this latitude. It 
hasn't been cold— 
though last night 
the thermometer 

got down to 1 deg. 
above zero — but 
tliere has l)een 
plenty of snow, and 
more to come. It 
snowed a little last 
night. and then 
partially cleared off this morning, but 
the weather man says it Is likely to 
snow more tonight and tomorrow. It 
will be warmer tonight, with the lowest 
temperature about 10 degs. above zero. 
Yesterday's lUghest was 11 degs. and It 
wa^i mostly clear and pleasant. 

A year ago today it was thawing and 
clear. 

The sun rose this morning at 6:33 and 
sets tonight at 6:iJ5. makmg 11 liours and 
32 minutes ot sunlight, more than three 
hours longer ihaa ibe shortest day of 
tlie year. 

Says Mr. Richardson of conditions: 
••L.OW pre.ssure areas over Alberta and 
off the Atlantic coiust cau.sed snow or 
rain duiing Sunday or last night 
Lhruughoui the iNorlhwest. the Liake re- 
gion. Southern and Northeastern states, 
and warmer weatlier this morning 
ihrouijJiout Uie Northwest, but rero lem- 
i>eratures continued last night In North- 
ern Minnesota. Marfltoba and Saskatche- 
wan. The naiometer Is highest over 
Kansas and Wyoniiing. The easterly 
movement and turther development 01 
the Alberta disturbance lavors snow 
Hurries in this locality tonight and 
Tuesday." 

Following were last night's lowest tem- 
peratures: 

Abilene »), Medicine Hat 24 

Ashe\nlle 4s!Meniplil8 *'> 

AtUnta 5^:Mlles City lb 

Haitleford -S Milwaukee lt» 

Bismarck 10 jilinnedosa -lo 

Boston .^6 , \J L.iKg.>mery w 

Buffalo 20 Moorhcad 2 

Cairo 34!.^.vv oiieana 



•••Spirit Lake's sum'mer hotel is 
now under construction, and this fa- 
vorite resort will doubtless be gener- 
ously patronized during the coming 
season. Capt. Inman's new boat will 
make dally trips to the beautiful spot. 

•••Thomas P. Kane of Blunt. Dak., 
who is to establish a drygoods store at 
the West end, arrived in the city yes- 
terday. 



•♦•Miss Anne Muggins died yestei^ 
day at her home at tIN West end, 
after an illness of several months. 
She was 19 years of age. 



•••At the first election of the new^- 
ly Incorporated town of Canosia. held 
a few days ago. the following officers 
were elected: John McCormack, 
chairman of board of supervisors; J. 
T. John.>^on. Richard Hood, supervis- 
ors; William McCrlnnan. town, clerk; 
Messrs. Thatcher and I3rendos. jus- 
tices of the peace; John Thatcher, 
treasurer; Thomaa Hanley. assessor. 



•••Nine magnificent triple-plated 
horns, cornets and other instruments 
were ordered yesterday for the new 



DULUTH AND THE HERALD 



band of Duluth, to bo led by Edward 
Walker, formerly leader of the cele- 
brated Germania band of Towanda, 
Pa. The band will have twenty pieces 
in all. Edmund Sherwood. Frank 
Ourle. Jr., T. U. Pressnell, J. B. Sut- 
phin and G. G. Hartley have guaran- 
teed all expenses of the band for six 
months. 

•••The sale' of the Windsor hotel 
property was closed last night. The 
price paid was $1,036 per front foot, 
a total of $77,700. It was t>ought by 
Eastern capitalists. Less than two 
vears ago the same property was sold 
to O. W. Saunders for $15,000. 

••♦The Ely residence, corner of Sec- 
ond street and second avenue east, haa 
been bought by Capt. Joseph Sellwood 
for $25,000. 

•••The following real estate trans- 
fers have been recorded: 

R. J. Blackmer to Charles Schulze, 
lot 96. St. Louis avenue. Lower Du- 
luth. $400. 

H. U. McHarg to Henry Schneider, 
lot 325. block 73, Second division, 
$3,100 

Jacob Sundburg to Louis Beauri- 
vage, part of lot 309, block 10 S. Sec- 
ond division. $2,200. 

A. E. Gallagher to Flora Maxon, 
lot 191. block 67, Second division, 
$1,200. 

Fanny G. Stack to Mary B. Downs. 
part of lots 33 and 35, East Fifth 
street. First division. $2,500. 

O. L. Young to W. R. M. Field, lot 
61. block 93. Third division. $600. 

Western Land association to August 
Norstran. lot 329. block 125, Second 
division, $475. 



li New York 

.62 llVorfolk 

:l> Northfield 

.30 .sorth Platte .... 

.13 Oklahoma 

.18|Omalia 

.UlPhoenix 

.IJli'ierre 

. 1 1 Pittsburg 

.ItjIFort Ariiiur ... 

. ij Portland. Or. .. 

.ISlRapid City 

.86 Regina 

—2 .Si. lx)uia 

vj*i..v«.^- (J3!St. Paul 

UranTHaveli [...ISi-'iAn Antonio ... 
i>reen Bay 10 San Francisco 

.21 janla Pe 

.26 >iult Sie. Msu-ie 

. 8 Shreveport 

. 2 Spokane 

.60 Svvit i.-urrent .. 

.23 I vVa«nington ... 

.22i^Vichita 

.t: .Villislon 

.K) Winnemucca .. 

.38 .Vinnipeg 

A\ i'ellowstoue ... 

•Vepar'tment'of Agriculture Weather 
Bureau. Duluth. March 9.-Local fore; 
-cast for twenty-four hours ending at t 
p ra. Tuesday: Duluth. Superior and 
vicinity, including the Mesaba and \ er- 



Calgury 

Charleston 
Chicago . . . . 
Cincinnati . 
Concordia . 
Davenport . 

Denver 

l>etroit .... 
Devils L«ake 

lX»dge 

Duluuli 

l£dnionton . 
Kl Paso ..•• 
l!:scanat»a .. 
Galveston 



Havre 

Helena 

Houghton ,. 

Huron 

jack3<Miville 
ICamlooiJS .. 
Kansas City 
Kiwxville .. 
lix Crosse .. 
IJttle R>JCk 
U>3 Angeles 



..61 
..30 
..41 
..il 
..LS 

..io 

..42 
..10 
..30 
— 12 
.M 
..Hi 
.-6 
..2S 
.. U 
. 46 
..l-i 
..16 
.. b 
..46 
..28 



nominees for the presidency, 
alune was worth JSXOOO. 



And that 



..40 
..•20 
..22 
..18 
—IS 
..10 



aU they' had btMught and then n.ilion i'ron ranges-Partly_ cloudy tonight 



He ate aU ttiey na.i "^'^f"^ commuree i an.rTuesdayr wUh 'probably su'ow flur- 



wim hastily organized to keep 

TJ^ aulot Tha professor couldn't wakt 

hfn? up and be fSught for something to 

*^Ve men folks Just kept running from 
the town hall to the grocery store an-l 
Henry Orlbb's restaurant fetchlnR \io- 



Fresh southwest v^Jn^^i^HARDSOK. 

i^ocal Forecaster. 



Chicago, March 9.-Forecasts until 7 p. 
Tuesday: Upper Michigan-Partly 



^^"^^^^'-A^T-^i^^ S;^rSi. .^5:i^,sr^H ^ 



Then Doc Hlncktey 

hun<%n limit was reached, and ....-v -. 
Km dldn-t cime otlt of ^le trancepretty 
30i>n he would get a pass oat check for 
the golden stair prome^nade vi.,ir«^ 

••Wo shook and pounded and ki9.ked 
L«m It was all to no use. He lust ki-nt 
vfinn^ and It the same time devouring 
tfc tuals i? he died, we wore afraid we 
would be indicted for man slaughter. H.- 
wiLM eatln« the town Iry. 
""^^ome me suggested that we »fnd f;'r 
T em's mother He was deathly afraid of 
his mo^^-r%'^ *-^^^*^^ maybe she could 
Hclre htm out of the trance. Some one 
started a^^ro^M th- town out to the Hume 
farm He dr^ve Uke mad. for time was 
Sous We waited with bated breath 
^ii^ier >7inlng Some one suqrge.st-d that 
in rha inl^lni we lyn>-h •h- professor. He 

was waving his hunds "^« » "l^lt keoi 
but he couldn't move Lem, who Just Kept 

^*-Th*n'hls*m.nher burst into the roon. 
.She Just walked up to Lem and spoke to 
him Th-n she gav^ him a cuff on the 
side of the ear and spoke again. Lorn 
' opp:^ >'elUng. moved Ws lyroax ud and 
down and opened his eyes. The fear or 
woman had moved ,.^^int« 

•The meeting broke up. All the receipts 
were taken to pay he grub JJ» ^JJ^^ 
^^ix had oonsume<l. The protessor 
^ -lid to «"t away without being 
^rg:.d with murder and ^-^j}}^"^^^ "^^ 
had seen enough of ^hypnoUsm. 

*^" S. L. agun. Port 

. at. Paul; O. L. 

<i. Rothfero. Two 

Chicago; J. K. 

W. <'. McCray. 



ably snow furries. Warmer in south por- 

'^"visconsln-Falr tonigni and probably 
Tuesday. Rising temperature. 

Minnesota- Partly cloudy tonight and 
Tuesday, with snow flurries in northeast 
portion. Warmer tonight. 

North Dakota-Partly cloudy tonight 
and Tuesday. Warmer in east portion 
tonight. 

1904 -ECHOES OF HAHMONY-1908 

Appleton Pressi Th^ Buffalo Journal 



Mankato Free Press: The Duluth Even- 
ing Herald is receiving much deserved 
praise. The Herald is taking front rank 
as a newsi)aper. 

Pine City Pioneer: The free advertising 
The Duluth Herald and the Duluth News 
Tribune are receiving from the couniry 
press. In the form of complimentary 
notices, are bringing those publications to 
the front. Both papers are up to dale in 
tvery respect, and tar superior to the ma- 
jority of the Twin City dailies. If you 
want the news of the world in general 
and of the north part of tho state In 
particular, you will ttnd your wants moro 
than supplied by either The Herald or 
the News Tribune. 

Hendrum Review: To those who want 
a daily newspaper we would recommend 
The Duluth Herald as being the best In 
the state. 

Wahkon Enterprise: Duluth Is receiv- 
ing a lot of free advertising lately, due 
to the fact that the dailies of that city 
are the only dailies in the state lliai have 
continued to extend fraternal courtesies to 
the country press. Duluth Is a great city, 
and It is going to continue to be great. 
It has two great newspapers lo herald 
Its greatness. But we cannot help think- 
ing that The Kvoning Herald was the 
first of its dailies to publicly declare its 
allegiance to the country pi-ess. 

Hibbing Mesaba Ore: The Duluth Even- 
ing Herald is out with its bi-ennial call 
of the wild for strong men for the com- 
ing session of the legislature. The Her- 
ald does not care of what political faith 
they be. so long as the northern part of 
Minnesota sends some of its rcpresenla- 
llve men to the state capltol. The legis- 
lative districts of St. Louis county have 
never had the representations thr-y are 
entitled to. The move for better timber 
was made two years ago. and brouglit 
some relief, but not enough. Th.- iron 
ranges, particularly, need something bet- 
ter and when the ranges reach the point 
where they can forego politics for the 
sake of something good, it will then be 
possible to pick out some strong men 
that honor the Iron ranges and send 
them to the state legislature, where they 
wlil be able to do something for the 
benefit of the dl.strlcts they represent 
Truly, we need strong men. and the need 
la increasing. 

ADDleton Press: Nearly all the Twin 
City dailies have suliscrlbed for tlie Press 
or signified their willingness to do so if 
we will subscribe for their publications. 
We wiU swap even, but we won t &'ve a 
cent of boot. In fact, we dont need them, 
so long as two such excellent newspapers 
as the Duluth dailies come to our table. 

Austin Transcrim? Dr. Campbell Coyle 
of Duluth siiys that 9t) per cent of the 
skepticism of today Is due to ignorance of 
the Bible. We believe It. How <^an >o" 
know of things of which you are totally 
ignorant? 



MIRTHFUL MOMENTS. 



Baltimore American; Son (looking up> — 
I want to use a word in this letter which 
is synonymous— 

Molhor (breaking in)— Don't do It. my 
boy. Have the letter real dignified and 
perfectly proper. 

Browning's Magazine: "Her descendants 
boast that she came over In the May- 
llower." 

••Pooh; A little old tub of a sailing ves- 
sel that had a liard time to do the trip in 
two monihsl Think of the posterity th.ic 
is going to boast that their ancestors 
came over in the Lusitania. and in four 
days!" 



Illustrated Bits: Sporting Customer— A 
pound of cheese, please. 

Grocer— Oorgonzola or Cheddar? 

isporiing Customer— Oh. I dont care! 
Start "em both across the counter and I'll 
take the winner. 



Somerville Journal: "Pa, what is » 
philosopher?" 

•A philo.sopher. Tommy, is a man who 
doesn't worry any about financial strin- 
gencies, because he never has any 
money." 

Modern Socie-ty: Critic— Now that your 
play is to be actually produced, you cau 
surely give me .some iaca as to the plot 
and general action. 

Plavwright— It's still too Indefinite! You 
see. the callboy and tlio man at the stage 
door haven't told me yet what they want 
done to It!" 



lx)U!sville Courier- Journal: "John, do 
you love me?" 

••Ves." 
•How much do you love mer* 

•■.Say $60 worth. iMaria. Money is tight 
Jusi now." 

Nashville American: "Is sh« popular?" 

••Oh. very." 

"What's the secret?" 

"Cant afford to outdreas anybody." 




Montevideo I^<^ader: We understand the 
wholesale houses of Duluth will ha%e the 
^d^ anltge of the Twin C ty hou.^es on the 



Tower: . ..,, 

awanson. Port Wing. 
VVmg P. A. Cosgrove 



Bogg. Geneva. N 

Minneapolis j^G. ^ ^^^. 

W H. t'araer. i~^ — ^ Fond du Lac; 



Bogg. <''^,^«^'^^ '^ XmAd. M;nneap)lis; 
Minneapolis, G. "• ^l."'^' . p^ed Mer- 



rill, Tower R-Aherne Krelw.tr, 

U Kropp. »* "'y.^^'^'^it: A. Hlndun. San 
and wife. Aitkau_» ^^^^, ^^ ^ 



It is our habit to let such matters go unheeded until^^^*^'' ^^*'* Jecades o£ slumber, ought to make^them 
they arc brouglit forcibly to our attention by some such ^^'*"' ^"^ 



Francisco "v "\y j usland. Oahkosh; 

« "T" Kennedy and wife. New York; 
B. J ivenneuy -_ .^ ^^^^ York; Har- 

"" her- 
OUa 

ii'^^J'^Swartz 'Eric, Pa.. WilUam U. 
Wisdom. Mountain Iron. 






8t. 



Louis: 



Pk%'T V: o^r<«^-i^±; <;■ •>■ 



A. H Rose, 

F 
H. Street. 



St. 



*^**'=^1^^ch'*T'^rBroad."vi?^l-i!fa-; '<^a"- 
f«^^I? Kr'aiiey; Eau Claire; H. New- 
lam "• "^Xtrl Farto: J. W. Lane. Iron 
nan and wire, rargu. - i^^..^- 



Breinerd 
J. A. Sol- 
p. Kusch, Crookston; 



terrible catastrophe as that of CoUinwood. Then, for a 
time, we become exceedingly vigilant, and remain vigil- 
ant until tlie memory of the horror grows dim, when we 
relapse into carelessness again. 

It would be very much better, of course, if we were 
alv.-ays vigilant. If we were, we shouldn't have to pay 
sucii an awful price for our reminders as the people 01 
CoUinwood have paid, as the people of Chicago paid 
whei' the Iroquois theater burned, and as the people of 
New York paid when the steamer Slocum was destroyed 
by fire, and with it more than a thousand people. 

Since we can't lock our stable doors before the horse 
is stolen, at least, when our neighbor loses his horse, we 



Talk about the "dignity of labor" is all well enough, 
except when it covers an endeavor to compel labor to 
take its pay out in dignity. 



Senator Kn->x weig^Us 119 pounds. He is hiistaken 
if he thinks this is a lightweight contest. Taft weighs 
more than twice that much. 



Mr. Shaw of Iowa says he has authorized no one to 
use his name in connection with the presidency. He 
need not fear; there is little danger that anybody will, 
except in joke. 



Srver^'F. W.^'o'ls'on and wife. 

" W.' Sargent. Ml^neS-Pl^j^^J 

ines, at Paul; A 

T. C 

St 

a. Bau 

glnla 

t nioago; J. *■• """"r',.. 
ii^nra^ Flfferson, cr<>oK8ton. 11. 

MarStr-Tte; H. D. . Eddy, Chicago: J 



son 
.'11 




uttless we let Bob Dunn do the carving 
act there would be as big a rumpus over 
fhe division as there can possibly be 
over a contest for the whole. ^Dunn, no 
doubt, would be willing, ^l^f^^,'' ^^*^"^| 
bad skinned the timber off. to let Young 
have that little mistake that Juts up in- 
^, Canada long side of the ^ke of the 
Woods. Such a division would be In ac- 
cx,rdance with his Idea of a compromise 
and a feasll^le pl an of h armony. 

PaynesvlUe Press: R. C. Dunn's hate 
for Jacob K. Jacobson Is exceeded only 
>)V his abhorrence ol L. T. Young, inat 
is w4iy he is traveling up and down tlie 
state breathing harmony for Jacobson 
ard plotting ven geance against Young. 

Grand Rapids Independent: The Hlb- 
biuK Tribune states that many of R. c. 
Dunn's friends turn up their nose at 
Jacobson. Likewise many of Jacobson s 
friends resent his bomg groomed and 
run by Dunn. 

Walker Pilot: A tew of the Republi- 
icans -'fixers" who knifed the ticket last 
vear because they couldn't have their 
way are having an awful time trying to 
convince the people that they are per- 
fectly caj^ble of handling their temper 
this vear. We Imagine that should Jacob- 
Lin for some reason or other laU to land 
fhe nomination, the same old whetstones 
would be put to work this year the 
same as two yea rs ago. 

l>e Sueur News: Jacobson says that 
he will not tolerate the entry of an- 
other candidate, than Young. Into th» 
gubernatorial race. Who. is thl.s man 
who thus dictates to the voters of Min- 
nesota" If we are not In error he 
13 the gentleman who rode over the 
Slate a year ago denouncing men 
cause they would not stand by 
Shevhn's candidate. Cole, and all the 
time Mr. Jacobso n trave led on a pass. 

Flv Miner: Harmony meetings are be- 
comW popular features In Minnesota, 
^d Sometimes there are as many as 
two and three pe ople pr esent. 

Austin Transcript: -The theory' of har- 
™^nv which most of the politicians hold 
I![!''"L -11 the others to lay down and 
candidates and aspira- 



uVey will have the same rates as St. Paul 
and M Ineapolis on Western shipments, 
and being more convenient to tho Kastern 
markets with lak» navigation in their 
mvor! they can get their stocks laad down 
for less money and can undersell the 
Twins on all such goods. 

l»oint<Hl rai-aiH'aplis. . , ,^ 

Chicago News: A soft aiiswer catcheth 

^s1^.5ie^n[en"would rather be followers 

than leaders. . i, i,„ 

The netx day a man wonders why tie 

'"I'Vmow^- maid is a skinny girl with 

""M^S^'^'^w^ol^aT^vincos step by step 
until she becomes a st-p-mother. 

M n V a man's reputation for wisdom is 
due to h*s ability to keep his mouth shut. 
"^Listening to the average "^^"'^ 'J-^"^^// 

Is almost as bad ^f l'«'^"}"^„,V^,^'fhat jf- 
A vounif man seldom discovers thai nc 

i/in^^ove*^ until the girl in the case puts 

''so man's life is one grand sweet song 
If he Is married to a woman who Only 

^'^"o!^%t1me«^\" «^".fVan is unpopular with 
her neighbors because she 

that they can 

es a man to _.. 
,s m his Prinie. but sav ^the^same^tbing 

to a woman 
ruffle. 



Kansas City Journal: "John. I met a 
woman today I hadn't seen for flv« 
years." 

"Did she know you?" 

••Yes; she recognized me by my hat. 

Then the silence became oppressiva. 

Woman's Home Companion; Mrs. Good- 
kind— So you are an engineer, and cant 
get a job in this town! Well, why don't 
you go to some other place? 

Tettereeden Torne— 1 can't, madam: you 
see I'm a stationary engineer. 

Chic;igo News: The Man— And you real- 
ly think you have an Ideal husband, 
aon't you? , „,. 

The Matron— I know I have. ^^ by. he 
treats me as If he were a candidate for 
office and I was a voter. 



Kcllectlons of a Bacliolor. 

New York Press: A wom.an will nev«W 
admit her feet are big unless they aren t 

Optimism is thinking youre enjoying 
life when you know you aren't. 

A man's conscience never bothers him 
till he's ill. and a woman's except wheu 
she's happy. ^ ,. ^„„ 

A boy sometimes gets over the con.ie- 
uuences of a fine education by Uvinjr to 
an extreme old age. 

li is more romantic to a girl to be en- 
gaged to three men than to be marrlea 
Lo one. 



never doej 
about 



be 
Tom 



anything that thoy <=an gossip 

Tt nleases a man to be told mai ne 
It pieases^^^ ^^^ ^^^, ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ 

and her feathers begin to 



J. v-reeman. Chicago: »V*'«v,rk^"ce^r 
a., wani.la lowa; A. J- ■K>pK*. ^-eoar 

nominee, n- »*• '^j, ua,ii- n Kiino 
T.'omas aullivan. St. Paul. C Jviine, 

at. PauL , • * ^ 

At the Spalding:: Margaret Daley. 
New York; Thomas E^^^^oK*'"-^^^'^ 
York; W. .Schwarts. Chicago. C A. 
Dibble. St. Paul; B. L. Marielte. Mlnne- 
apoUs; B. S. Benton, Minneapolis; H. 



give up 

tions. 



their 



New Ulm Review: What the ReP"'>- 
llcans of this state need is a fresh -sh uf - 
« with a new deck. Harmony with the 
Sfd'^andidater under consideration Is out 



Slusli. 

1 walked adown the noonday street. 

In something of a rioonday rush; 
And e'er there filtered 'round my feet- 
Slush! 

Tt soulrmed about me to and fro. 
It squ^hed far more than man could 
'wlsh * 
Where'er *I stepped I heard It go- 
Swlsh! 

But as I walked It deeper grew 
Until, at every step, begosh. 
I heard the rumble from my shoe- 
Slosh! 

And still It deepened fast as «}^' ., 
With many a damp and ooz> gusn, 
Ettsoon I WAS full knee-deep In 
Sqush. 

The slush-place widened to a X>on6, 
Yet still I strode-thts Is no ,Josh- 
And people screamed out, ware oe 
yond:" 

Swash! 

But I pushed on like one '^^'>'s Jl'fP***- 

(My temper being bold and rash)- 
rntll-ah well-my both feet slipped- 

—Richmond Tlmes-DIspatch. 



Tiio Sun I-Voiii a Balloon. 

H. H Clayton In the Atlantic: At th« 
helKht of two miles, the sun shines with 
a n. rce intensity unknown below whei-e 
the dust and denser air scatter the rays 
which, thus diffused, lose their intensity 
wiiile illumining every nook and corner 
of our houses. At heights exceeding five 
miles, this diffused light Is mostly goaa 
and the sun shines a glowing ball, sharp- 
ly outlined In a sky of which the blue is 
so dark as to approach blackness. .\t 
the outer limits of the atmosphere, the 
sun would appear a brilliant star of 
massive size among other stars; and it 
one stepi>ed from Its burning rays Into 
shadow he would enter Egyptian dark- 
ness. .\t the height of a mile and a hair, 
we found it necessary to shelter our 
faces to prevent sunburn, although the 
air around us was but little warmer than 
that of the previous night, being about 
45 degs. As the afternoon wore on and 
the balloon began to cool and sink, we 
were obliged to throw out much sand, 
casting it away a scoopful at a tlm«. 
and just after sunset. It was even neces- 
sary to empty two or three bags at once. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



of the question. 



Answer: They Shouldn't. 

St Paul Dispatch: Why any Western 
senator should vote tor a bin ,«^at will 
^neflt only the people In the vicinity of 
Wafl and Uroad streets, at the expense 
of the rest of the country 
cao And out. 



DO feUow 



LYCEUM 



Tl'ESDAY AND 



The BIjiek-Li««>ae Players la 

«THE CASE OF RE- 
BELU0U8 SUSAN" 

By HENRY ARTHUR JONES. 
Mattaees \%'e4laesday aad Satvrdar. 
Lsaai prices. 



Narcii !«, FRANK DANIBI.S, Mareh 
17-18. "THE MAN OF THE HOLR." 



WeU Worth the Money. 

Portland Oregonlan: The report that 
Br%4n made JB2.000 last year from h s 
lectures is seized upon by Harper's 
Weekly as the .-subject for a eartoon rep- 
resenting the peertess leader as a bloated 
nUitocrat And yet. with all his faults 
Br Jan was well worth $32,000 to the peo- 
ple* of th^ United States. If he^dld noth- 
Inl else he made such men as Fairbanks. 
Knox. Foraker and Cannon Impossible 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD! MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



1 






KILLED BY 
CONVICTS 

Assistant Warden's Throat 
Cut^nd Warden Serious- 
ly Wounded. 

Bloody Affair Occurs at 

the Montana 

Penitentiary. 



Deer Lodge. Mont.. March 9— Warden 
Frank Conley, of the Montana peniten- 
tiary, was dangerously wounded yester- 
day morning and his first assistant 
warden. Julm Roblntson, was killed, when 
three lit\--oenlenoe convicts, George VV. 
Rock. W. H. Hayes and another, whoso 
nania la not given, made a dash for 
liberty. Robinson's throat was cut 
from ear to ear and the jugular vein 
was severed. Conley's throat was gaslied 
an<l ho was slabbed several timos in the 
sliouldur and groin before he was able 
lo draw his revolver and shoot Convicts 
liayes and Rook. It la belitved that 
the wurdi'u will recover. 

The ai'.aok and the attempted escape, 
according to the prison authorities, had 
long been iiliuned by Rock and il;iyes, 
wlio w-re oeUinales Both w-jre armed 
With penknives, sharp as razors. 

Thu tliree convicts weri brought to the 
office of the penitentiary by Deputy 
"Warden Robinson, to be tried for some 
trivial infraction of the rules, and Con- 
Icy was waiting to sit m Judgment, 

The moment the men en.ered the of- 
fice, Rock turned swiftly upon Robinson, 
who was clu.slng the door behind him, 
and iiuickly drawing a knife, he began 
slashing at the deputy warden's throat. 
Miiik D.viUK to the Floor. 
His throat w is cut wide open and ho 
Bank to th»i floor, dying. At the same 
moment. Hayes drew a knife and started 
for Conley. The latter retreated to the 
xear of the office, but before he could 
draw his gun, Hayes had slashed his 
throat, cutting him from the left ear to 
a point uiuler th ? chin The convict 
eeeing liis intended victim getting away, 
grappled with him and stabbed him 
8^•v«ral times in the shoulder and the 

froin. Although bleeding terribly, Con- 
>y managed to draw his gun and fired 
four time.-i. with the weapon pressed 
agulnst H lyes' abdomen. As Hayes 
sank to the floor. Rock rushed at Con- 
ley, wlio emprl'd the remaining charge 
Into Rock, and the latter also went 
down The third convict, who had Ijeen 
called Into the office, took to Ills heel.s. 
but was cjiuckly captured and placed In 
his cell. Tiie authorities refused to give 
* out hi.-t name until ttiey investigated 
whether ho was ctmcerned in the plot. 
How i.^e convicts. Hayes and Rock, se- 
cured possession of the knives Is a 
mystery. It is belie\ed that the In- 
fracti.)n of the rules had bef;n olann ;d 
In order to reach the warden's office, 
where *h} convicts would have more 
• chance m making a dash for liberty. 

You can eit hot biscuits at midnight 
If they xri tn.xde by a good o<iok vvh<) 
uses Hunt's Perfe.it Baking Powder. 




Kelt's Sale of Office Furniture ! 

lUSINfiSS MEN, furnishing or refurnishing their offices, can secure quotations 
,»_J here this coming week which approximatethe usual wholesale or manufacturer's 
figures. Our entire stock of Office Furniture is the largest in the city and represenU 
America's foremost manufacturers. We mention but a small number of the inany 
great values that can be obtained during this great undersellmg event. BUY NOW 

FOR FUTURE DELIVERY— GOODS STORED FREE. 



MAIL 

ORDERS 

FILLED 



Leopold and Derby Desks 



MAIL 

ORDERS 

FILLED 




CREAMERIES AND 
COMMISSIONS 



Sldbe-WermcHc 

FiUng Devices 

At FACTORY PRICES 

GIobe-\V«^rnlcke good.s need no introduction to the business men 
of Duluth They are up to the minute in every respect and no oRice 
should be without them Wo have In stock a complete showing of 

Globe-Wernlcke Elastic Bookcases and filing devices. NN e are iniro- 
duclng for the first time. 

All Steel Letter Files 

And we want every office man In the city to use these splendid 
files They, together with a number of other new files will be on sal« 
this week >T FACTORY PRICES. 



We Are Duluth's Exclusive 
Agents for Globe-Wernicke 
Goods. 



Bankers* RoU Top 

This handsome desk Is made of quar- 
tered oak, with a dull egg shell finish. 
Square edges. Raised panels. Every 

drawer Is finished Inside and has movaoW 
partitions. Center drawer has flat key 
lock. Interior of desk is filled with 

pigeon hole boxes. Metal pen racks. Card 
Index drawer and ink wells. Length of 
desk 50 inches. Regular value $43.50, 
Sale price 

$34.50 



Flat Top Desks 

Compare these prices and 
act quickly. 

Solid oak flat top^desk — fin- 
ished golden. A well made 
desk in every way. Has four 
drawers and slide in right 
pedestal, large cupboard and 
drawer in left pedestal. Size 
of desk 4 ft. long, 28-in. wide. 
Worth $15.00. 
Sale price .... 



$9.98 



Reply to Secretary of 

State Dairy and Food 

Commission. 

To th<j Editor of The Herald: 

1 was very much amused at a 3tat':«- 
ment or rather an article appearing 
In your payer jf March o headed as 
follows: "Minnesota Creameries Pay 
$1,000,000 in '.'omrnisions to Sell But- 
ter." and further stating In paragraph 
No. 1 that • Better raw material and 
a higher gri-ie of tlni.sued product 
would pu^ an end to this great drain 
upon til.? dairy r'sourcos." 

I wonder if W. W. Wall, the secre- 
tary of th- Mmnesota dairy and food 
commission, is aware >!! -he fact that 
a creamery, x\o matter what the grade 
of butler it purs >n the market, will 
make more money by sending to a re- 
liable commission hauso m the East or 
elsewhere than where It sells its prol- 
uct outright. This is the reason that, 
alm-jst all d'ViK-rs In creamery butter 
In X wholesale way prefer to contract 
their butter at a given market price 
than to handle on a commission basis. 
Why Is this? one may ask. From th-^ 
fiist of June on creamery butter ad- 
anc^s in priC'\ as a rule. Take butter 
shippeii June 15. from a. Minu'^sota 
creamery to New York and it will ar- 
ne there aiwut July 1. if this butter 
Is sold f. o. b. the creameries. !t will 
bring the market price on the date of 
Bhlpment and if sent on commission 
It will bring the nurket of July 1 or 
perhaps an advance of 1 cent at least. 
Mr Wall forgt'ts that the fellow at the 
other end has to live, and lie seems to 
■be ignorant :>f the fact that the man 
who buys lie product of the creamery 
and the one who handles on a commis- 
sion may be one and the same fellow, 
and in any ev^nt he must make a 
reasonable profit, and where he buys 
outViglU th-'re is no way of curbing 
th' extent jf profit, but where handled 
on commission the railroad and ware- 
house .commissioner steps in and says 
you shall do so and so. and you have 
not mad^i Mr. dmlth or Mr. Jones 
proper returns and you must do so or 
get out of bu.-sinesa. 

Mr. Wall says that in .Steele and 
Freeborn counties thsy make a high 
grade creamery butter and sell it at 
top prices f. o. b. the creamery, ^^ill 
Mr Wall please tell the public what 





Flat top desk of solid oak. 
Extra heavy — has drawers on 
both sides. Size of desk 54- 
inches long, 30 inches wide. 
Worth $18.00. 
Sale price . . . 



$14.00 




High Ron Top Desk 

This is one of the Leopold Desk Co.*« 
finest desks. Made entirely of quarter- 
sawed oak Writing bed is 14 inches 
thick built of five-ply stock. Drawers are 
finished inside and fitted with moveable 
partitions. Vertical letter file in right hand 
pedestal. Interior filled with pigeon hole 
boxes, card index drawer. Ink well, eto. 
Length of desk 64 Inches. A complete 
desk in every way. Worth $54.00. 
Special sale price 

$42.00 



Office Cfiatrs 



In thLs groat sale we include Office 

Chairs and Stools, Letter Press Stands, 

Office Rugs and almost everything needed to equip 

a modern ofllce. 



High Roll Top Desk 

Exactly like cut — raised panels on ends 
and back. Solid quarterd oak writing 
bed. Drawers have moveable partitona. 
Made of oak. dull, golden finish. Drawer 
In right hand pedestal for vertical file. 
Regular value $34.00. Special sale price 



$27.50 





standing Desks 

Compare these prices on Standing Desks 
and you wUJ see the economy of buying 
here. 

Oak Standing Desk. 4 ft. long ^•g ^ ||A 
— worth J18 — special price V*»»VV 

$15.75 



Oak Standing Desk. 6 ft. long 
— worth $24 — special price. 




Typewriter Desks 

Made of oak. golden egg shell finish, 
raised panels in ends and back. Drawers 
are partitioned The typewriter mechan- 
ism works smoothly and la guaranteed. 
This style of a desk retails about the city 
at 125.00. Our special sale price 



$17.50 



Lettei" Files 
Complete 

19c 



The mind work with diffi- 
culty during the after-effects 
of coffee drinking. 

The brain worker who 
drinks Postum — made from 
clean, hard, specially roasted 
v/heat— has no "after-effects" 
to contend with. 

In making Postum, the 
outer, bran-coat of the wheat 
(containing the phosphate of 
potash, which nature places in 
the cereal, for replacing 
worn-out brain cells) is used 
with the wheat berry. It pro- 
duces a health drink for the 
thinker. 

'*There's a Reason." 



the difference is between the profit 
that the man makes who buy.i f. o. b. 
track and the commission that ^he 
merchant charges? Are they not Iden- 
tioal ? A.'i stated before, the man who 
buys outright li the man who gets his 
profits all tlie time from the creamery, 
buying low on an uncertain market to 
t)rotect against loss in case of a de- 
cline, and contracting as heavily as 
p.).sslhle> on an advancing market. The 
thought Mr. Wall intended to give 
wings to was that creamery manufac- 
turers should maintain a high standard 
of excellence In the making of their 
product so that at all tlme.s they could 
command the highest possible price 
whether 3oli outright or on commis- 
sion, and in this way they would 
save the Jl.iWO.OOO of loss. I find a 
b'^tter percentage of profit in buyniif 
outright than to handle on a 5 per 
cent basis. Very truly. „„,„^,^-- 
WILL Q. STARKEY. 

Duluth. March 7. 

"HAfCHEfMEN" 
FOUND GDILTY 

Nine Prominent China- 
men Are Convicted 



2, 1907, a number of strange Chinamen 
suddenly appeared In Oxford place, hi 
the he.'irt of tne Chinese quarter of Bos- 
ton, and when. the .signal was given, be- 
gan fi;iii& from revolvers upon scores of 
(.'hlne.'*.; merchants and laundrymeu. who 
w>>re lazily lolllns about. 

Over forty ^liots wero fired and when 
the police appeared they found three 
Chinamen il.>ad an<l a dozen others seri- 
ously wound.'d. one of whom die<l. 

Shoy Ton^, on^ of th*- principal gov- 
ernment witii'^ssos. testified that Warry 
Charles, pro.sldent of th." Hip Sing Tong. 
had instituted the killing. 

ROCKNK MAY RUN. 

Is Likely to Become Candidate for 
Attoruey (General. 

St. Paul. March 9.— (Special to The 
H^•rald.>— Tho contest for the R«»publlcan 
nondnailor for attorney gonoral has 
taken delln'te shape In statements by 
three .suijgosled candklatea. Qeorge W. 



of Murder. 



Boston, March 9.— Warry Charles, ona 
of the Wialthlest and mast Influential 
Chinamen of Boston, and eight of his 
countrymen, claimed to be notorious 
••Harchet men," were found guilty by a 
Jury in the superior olrminal court of 
muider In the first degree on four 
counts, alleging the killing of four 
Chinamen In Boston Aug. 2 or last 
year 

A tenth («efendant. Yee Watt, who had 
also bee'i or. trial on the same charKes. 
died suddenly in liis cell last Tuiisday. 
whilo the trial was In pr-Hfress. 

The men found guilty Saturday were: 
MUi Sing. Honi Woon, Leong Oong, 
Won*? l>ick. Wong H')w. Joe CJeup. Dong 
Bok. Ling Lee and Warry Charles. 

The men were accu.-^d of the murder 
of Chi Mong Quln, W "ng 9au Chung 
Chin Leet and Lee Kai Nem 

In ea:h case Warry Charle.>§ was ac- 
cused of bemg an accessory before thi 
fact. 

The rr.utdor.s for which the nine Chma- 
men were found guilty grew out of a 
long standing feud between the Hip 
Sing Tong and the On Leong Tong. rival 
Chin«»3t» .societies. 

Early In the evening, on Friday, Aug. 



CARTERS 



■llTTLI 

TlVE 

1^ 



llTTLE 

IVER 

PILLS. 



Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Signatura 




REFUSE SUBSTITUTES. 



SICK HEADACHE 



CARTER'S 

llTTLE 

IVER 
PIUS. 



regulate tbe Bowels. 



PositiTely cured by 
these Littla Pills. 

They also reUcTe Dis- 
tress from Dyspepsia. In- 
digestion and Too Hearty 
Ealing.. A perfect rem- 
edy for Dizziness. Maosea. 
Drowsiness. Bad Tasts 
la the Mouth. Coated 
ToDgiie. Pain In the Bide, 
TORPID IXVYSi. YtUSt 
Purely Vegetable. 



SMALL PILL SMALL DOSL SMALL PRICL 



CARTERS 



SlTTLI 

■ IVE 



llTTLE 

IVER 

pias. 



Genuine Must Bear 
Fac-Simile Sign&turo 




REFUSE SUBSTITUTES. 



SomervUle of Sleepy Eye declining to 
Income a candidate. George T. Simpson 
of Winona ninking formal announcement 
of his canulti;tcy. and A. J. Rockne of 
Zumbrotu, making the slutenient that he 
would very probably be a candidate. Mr. 
Ruv-kne had slated some time ago that 
he would not bt a candidate if Mr. 
SomervUle was in the field, but that ho 
would supr.ort hlni. But yesterday Mr. 
Rockne staitd tbnt, since Mr. Somer- 
ville had retired from the field, he would 
very prjbably be a candidate. 

Kennedy'.s Ijaxative Cough Synip acts 
gpntly yet promptly On tlie bowels and 
allays Inflamatlon "at the same time. It 
Is pleasant to take. Sold by all druggists. 

REMONSTRANCE 
OF SETTLERS 

Against Drainage Repre- 
sents Views of Only 
a Few. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

More than passing comment has been 
recently occaiiioned regarding the ac- 
tion of some of the settlers living In 
the wooded portions of Northern Min- 
nesota, adjacent to the Lake of the 
Woods, and the lower reaches of the 
Rainy river. In their adopting a formal 
remonstrance against the drainage of 
Xorlhern Minnesota lowlands, as pro- 
posed by the well known Steenerson 
bill, and In presenting the same to con- 
gress. In view of the unanimous and 
enthusiastic approval of the principle 
of drainage, not alone in Northern Min- 
nesota, but In all sections of the state, 
and also in the face of the extensive 
work of ditch digging, undertaken 
within the last three years by the 
, .state, counties and towns. It Is sur- 
prising to tlnd this decided opposition 
where drainage should prove a boon to 
«'very settler. A word of explanation 
at this time and In this connection may 
save much misunderstanding later. 

The territory drained Into the Rainy 
river and the Lake of the Woods Is 
largely timber country and wooded 
with spruce or pulp wood, cedar, tam- 
arack and. on the higher lands, pine. 
Here and there are found some open 
meadow lands. The settlers who have 
homeateaded all the grovernment lands 
In this wooded region, naturally de- 
sire to secure immediate returns from 
tlieir ventures by disposing of their 
tlint>or. Farming, a.s practiced else- 
where is necessarily a secondary 
(M.nsUU'ration with tnem. The border 
towns, deriving tbe bulk of tbclr busi- 



ness from trafficking In ties, posts, 
puipwood, and other forest products 
sympathize wUh the settlers and favor 
Immediate cutting of the timber. Tlxey 
see in the Steenerson bill, or believe 
they do. a possible delay in the accept- 
ance of final proof on their homesteads, 
tills proving up process being neces- 
sary before they can dispose of any 
timber, and thus have filed their griev- 
ances in the form of the remonstrance 
noted above. That this action does 
not represent the sentiment of the 
settlers living on the lands which will 
derive the greatest benefit from the 
bill should be made clear. Vast reaches 
of rich prairie land In Roseau, In East- 
ern Marshall. Central Western Beltrami 
and In Eastern Red Lake counties, 
are. unfortunately. In wet seasons. In- 
capable of profitable cultivation. De- 
spite this fact, tills whole region of 
level prairie Is well settled and pos- 
sesses schools, churches, postofflces, 
rural routes, stage routes, etc.. in abun- 
<lanre. bBt hundreds of thousands of 
acres of land that is now clas.sed as 
lowlands In this region could also be 
made available for farming by the 
operation of the Steenerson bill. And, 
strange to say, the proestlng settlers In 
their remonstrance openly acknowledge 
the greate richness of this undrained 
land and Its future value for agricultural 
purpose. The homesteaders in this 
prairie territory, to a man, favor the 
bill. They Invite its operation, and own- 
ers of private lands wlthl nthe scope of 
the proposed drainage region are eager 
to assume their juft share of the burden 
of drainage. 

The recent geological survey, ordered 
to determine the possibility of the 
drainage o fthese lowland, dlcloses the 
fact that not one swamp or bog exists 
in this whole region, but that the natural 
waterways are simply clogged with the 
accumulation of ages of vegetable 
growth. It shows that ample fall exists 
to drain every quarter In the whole ter- 
ritory, and that when this is accom- 
pUhed In accordance with the Intent of 
the Steenerson bill. It will present for 
homestead entry or private purchase the 
alrgcst and richest tract of strictly ag- 
ricultural lands within the borders of 
the United States. 

This unexpected remonsrance from the 
settlers in the wooded slopes of the 
Rainy river against the well-established 
principle of drainage in Northern Minne- 
sota is to be deplored, particularly when 
it has been such a task to remove the 
prejudice that existed In well-known 
quarters of the state against it. The 
Interests of these sections cannot be 
jeopardized by the action of the Stee- 
nerson bill, while the benefits resulting 
from the construction of federal ditches 
In the four coimtiea mentioned above 
will place multaitudes of struggling 
farmers firmly on their feet and make 
available to homestead entrj' or to pri- 
vate sale of thousands of acres of as 
good prairie land as can be found in the 
Red River valley, but which at the pres- 
ent time lacts just a sufficient drainage 
to make its possession a profitable prop- 
o.'^ition. J- H. HAY. 

Thief River Falls. Minn., March 4. 



COURT FLAYS NELSON. 



PlaintiiF in Divorce Cas« Is Turned 
Down by Judge. 

Judge Ensign, before whom the divorce 
action of Albert Nelson against Ida Nel- 
son was tried last week, has fil^d find- 
ings of facts and conclusions of law. to- 
gether with judgment In favor of Mrs. 
Nelson, the decree of divorce being de- 
nied on the ground of insufficient evi- 
dence. The court finds that the Nelsons 
were married in this city Jan. 15. 1907, 
and that the following March, while Mrj». 
Nelson was sick. Nelson, without any 



cause, left her in that oondition and 
remained aw.iy from home several daya, 
although neighbors went to his salooa 
and attempted to Induce him to return 
to his home and sick wife. The court 
finds ha did not go home until the polio* 
threatened him with arrest. It ia a^aa 
found that Nelson, at another time, weat 
out after medicine for his wife, but in- 
stead of returning right way. went to th« 
theater and retnained away from homo 
until nearly midnight. The court finds 
♦:hat Nelson willfully deserted hlg wife, 
failed to support her. ar.d that his charge 
against his wife of keeping bid come 
pany is groundless and t;ils«. John Helt- 
nian represented Mrs. Nelson. 




Just a grand old Beverage-^ 
for people who appreciate a 
mud stimulant that is at 
the same time nutri- 
tious and healthful. 




Blalz Beer may be on tale from the keg, or botdcd- 
boA. You may be sure of the very cream of quaKty if you 
inntt on BLATZ In many places wKcre Blatz signs are not 
dUplayed. th«r bottled brands are on sale. Whether in aub, 
Cafe or Dining Car. ask for "Blatz.**. 

DULUTH BRANCH— Lak« Avenu* and Railroad Straat. 
Phont, Sa. ' DULUTH, MINN. 



VAL BLATZ BREWING CO.. MILWAUKEE 



i 






m 



I 



^ 







CONCERNINe 



W^t 



At a recent meeting of the board ot I will be Mra. Fred Q. Bradbury of this 
managers of the Duluth Art school ^^^y- 



Airs. J. B. Weston was chosen as act- 
ing cliairman during the absence from 
the city of Mrs. H C. Marshal). The 
plans for the school are meeting with 
Bauch success and It Is confidently ex- 
pected that by the opening on April 1 
that a good attendance will have been 
Insured. 

The school Is on a financial basis 
that Insures the progress of the work 
without harrasslng cares as to the 
outcome. The Intention is to make 
th€ school as nearly as possibly self 
•upportlng. but the assurance of a re- 
■erve fund brings a greater sense of 
•ecurlty. David Ericson contributed h 
picture to be sold to add to the fund 
for the society and a gift of $50 was 
iplven into the treasury at the begin- 
ning of the work. The finance com- 
mitttfe of the board of managers, con- 
sisting of Mrs. Julius H. Barnes, Mrs. 
J. D. Titcomb, Mrs. J. B. Weston ana 
Mrs. H. C Marshall have secured an 
assisting committee of ten reprefcenta- 
tlve business men uf tho city who will 
be responsible for any deficit whlcn 
may result up to a certain sum. 

A. J. Itosencranz of Buffalo has 
been secured as teacher of the school. 
Mr. Rosencranz was engaged on the 
recommendation of David Ericson. llo 
baa been Identified with the Buffalo 
fioclfety of Artists and has exhibited 
to the Albrecht Art gallery. He h.is 
been a student of the Artl.^ts an'l Arti- 
sans of New York and studied under 
John Ward Stinaon, known as the 
John Ruskir. of Amtrica. 

Fifteen appiications have tuready 
been received and it 1k expected that 
the clas.ses will bffe'n with a mem- 
bership of twenty-five or thirty. Tlie 
manage^-e of the school wifili to empha- 
ilze the lact thr;t design and the under- 
lying principles of art wlil be the 
feature of the work of the schoo , and 
the application of these principles in 
the various crafts and art woik. It is 
possible that a teachers' clasa will be 
orKiaiized for Saturday mornings. A 
olas-s for the educ;itlonal workerb has 
met with great success In Minneapolis 
and if a demand is expressed such , a 
class will be organized here. 
•asela and drav^ing board for 
achool have been ordered from 
workers In the manual training depart- 
ment of the high school. 

RARE LACES 

To Be Shewn at Meeting of 
Travel Class. 

sht.Wii.g of rare laces 



Hosts at Dinner. 

Mr. and Mr.s. G. O. Hartley were 
hosts at dinner Saturday evening at 
their hcime, 130:> East Suporlo-r street. 
The affair was In honor of their twen- 
ty-fifth wedding anniversary. The 
tables were prettily decorated In yellow 
jonquils and lilies of the valley. The 
guests were: 
Messrs'. and Meedames— 

Williiuii J. ulcolt, D. G. Cutler. 



THE NEWEST DRA PERY SILK 

■ ■- ?■ — J---- -i ■ - 

The latett novelties are Juet recelVQd — the 
choicest of designs for draperies, pillowe, klmonas. 
' etc. — the best quality — the price only ^ 

69o 8^ 



Always Send Your MaU Ordent to 

117-119 Wcet Superior Street, Duluth, Mfnn., 
For Quick and Satisfactory Scr\ioe. 



OUR LEADER— SUIT CASE 



A full stock cowhide ca-^ee — full riveted — steel 
frame— our special handle— a vei-y etrong oa«e aad 
strong value at 



$5.00 EaoK 



O. C Har'.man, 
A. W. Ilartnian, 
Whitney Wall, 
W. i\l. Prindle, 
E. P. Towae, 
C. VV. Andrews. 
Messrs.— 
R. P. Dowse, 
Leon Lum, 



W. B Silvey, 
George Spencer, 
W. E. Morrow, 
B. F. Myt:rs, 
W. W. Walker. 
Mias Bradi^haw. 

John C. Greenway, 
Mllle Bunnell. 



Club House Outings. 

Tha various outings at the Spirit 
Lake branch of the Dulufh Boat club 
Continue to be among the most popu- 
lar of the outing expeditions. The vari- 
ous means of Journeying to the club- 
hou.se and return allow for an outing 
of almost infinite variety and charm. 
A sleighing party to the club for din- 
ner, and then return, yesterday, was 
composed of Mr. and Mrs. G. A. 
FVei.ch, Mrs. Katherine Van Loo, Mrs. 
Cupeland, c^liarles E. Bas.sett. Francis 

Sullivan and Francis Sullivan, Jr. 

* • • 

A long distance skiing party up the 
river and return was composed of 
Worthlngton .S. Telford. Charles J. Mc- 
Bride, A. K. S<iulre, Ray Uiggins and 
B. J. Daugherty. 

• • • 

A party is planned for this evening 
and during the week, during which 
time in the evenings a moon of not too 
recent newness Is promised, there will 
be several snow shoe tramps to the 
clubhouse, to be followed by a hot 
supper. 



World's Finest White Goods 



Are Now Assembled Hare For You ! 

lAPHANOUS white materials are more beautiful than ever before — 
our superb collection will find favor with all discriminating dress- 
ers — there is so much that is iiew and exclusive — so much that is 
different. Fabrics so winsome that you'll decide on a beautiful dress 



D 



The 
the 

the 



exhibit at the library, 
tVednesday afternoon, at the^ meeting 



A valuable 
will be on 

Wednesday anemuvn, a,^. -• . .v. 

Of the Travel Clas;. of the Twentie h 
Century club. Mrs. E. A. Sllber.teln 
Vlll be leader for the aft<rnoon and 
"Dac^P and Lac^aklng" will be the 
subject for study. A collt<-tion of la«es, 
valued at Jli.WW. has been loaned for 
the occai=ion, and some rare ecclesla-s- 
tlcal laces of Irish and English make 
have I'cen loaned by Bishfi-p McOolrlck 
for the afterncon. It will be the first 
time that tlu-se latter laces wlil have 
been publicly shown in Duluth. The 
meeting Is an <'pen one, and any one 
Interested U Invited to attend. 

'Cello Recital. 

Jean Gerardy, the Belgian 'eelllst, 
"Who will appear in a recital Wednes- 
day fvenlng of this wetk. before th»- 
members of the Matinee Mus.cale, will 
be the sr.lolHt. totnorrow evening, at 
the sixth Symphony concert of the St. 
Paul .Symphony orche«trn. The lr<al 
•ociety wac enabled to secure CJerardy 
becauf?e of his St. Paul engag'ir.ent 
oon.inf at this time, and the met,»bers 
are elated at securing so grtat an art- 
ist for the last concert of their se.'ison. 
Oerardy, although a young man, is 
recognized the world over as one of 
the yreate.««t masters of the 'cello. 

The accompanist for the evening 



Women's Meeting. 

A womens meeting will be held to- 
morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock at Grace 
Methodist Episcopal church at the cor- 
ner of Third street and Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west. The meeting will be 
in charge of Mrs. Mary J. Kreldler, 
deaconess of the Duluth district, and 
all the women of the vicinity are In- 
vited to be present. 

Club Meeting. 

The literature class of the Twentieth 
Century club will meet tomorrow aft- 
ernoon at 2.30 o'clock at the club 
room of the library. The "adlng and 
study of part I of "Faust" will be 
continued. 

Matinee Musicale. 

The regular meeting of the Mat- 
inee Musicale was held this afternoon 
at Stein way hall. The program of 
compositions of the old classical com- 
posers was arranged by Miss Faith 
Rogers and Miss Frances Woodbrldge. 
The piano numbers were given by Miss 
Maud Gilbert and Miss Flaaten. The 
vocal numbers were both by Chcrub- 
ini. Mrs. Leo Ball sang "Ave Maria" 
and the closing number of the program 
was a trio sung by Miss Thiers, Miss 
Markell and Mrs. Stowers. 

Lenten Talks. 

The first of a sent of six Lenton 
Bible lessons to be held at tlie roomr 
of the Y. W. C. A. was held this aft- 
ernoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. Alexander 
Milne will be the leader and any wom- 
an of the city interested In the course 
is invited to attend. The second meet- 
ing will be held next Monday after- 
noon. 



i 




of white on sight of them. 

Only the choicest things are here — 
our car© has been to search out the 
most beautiful and unusual — and there'* 
style and value In every piece we 
have. 

The new 31 -Inch All-Ovcr Em- 
broidered Shwr Soft Mulls must bo 
s«'<-n to be aiipreolated — here in 
refined and confined styles at 9»0 
to 93.00 a yard. 

$ 1 Linen Savoie 

To Sell at 6Sc. 

A very sheer, very beautiful fab- 
ric, quite different from BatLste or 
French lawn — goods that have al- 
way.s sold at a dojjar — we have 
about half a dozen dress lengths of 
It to sell at 66c tlie yard! 

More Than 50 Styles of 
New White Goodf^ at 25c 

Our line of Fancy Waistlngs on 
sale at 25c the yard is not equalled 
anywhere. You have choice of more 
than fifty different styles, sheer 
and medium weights — in dots, fig- 
ures, stripes, checkH, plaids, fioral 
and open work ffferts. 

Get a (rood supply now while 

gneh rich assortments are offered 

you at 25e the yard. 

Anchor Sheets, Special Prices 

A lot of extra size, ready-made 
Sheets — An<-hor brand quality— 
not a great many — 81x90, 81xt»9, 
90x90. 90x99. 90x108. All at big 
reductions for two days. 

14-INCH CRASH 10!/^c 

14c heavy, all pure linen. Crash Towel- 
ing, 18-inch width — fast borders — the yard 
lOt^c. 

HUCK TOWELS 19c 

60c dozen real 25c Linen Huck Towel* 
— 19e. 

Will sell quickly nt 19c cat-h. 
l^ay in a supply. 

Best $1.25 Satin Damasjk — full bleach — 
Irish linen — fine, and guaranteed to do up 
smooth, with a lustre — full two yards 
wide — 08c. 



Novelty Embroidered Swisses are here 
In as fine an array and as immense an 
assortment as anywhere in the land. 
Exclu.sive stuffs in extreme styles to the 
tiniest dots and figures. , 

Import Oil Swisses. Embroidered 
Soft Nainsooks and Batistes, Eng- 
lish Madra-s. Mercerized Xoveltles, 
Jacquards and a dozen other weaves 
at prices ranging 15c to $1.50 yd. 




Easter Is But Six Weeks Away 



The Silks and Dress Goods Are Ready ! 

lOU'LL be immensely pleased with the assortments of fine and fash- 
able fabrics we have ready for you tomorrow! In every way it 
surpasses the splendid assortments which have made our Silk and ij 
Dress Goods Depajtments the busiest in Duluth. We pride our 
selves on the taste of our selections— and as usual, prices are such that we'll 




be busy. 

THE NEW HASKELL SELKS. 

In all Silkdom, there is no name that 
ranks higher than "Haskell." Half a 
century of continued excellence has 
made them famous for goodness — as 
most weavers of fine silks know. 

The new stock is ready — blacks 
and colors — plain and fancies and 
because of the magnitude of our 
order, tlie Haskell Mills have given 
tts a special label! 




86-ln. PONGEE, $1 A Yl>. 

Here's an all silk cloth, and It'e a 
remarkable number at the price 1 Pon- 
gees are to be much worn this eprlng 
and summer, and why not plan on that 
gown, coat or girl's drees now? 

Then you'll get the benefit of tliis 
epecial Aalue at a dollar. You'll 
appreciate it better after you have 
seen it and felt its tenure — SO-iu. 
wide, and $1.00 the yard. 

Amazon Silks 

A new Silk, on the messallne or- 
der — beautifully lustred, soft, yet 
very firm close weave, and bound to 
give very best wear — suited for 
itreet. house cr evening wear. 

Bound to be a favorite — see it 
the next time ycu are doun — 19- 
inchce wide, at 85c a yard. 

We Sell Samson 
Lining Silk 

It has not the lut^tre of a regular 
taffeta, but it will wear twice as 
long in most teases — the new finish 
gives just the same ciisp touch and 
modest swish of the best tnffetas. 

If ycu are thinking; of a drop 
skirt or jacket lining, plan on 
tills — s^taple wlindes= and black 
and cream — 19-inchee wide, at 
58c a yard. 



Linings 



Here's 
a Snap 

White 
Linen 
Waist- 
lngs 39c 



Swell new Plaid and Check Linen 
Walstings — 36-inches wide — a real 69c 
qujility that looks much like our more 
sheer 85c quality — we bought the re- 
mainder of an Importers' stock. "- 
Seven different kinds of checks 
and cross bars, very special at 
8»c yaj-d. 
It's a bargain you'll be sorry 
miss: Only 39c a yard! 



to 



NewEffects in Black Suftmgs 



More blacks will be worn this sea- 
son than for many years. Bome very 
smart styles have been brought out 
In shadow stripes, chevron stripes, 
new V<in Dyke stripes and neat 
checks — they're in weaves that tailor 
effectively, keep their shape and give 
best service — they offer a change 
from the plain good? — see them for 
that new suit or skirt. 



Everything that could be wl.shed 
for — everything for the dress 
foundation at c>ur lining dept. 



Shadow Effects in Suitings 



Some of the prettiest shadings and 
neatest styles are shown In these 
cloths — there's a cl<en cut air about 
them when made up that appeals to 
one. Ours are all of foreign manu- 
facture. They're to be very popular 
— the best are shown now — why not 
get your suit made early? Otiiers 
are already buying — It's none too 
goon! Prices from $1.00 a yard up. 



Come Here Tomorrow Engage Your Dressmakers and You'll be Ready for Easter, 





Personal Mention. 

Miss Maybelle .'^nydtr, who liae been 
tin- gueit of Miss Mary Richards, re- 
turned yesterday to her home at Min- 
neapolis. 

• • • 

Miss Harriet Arnold of Meadow- 
lands was the guest of friends in the 



Wkat Retail Markets Offer. 



Ccdn.'^h. 12% to 20 cents a lb. 

Lobsters, 40 cents a lb. 

Orabs. 35 cents each. 

Sfm<'ked herring, 15 cents a lb. 

Grape fruit. 4 for 25 cents. 

yi.sh and eggi* pncmlse to leap Into 

rirominence as an article of diet during 
he days to come. The market offers 
a pleasing variety In fish, and the 
jroung housf'keeper Is industriously 



hunting up new ways of preparing. 
For houseket-pers of a st.ilder experi- 
ence, for whom the glamor of delight 
in preparing three meals a day ha.« 
been partly dissipated, thei*e Is content 
in simply h.-ivlng codfish. either 
creamed or in •'halis,' halibut broiled, 
imd herrings as little as possible. 

After fish, n«»thing st-t-ms so nice to 
think about as grape fruit, tart and 
clear and cool and luscious. 



Tfuluib 




Superior. 



New Kid 
Gloves 



You 
Are Invited 



New 
Hosiery 



To come and visit the store these 

days and gat acquainted with the new 

and attractive I'abrics, Garments and 

Requisites as they are opened up and 

placed on the racks and counters. It will 

be a pleasant change after months of intimacy 

with the quiet habiliments of the winter. 

We think that we have bought wisely 

and well. It's the merchandise we 

show, not our talk, that will prove it. 



city for the week end. Miss Arnold 
left yesterday for a month's visit with 

friends at St. Paul. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Carey of 
Minneap( lis were tlie week end guests 
of Mrs. Harriet L.. Carey of Lakeside. 

• • • 

Mrs. Stephen H. Jones has returned 
from a several weeks' Eastern trip. 

• • • 

Mrs. J. C. Farles of Hunter's Park 
will have her sister, Mrs. Coffin of 
Minneapolis, as her guest durmg the 

week. 

• • « 

Mrs. F. M. Anderson Is vislllng 

friends in Montana. 

• • • 

Mrs. Bain Smith of this city and 
her sister. Mrs. \V. A. Smith of I>jn- 
don. Can., have returmd from Nev» 
Orleans, where they attended the 

Mardi Oras. carnival. 

• • • 

Mrs. Joseph W. Clancy of Seattle, 
Wash.. Is a guest of her sisur, Mrs. 
James Walsh. Mrs. Clancy has re- 
turned from a t'isit in the Soutli and 
Kast and will later go to San Francisco 

to make her home. 

• • • 

Mr and Mrs. Ward Ames, Jr., Mr. 
and Mrs. Wiiiiam Dalrymple and Mr. 
and Mrs. H. F. Williamson are at Palm 
beach, Fia. 

Mr and Mrs. William R Webb re- 
turned yesterday from their wadding 
trip Their marriage took place last 
Mondav from the home of the bride at 
Houghton. Mrs. VVtbb was for.nerly 
Miss Leanor N. Healy. Mr. and Mrs 
Webb will be at home after May 1 at 
217 Nineteenth avenue east. 

• • • 

Among the Duluthians who wlil 
leave during the spring for a trip 
abroad will be Mr. and Mrs. John Me- 
gins of the St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. 
Megins will sail next month, and in 
June will Join Capt. and Mrs Ray T 
Lewis in London. Capt. and Mrs^ 
Lewis are now abroad and will visit 
at Rome, Paris and Le.ndon before 
flielr return in July. Mr. and Mr». 
^legtns will tour Italy. Switzerland. 
Germany. Holland. Belgium, France 
and the British Isles. 




V 



IN DVLUTH CHURCHES 



REVIVAL IN 
PROGRESS 

Rev. J. W. Powell Says 

« Moral Awakening Is 

Taking Place. 



most Important part of the church work, 
because it reached the younsr. who are 
most susceptible to Influence for ^ood. 
He suggested that parents take greater 
pnina to mak(» their children study their 
Hiinday school lessons. 

Miss Porter said the moulding of a 
child's character came within the province 
Of the school, and asserted that for tli;s 
reas<in parents should enoounige teach- 
ers wiierever possible and thus make 
their work easier and more efficient. 
Slip thought that parents too often took 
sides again.st the teacher in cases where 
a child lias been punislied for some mis- 
demeanor in the school room. 

Judge VVlndom spoke of the grave dan- 
gers arising from a cliild frequenting the 
Streets, saving this wa.< true of both 
boys and girls, but more particularly with 
the latter He characterized the dance 
halls as the great evil that is undermin- 
ing the city's morals by corrupting: so 
many of the young. The fault for an 
evils in this connection the speaker laid 
at the doors of the parents. 



EARLY LID 
WEDNESDAY 

Saloons Will Close at H 

o'clock After That 

Time. 



NOT SO H.\RI> TO BELIEVE. 



Boro 

Oil. 



New 
Wash Goods 



Come and 
See! 



New 
Wool Goods 



X^ew Tailored Suits New Coats for Women 

New Coats for Girls New Waists 



l^'X'itTn a'^f'ewloX Relieves any pain 
in any part. ^ 

INSANi'PATlBNT EN^S LIFE. 

xiuttiiwan N. T.. March 9. — A 
..'man 'named Mrs. ,!>"-'•. ->J.,S,J,^ 
1 member of a prominent and wealtn> 
Southern family, who has been a pa - 
lent at the Insane asylum here, k > ed 
herself today by Jumping from a win- 
dow. __._ 

Trv our Turkish Baths. Knauf Sis- 
ters.' over Glddlng's Annex. 



'Jt'SXXC^ D.noloa. 

ara suoerior to all otheri. 



/AWbNitot^^^ 



Duiuth — Superior 



H. M. Gevson, 

LADIES' TAILOR 

i^22jejferson St. Duiuth. Minn. 

Ztnith Phone XiSC-Y. Old Fhoiui :ril-L. 



"People are down on their knees in our 
churches praying for a revival, and do 
not know that one of the greatest of n- 
vlvalB is going on about them," said Rov. 
John W. Powell during the course of his 
.sermon on "The Tides of Lilt" at the 
Endion M. E. church yesterday morning. 

"There has Ikcu more quickening of the 
moral sense of the people of the civilized 
nations during the la.-t five y«ars than 
there was for yOO y<ars before that. Wo 
arc In the midst of a great moraL 
awakening." ... 

Mr Powell showed durmg his sermon 
t'.at'all the forces of nature have Ihtir 
tbb and flow. Night is followed by day. 
Even the planets swing toward tlie sun 
in their orbit, rush past it, and th.n move 
slowly away. All vegetable life starts up 
In the spring buds and blooms, and then 
apparently di. s in the winter. 

Tite speaker attempted to show that the 
human soid was guverned by the same 
iaw, and that tliere were momenta when 
a man se> nis to live at tlood tide, wltli 
his mind keenly grasping ax.d mastering 
its problems, and nls body alert and ener- 
getic These nu'ments are followed bj 
others when the mind seems to vegetate 

"llut this need not worry us. said Mr. 
Powell. "Kuring one of thest moments 
of elation, when life is at its flood tide, a 
man may plan a course of conduct, nr.d 
net in.«<piratlon enough to last him a llfe- 
Ume. Kvery boy knows that the bas^- 
wood shoots are t. nder for onlv a fevv 
weeks in the spring. But the forces of 
nature are working all summer to turn 
the growth of the .spring Into hard fltjer. 
And during the moments when our life 
seems to be at its ebb, we can be work- 
ing and turning into moral fiber the in- 
spiration of these moments of claUon. 

STEPS TO SAVfCHlLDREN. 

Parents' Service Held at Lester 
Park Methodist Church. 

Following out the suggestion of Judge 
J. D. Ensign that every church In the 
city allow at least one service for talks 
on the government of tlie child In an at- 
tempt to reduce juvenile crime in the 
cltv the Lester Park Methodist church 
las't' night devoted the usual service hour 
to a discussion of the subject. 

There wer^ tour speakers. Mrs. T. J. 
Walt spoke on the home: Rev. James A 
Geer, pastor, represented the church; 
Eva Pbrter. principal of the Lester Park 
■rhool SDoke from the viewpoint of the 
teacher. Tnd Judge W. U Wlndom of 
the municipal court spoke for the state. 

Mrs Watt said she did not believe In 
us'^mt'the rod to loo great an e.xient. but 
did believe in a vigorous application wlien 
used a all. She expressed the belief that 
pitlence and good "^ture were the strong- 
eat factors necessary in training chllBren 
in the home. She thought that under 
existing conditions, the rich are .^oo In- 
dulgent with their children and the poor 

^'Rev^'^Mr Greer emphasized the value 
of the church in building up character. 
«d slid that the Sunday school was lae 



Mayor Haven's edict went to Chief of 
Police Troyer this morning and the 11 
o'clock lid will go down Wednesday 
___^_ .night. The action was expected, the 

Rev. Campbell Coyle. pastor of the | saloonkeepers are prepared, the police- 
First Presbyterian church, does not think ; men know v, hat is expected of them, and 
that the story of Jonah and the whale, jt js beJievcd the new cover 
in the Bible, should be rejected ae pure 



fiction. If one is a believer In Christainity 
and Its teachings, and he told a large 
congregation so last evening. 



will be 
fitted, tightly without a hiteh. 

Tiie mayors order lo tlie chief sets 
forth the state law requiring all saloons, 
bars, buffets and other places wliere II- 



T>r Covle said that th? only adequate , ^y^' jg g^i^ jq j^cit their doors and cease 

-' Jonah ^jjg gjjj^ of liquor at 11 o'clock each nigi:t 



for the landiner of 



explanation .-. — ... ,, l,.^ j,...,; ».. •• .- — . . , 

_^^ „..^ -1 .»3i . ^" - - eiicli 

whale" for"~three days was that CVod had } ^Jy^^^j'^g' jj^^'j ''requiring them to close ai 
mir.'>culously lnter\-ened and he said that|jj o'cicck each Saturday night and re- 
It was Just as reasonable to accept this j ^ain closed until 5 o clock Monday 
as the truth as to accept some other i morning. 

statements in the Bible. The chief Is Instructed to have a rcpre- 

The preacher said that the suner- gg,,iative of his department call person- 
natural In the Bblp must tK- upheld tojjj,],. ^t each saloon and noiimy the x>art> 
a certain extent, else there were many ; j,^ charge -tliat Wednesday night »■- 
things w'lilch would be hard to believe. ! after, lEe law In 
He did not think that the story of Jo- 
nah's experience was pa«t all belief. 



For Your 
Digestion's 

Sake. 

Why eat wood? 

Cellulose is like wood. It's 
in wheat It should be milled 
out. Generally it isn't 

You can't find a speck of it 
in Gold Medal Flour, 

That's why it's so whole- 
some. 



Gold 

Medal 

Flour 



For Sale 
by Grocers 




an.l 
that re.epect must be 
strictly obeyed. The orders will be 
eiven to the saloonkeepers at least 
twelve hours before the lime the order 
is to go int . effect and viloations of the 
law win be prosecuted. ^ ,,, 

■The chief is notified that earh officer 
will be held personally responsible tor 
the enforcement of the law on his V)eat, 
and he Is enjoined to notify the men un- 
der his charge that the law rriuit be en- 
forced strictly, without partiality, pre- 
judice or persecution , 

Since Mayor Haven iook office, the sa- 
loonkeepers have been expecting the 11 
o'clock lid and the order of the new 
executive comes ag no surprise to them. 
They and their patrons understand the 
law and the intention of Mayor Haven 
to enforce it, and it is beheved the up 
from th^ police will be enough to get all 
the saloonkeepers in line with the new 
Do'icy 

Mayor Haven said this morning that 
his message, which will go to the coun- 
cil tomorrow night, will contain a refer- 
ence to the 11 o\lock lid and he held oft 
putting It into effect until Wednesday 
night m order that his expressions on 
the subject may be public before it goes 
on. 

C. W. KENNEDY 
IN DULUTH 



diamonds for diililng purposes. He 
believe.s that tiu;ie is a good fiedd up 
here, and will ojien an office In the 
near future. 

Just the other day Mr. Kennedy 
was man led at Irtnwood. Mich. He 
i.« 72 years old, but evidently does 
not believe in the Osier theory of 
mail t>utliving hip usefulnea*? at the 
age of three score. Three score and 
ten years have passed lightly over th« 
head of the former Northwestern pio- 
neer. Today he look? and acts like 
a man of 4t'. 

Mr. Kennedy showed a representa- 
tive of Tht Hiraid enough of the 
black diamonds te make a man in- 
dependent. The- diamonds are aa 
black as eoal. and are u.^ed for dia- 
mond drills. They are harder than 
the white diamond, and for that rea- 
s«m are used for drilling purposes. 
They are generally used in the 
Northwest, and it was because of the 
demand that Mr. Kennedy decided to 
open an office in this city. 




C. W. 

friends as 



Kennedy, known to his 
■Old Carbon," is at the St. 
Louis hotel. Mr. Kennedy, although 
making his home in New York for the 
past number of years, may be said to 
be a pioneer of the Northwest. He 
wpnt into the Copper country before 
the iron rail made progress and travel 
a comfort as well as a convenience. 
He went in there on snow shoes, 
when the drifts of the beautiful was 
the despair of men bent on practical 

^^ork. ..»,,, T. 

Mr. Kennedy is going to establish 
a headquarters in Duluth. For a 
number of years he has been in the 
black diamond business. He sells 



SPECIAL 

First records macle from 
the words and music of the 
newest "Standing - R o o m - 
Only" music-il hit, lliat has 
just captured New York. 

"A Waltz Dream" 

Four records— one beautiful or- 
chestra selection and three splen- 
did duets— played and sung exact- 
ly as on the stage, and all brim- 
ful of tingling melody. 

Made In disc and cylinder.— 
And don't f org< t that "Columbia" 
records fit any talking machine 
and make it sounrt almost a» 
good as the Columbia Grapho- 
phone. 

For Sale by Your 
Dealer 



or by COLIMBIA 
PB0N0€R.4PH CO., 

1 8 Tliird Avenue 
West. 




— T 





•n<aMainan>^ 



THE 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD: M(i>II>AY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



a 



BM lUE DiBOi mm 





RANGE TOWNS TO 
CHOOSE OFFICERS 

Lively Elections Are Prom- 
ised in Biwabik and 
Two Harbors. 

HlbbiiiK. M nii . March g.-tSiX'cial to 
The Heialii.)— Thf laiious !trtniinft«« iu 
the elccuon to bv held toniornnv are: 
Presldtfu, Dr. II. K. Weirick; recorder. 
Mlle.s Gundsey; treHsurt-r. A. 1). Smith; 
Cdiistabhs. Peter Wring. GmirKe Dono- 
hue; couiiciliiieii. H. B. llav«-s. Thomas 
Kuddy, Max Kogalsky. 

Tiit-rc is also an ind'-peiuioni tieket in 
whifh candidates are as follows: R. L.. 
Oriffin for treasurer and Usnir W.a 
strand, recorder. 



Uit>. M. K.van. tnistf 
Anton Skoda. Aiidn-w 



s, \>'. !•'. tJiiyott, 
I low kinson. 



Kveleth. Minn.. Mar.Ji S*.--«8pei'ial to 
The Ueralrt. I- •{'hl.'s ti'kei ha.s l>epn 
named lor M*'sal>a Moinitnln townsliip: 

AasuMor. H. 8. H^'^rman; treasurer. 
William HurU. Jiisiii-es of \\^^' peace, i). 
11. Haelinke and Ed Moylan; constables. 
Peter CoaRrove. asul Rorco t'Iffone. 



9 a.m. 

Each Day 



If 



Tuesday, 9 to 11 



a.mn 



FRUIT OF THE LOOM ancM 

and Lond-sdalf Muslin, the 

always pay 12>» a 
lo yard limit) goes 
s Tue-^dav at — 



Biwabik. Minn., March ».- (SpeciHl lO 
The Herald.)— Til. re ar,? two comi'iele 
tickets in tlie field to be vot-d for h-re. 
and the election is by no moans a tann- 
affair. These are ilu- tickets: Ctucns 
ticket— Presideni. Axel Johnsun; reord- 
ei John V. Goldlliorpe; treasurer. G^nKe 
m" Gleason; trustees. K. A. doderlund. 
trunk Guss, Dennis Hogan. 

Independeiil tlikei -Presideni. N. «• 
Bhank; recorder. J. S. llopknu-*. 1 1 <-as- 
urer Michael Norton; trustees. !• rank 
Tnomas. K. B. Myers, J. E. Kiley. 

There is also a township tii k»-t a.-; loi- 
l.>ws- Supervisor. W. G. Dundas; clerk, 
n J Cameron, ireasurei. liainev Kin- 
ney justice H. J. liilbrook; a.sscssor. H. 
H. 'salmon; constabl.-, Herujan Jones. 

Two Harbors. Minn.. March 9. -(Special 
to The Herald. >-There 1» «■ .»;e8.Hvi>_. ^"/^ 



MOOKHHAI) MAN TAKHS 

1 liar^e of Salvation Kv\\\\ Barracks 
ill Eveleth. 

Eveleiii. Minn.. March 9.— (Sppcial to 
The Herald.)- C'apt. Rieiz of Moorhead 
has been appointed lo the vacftnoy ai the 
Sfilvatfon Army, can.srd by the transfer 
of (^'api. and Mrs. N'elson lo Rhinelander. 
Wis. 

The I'nlted Stale.st Kxpress company 
lias Installed an agencv mi I'd tit and 
placed Agent Fuller of Ih.- rallwa\ oC- 
I'lc in cliarge. 

Hx-Mayor Jtsmon- oi this <iiv will open 
up a furniture and underiaklnn establish- 
meni at the Gilbert In tlie near future. 

Superlnl-ndent and Mrs. Greening '^f 
111., local schools left Krldas uiiernoon. 
thf' former to secure teachers foi- the 
coniiiijf fall term, and ili»> latter on a trij 
lo Hurley. Wis., lo visit friends. Siipt. 
Greening will vl*>il I lie upper peninsula 
points in MicliiRan. 

Tile lamilv of Mr. Hall, proprietor of 
the Kveleth Steam laundry, consisting of 
his wife and two uons. have arrivd .ind 
set up lleir home in town. Mis. Hall 
was very prominent in social circles in 
St. Paul. liavliiR ix'f-n the first president 
of the state assembly of the Rebvckas. 




l.usch; assessor. Charles Ander.son: lus- 
tices, Louis La Bounty. Louis Uirson. 
constables, John N.slund. .Wi >«*•" Kep- 
perllng; school superintendent, V\ llliam 

Independent ii.:kcl-*.upervisc»r. A. A. 
Gow clerk. John Mcl.'ormUk; treasurei. 
Jolin" Marshall, as.se.^.sor. Charles Ander- 
«Jn justices, G. W. Koberts Andrew 
Cisber constables. Matt SpUlum, C. 
Tipthesrove; school superinlendeni. bam 
Bloan, 

Grand Kapids. Mmn., ^•^^''^ ,1,"^^?-'^' 
Cial to The Herald.)-There are two tick- 
ets in tlie n-ld here as follows. 

Caucus Ticket-PresidL-nt, George Kid- 
dle re-order. W. <:. Vancy: treasurer. 
John MoMahan; trustees. Henry Hcshes. 
Keo l^^roux, M A. Bossard. 

independent TIcket-Presl.lent 
Krksine lunnaounced 
Yancy 



recorder, 



C. 
W. 



W. 
C. 



I 



The township ticket is as '^'^l'5>ws 'Ju/ 
ervlsor. Hugh McKwan; .^••^"k. J<J"''P»^ 
IrMahon; justice, Robert H. Bailey. 



BHIDHKMAN FOR MAYOR. 

Nomiiiatt'd bv At't-lamatioii by Voters 
of Bovn \ illaff«'. 

lUney. Mmn.. March <.♦. (Special to 
Th»- Herald. )-At the village caucus h"ld 
here Kriday evening, f. 1. Bledennan 
V. as nominated l>y acclamation for m;iy- 
or, John Spechl, <h;irl(>s Peterson and 
Nols Lexon were nonunaied for villiige 
councllrnen. Kred tJardnep for recorder 
and I). M. \ i-i inilyea km treasurer by 
acclamation. Tlie hall was filled with 
vuter.s elbowing their way for staiidintt 
room, which showed that the people of 
the town were iniei'-sif'd In chosing a 
good ticket. 

.\l the caucus held her-' Satniilay even- 
ing ihe following ticket wa.s nominated 
for Iron Range township: Krick John- 
son for Bnper\ isor. W. IJollinger. chrk; 
I). Verndl.s'ea. U'ciisucer; J. Riiatama, as- 
sessor; Vv. J. Trescoil, justice, and 
Henry Topping, constahle. The sup^-r- 
visor, clerk, jusl^li-e and con.-ttahle were 
nominated O.v acclamation having no op- 
position. The treasurer and assessor 
Wen* nomiiiHted hy Oiiil.ii. P. K. I'riest 
and 1>. M. N'ermilyea wi-re up for treas- 
urer and Kd i"haml»erlain and J. Raai- 
lami for asse.-^sor. li is reported that 
Coleralne will enter the Meld with an 
Independent ticket as most of the oflices 
nominated are representatives of Bovey. 



Aurora. Minn.. March 9.-{Special to 
Iho Heraid.)-There is one ticket here 
as tollows' 

President. W. J. Hashlelgh; recorder. 
«• G Vandorpool. treasurer. John W. 
Lang justice, L. Tillman; conslal>le, 
H.Tn i^ang. asses.sor, C. H. Graham; trus- 
tees, r J. Nichols, G. J. Roop. John 
Gersloh 



-(Special to 
tickket here 




8K2C 




John d Afoe &SonsCo\ 

( for mer/y Johnson AMofi) 

2/^ Ave Wis .%penorzSr., Du/ufh 



Tuesday,2to4p.in. 

LINEN CRASH TOWELING 

unbleached, our regular lOc qual- 
ity, special for Tuesday, 2 hour 
sale, yours at the yard — 



The Introductory Sale 





i ly 





TOBY OF TIHlll 





A MATCHLESS ARRAY OF EXTRAS. 



A SPLENDID TESTIMONIAL OF CONHDENCE. 



ATURDAY at sharp 9 a. m. the doors opened to the biggest crowd 
and upon the biggest assemblage of values ever known in this great store. 
While we knew the prices would bring a multitude, we did not expect a 
stampede. We arc justly appreciative because the throngs and sales surpassed 
our great Christmas business, when we had fully twice the stock. 

All the New Spring Merchandise Thrown In at Introductory 
Sale Prices- Can You Resist the Opportunity ? 



Another Splendid Silk Sale! 



HOUR SALE 



TUESDAY AT 9:00 A. M. 

Fancy Floral 



Aeain Tuesday we will give you another chance to buy these fine new Black Silks and 

Effects, at a price that is really below our cost. 

$1.48 Taffeta, guaianteed, 36-inohe9 wide. 
$1.2.5 to $1.75 yard — an exceptionally fine 



Six pieces of Fancy Silk 
designs — 9 to 10 a. m 
valuea — sale price 



in floral and other 
only — 68c to 75c 



$1.25 Black Guarantwd Taffeta — 30-inches 
wide, about 150 yards only. To introduce 
tho new firm — sale price only 



value — sale price 



Sparta, Mmn.. March ». 
The Herald.)— There is one 
as follows: 

President, Otto H. Haehnke; recorder. 
D M Mau.srtr. troasnrer, Karl Fredrick- 
Bon constable. WllUam Olson; Justices, 
John N. rarlson, flyd<» Campbell; trns- 
teea, L.izurns Knbeiistoln, Anton Indihar, 
Sam Keller. 

Bo\'«y. Minn., March 'J.— (Special to 1 
Thf Herald. I— This Is the tlckttt to bo 
vof'^d here: 

Supervisor. Bnr. Johnwm; clerk. W. 
Bollinger: treasurer. Uavid Vermilyoa; 
a.ssf9.sor. J B. Rnapania; justicf. W. J. 
Trescott; eonstnbU', Harry lopplng. 



PLAN WOLF uorxn UP. 

Itasca County Sportsnipii l*ro|)«st» to 
Protect Deer From .\iiimalK. 

Grand Rapids. Minn.. March 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The ravages of wolve.? 
are playing havoc with deer in Ita.sca 
county and in order lo check the Inroads 
of the beaMts the sportsmen of the isectlon 
propose to holil a regular old time round 
up of the animals same as In othf'r 
states. Thi- hunters will infct at an 
agn-ed upon point and chase the animals 
towards one spot by ln-atinK the brush 
and then slay the beasts In one general 
slaughter. 



McKlnley, Minn. March 9 -(Special to 
Th^ H.rald.t— The ticket to be voted on 
hert- follows: 

T'r.'sid.'nt. Dr. J. i'. Farmer; recorder. 
PiHor Harmon, treasurer, Andrew 
Th>ms.>n: constable. Ueorge Orange; Jus- 



Turn Your Face 
Into Dollars. 



Many a Man Has Failed Because His 
Face Was a Picture of Calamity. 

1' takes sun.shintf to produce a rose. 
a perfect rose. And -so man, to be .suc- 
cessful, must have sunshine inside. 
Tho life which has it not, which ha.s 
no health and no happlne.ss. is sour, 
aurly, pes.simlstic, and a failure. T.te 
world already has too many vinegar 
faces that breathe Ill-will and strife. 
The world wanfs joy. comfort. n\u\- 
Hhine, and will cling to the man who 
has it. who radiates gladn.-s.s and 
triumph wherever he is and under all 
circumstances. 

.Some people have a genius for .seek- 
ing out the dl.sagreeable, tlie crooked, 
the bad "^nd th« ugly. The.se are the 
destroyers; they travel in schools, they 
herd together for they love their kind. 
and the cheerful part of the world will 
have nothing to do with them. 

And -vhy is It that so many peddle 
disaster knowing at the same time 
that if they do. their lives will be 
ruined.' Some people cannot help It, 
for Pessimism usually comes from bod- 
ily disorders, and this cannot always 
'»e prevented. The .>»tomach, for !n- 
atance, is th« most common pause of 
discontent, -sour face, recklessness, dis- 
gust and lack of ambition. A bud 
stomach.— the*.- is the secret of many 
a 'allure. Anyone can have a good 
dtonmch that Q9.n take care of any- 
thing and everything that is put into 
It no matter wh<>ther it is a very bad 
stomach now (»r not. Then why not 

3tuarts Dyspepsia Tablets do this 
v.»ry thing One ingredient of these 
little tablets digests 3.000 grains of 
f.x)d. and no matter how bad is yoia 
dy.spepsla or Indige-^tlon. the.se tablets 
will digest everything in your stom- 
ach, thoroughly and completely, and 
better and .quicker than a healthy 
Htomach can do the same thing. 
Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablet.-, will cure, 
quickly loss of appetite, brash, irrita- 
tion, burning sensations. nausea, 
heartburn, eructations, loss of vim and 
spirit, bad memory, and dyspepsia and 
indigestion in their very worst torms_ 

No other little tablets In the world 
can do so much. You should carry 
Stuarfs Dyspepsia Tablets amund 
with you wherever you go and take 
them after m.sils. Then only will you 
realize what ft is to enjoy a meal, 
and what perfect digestion tiieans. 
Your whole b<idy and your mind 
feel the effects; your vim will 
crease, you will be more s'atisfled with 
what the worJd does, you will think 
happier and be happier and your face 
will be one of supreme contentment 
That will bring you success and .hen 
mor- .success. Try It. It will cost you 
Just :*)c. for a pa<'kage of these won- 
derful Stuart's Dy.-pcpsla Tablets, a. 
any drug store on earth. • 

Send us your name and add!e.>^.« to- 
day and we will at once send you by 
mill a .sample package, free. Address 
F. A. Stuart Co., 150 Stuart Bldg.. 
Marshall. Mich. 



MKSABA MOrNT.\IN 

TOWNSHIP CANDIDATES. 



Kveleth, Minn.. March ».— (Special to 
The Herald.) -At the caucus at the Me- 
saba Mountain township hall .Saturday 
evening, tlie following ticket was decid-'d 
on: Supervisor. T. J. Trengrove; clerk. 
S. K. Helps; treasurer. William Burke; 
justices Ol the peace, f). H. llaeiikhe. Kd 
Moylan; asses.sor. H. 3. Sherman; con- 
stables, I'eter Cosgrove, Koc<-o Oifone. 

HecausH of the close voi.- for William 
Hurke for treasurer. It is ixiKcti-d that 
r. J. Murphy will run independently at 
I h»- township election that conie..4 off lo- 
ninriow night in tiio Mcsaija Mountain 
lowiisliip hall. 

The .-status of the road supervi.sor is 
changed. According to Ihe recently adopt- 
ed code, he Is ajjpoiiited by the Imard 
of snj)eivisor.s and ch-rk. He serves* un- 
der lite road supervi.sor appointed by the 
county coiniuissioners. 



PKUHAM MAN ASSl MKS 

('HAR(iKOFUMIU:UYAm). 

Grand Kapids, Mmn., March 9.— (Spe- 
cial to 'Phe Herald, i-l... Sehaf. who re- 
cently pnrcha.s.tl the U. b'. Knox lum- 
ber .vard at this place .and who expected 
to build a Hue home here this spring, 
has hired 1.. O. Oorenkeinber. lately of 
I'erhain 'Us manager ot the yard. Mr. 
Schaf will go to Wadena, where he will 
go l)ack to his old trade, contractor and 
builder, for a time al leasU. Mr. Schai's 
decision not to move liere lilinseM was 
brought atwiit by ih- fact thai he wa.-^ 
nimble to secure the title to the lots he 
bargained tor some time ago and could 
not find a suitable site on which to 
build himself a liouse. 



Curtain Sale 
Tuesday 

20* Ofl! 



Last week we received our 
new Lace Ourtain stock, by 
all odds the finest ever in this 
store. To give still another 

impetus to this great Introduc- 
tory Sale, you buy values to 
$15.00 as follows: 



$2.00 CurtaJiw, now 



$3.00 ( iirlains. 



$.">.00 <'iirlain.'<, now 
$10.00 Curtains, now, 
$15.00 ( urtains, now $12.00 




43c 



79c 



89c 



Ladles' FaU and Winter 

Suits, Coats, Furs, 
. atHaU. 

Dress Skirts, StylistT Fall Suits, suitable for 
immediate and spring wear— also caracul coats, 
fur boas, scarfs and collars — infants' and chil- 
dren's bearcloth and astrakhan coats— all to go 



At 



HALF 



Price 



^ __ _ _^^ ^ A^ ^™ Each Palp Men's 
i3aVC OUC or Women's Shoes! 



Not 60 per cent ofif, but ''60c ofif" is the way 
we are selling all our Men's and Women's 
Shoes. For examplee: 

$5.00 Shoes are now $4.40 

$4.00 Shoes are now .$3.40 

S3.50 Shoes are now , .$2.90 

S:lOO Shoes are now $2.40 

$t?.50 Shoes are now $1.90 

$2.00 Shoes are now $1.40 

$1.75 Shoes are now $1.15 



In The 

Base- 
ment 



15c Press-Cut tlla.ss .Sugars. 15c 
C'reamer.s, 10c Fire Shovels. 10c 
Steak Founders. 10c Pudding Pans. 
10c Enameled Pie Plates, 10c 
Round Oraters, 10c Towel RoUens. 
10c Rat Traps, 10c Sad Iron 
Handles. 10c Dust Pan.s. 10c Chop- 
ping Knlve.s, 10c Slates, 10c 
Knives and Forks, and flfty other 
Items, choice at 




25c Earthen Cuspidors, Jardinieres, 
Pitchers and Stew Pans, 25c Salt 
Boxes, ir>c Hammers, 19c Clothes 
Racks 15c Shoe Brushes, 19c Screw 
Drivers. 25c Enameled Sauce Pans, 
2.'>c Tin Dish Pans. 19c Framed Pic- 
tures, 19c Enameled Dippers, 19c 
Vases, 15c Cups and Saucers. 15c 
r:hina Plat-s, 19c Pocket Knives, and 
fifty other u.seful things, all new 



10 



c 



Values 
15c up 
to 25c 



Tea Cups and Saucers. Cake 
Plates, Salacl.<. Pickles. 

Sugar and Cream Sets, Hair 
Receivers, Shaving Mugs. 
Milk Jars, Manicure Trays, 
Celery. Irishes, Olive Dishes. 
Craclier Jars. Large Pitchers 
— and dozens of other items 
— all new goods — choice at 



25 



c 



Horth 

le 50c 



AURORA (AMPAIGIN LhEIJ. 

El«»dioii SuppostMl to Be Qiiit't Is 
(jetting Kedliot. 

Aurora. Minn.. March 9.— (.Special to 
The Herald.)— What was thought 
would he tme of the quietest elections 
In the history of .\urora is turning 
out lo be one of the liveliest. In the 
village indt'pendenl candidates for 
president, and one trustee are in the 
held. Charles Olson, the present presi- 
dent, and M. I.,evine. now coiincilniaii. 
are contesting with \V. J. Ras.ilelgh 
and Capl. Xicholas, both mining men. 
for the offices. A circular stating 
that the mining corporations are try- 
ing to get control of the village and 
thereby knock out the sewer proposi- 
thm and other contemplated Improve- 
ments, is being passed around and ask- 
ing for Levine. 

in the township of White several 
contests are on. VV. J. Ilasoleigh, regu- 
lar candidate for super\ Isor for one 
year, has J. J Hudson of the M^adow- 
Fowier mine against him on stickers. 
Charles l\. Hill, the present treasurer, 
is opposed hy Carl Kriik.son on slick- 
ers For assessor. F". C. Levine. F. V. 
Andei.son and F. O. Adam.son are con- 
testing. Money is being repent freely 
and it is a tight to the Mnlsli. 



In- 



sleigb ride party tc/ their members Tues- 
dav evening last. 

The reeeni Slate school apportionment 
allowed l..jike county $2,150. 

Conductor and Mrs. Oeorge Lmerton 
have returned from tin extended visit 
with relatives in Canada. 

The American Hridge company are 
putting up Ihotr derricks near the ore 
vards where the steel girders for ore. 
dock No 6 are being unloaded and will 
soon commence work making the .ste^el 
work into sections to >>e placed aa the 
dock work progres^es. Owing to there 
l)eing no other work ahead and plenty 
of men to be had it Is expected to have 
the dock completed earlier than was first 
thought. 

Mrs VV. 8. Andrews has returned from 
Si>mersei, W i.s.. where she hag been un- 
dergoing medical treatment. 



NEW BALLOTS RKUIIRED 

In Villap' Election Beoanse of Late 
Rnling. 

Aurora, Minn.. March 9— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Word was received hern 
yesterday from Village Attorney Law- 
rence of Two Harbors that the Aus- 
tralian ballot cannot be used legally 
at the village election here Tuesday. 
The point of law taken Is that the 
village has no charter which entitles it 
to elict a mayor and other city offi- 
cers. The ballots are all ready for 
election, but will have to be destroyed 
ami new ones printed. 



tify the unknown man struck by an 
Iron Range switch engine at Tower 
Junction Saturday and Instantly killed. 
The body has been brought here for 
Identification. The deceased was of 
average build and apparently a labor- 
er The engineer -lalms he repeatedly 
blew the whistle, but the man walk- 
ing along the track paid no heed until 
It was too late and the reversing -' 
the engine did not save him. 



of 



UNKNOWN IS KILLED. 

Man Walking: on Iron Range Traek 
Hit by Locomotive. 

Tower. March 9.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— Considerable difficulty is be- 
ing experienced In attempting to Iden- 



H. S. BRYAN RESIGNS 

As Chairman of Lake County Repub- 
lican Committee. 

Two Harbors. Minn.. March 9. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The Lake County 
Republican cormmittee has been reor- 
ganized. H. S. Bryan has re.slgned as 
chairman on account of ill-'health and 
Creorge Munford has been elected to 
succeed him. 

M. M. Hanna and George J. 
Miller were appointed to fill vacancies 
In the committee. The primaries will 
l>e held April 6 to elect delegates to 
the county convention, which will be 
held April 9. which, in turn, will elect 
delegates to the state convention at 
Minneapolis, April 16. 



Fox Will I^wrence, Agnes Behler and 
many others, Including a large chorus. 
"Newport" is said to tje tjuite a preten- 
tious offering. The words and music 
were written by Dave Marion. 

RABBIT HUNTER SAVED 
FROM FREEZING TO DEATH. 

Newberry, Mich., March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Wandering through the 
woods for two days, and with hands and 
feet frozen having laid down to die. 
Peter Steinbach, an Austrian woodsman, 
owes his life to George Mead, a fellow 
employe at the logging camp of George 
Fronij near Chapel Beach. In the Pic- 
tured Rock country east of Munlsing. 
Steinl>ach had started out to hunt rab- 
bits and had lost his way. When he had 
not returned the following morning, oth- 
ers of the logging crew set out in search 
of him. Mead found the man late that 
niglit, eighteen miles from camp, and 
then carried and dragged him for much 
of tho distance until fellow-searchers 
were met with. The Austrian Is in seri- 
ous condition but is expected to re- 
cover. 



cruisers, four. r)t>,700 tons; other 
cruisers, five. 7,006 tons; destroyers 
thirty-three, 12,573 tons; torpedo boats, 
five, 760 tons; total,, fifty-one 148,539 
tons. 

Present ' force— Battleships, thirteen, 
131,381 tons; armored cruisers, twelve. 
130,683 tons; other cruisers, forty- 
fixen, 1d5s252 tons; destroyers, fifty- 
five. 20,508 tons; torpedo boats, seven- 
ty-seven. 7.258 tons; total, 204 ships. 
51.3.082 tons. 



liealih department was notified. 

Health Commisslonei- Murray tried In 
vain lo gel a place for Olson in one of 
the hospitals. l)iit ihey would not lak-i 
him in. so th< pesi house was the only 
alternative. Olson is in some danger of 
contracting smallpox, but he was willing 
to take a chance raUier tliaii sl.-^.p in ih« 
snow. 



JAPS HAVE GREATER NAVY 



Only 5c Per Box, But, My How They 

Red Cross -|- Cough Drops. Try 



work, 
them. 



TWO HARBORS E\ ENTS. 

Happenings (Jatheieii at County 
Seat of Lake County. 



(Sp«'cial 
h.is lln- 



Iw-. Harbors, .Vliiui.. .March 9 
to The Herald.) -M. K. .Marlon 
ished his shipment. •; of logs tr«im Athens 
to the Nolan Bros. & l.alrd mill at 
JSkibo. 

fondnclor C K. Wall has again takni 
I lie local run between here and Biwabik 

.Anton Kotclievar has completed his 
shipmenls ol logs rroin Robinson lo the 
mills at Tower. 

The roads are now In tine condition 
a;ul Wiiod hauling Is In-ing rushed. 

Ml-s M.ivine McGraw has returned to 
her du i-\s at St. Paul after a couple of 
we.ks' vNU with her parents. 

The Voung Petiples society of the .Nor- 
wegian TiUtheran church gave a pleagant 



KIDNEY, LIVGR 

AND BOWELrS 

Si< kness is next to Impossible If you 
keep the Kidneys. Liver and Bowels In 
perfett working order with an occa- 
sional ilose of 

Dr. A.. W. CHitse^s 
Kidney-Lriver Pills 

Mr S. ». Holden. No. 1W44 Cass Ave., 
(Jrand Rapids. Mh h.. says: I have for 
vear.-i been subject to sluggishness of 
the liver and constipation, the kidnevs 
were also Inactive and causeil me a 
great deal of pain across my loins. I 
got some of r>r. A. VV. Chase's Kldnpy- 
l.,lver IMlls and they cured the In.'tc- 
llvltv of the itrgans rapidly an<l easily. 
I would not be without them." -5c a 
box al all dealers. Write m.» for a free 
.-ample l>r. A. VV. Chas** Medicine Co.. 
Bufralo. N. Y. 




emECTORY OF 

WllKKK TO m TOMOHT. 

METROPOLITAN-Burlesqu*. 

Green Room Gossip. 

The Mack-Leone Players will open a 
week's engagement at tbe Lyceum to- 
mtirrow evening in "The Case of Rebel- 
lious Susan." a comedy-dfamA. by Henry 
Arthur Jones. 

* • * ' 

Charles Elliott of 'The Red Mill " com- 
pany was entertained while In the city 
by A. G. and C. M' Flugemld. Mr. El- 
liott is an old Exeter and Harbard man. 
and a former schoolmate of the Fitz- 
gerald brothers. 

• • • , 

Tho Dreanr.land Btirl«s.iuers. with Dave 

Marlon In that comedians latest farce. 

"Newport." furnifh the amusement at 

the Metropolitan this wee^ Besides Dave 

Marlon, th.^ company Includes Harrjr 



(Continued from Page 1.) 



torpedo boats less. Her naval loss 
during the war included 2 battleships, 8 
cruisers. 2 destroyers, 7 torpedo boats, 
or a total of 19 vessels and 46.616 tons. 
On the other hand, as against the two 
battelships torpedoed by the Russians, 
the Japanese bajrged at Port Arthur 
and in the battle of the Japan Sea. five 
battleshipfik, representing 62,524 tons. 

In addition, there were taken II un- 
armored cruisers (71.276 tons); five de- 
stroyers (1.740 tons), or a total of 21 
vessels, representing 135.350 tons. 

The following figures are given: 
Strength when the war commenced— 
Battleships. 3ix. 84,652 tons; armored 
cruisers, eight, 73.982 tons; other cruis- 
ers, forty-four, 111.470 tons; destroy- 
ers' nineteen. 6,159 tons; torpedo l»ats. 
eighty, 7.119 tons; total. 157 ships, 283.- 
743 tons. 

Built during or since the war: 
Battleships, four, 71.500 tons; armored 



MAY ADOPT HIS 
' DIVORCED WIFE 

D. A. Petre Will Neither 

Deny Nor Affirm 

the Rumor. 

D. A. Petre this morning refused to 
either "deny or aftirm the rumor that he 
is planning to adopt his former wife, 
Elhlwyn Dean, from whom he recently 
securt»d a legal separation. 

He laughingly referred the reporter to 
Miss Dean, formerly Mrs. Petre, who 
was in the office with hJm at the time. 

Mrs. Dean also refused to give out any 
information on the subject. 

"You are to l>e reunited, are you not?" 
asked the reporter. 

"I can't say Just- yet." replied the 
former Mrs. Petre. 

"W^hat is it to be, an adoption or a 
remarriage?" 

"Well, it's not the latter." replied the 
former Mrs. Petre. and refused to talk 
further on the subject. 

It was reported that papers would 
shortly be tiled in the district court mak- 
ing Mr. Petre the legal ■ guardian of his 
former wife. 



Pain 



MUST GO TO PESTHOUSE. 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Haver Always Bought 



Bears the 
Signature of 



After efforts to secure admission in the 
hospitals of the city and in several board- 
ing houses and other places where he 
might be isolated and still receive need- 
ed attention had failed the health 
authorities were obliged late Saturday to 
fumigate the annex to the smallpox pest 
liouse and .send thither John Olson, suf- 
fering from scarlet fever. 

Olson arrived from the woods Saturday, 
and being ailing, visited a West Duluth 
physician. The doctor told him he had 
the fever and advised him to go to his 
boarding house and go to bed. Admission 
W8W denied him there, however, and th« 



Weakens 

Hea(la<*lie, rheumatism, 
neuralgia, or pains ol' aujj 
nature weaken the sys- 
tem—they are a strain up- 
on the nerves. Ahuost 
instant relief can be ob- 
tained by taking Dr. Miles 
Anti-Pain Pills, and with- 
out any bad after-effects. 
Take one on first indica- 
tion of an attack— it will 
ward it off. They are a 
pleasant little tablet, sold 
by druggists everywhere, 
25 doses 25 cents; 
never sold in bulk. 

"I was subject to constant head- 
aches for a period of four years. At 
times I was almost unfilled for th« 
work In which 1 am engaged, that of 
station agent. Through the advica 
of a friend I tried Dr. Miles' Antl- 
Pain Pills, and the result has been 
that I have entirely eradicated my 
system of those continuous headaches 
that follow a continual mental strain. 
They liave done for me all that is 
claimed for them." 

O. T.. RUSSBLLu 
Agt. C. &. N. W. Ry.. Battie Creek, !•. 

"I have used Dr. Miles' Antl-Pain 
Pills for a year now for neuralgia 
and find there Is nothing like them. 
They surely have been a blessing to 
me." MRS. M. J. HAMITTON, 

Upper Alton. Ills. 

Your druggist sells Dr. MMss' Antl- 
Pain Pills, and we authorizs him to 
return the price of first packags (only) 
If it falls to benefit you. 

MUes Medical Co., Elkhart, Ind 



\ 







10 



THE DULUTH EVENING HI^^^ALD; MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 






A LAZY LIVER' 

May be only a tired liver, or a starved liv«r. It would be a stuplfl a« 
well as savage thing to beat a weary or starved man because he lagged 
in his work. So in treating the lagging, torpid liver It is a great 
mistake to lash it with strong drastic drugs. A torpid liver is but an 
indication of an ill- nourished, enfeebled body whose organs are weary 
with over-work. Start with the stomach and allied organs of digestion 
and nutrition. Put them in working order and see how quickly your 
liver will become active. Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery has 
made many marvelous cures of "liver complaint," or torpid liver, 
by its wonderful control over the organs of digestion and nutrition. It 
restores the normal activity of the stomach, increases the secretions of 
the blood-making glands, cleanses the system' of poisonous accumu- 
lations, and so relieves the liver of the burdens imposed upon it by the 
defection of other organs 




BOYS MAKE 
LONG JUMP 



OIF IM DAY 



JUNNUM IS 



THE VICTOR 



IS?" 



Symptoms. If you h'avo bitter or 
bad taste in the morning, poor or vari- 
able appetite, coated tongue, foul breath, 
constipated or irregular bowels, leel 



Prof. Finley Ellingwood, M. D., of 
Bennett Medical College, Chicago, says 
of Golden Seal root: "It is a most 
superior remedy in catarrhal gastritis 
inflammation of the stomach), chrouio 



mptoms of weak stomach (This agent, Golden Seal root is an 
I liver or biliousneee, no important ingredient of Dr. Pierce S 
ill relieve you more promntiy ; Favonterre.cri,H.on orwoinan 



weak easily tired, deipond^it. frequent ' (inflammation o! i'^*' s»f"J'ac" ^ cnrou.o 
Saches pain or distress in "small of , constipation, general debility m con- 
baS' gnawing or distressed feeling in ! VHlt-.^cenoe from protracted fevers, m 
fitomkch per laps nau.ea, bitter or sour : prostrating night-sweats. Jtts an ,m- 
Sn%'''^n throat after eating, and por<a«^ m«ec/y^»« rfi.Wers om. t^omft.;; 

kindred sy 

and torpid 

medicine will relieve you more prompt.^ , . „o ii \f a 

Tr cure vou more permanently tt.an 1 nesees, ah well a« ot the "Golden Med 
Sr Pierce's Golden Medical Discovery, ical Discovery -; IT. Rlhngwood con- 
I Perhaps only a part of the above symp- I tinues "in all catarrhal conditions it 
koms will be present at one time and t le useful." 

yet point to torpid liver, or biliousness | Much more, did space permit, could 
and weak stomach. Avoid all hut bread ; be quoted from prominent authorities 
land biscuits, griddie cakes and other j as to the wonderful curative properties 
andiaestible food and take tlie "Golden I possessed by Golden Seal root 
iMedical Discovery" regularly and ttttck . ^r^ ^^^^ ^f, assure the re 
i«o t<» t*se until you are vigorous -"'' ~ -- 



New Records on Chester "Itasca Moose" Wins at 



Hill in Amateur 
Tournament 



George Jacobson Makes 

Longest Standing Jump 

of 107 Feet. 



_^ ._ .. _ and 

Istrong. ' . 

I Of Golden Seal root, which is one of 
jthe prominent ingredients of "CJolden 
Medical Discovery, " Dr. Roberts Barth- 
olow,of Jefferpon Medical College, says: 
"Very useful as a stomachic (stomach) 
tonic and in atonic dyspepsia. Cures 
gastric (stomach) catarrh and head- 
aches accompanying same." 

Dr. Grover Coe, of New York, says: 
♦^Hydrastis (Golden Seal root) exercises 
an especial influence over mucous sur- 
faces. Upon the liver it acts with equfl 
certainty and efficacy. A? a cholagogue 

ihver invigorator) it has few equals." 
)r. Coe also advises it for affections of 



reader that 
"Golden Medical Discovery" can be 
relied upon to do all that is claimed for 
(ioiden Seal root in the cure of all ths 



Amateur rklors ot Uuluth sliowod that 
they are making great strid-s, in toru- 
ii.iments held Saturday and ycsler-lay. 
Neajly filty riders competed yesterday 
and the exiulnlion thi; boys gave wa.s al- 
most as satlslying au a profeasional tour- 
nament. 

In C'lase B yesterday for amateurs un- 
der IH years ot age, tlarold l^andre won 
tirsl prize and Arnold Olbon made the 
Icngest standing jump of Of- feet. In 
Class C !«ir anmtturs over 1» years of 
CJeortje Jaeuhson landed lirsi place. 



above brief extracts, for its most 
prominent and important ingredient is 
Golden Seal root. This agent is, how- 
ever, strongly reinforced, and its cura- 
tive action greatly enhanced by the 
addition, in just the right proportion 
of Queen 8 root, Stone root, Black 
Cherry bark, Blood root. Mandrake root 
and cheniically purt glycerine. All of 
tliese arfa happily and harmoniously 
blended irto a "most perfect phar- 
maceutic}! 1 cf^mponnd. now favorably 
known throughout most of tfie civilized 



the spleen and other abdominal^ viscera cf7untrieB of the world. Bear in iiiind 

md evt-rv ingLC Jient^ptering 
t}if " Dx-overv •• hag^rec cived the 



generallv. ,.and for scrofuloui^ and gla nd 
alar diseases, cutaneous eruptions^ in 
digestion, debility, cb^finl^ diart^ea. 
constipation, also insaveral affections 

Seculiar to womenTT^ in all chronic 
erangements ^>f- th< liver , also for 
chronicii4iarnri»atV>n of bladder, for 
whicfy^)r "t>«<,s^« "it is one of the 
inostfreliable agems of cure " 

PrA John King. M D , late of Cin- 
cinnatb authflr of the AMERICAN Die- 
fENriATORY, gives it a prominent place 
among medicinal agents, reiteratet all 
the foregoing writers have said about 
it, as does also Prof. J<.hn M. Scuddei, 
M. D., late of Cincinnati. Dr. Scuddor 
says: "It stimulates the digestive pro- 
cesses and increases the assimilation of 
food. By these means the blood ts en- 
riched. * * * * the consequent improve- 
ment on the glandular and nerv'oi.s sys- 
tems are natural results." Dr. Scudder 
further sars, "in relation to its general 
effect upon the system, there itt no vie(H- 
cine xn use about uhich there is su<h 
general unantmity of opinion. It is ««i 
versally regarded as the tonic, 
in all debilitated states 



that efjoh r i 
into tliej * b 
eiidorsemTTn' 



[fe- 



ol tnc leading niMjiCl 
rnenot our hi nd^ uh o e.viui eac.'i artjcle 



various diseases as set forth in the ] .^„^^ .,iin, uiuUe the lungc^i aiauamg jump 

ot loT feet. H. Trannum made iho long- 
est jump vi the day, US feet, but ne 
failed tu hold his balance after striking 
the :<lide. 

tJauiKlay. also, the lH»ys Jumped well. 
11. Ti;iunum. «t-orge Jaeobjon and Arn- 
old Oisun making umg .lumps. Jacobson 
had the longest suuiUuig jump of loa 
liet. 

The new records of the amateurs were 
nuide possible by the changes made in 
the slide. The bump has been moved 
baik ten leet and raised four feet, giving 
the lidtTP a higJitr llighi and more mo- 
mentum for tht jump. The ciiange.s ar.; 
also induclve to mere s-pcctacular jump- 
ing and Konie great marku are t-xjiecud 
at the lournanuni next Sunday, when 
the Fiars will a«ain compete on the hill. 
John i:vtns<.:i, holder of the American 
record, who missed lilf train for Hib- 
bing yesterday, went out on Chester hill 
ami twicf made Jjnips of lis fe»t. It Is 
believed he can l»eat his Isiipemmg rec- 
ord t»n the hill next Su.iday, niter prac- 
ticing all ihla w^-k under tht changed 
conditi<ins. 

The awards In yeHt.rday'g amateur 
tournament, nuule lapt>*yening by the 
judges, are as follows: 
CLASS B. 

Kid»r— 

Htimid Land re ■ 

(>S(ar Kriekson 

Uignar Rudlfd 

.Majlon Uls.)n 

l^uigttt standing jump. Arnold Olson, 
)tt tett. 

CLASS C. 

Rid( r- Points 

tJeorge Jacobson '-i^ 

Ftergcr '^^^ 

T. i:. Lanfold i<3-* 

K. 8. Handrum ''^•*^i 

iMaf Kygh :^^4 

lx)np( St standing jump, George Jacob- 
son, 107 feet. 



laine^ flwO^^ in 



-trr 



7iT«^est 



naiiieg awo .- - 

\VhMt ot1( T m>-diriii( pu t u p for pal» 
thniiij^ h drn^;gi!?tP c u i i sTtow ^ any nic^ 
ofestiiomil eiiiTorftemeiin' Tor dys'- 



liZ. 



jubles, all chronic catar- 



pep?ia. liver troubles, 
rhal affections of whatever name or 
nature, lingering coughs, bronchial, 
throat and lung affections, the "Dis- 
covery" can be relied upon ae a sover- 
eign remedy. 

A little book of extract* treating of 

I all the several ingredient!- entering into 

Dr. I'ierce's medicines, being extracts 

i from standard medical works, of the 

! different schools of practice will be ! Aif 

mailed free to any one asking (by pobtal 

card or letUr), for the same, addressed 

i to Di. R. V. Piirce, Buffalo, N. Y., and 

' giving the writer'p full poet-oflSce ad- 

I dress plainly written 



the nibbing SKI 
Tournament. 

Ole Feiring Gets Money 
for Longest Stand- 
ing Jump. 



Hibbing, Minn.. March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Olaf Junnum. "tho llasca 
moos..." of Coleraine carried ott firs; 
honors in the annual ski tournament of 
the Hibbing Ski club held here yesterday 
alurnoon. bitorc a crowd of about 3,0oy 
people from the range towns. Jun.iaiu'j 
juniping was tae most consistent of uie 
afternoon. All of his three regular jumps 
Wire long and graceful, and besides lirsL 
money, he luuk the special priite for mc 
most graceful rider. 

The Oulutn ruu rs did not show uo as 
well as waa expected, although Ule Feir- 
ing took the prize tor li»e longest slau.l- 
ing jump, wim a jump of 11:; feet. !• cur- 
ing's jump was made in tiie spveial run 
for that pr.ze. but in one of mc reguiUi- 
runs, ulai Junnum jumped Hi feet ana 
stood. John Kvenson. American cham- 
pion, who holds the recrd of li: leet 
nifide at Istipoi.iuig. Wasainglons biiui- 
uay, missed his train and was not pres- 
ent. , , 

Ole Fcirlng and John Mangseih of Du- 
luth broke msiue ol Hie money by taking 
fourth and fiHh prizes. lespecLlvely. Au- 
gu.si Nordby o: Sioughton, ^Wis.. stood 
second to Junnum, wiiii Ule Mangsetn or 
Coleraine in tliiid place. 

Tht tournam.nt Wius held on the new 
slide on lin- Mahoning mine property and 
the jumping was the best evei seen on 
the range. Nearly all of the stars, wno 
tCH.k pan in iiie n-uional tournament at 
I»uluth, were prestni. and the crow.i 
thoroughly enjoyed the jumping. The 
awards were as follows; 



Energy is well-nourished muscles 
plus well-nourished nerves. 

Uneeda Biscuit 

are the greatest energy-makers 
of all the wheat foods. 

r^ In dust tight, "" 

^ moisture proof packages. 
JVeper sold in bulk. 

NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY 



Points. 
....1:85 

2;i6 

....;:-7 



City Prize. 

,. Coleraine First 

.. Stoughton... Second 

..Coleraine Third 

,. Duluth Fourth 

.."imluth Fifth 

..Coleraine Sixth 

...Coleraine .. Seventh 
L.onge'sT standing jump. Ole Fiering. Du- 
luth, 112 feet. _, ^ 

Most graceful rider. Olaf Junnum. 
Ct>1eralne. , ^, 

Best tandem Jump. Ole Mangseth, Ole 
Westgard, Coleraine. 



Rider 

Olaf Junnum .. 
August Nordby 
Ole Mangseth... 

Ole Fiering 

John Mangseth. 
Ole Weslga.'-d... 
Jacob Kolstad 



useful 



« >■> 



MINNESOTA 
UNIVERSITY 

^even-Game Schedule for 
the Conference Col- 
leges Next Fall. 

First Dictionary of the 

Minnesota University 

Has Been issued. 



Minneapolis. Mdeh 9.— (Spf<:lai to 
The Herald.)— Minn* sota ha.s received 
pfRcia] notice that a seven-game 
sdiedule will be permltteii to the con- 
ference college.'! next fall. At tlie 
meeting of the athletic board of con- 
trol Tuesday. Prof. Paige read a teie- 
gram from Coach Stagg. president of 
the conference, announcing the vote 
«)f the "big eight" to be 6 to 2 in favor 
of the lonfe'er schedule. Wisconsin and 
Illinois being the i>air wliich held out 
iigainst the wishe.< of the majority. 
This will add three more contests to 
the schedule already prepared which 
•was us follows: Nebraska, at North- 
rop Field, Oct. IT; vacant. C'ct. 24; Chi- 
cago, at Man^liull F'ield. Oct. 31; Wis- 
consin, at N»'rthrop Field, Nov. T; va- 
cant. Nov. 14; Carlisle, at Northrop 
Field, Nov. HI. l>r. Williams will not 
even state whether he wants to fill out 
th« two vacant dates befort the Chi- 
cago and Carlisle games, and refusi s 
to specvilate on the personnel of the 
rest of tlie Gopher schedule. Tht. 
boiird also approved tht contracts lor 
ba.«eball gainev with Madison. May Ifi. 
and a return game on Nortnrop Field, 
Junt 6. Th( lir.«t game on tht .'4ched- 
Ule will be Illinois on April 18. 



Don't accept a snbstitut* of unknown ;1a||J I DDAR ARI V 
composition for this non-secret mkpI- fflLL I I\Vli/lEJi-i I 

ORDER A YACHT 



iposit 

CIXK OF KNOWN COMPOKITIOM. 



ever prepared camt ovU last week. It 
is most interesting— a feature not com- 
mon ti. dicticnarles— not only on ac- 
count of its being tht ttrst dictionary 
in tnt histcry of any collegiate ^insti- 
tution, but also be( Kusf of its* com- 
paetr.iss and tht snappy style in which 
evcrvthing and everybody have been 
wntlen up. Tlie Srrepressitilo humor 
of E. B Jf>hnKon s«cretary of the gen- 
era! Alumni assi>clatlon who compiled 
it, gleams forth everywhere, for in- 
stance: •Castiilian Literary Society— 
urgjtnized Nov 11. 1896, and stlil in 
existenct." The sports and debates 
are >i('th written up in a particularly 
interesting manner and tht records art 
coiiipl* :e in every detail. 



• V * 

Daily. Hcores of university 
are sten rushing in and out 
Arcade Bo.viing alley on 
avenue. Never ht f ort in 



neck 

still to 



Psi Upsilon; 



Th< first 



• • • 
riictionary 



Minnesntr 



Greeks 
of the 

Hcnnepm 
the history 
of inter-fraternity bowling have the 
teams been as evenly matched. Two 
weeks of sttady lH>vvling leaves the 
final result untertain. Even Anna Eva 
Fay refuses to predict tht result ot 
the conte.'-t, only hazarding a forecast 
of a dost fight and a neck tc 
finish. The completed schedule 
b< played is: 

March 9— Ztta Psi vs. 
Alpha Dtlt vs. Chi Psi. 
March l3-v^igma Nu vs Dekes 
March ll— Dekes vs. Psi Upsilon; 
Sigma Nu vs. Ch; P«l. 
March 20— Zeta Psi vs. Alpha Dclts. 
March 23— Dekes vs. Sigma Nu; Sig- 
ma Nu vs. Alpha Delt. 
March 2it— Psi T'psilon vs Chi Psi. 
Seven basketball girls will leave for 
Lincoln. Neb. on March 21. Day 
Oakes and Peggy Woodrich will ae- 
companv thtm. and Miss Butner wili 
act as "chaperone. This is the •^rst 
i.ut of town game f<>r two years 
there is much (ompeliticn fc-r 
seven placts. Mrs. William Jennings 
Brvan and the governor s wife. Mrs. 
Sheldon will be tht patroness** of the 
game. A return game *il! bt played 
here with the Nt tr.iska quint the first 
part of April The two high .school 
games with sSuth tmd Central art in 
prejiaration foi the oi.e with Nebraska. 
Haddon Ostlund. Edwin McKeene. 
Ed .-Xeklev and John A. .Shields will 
represent "the freshmen in the I'eavey- 
Dun woody oratorical t<.nttst this even- 
ing F. R. Johnson. H. B I>utT W. E. 
Irwin and Theodort Thomi.son were 
selected fr..m tht sophomorts from a 
great number of contestants. Cai'h 
prizes of r2'>. Sl& and $10 are given by 
William H. Dunwoody and Mrs Hef- 
l'-ir.r.p.:r to t^e winner!- <-f the «-o'itest. 



Members of Yacht Club 
Anxious to Enter Nut- 
ting Cup Races. 

At ii smoker to l>t fteld by the mem- 
I'trs ol the Uuluth Yacht club tonight 
in Flaatei/t hall, ::i- West First street, 
the plan TO enter a yacht in the Nutting 
Cup races at Chicago next September, 
wili be tliscussed and a dCLlelon prob- 
ably inadt. 

The plan was plactd l< f ore the mem- 
b» IS ot the club at a sn.«ker held some 
I. me ago, a repies^'Jitatlen of a I'hioago 
Viicht club being a guest. At that time, 
lavoial'lc sentiment was expressed, and 
a canvass of the members of the club 
within th'j last week, *i;is brought out 
strong support of the plan. 

It is probable the result of the meet- 
ing tonight will be the pl:it:ng with un 
Ostikush tirm of an ordu tor the /on- 
structioii ot a yaeiit on hnes suitable for 
entry Into the Chicago races The entry 
will whb-n tne scop* of tht club, whi' h 
baa alwtivs heretotore, confined itst If to 
the Heiici ot the Lakes. The Nutting 
Cup races bring together seine ot th-: 
finest yachts <m the Great Lakes, and 
I'uluth Will necessarily have a f«*t one 
to n.ake a showing. 




fought the petition of the Duluth and 
Winnipeg clubs to have Houfehton and 
Calumet dropped from the Nortiiern 
league, some comment was made on 
the Intluence behind the action. The 
Copper country towns carritwl tlieir 
point and the league was divided, with 
all teams on an equal basis. Incident- 
ally, those who criticised their action 
came in for a vigorous grilling. 

According to reports, the criticism of 
the magnates of at least one of the 
.Michigan towns was not Ill-advised. It 
is said that Calumet, which hasn't one 
chance in a million of getting Into 
organized baseball this year. Is sign- 
ing up the players reserved by it last 
season. In the hope that they may re- 
ceive sometliing for their release, and 
at the same time tne players are pre- 
vented from making advantageous con- 
tracts with other clubs. 

It Is said Houghton has turned all of 
Its phivtrs loose to sign where they 
will. Reports may be wrong in regard 
to Calumet, but If thev are true, the 
action is unsportsmanlike to say the 
least. The magnates would certainly 
be within their rights in taking tne 
action. They lost money and. In their 
estimation, probably, they are justihed 
in taking any possible means to g«t 
some of It fiack. Hut tt looks like 
pretty small sportsmunsliip and un- 
fairness to the players, who might be 
able to sign good contracts, but for 
whose release nobody would pay a 
cent. 

• • • 

Fr.ank Gotoh evidently slipped up in 
his estimate of Joe Rogcr.s. He only 
threw tiie New York collection cpf beef 
twice In an hour, whereas he had con- 
tracted to throw lilm five times. 

The result doesn't change the opin- 
ions held of Rogers' wrestling ability. 
Very often its easier for a wrestler to 
throw n man, who is on the offensive j 
than it is to throw a man, who is play- 
ing on the defensive side and assidu- 
ously sparring to prevent holds and to 
keep himself from being thrown, rather 
than trying to throw the othtr man. 
Gotoh can tie Rogers in a knot in a 
straight match. Hc> threw him twice 
when the New Y'orker was entirely on 
the defensive and any claims Rogers 
may make on the strength of his win- 
ning with the big handicap, will not be 
taken seriously. 



REPORT OF 
GRANDJURY 

Condemns Public Dances 
and the Question- 
able Hotels 



Evidence Furnished 
the Herald Basis of 
the Report. 



by 



The 



WomJ>n loves n clear, rosy complexion. 
Burdock RlcK.d Fitters lurlfles the Hood, 
clears tht skin, restores ruddy, scund 
health. 



and 
the 



SIFKKKIR F!VK WINS. 

Vij.itin^' Basketball IMa3ei> Out- 
cla^^sed by High School Team. 

Hy winning Saturday night by a score 
of M to 15. the Blaiiie high tchc>ol basket- 
ball team ol tSuper.or nti^ile It two 
straight trom the RUe l^ftke tlve, having 
won Fridav night also. Tht game Satur- 
day night was clean a:id last. Blaine 
tspecially showing tint team play- The 
one-slcUd score was the only teaturp to 
n ar the game ft r the sptctators. but 
R.ct IvJike did not give up until the final 
whistle had blown 

The Nelson i-ewey high school teaMi 
eas:ly defeated tht I'roctor Y. M. c . A. 
Ave Saturday night al Superior by a 
score of 4f to 8. l'roctt>r was outclassed 
at every st.ige and never had i. charge 
to pull a victory. Hudson, tht captum 
me faame. 



a . - 

vacant lot into 

forthcoming. , 

The next best thing was done 

peop!e consented to raise the necessary 

amount of money to rePr.tr the stands 

a i bleachers and Sullfvan announcc-d 

tlVt If he could secure the necessary 

jec^ncesslons from the ^''^''^*^\.'[^]'^"^l 

company he would take a chance on 

tht old park in the hope that Superior 

Ifans would be enthusiastic enough to 

Isuppo.t the team despite the distamre 

I The street railway company furnished 

tne hitdi. According to Sullivan, they 

rc-fuse to lay a double track, r<^fu^*^d 

U? build a spur refused to furnish 

transportation fo; the players as an 

nduceinent for him to place the team 

there and would not even guarantee 

a service "-uth as baseball fane demand. 

Such concessions are usually granted 

baseball ttams by street railway com- 

Duiiies which derive revenue from the 

transportation of the crovyd.'j to and 

from ball grounds, but the ofriclals 

of the Sui^erlor company could not see 

it ji^aX way. ... ,. 

Tiiert is no disposition to criticise the 
street railway eon.pnny here. The of- 
ficials know their own business. If 
they think that the revenue they wc>uld 
derive from the revival of baseball in 
Superior would not justify their 
irrinting concessions tc the ball club, 
they are within their rights in refus- 

'"Biit Sullivan should not be criticised 
either He spent a good deal of time In 
Superior looking over the situation. 
He worked "P interest and was pre- 
naied if he could see his way cle.tr. 
U, go ahead with the team. The pro- 
moting of baseball is not a sentimental 
proposition. No man is going to will- 
Inirlv sink thoutamls into a ball club, 
if he cannot see that he Is going to 
iret it bark. That is all right, where 
local pride influences the investment, 
but Sullivan was an outsMer He 
wanted to see where he could break 
even at least, before taking the fran- 
chise. ^ ^ ^ 

C' pper country towns 



SUPERIOR 
DROPS OUT 

Northern League is Given 

Another .Bad Set 

Back. 



Magnates Have Hope of 

Lining Up Another 

Town. 




10D5THE SYSTEM 
OF CATARRH 



When the 






Ciiildic-u Are Clever. j 

Jessie Beatty and Archie Itennis. two 
Duluth children, gave another exhibi- 
tion ot fancy roli« i skatint. a: the Tern- | 
pie nnk SaturdHV night, and pleased a; 
large crowd. Tht children art wonder- ■ 
tullv clever and their first appearance 1 
in public was. a dist:n:-t hit. Manager i 
Shea IS counting on patting them on ' 
again t)efore the stason t nds. I 



Even in its early stages Catarrh is a most distressing ailment, caused by i(\\pXAlN OF REV EM E 



the stuffy feeling in the head, ringing noises in the ears, watery eyes, 
difficult breathing, continual "hawking and spitting." etc., but when the 
blood becomes thoroughly saturated with the iiupnrities "which produce the 
disease it becomes a serious and often dangerous "disorder. Then the bron- 
chial tubes are attacked, the bladder and kidneys diseased, and often the 
lungs become affected by the constant passage of impure blood through 
them and Catarrh terminates in Consumption. The impurities and poisons 
in the blood which produce Catarrh can never be removed through the use 
of sprays, inhalations, wasb.es, etc. Such treatment cannot reach the real 
cause, and their use alone should never be depended on to cure the disease. 
S S. S. cures Catarrh by cleansing the blood of all impure catarrhal mattef\ 
It goes down and attacks the disease at its head, In the circulation, and 
removes every trace of the impurity that is cau.'^ing the trouble. Then as 
rich purified blood is carried to all parts of the system the symptoms grad- 
ually leave, the health is improved, and S. S. S. makes a permanent cure of 
the trouble' Soecial book on Catarrh and any medical advice desired sent 
[lee to all who Write. XEE SWUT SPECIFIC CO., ATLAKTA, GA. 

\ 



(1 TIER ENDS HIS LIFE. 

Seattle. March li.— James J. Atnsworth. 
corimamler of the revenue cutter Rush, 
committed suicide early yesterday morn- 
ing In tht b^thrcom of the vessel. 
First L.ieut. Atmer lound ihe command- 
er's U'dy. a bullet lit>1t showing in the 

' 'no' one aboard the vessel would ven- 
ture an opin-on as to. the probubie cans'- 
of the suicide other than to say thr»i 
the captain sten.ed worried ol late anJ 
had acted strangely. A court-martial 
wa* in progress nvolving the conduct of 
some c f the off.^rs aboard the vessel 
it Is learned, but the charges did not 
affect the capt.-;!:!. „ , » „ 

Capt Ainsworth recently applied for a 
Itave of absence to visit bi.s mother, wh,^ 
was ill at Portsmouth. N. H. it i-: 
understort his reque.-t was relusen 
(■apt. Ainsworth v\a« it years old and 
u&married. 



Your Hot Pipes 

%a/HEN the heater man put 
** hot pipes through the 
house in place of stoves he 
thought it was something 
new. But nature put hot pipes 
all through our bodies to keep 
us warm Idng, long ago. 

Scott's Emulsion 

sends heat and rich nourish- 
ment through the blood all 
over the body. It does its 
work through the blood. It 
gives vigor to the tissues and 
is a powerful flesh-producer. 

AQ DrngcuU : SOc. aad $1.00. 



Ted Sullivan's telegraphed announce- 
ment that he would not take the Superior 
franchise, effectually held up proceeding.^ 
at the meeting of tlie Northern league at 
Fargo yesterday, and nothing was done. 
Unofficially, the magnates made a few- 
remarks about Sullivan, and prepared to 
go to work and line up another town, so 
as to save Eau Claire, which already has 
a franchise, and the dropping of which 
would throw it out if baseball for the 
year. 

The magnates couldn't do anything 
wlth*their plans unsettled. An effort w.ll 
be made to have tht Superior pectple take 
the franchise on their own respjnsibility, 
and If that cannot be dor*. Grand Forks 
or Crookston may yet be dragged in. 

As it is. tiie situation is just about 
where it was before Sullivan talked of 
faking the Superior franchise, 
additional complitalion 
holding a frautfhise 
being unwilling to 
thing in the way 



Condemning the public dances and 
the conditions existing in certain ques- 
tionable hotels, which were exposes! 
by The Herald., the grand Jury pre- 
sented its report to the district court 
late Saturday afternoon and was dis- 
charged. 

A brief summary of the report was 
published in The Herald Saturday 
evening. The rtiK>rt in full follows : 
"To Hon. Homer E. Dibell. one of the 
Judges of the Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict— 

"The grand Jury, called for tht pres- 
ent term of the district court of St. 
Louis county, having this day finished 
its work, after four days" session, 
would make to your honor the follow- 
ing report: 

"We have exaimined into all tht 
cases brought before us by the county 
attorney, twenty-three in ail. and have 
bilKs of'indictiiient against twenty per- 
sons. In three cases wt failed tc in- 
dict. ... 

"We examined the county jai! and 
found matters in satisfactory condi- 
tion We regret that its limited ac- 
commodations—thirty-two cells for the 
male prisoners— render overcrowding 
ajrparently unavoidable. 

"The grand jury has considert'l the 
ciuestioii of tlie renting c>f tht hall in 
the city Armory building for public 
dances, and we find nothing tc be said 
in favor of such renting— not even from 
the standpoint of revenue. The testi- 
mony brought befc-rt us proved that 
the influence of the.se public dances in 
the Armory hall is ui.ciuestionably bad. 
and we are satisfied that the bc'ard of 
control of the Armory building will be 
glad to herd an aroused public senti- 
ment and refuse hereafter the use of 
this hall for public dances, or any 
other clearly objecti<inable entertain- 
•menls and "we urgently so recommend. 
Our attention has also been called to 
the matter of public dances in private 
halls and the sworn testimony in re- 
gard' to their evil influence puts them 
in a most unfavorable light. This 
grand Jury would unanimously recom- 



meiid tliat through city ordinance, or- 
by amendment to the city cliarter. 
publ-.c dances in private halls shali be 
forbidden, except in the case of the 
owners or lessees of such hails as shall 
have been licensed by the propel au- 
thorities. 

"We have examined a number of 
witnesses relative to the allegred <3i»- 
rc'gard of the laws concerning tht so- 
cial evil on the part of tht keepers of 
certain hotels and lodging housee. 
While we did not obtain sufficient evi- 
dence upon which to find any bills of 
inoictment. we feel satisfied that there 
}-.ave been grv>ss and rejieated viola- 
tions of these laws, and we wcuid urge 
unceasiTig vigilance on the- part of our 
city authorities to cTitck this great ^ 

evil. 

"Wfc recognize that the power of 
ccrjif: and officers of the law tc check 
the evils we have referred tc is small, 
<H»mpared with the intlueiice and au- 
thority of parents and guardians, wlien 
1 ropei-ly exerted, over the young peo- 
ple ii' their care." * 

Tht leiKTt is largely the result of 
certain evidence furnished the grand 
Jurv bv members of The Herald staff, 
aho marie a tour of the Suferior strt-et 
led light district, a wttk age Saturday 
night. 



Prestiibing Ftir a r<»nva!e«x?nt. 

C»n rtcoverir.g from ar; iUi.ess ex- 
perience has taught tht value of 
cheerfulness. Music is a great help. 
fresh air is ab.solnlely essential and 
as much exercise as car; be wisely 
taken. A good wholesome malt tonic 
should be taken rtgularly. The best 
beverage for this iS golden grain bolt 
beer, noted for its health-giving food 
value. A ta*it wil- put new life into 
the convalescent. Order of Duluth 
branch Miiineapolis Brewing Co. 



SITUATION IS 

IMPROVING 

Diphtlieria Cases in City 
All in the Convales- 
cent Stage. 



IS 



Tht diphtheria situat.or in Duluth 
constantly improving anu the offi- 
cials of the health department itport 
the number of cases now far l)elow 
the normal for Duluth. Within the 
last three days, nineteen eards have 
been taken down, without tht addition 
of a new case. It is expected on the 
sliowing today that seven other pa- 
tient.s will be turr.od loose tcKlay. 

The tctai number of casts now it 
under thirty and all art in tht ctnva- 
lesct'nt stage. Not since last spring, 
when tht present eiiidtmic really be- 
gan, has the situjition been sc encour- 
aging and the ofticials of tht depart- 
ment are congratulating themselvts on 
it The contagious disease ctnditionK 
in Duluth on the whole are satisfacj- 
torv. The cases of smallpox art few 
anci not of virulent type. Scarlet fever 
is at a low mark and lew eases have 
turned up of late. 



WAIT FOB 



with the 
of iiau Claire 
and the magnates 
i.and that town aiiy- 
of a mean d ai oy 
wVeiding' the ax "at this stage, when the 
Wisconsin city has no chance to get liKu 

another league. . , „. .v,^ 

Two scheuules were accepted at the 
meeting yesterday. One is for a six-c ub 
circuit and the other for a four-club 
affair. If another club tan bt b"^^' "}'• 
the six-club circuit will go throu,^h. 
Otherwise, it will bt anothtr grasshopper 
circuit of four clubs, and the magnatt^s 
do not hicc the prospect of that. 

Sullivan gave as his excuse f"^'^ thruw- 
Ine UP the Superior franchise tht fa.t 
that the ball park was too far away from 
the city and ne could not get concesstons 
Irom the street railway company. 

A W Kuehnow returned from tne 
Fargo meeting this m.oming, and h*-. "was 
hopeful of securing another town W inni- 
neg Brajidon, Fargo and Duluth are 
r,*dv. Fargo has secured a manager, 
altiiclugh his name has been withheld for 
the time. 

mfpTcaT'scictety elects. 

Ontonagon. Mich.. March i* -;f PJ<-'f ' '« 
The Heiald.l-The annual meeting of the 
Ontonagon County Medical society was 
held Wednesday afternof-n at the resi- 
f'ence of Dr A. L. Swinton. The follow- 
nig oifKcrs were elected for the ensuing 
ye^r President, Dr. J. S. Nitlerauer; 
Vice president. Dr. E. J. Evans: secre- 
tary. Dr. E. W. KnowJes, treasurerr Vr. 
-^\ 'li, Hanna. 




u 



i 




OMING 




— j«t 



— 4 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: ^<((^NDAY. MARCH 9, 1908. 



11 



^ 



ERIC ANDERSON, Agent, W2 Lumbermen's Exchange Bidg., Minneapolis. 



LUMBER INSURANC E COMPANY 
OF NEW YORK. 



Principal office, S4 William street New 
York. N. Y. (Organizo.l in 190*.) G. A- 
Mitchell, president: R. H. MoKelvey. sec- 
retary. Attorney to aeci-pt service in 
Miunesijta, Insurance OoinnUssloner. 
CASH CAPITAL. $200,000. 
INCOME IN 1907. 
I»remlum9 otJuT than per- 

Petual-s I «^5-2^-^ 

Rents and Interest l?-'^]*" 

From all other sources i.l!U..o 

Total income I 289,512.53 

DI.SBURSKMENTS IN 190T 



Amount paid lor Ii)a3e3 5 

Divld'n.l.s and interest 

Commis.sions and brokerage.. 
Salaries atid fees of officers, 

agont.s and i»niploye3 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 

All other disbursements 



114.279. rfl 
20,000.00 
66,>tT.52 

6,491.00 

4.66.1.93 
6.941.10 



Tolai disbursements $ 21S.4:;2.78 



over 



dls- 
$ 

1907. 
..I 



Exc's.s of Income 

bui"seinunta 

ASSETS DEC. 31 
Bond.s and stocks owntJd •■ 

Cash in office and bank 

Accrued interest and rents .. 
Premiums m course of colleo- 

tl4jn 

All other admitted a.<?sels .... 
L>eduin special d'posit.s less 

$1,148.61 liability there«jn .... 



71,089.:5 

332.150.00 
102.12t;.75 

54.999.S9 
332.99 

8.TS1.39 



ADIRONDACK FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY. 

Principal Office. M William street. Now 
York, N y. (Organized In 1906.) « A. 
Mitchell, President; R. H. McKeivey. Sec- 
retary. Attorney to accept service In 
Minnesota Insurance Coniml.ssloner. 
CASH CAPITAL, $200,000. 
INCOME IN 19tr7. 
Premiums other than perpet- „,„ ^„„ „ 

uals $ ^■}^H^ 

Rents and Interest ^'^'Pl^n- 

From all other sources B3S.0.. 

Total Income $ 2&6.1*4.03 

DISmiRSEMRNTS IN 1907. 

.\mount paid for losses $ 97,",»36.U> 

("ornmlsslons and brokerase — 
Salaries and fees of officers. 

agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 

All other disbursements 



64,161 
6,537.(0 

3,443.59 

5,602.30 



CLARKE-HEP WORTH CO;jnsiiraiicc,223 Manhattan Bldg.,Duiutti 



I 



Total disbursements $ 177.6>;0.80 



Total admitted a.s>tets $ 484,'ilti.oi 

Assets not admit t-d. $4<».710.79 

LIAUILITIlSri DEC. 31, 1907. 



Unpaid losses and claims . 

Hoiii-sMrancu re3er\'e 

Commission and brokerajfo 
Keinsuianoe premiums .... 
Capital stock' paid up — 



S,8Si).H.S 

135.714.35 

16.820.76 

250.93 

200,000.00 



Total liabilities includingr 
capital $ 361,666.72 



Net surplus $ 123.149. S5 

RLSK.S AND PRBMU'MS, 1907 BUSl- 
NE.S.-?. 

Firo ridks written during the 
year $26,539,011.00 

Prynnums received thereon .. 464,73S.72 



Excess of income over dl.s- 

bursements $ 

ASSETS DE(^. 31, 1907. 

Honda and stocks owned $ 

Cash in office and In hank 

Accrued Interest and rents 

Premiums In course of collec- 
tion 

All other admitted assets 

lieduct special deposit in Ore- 
gon, less $1,029.63 liability 
thereon 



79,273.23 

289.400.00 

92,564.^9 

3.1)5.83 

46 642.94 
' 1.9& 



8,S72.57 



ALLEMANNIA FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY. 

Principal Office: 345 Fourth Avenue. 
Pltt.sburg, Pa. (Organlred in 1»**) w. 
Sielnmeyer, president. C. P. Kellerman, 
secretary. Attorney to accept service in 
Minnesota: Insurance Commissioner. 

Cash capital $ 200.000.00 

INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other then perpet- 

uals $ 

Rents and Interests 

Profit on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 



656. 201. S!) 
53,148.50 

313.50 



THE HOME IXSfR^ANCE COM 

>. 56 V<vkr s 
•rgarnzPd In 



Total Income • 708,663.59 

DISBURSEIMENTS IN 1907. 



Amount paid for losses $ 

Dividends and interest 

Conmilssions and brokerage.. 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 

Taxes, fe'='S, rents and other 

real ©state expenijes 

I.A1SS on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

All other disbursements 



278.187.72 

20,000.00 

173.629.34 

41,738.62 

16,943.41 

2,462.50 
37,00tt.9S 



Principal office. 66 K<£ta.r street. New 
York, N. Y. (Orgarflzld in 1853.) El- 
brldge G. Snow, president; A. M. Burt is 
and Charles L. TyneT|*ecretarles. At- 
torney to accept seB#fc In Minnesota, 
Insurance CommisslAir. 

('ash capital Jt» — $ 

INCOME T>r 1907. 
Premiums other than per- 

petuals ' 

Rents and Interest 

Profit on sale or maturity 

of ledger assets 

From all other sources 



3,000,000.00 



10,333.165.46 
947,578.08 

4,074.97 
2.102.70 



Total Income $ 11.286,921.21 

DISBITRSEMENTS IN 1907. 



Amount paid for losses. 

Dividends and interest.,.. 

Commissions and broker- 
age ■,■■■■—■.■ 

Salaries and fees of offi- 
cers, agents and employes 

Taxes fees, rents and 
other real estate expenses 

All other disbursements... 



4,51«.699.46 
600,000.00 

1,940,690.99 

652,012.76 

395.968.57 
649.000.19 



422.882.91 



Total admitted assets $ 

Assets not admitted.... $36,458. 57 

LIAIULITIES DEC. 31, 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ 6.234. 7o 

Reinsurance reserve 

Commission and brokerage — 

All other liabilities 

Capital stock paid up 



120.011.73 

14,ri72.31 

042.89 

200,000.00 



ffet amount in force at end of _ 

year $15,9*5,227.0') 

BUSINESS IN MINNEJSOTA IN 19(/7. 
Fire Risks.— 

Risks written $463,225.00 

Premiums received 9,047.90 

^issos paid 375.72 
)SSOs incurred 376.72 

Btat.; of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. 

I Il"r<>by Certify. That the annual state- 
ment of the Lumber !n.«turance Company 
of New York for the year ending Decem- 
ber. 31.-»t. 19(/7. of which the above Is an 
abstract, has been received and filed in 
this di^parunent and duly approved by 
me JOHN A. HARTIOAN. 

Insurance Commlsloner. 
Duluth Evening Herald, Feb. 24, Mar. 2, 
9. 08. 



Total liabilities including 
capital ■$ 341,491.68 

Net surplus ^^i??!'''^ 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 

Fire risks written during the 
year $21,178.326.0») 

Premiums received thereon — 352,916.70 

Net amount in force at end 
of the year $13,632,^61 .00 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 

Fire Risks— ,„ ^ 

Risks written $ 43W.00 

Premiums received ^lir* 

Losses paid }?-'^ 

Losses incurred Io-j.-:. 



Total disbursements $ 569,971.57 

Excess of income over dis- 

bursements $ 138,692.0- 

ASSETS, lyEC. 31, 1907. 

Value of real estate owned — $ 26.909.50 

Mortgaige loans 681.2.S.0O 

Collateral loans ^•*'9SS 

Bonds and stocks owned 279,362. 5«) 

Ciish In office and In bank.... 10J,5S6.47 
Accrued Interest and rents — 12,317.00 
Premiums In course of col- 
lection 79,714.62 



Total admitted assets $1,179,167.99 

Assets not admitted, ($2,412.53.) 

L-IABlLITIES DEC. 31, 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ 59..S80.64 

RelnsiiranC)! reserve 553,6T2.&i 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, divi- 
dends and interest due 2,233.91 

Conjmlsslon and brokerage.... 1,590.00 

Reinsurance premiums 1,342.6." 

Capital stock paid up 200,000.00 



Total disbursements $ 8,756,971.97 



Excess of Income over dls- 

bursements $ i,bsa,viv.ii 

ASSETS DEC. 31, 1907. 

Value of real estate owned. $ 1,543,892.06 

Mortgage loans 

Bonds and stocks owned... 

Cash m office and In bank 

Premiums In course of col- 
lection 

All other admitted assets.. 



MILWAUKEE MECHANICS' IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY. 

Principal Office, 442-444 City Hall Square. 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. William L.. Jones, 
President; Oscar Griebllng, Secretary. 
Attorney to accent service in Minnesota, 
Insurance Commissioner. 

CASH CAPITAL. $500,006. 
INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other than per- 

petuals $ 

Rents and Interest 

Profit on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

From all other sources 



1,446,-589.14 
112.938.10 

901.85 
4,000.00 



Total Income $ 1,564,429.09 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 



ASSETS DEC. 31 19OT. 

Value of real estate owned. ..$ l"°'"!^-.j? 

Mortgage loans ^' oi'A-"r'n 

Collateral loans •• 

Bonds and stocks owned.. 

Cash In office and in bank 

Accrued Interest and rents... 

Premiums in course of collec- 
tion • 

All otli«r admitted assets ..... 

Deduct special deposit in Ore- 
gon, less $20,775.97 liability 
thereon 

Less ledger liabilities... 



35.000.1 

1,136,728.50 

126,172.24 

29.1,01. •.:« 

203,062.77 
1.343.97 



1.974.03 
124,661.86 



Total admitted assets ......$ 2,64^947.08 

ssets not admitted.... $6, 766.64 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1907. 



Amount paid for losses $ 

Dividends and interest 

Commissions and brokerage.. 
Salaries and fees of officers. 

agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 

Loss on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

All other disbursements 



5W.802.91 

05, 0-0. 00 

378,679.90 

135,975.72 

615,560.18 

115.00 
179.666.14 



Total disbursements $ 1,415,798.85 



102 Si.W.OO 
16,4«r7,630.00 
1,611,607.17 

805,074.63 
331,693.82 



Total admitted assets $ 20.862.697.68 



Total liabilities including 
capital $ 818.419.66 



State of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. 

I hereby certlfv that the annual state- 
ment of the Adirondack Fire Insurance 
Company for the vear ending December 
31st, 1907. of whlcli the above Is an ab- 
stract has been received and filed In this 
Department and duly approved by me. 
JOHN A. HARTIOAN. 
Iiksurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald— Feb. 24. March 
2-9. 1»08. 



Net surplus $ 360,748.34 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 
191)7 BUSINESS. 
Fire risks written during the 

year $73. 233.511 .0'3 

Premiums received theron 857,040.13 



ad- 



Assets not 

mitted $2,007,708.68 

LIABILITIES DEC 31, 19^- „,, ,„ 

ITnpald losses and claims.. $ 958fir>f»..w 

Reinsurance reserve 9,116.297.00 

Commission and brokerage 63.0.,. i^O 

All other liabilities 1,021 44o.ol 

Capital stock paid up 3.0<.X),000.00 

Total liabilities. Including ,,,„,„.,, 

capital $ 14,159.486.41 



Excess of income over dis- 
bursements $ 



148.630.24 
BUSINESS IN 



Unpaid losses and claims 

Reinsurance reserve ..•••■ 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, divi- 
dends and interest due eoo OOO 00 

Capital stock pajd up 6m^WA)*f 



80,049.64 
1,491,700.00 

80,000.00 



Total liabllltiea, 
capital ' 



Including 



$ 2.101.749.64 



646.1S7.44 



Net surplus * 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 



$162,656,132.00 

2,0l»,286.07 



Fire risks written during the 

year 

Premiums received thereon. ^^ 

Net amount in force at end ,.. «^ jj^ 
of the year $244,1.0,392.00 



C. L. RAKOWSKY 

201 Exchange Bank Bldg. 

MICHIGAN FIRE AND MARINE 
INSURANCE COMPANY. 

Principal office. Penobscot buildlnjr. 
Detroit. Mich. (Organized In 1881.) F. 
H Whitney, vice president; B. J. 
Booth, secretary. Attorney to accept 
service In Minnesota, Insurance Com- 
missioner. . „ ,.^ ^ 

Cash capital $ 400,000.00 

INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other than per- 

petuals ♦ 

Rents and interest 

Profit on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

From all other sources 



560.950.W 
46.166.64 

361.82 
14.66 



MINNESOTA 
Fire Risks. 

Risks written ^'■^^o'^f^?^ 

Premiums received T-'tLr^M 

Losses paid U'^fl 

L>osscs Incurred •• lo.oou.i* 

State of Minnesota, Department of Insurance 



IN 1907. 

Tornado. 

$241,030.00 

1.359.43 

.74 

.74 



Aggregate. 

$3.0i5.926.00 
50,771.^3 
17.231.37 
16.:30.?;8 



DULUTH IN 
A NUTSHELL 

Capt. McDougaH Contrib- 
utes Article on City to 
Eastern Paper. 

Concise Statement of Facts 
Should Greatly Adver- 
tise the City. 



Thar the attention of tho business in- 
tcre.sts of the East is directed toward 
Duluth and its proml.se of great Industrial 
development during the next few years. 
Is shown by the faet that the Boston 
(Nows Bureau requesttid .in article on the 
city and its commerce fro'm Capt. Alex- 
ander MI>JUgall. Tho article was pre- 
pared l»y Ca-pt. Mi.l>ougall and it is_ be- 
ing Wiilelv 



circulated through the East. 



miles, or on to Montreal, etc., 1.500 miles. 
mu<Th cheaper than any railroad can haul 
It. This, the we«t end of Lake Superior 
extending into the Northwest. Is the focus 
p<»lnt for all the railroad haul from that 
portion of the United States and Canada 
tliat is westerly from this focus point all 
the way from the Pacific ocean because 
of the cheap lake haul. Al.so all the 
Eastern products that are bound for this 
western triangle and tne Pacific will 
have atlvantagt's In going via this gate- 
way to the Northwest. This port started 
in 1S70, yet not till the enlargement of 
the Soo canal did the commerce Increase 
very fast. Hut since then the Increase 
of the business of the port Is the great- 
est ev«»r known in the world, till 1907 
showed nearly 40.000.000 tons of products 
that were handU-d here, much of which 
was exchiiUKed or sold In tho port. 

"This c-nornious volum« of trado. 40,000.- 
0(iO tons. Is equal to 1,000,000 40-ton car- 
loads. 8.1*00 miles long, or equal to 8.000 
shiploads of 5.000 tons each. In this Joint 
port lo) great ships may be .seen at otie 
time, many of them the largest and finest 
class of steel ships seen in any part of 
the world, up to I4.000-tons capacity 
eacli. Here the foundations of one or 
two great cities are being laid in the 
construction of many enormous grain 
elevators, merchandise warehouses and 
the most extensive docks In the world. 
The joint harbor Is most wonderful and 
favorable to do the businci»s required of 
it. and Is large enough lor many times the 
present trade. The United States gov- 
ernment is quite liberal In making har- 
bor Improvements here. 

From Duluth and Superior, In addition 
to the many local lines of railway, there 
are now three lines of railroad acro.ss 
the continent, and before long there will 
l>e in all four or five lines through the 
United States and three lines through 
Canada connecting this joint lake port 
with the Pacific ocean. The country ad- 



Net amount In force at end 

of the year $93,947.f>26.00 

BUSLNF^S IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 
Fire Risks- 
Risks written $2,221,339.00 

Premiums received 22,6.%. 22 

Los.ses paid 4,013.<»6 

losses Incurred 3,743.69 

State of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. 

I hereby certify. That the annual state- 
ment of the Allemania Fire Insurance 
Company, for the year ending Dec. 31. 
1907, of which the above is an alwitract, 
has beei^ receivrt<l and filed In this De- 
partment and duly approved bv me. 
JOHN A. HARTIOAN, 
Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald— Feb. 24. March 
2-9 1908. 



Net surplus $ 6.703.211.27 

RISKS AND PREMHTMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 
Fire risks written during ,,.„.. ,^ „ 

the year $1,455,775,996.00 

Premiums received thereon 14.736.066.48 
Marine and Inland risks 

written during the year.. 81635,979.00 
Premiums received thereon 513.872.05 



te of Mmnesota, ueparimenL oi inauiin^v. »,n™,«,.i,^a iLro<-hnnicV Insur- 

I hereby certify that the annual statement of the Milwaukee Mechanics insur 
ance Company, for the year ending P«cenriber 31st IW. of J^^hich the above^s an 
abstract, has been received and filed In this department ana auiy approveu u, 

"»«• JOHN A. HARTIGAN, 

Insurance Commissioner. 

Duluth Evening Herald— Feb. 24. March 2-9, 1908. 



Total Income $ 607.493.18 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ 239.829. fO 

Dividends and Interest 

Commissions and brokerage 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 

Loss on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

All other disbursements 



24,000.00 
134,486.44 

36,047.70 

22,907.1* 

297.17 
46,170.22 



Net amount in force at end ^^„ „„^ „„, „ 

of the voar $1,630,036,291.00 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1007. 

Fire rlsk.s. 

Risks written .; '^^'^-^HS 

Premiums received :„!• ,1 rX 

Los.ses paid WAl^ 

Losses incurred 115,033.50 

State of Minnesota, Department of 
Insurance. . ... * 

I hereby certlfv that the annual state- 
ment of the Home Insurance Cornpany. 
for the vear ending Dec. 31st. 1907. of 
which the above is an abstract, has 
been received and filed In this Depart- 
ment and ^uly^ar.proved^b>-^me^^^ 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24. March 
2-9. 1908. 



bursements $ 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1907. 

Value of real estate owned — $ 

Mortgage loans 

Bonds and stocks owned .... 

Cash In office and in bank .. 

Accrued interest and rents .. 

Premiums in course of collec- 
tion ■••• 

Special deposit In Oregon, less 
$22,822.69 lia-bility thereon ... 



351,382.16 

220,000.00 

98S.674-«4 

2,908.312.50 

172,373.68 

21.719.93 

222,902.11 

29.677.31 



Total disbursements $ 502,737.06 

Excess of Income over dis- 

bursements $ 104,766.13 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1907. 

Value of real estate owned.. $ 90,546.06 

Mortgage loans 5H|'r«'?^ 

Bonds and stock owned 3(6,523. W 

Cash In office and in bank.. 54,160.91 

Accrued Interest and rents... 9.353. 78 
Premiums in course of col- 

lection **-S2iS 

All other admitted assets..-. 964.30 



Total admitted assets $ 4,504.205.41 

Assets not admitted, $278,072.81 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1907. 

Unpaid losses and clamis $ „ 6^,253. 10 

Reinsurance reserve ^,^.t),w».w 

Salaries, expenses. taxes. 

dividends and interest due .. 3,SJl.« 

Capital slock paid up 1,000,000-0 

Total liabilities Including „.,-„,., 
capital $ 3,349,(7?s-i^ 

Net surplus 5 1,155.132.23 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1907 
BUSINESS. 
Fire risks written during the 



more Iron ore. Blast fwmaces and steel 
mills are starting hero, and other largo 
Industles also. Next to Niagara Falls, the 
greatest water power In America has 
lately started Its first hydro-electric 
power and is now offering to all industries 
che.ip power In small or great quantities, 
which will stimulate all local Industry 
and manufacturing. The climate is de- 
lightful on the av«rage. and the water 
supply for the cities th«^ best In the 
world. Minnesota is kn<^wn as the bread 
and butter state, and a great share of the 
butter will be made In the country about 
here in .Minnesota and Wisconsin because 
elove-r and timothy hay come as weeds 
when the timber Is cut off. 

"There are only al>out S3.000 people in 
Duluth and «,0OO In Superior, and there 
Is now here the permanent business 
foundations for a po:>ulallon of 500,000 
or more, a great opening for most any 
lino or kind of trade. 

"ALEXANDER McDOUOALL." 



ventlon to be held in Minneapolis AprU 
16. and also to select thirty-nine dele- 
gates to the Republican district con- 
vention for the Eighth congressional 
district, to be held In Pine City on 
April 15. 

The primary election for the choos- 
ing of delegates to the county con- 
ventlon will be Ixeld in all precincts 
of the city and county on April », be- 
tween the hotirs of 1 axui & p. m. The 
basis of representaflon will be one 
delegate for each' 100 votes or major 
fraction thereof cast for governor, 
lieutenant governor, attorney general, 
auditor, treasurer, secretary of state 
and railroad commissioners. Fifty of 
the delegates will be from tho city 
of Duluth. 



NORTHWESTERN NATIONAL IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY. 

Principal Office, "Wisconsin and Jack- 
son Streets, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Or- 
ganized In 1869.) Wllford M. Patton, 
president; Joseph Huebl. secretary. At- 
torney to accept service In Minnesota, 
Insurance Commissioner. 

CASH CAPITAL, $1,000,000. 
INCOME IN 1907. 

Premiums other than per- ,„.^„__. 

petuals $ 1,830,%7.78 

Rents and Interest l®*'^?!! 

From ail other sources 35.69 

Total Income $ 1,937,497.24 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ 623,^6.17 

Dividends and Interest 120,000.00 

Commissions and Brokerage.. 471,417.4- 
Salaries and Fees of Officers, 

' Agents and Employes 143,<86.'« 

Taxes, Fees, Rents and other 

real estate expenses 61,0bo.O3 

Loss on sale or maturity of 

Ledger AssiHs ^iH-fx 

All other disbursements 212.292.19 

Total disbursements $ 1,646,116.08 

Excess of Income over dls- 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 19^ 

Fire Risks;. 

Risks written • *''^'?^M 

Premiums received • rii^^lfl 

Losses paid 358^05 

Insurance Commissioner. 
9, 1908. 



year 

Premiums received thereon. 



$221,(»7,445.03 
2,143,760.75 



Net 



amount in force at end 



of the year $453,374,057.00 



Tornado. 

$1,127,^5.00 

6,607.42 

527.11 

462.11 



Aggregate. 

$7,71S,3.59.00 
83.738-44 
33,712.30 
36,286.16 



Total admitted assets .$ 1.139.426.84 

Assets not admitted $36.80 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims.... $ 31,476.06 

Relnsurarfce reserve 442,6.9.^7 

Salaries, expenses, taxes divl- . c-. «. 

dends and Interest due .'^S 

Commission and brokerage.. HJX?S 

All other liabilities J,-}^^ 

Capital stock paid up 400.000. w 

Total liabilities. Including ,^„.^,. 
capital .$ 887,846.12 

Net surplus $ 251,580.72 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 

Fire risks written «!"'•*"« ^ ,„ „« 

the year *«2,005,1M.00 

Premiums received tnereon.. '90,<«>.i* 

Net amount In force at ^"d 
of the year $69,746,956.00 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 

Fire Risks- «— oonnoo 

Risks written ♦^•^i? 

Premiums received ^^2?=, A 

Losses paid 715.10 

Losses incuri-ed i,s9*.va 

State of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. „♦„♦» 
1 hereby certify that the annual state- 
ment of the Michigan Fire Insurance 
Company, for the year ending. Dec. 
31st 1907. of which the above Is an ab- 
stract, has been received and filed in 
this Department and duly :ir>r>|-oved by 
me JOHN A. HARTIGAN. 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24, iilarch 
2-9 1908. 



an 
me. 



Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24. March 



Ing wKlelv circulated t •",;'"«" .^"«f;''Yn joining the cities of Duluth and Superior 

It should prove of no little benetit In Jo .^, « ^^^ , wi-iconsrin a few years 

advertisinK tho city. In connection with "*",;:.V^ covered with great forests of 

it is pihllslied the picture ot or v yes- f » valuable timber that is 



dels w ii'iiiK in the liarlx.)r to unload, last 
«prln«. Tli'> article Is as follows: 

•TlK- l>uluth-Sup»Tlor harlx)r Is the 
«reat.'d* tonnaa;e port in live world. 

•'The joint port of Duluth and Superior 
Is bound to be muL-h the largest shippiug 
port in the world. 

••O.'ho 'ipper lakes and thoir harbors. 
Willi their twenty-toot channels, and tlie 
znoA* improved appliances for quickly and 
cheaply liandling cargoes, and the many 
large sti^.t»i ships now in use permit tho 
carryiiik? ^f freight from Duluth or Su- 
perior -astwaiil to Hnffalo, etc.. l.'W 



pine , . . 

Leing cut off, di.scoverlng great iron de- 
posits In iMjth states, and rich agricul- 
tural lands. The Iron ore in the great 
deposits of Minnesota close bv Is cal- 
culated In billions of tons and more is 
being found every day. Millions of dol- 
lars are spent each year exploring for 



COMMERCE INSURANCE COM 
PANY. 

iPrlneipal office. " .-^'ate St.. Albany.^N. 
Y (Organized In K'.9.) Uarret A. Van 
Allen presi.lent. Ad<lison J. Hinman. sec- 
retary Attorney to accept service In 
Minnesota: In.surance commissioner. 
CASH CAPITAL. $200,000. 
INCijML IN ISHjC. 
Premiums oliier than per- 

pKuals $ 27'1,4S6.15 

Rents anj interest 2S.164.'Jl 

I<'rom all other sources 13.925.00 



Total income $ 31S,576.06 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 19«r7. 

Ami>unt paid for losses $ 12.t.O(')5.38 

Divl.l.-nds and mterest 2O,»iO0.00 

Commissions and brokerage .. 70.037. 3S 
Salarle.-t and fees of officers. 

Agents and employes 17,308.11 

Tax''s, fee.'*, rents and other 

real '-s»ate expenses 14.S(V4.25 

All oth-r disbursements 14.4.'.2.;^t; 

Total disbursements $ 261.60!<.08 



MILWAUKEE FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY. 

Principal Office: 442-444 City Hall 
Square, Milwaukee, Wis. (Organized in 
isjs.t William L. Jones, president; H. A. 
Nolle, secretary. Attorney to accept 
service In Minnesota: Insurance Com- 
missioner. 

Cash capital •••$ 

INCOME IN 1906. 
Premiums other than perpet- 

uals $ 

Rents and Interest 



DATE SET FOR 
CONVENTION 

Republicans of County 

Will Elect Delegates 

on April 14. 

The Republican county committee 
met Saturday afternoon at the city 
hall and decided upon April 14 as the 
date for holding the Republican county 
convention to select Ihlrty-nlne dele- 
gates to the Republican state con- 



200,000.00 



337.137.09 
29,614.70 



Total Inccme $ 366,751.79 

DldBU'RSEMEN-ra IN 1907. 

Amount paid for los.ses $ l^^.-tj^-Sl 

i.»lvulends and Interest ^l-'JiirS 

Commissions and brokerage... 89.223. vs 
Salaries and fees of officers. 

agents an 1 employes 2t..lSJt> 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses ir,"!?!!!; 

All other disbursements 46,9J&.«<9 



Total disbursements $ 346.078.84 



over dls- 



$ 

1907. 
..$ 



Excess of Income 

bur!»»'m''n is 

ASSETS DEC. 31, 

Value oi real estate owned 

[Mortnige loans 

Bonds and stocks owned 

Casli in office and in hank .. 

Aecru^'d intert^t and rents •. 

Premiums In course of collec- 
tion 

Total admitted assets I 

Assets not admitted, $20,332. tlO 
LIABILlTIliS DEC. 31. 
Unpaid losses and claims — $ 

Reinsurance reserve 

All oth**r liabilities 

Capital stock ptiid up 



56,967. OH 



Excess of Income over dis- 
bursements $ 

.\SSETS DEC. 31, 1907. 

Mortga.Te loans $ 

lion<ls and stocks owned 

Cash in off'ce and in bank 

-Accrued interest and rents — 
I'remiums in course of col- 
lection 



75.1)00.00 

IS.'^W.O") I .All other admitted assets.. 



426,3.SS.OO 

40.007 .9s 

3,812.20 

34,212.31 

593,320.49 

1907. 

li>.<W6.83 

205). 177. 70 

743.93 

200,i>00.00 



Total liabilities Including 

capital » 429.90.S.V, 



Ket surpl'is * 16.1.412.03 

RIsLs^.VND PREMIUMS. 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 
Fire risks written during '^e 

year $ 28,i:jl.622.00 

Promliinw received thereon — 



Less ledge'- liabilities.. 



21,672.16 

326„V.O.0O 

2^.725.00 

43.373.35 

6,204.77 

42,J52.S6 

280.93 

21,288. SI 

693,098.10 



NORTHERN INSURANCE COM- 
PANY. 

Principal office, 50 Pine street. New 
York, N. Y. (Organised In ISSTT.) Leander 
N Lovell. president; James Marshall, 
secretary. Attorney to accept service In 
Minnesota: Insurance Commissioner. 
CASH CAPITAL. $350.UOO. 
INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other tha^i per- 

petuals $ 545.440.91 

R.-nis and Interest 37.922. 6j 

Profit on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

From all other sources 



156.?6 
2.063.09 



.90 



Total income J 585.5' 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Ami>unt paid for los.ses $ 24.«»,300.03 

Dividends and interest I.,o00.0i) 

Commissions and brokerage .. 198,297.11 
Salaries and fees of officers. 

agents and employes lOo.OO 

laxes. fees, rents and other 

real estate expense* 15.453. ou 

L<iss on .'^ale or maturity of 

ledger assets 

All other disbursements 

Total disbursements $ 507,992.68 



827.50 
26,509.49 



334.424.60 



88O.O2.%.00 

14,0is,(t0 

1,625.03 

2,8S2.9i) 



N«t amount tn force at «"<*^ ^ „. <j^^ ^o 

of th- year $ 36,»it5,5n)O.00 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 
Fire Rlsk.s— 

Risks written $ 

pr'-miums received 

i.,osses paid 

l.rf<s.ses incurred 

Stale of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. . ... 
I Hereby Csrtlfy, That the annual state- 
fnent of the Commerce Insurance com- 
pany, lor the year ending Dec-mber Slst, 
1907." of which the above is an abstract, 
has been reclved and filed In this de- 
»artmeiit and duly approved bv nie. 
•^ JOHN A. HART1C..A.N, 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald-March 9-16-23. '08. 



Total admitted assets $ 

Assets not admitted 1148.27 

LIABILITIES, DEC. 31. 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ 27.:?62.17 

Reinsurance re.serve 317,151.77 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, divi- 
dends and Interest due 6,000.00 

Capital «tock paid up 200,o00.00 

Total Mabllities including 
capital . $ 550,513.9* 

Not surpUt'! $ 142„SS4.16 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS 
lit07 BUSINESS. 
Fire risks written during the 

year $-•«>, W.SRS.Oi) 

Premiums received thereon.... 463.386.97 



Excess of Income over dis- 
bursements •$ 

ASSETS DEX:*. 31. 1907. 

Bonds and stocks owned $ 

Cash in office and In bank .. 

Accrued Interest and rents . 

P'remiums In course of col- 
lection 



77.580.22 

801.300.00 

2»".,329.32 

1,575.00 

75.686-67 



Net amount In force at end 

of the vtar $54,622,900.00 

BUSIN.^Sb IN MINNEISOTA IN 1907. 
Fire Risks- 

Rl-sks written $ 69.3,4SO.0r 

Premiums received 9.9.19. 1.'> 

Losses paid 3,143.10 

Lo.sses incurred 2,5.'<9.22 

State of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. 

I Hereby Certify, That the annual 
statem^^nt of the Milwaukee Fire Insur- 
ance Company, for the year ending Dec. 
31, 1907, of which the above is an abstract, 
has l>eoa received and filed In this De- 
partmen: and duly approved by me. 
JOHN A. HARTICJAN, 
Insurance Commissioner. 
EBY & «iRIDLEY. Local Agents, 510 Pal- 

ladlo Bldg. 
Duluth Evening Herald, Feb. 24, March 
2, 9. 19U6. 



Total admitted assets $ 904.890.99 

Assets not admitted, $66,835. 
LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 
Unpaid losses and claims — I 

Reinsurance reser\'e 

Reinsurance premiums 

Capital stock paid up 



1907. 

29.772.80 

417.061.71 

4.524.34 

350,000.00 



Total liabilities including 

capital $ 801.348-83 

RISKS AND PRPiMlUMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 
Fire risks written during the ^ 

year •• * 

Premiums received thereon .. 



0,241,178.00 
545.440.91 



CERTIFICATEOFIXCORPORATION 

— OF— 
THE RELIABLE CLOAK AND 
SUIT COMPANY. 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRES- 
ENTS, that we. the undersigned, do 
hereby associate ourselves together and 
agree upon tho following Articles of In- 
corporation under the provisions of 
Cliapter 58, Revised Laws, 1905. of the 
State of Minnesota and acts amend- 
atory thereof and supplementary thereo. 
and do hereby adopt the following AR- 
TICLES: 

ARTICLE I. , ^ 

The name of this corporation shall be 
THE RELIABLE CLOAK AND SUIT 
COMPANY. 

ARTICLE II. 
The general nature of the business of 
this corporation sliall be the buying and 
selling, at retail and wholesale, ladies 
and children's cloaks, 'suits, furs, milli- 
nery and ready-made wearing apparel, 
dry goods and general merchandi.se, and 
lo purchase, own, hoW, sell and lease 
real estate and other property, necessary 
or convenient in carrying on said busi- 
ness, and to transact any and all busi- 
ness necessary to carry Into effect any of 
the aforesaid purposes; 

Tho principal place of transacting tho 
business of this Corporation shall be Du- 
luth. Minnesota. 

ARTICLE III. 
The period of the duration of this Cor- 
poration shall be thirty years from and 
after March 5. 1908. 

ARTICLE IV. 
The names and places of residence of 
the persons forming this Corporation are 
as follows: Jacob Sablotzky, Duluth, Min- 
nesota; Morris Mark, Duluth. Minnesota; 
and Lydia Schulti, Duluth. Minnesota. 
ARTICLE V- • 
The names and addresses of the per- 
sons composing the board of directors, 
until the first election of directors, shall 
b. as follows: Jacob Sablotzky. Dulutli, 
Minnesota; Morris Mark, Duluth Minne- 
sota, and Lydia Schultz, Duluth, Minne- 
sota. The government of this Corp<jr- 
atlon and the management of Its affairs 
shall be vested in a board of three di- 
rectors, who shall be stockholders of 
the Corporation .and shall be elected by 
the stockholders at the annual meeting 
of the Corporation, which shall l>e held 
on the third Tuesday of February of 
each year. The first l)oard of directors, 
at their first meeting, shall elect a presi- 
dent vice president, .secretary and treas- 
urer, to serve until their successors shall 
be elected and qualified. The directors 
chosen by the stockholders, at each an- 
nual meeting, shall Immediately there- 
after elect a president, vice president, 
secretary and treasurer, each of whom 
shall hold their respective offices for the 
term of one year and until their re- 
spective successors are elected and 
qualify. The offices of president and 
treasurer may be held by the same per- 
son. _ „, 
ARTICLE! VI. 
The amount of the Capital stock of 
this Corporation shall fle ten thousand 
dollars, divided Into two hundred shares 
of the par value of flfiy flollars each, and 
may be paid for In money, property or 
services, as may be prescribed by the 
board of directors. 



before me, a Notary Public, with n and 
for said County and State, Jacob fa- 
blotzl^ Morris Mark and Lydia bchultz. 
to me known to be the persons de- 
sCrS in and who executed the fore- 
lolng Certificate of Incorporation, and 
they severally acknowledged that they 
executed, signed and adopted the same 
as their fn.e act ^"^h** J GRANNIS, 
Notary Public. St. Louis County. Minne- 
sota. 
(.Notarial Seal.) 
My Commission Expires Oct. 8, 1911. 

State of Minnesota 
State 



Department of 



m- 



I hereby certify that the within m- . ^""Yne "HeralS. according to law 
strument'^was.flled for_/e^ord^in^th^8 %ated a" Dulufh. Minn.. Feb. 21st, 1908 



best Interests of the estate of said de- 
cedent? and of all persons interested 
therein, to sell certain lands ot said de- 
cedent in said petition described, and 
pmy?ng ihat licenie be to them granted to 
sell the said land; . . . 

IT IS ORDERED That said petition be 
heard before this court at the Probate 
Court Rooms in the Court House, in 
Duluth, in said County, on Monday the 
23rd day of March, 1908, at ten o cl<xk A. 
M and all persons Interested in said 
hearlns and In said matter are hereby 
cited and required, at said time and place^ 
to show cause, if any there be, why said 
petition should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this order 
be served by publication in The Duluth 



office on the 2nd day of March A. D. 
1908 at 9 o'clock a. m., and was duly re- 
cord^ in Book P 3 of Incorporation, on 



corded 
page 476. 



JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 
Secretary of State. 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

l"'hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed In this office for rec- 
ord March 3, 1908, at 9 a. m. and was duly 
?I?ofied in Book 4 o^ M^sc. ^page^6^7. 

Register of Deeds. 
By THOS. x:LARK, 
Deputy. 



FOR 

Lou's 
Dis- 



By the Court^ 

J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 

Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24, March 
2-9, 1908. 



MILWAUKEE GERMAN FIRE 
INSURANCEJOMPANY. 

Principal Office: 213 West Water street. 
Milwaukee, Wis. (Organized '« 1«».> 
Edw Schroeder. president; V^ alter 
Schroeder. secreta-ry- Attorney to accept 
service in Minnesota: Insurance Com- 
missioner. ir¥» n«> IW 

Cash capital vv,\;A-;-' I*''**-'" 

INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other than perpet- 

uals * o2.157.1» 

Rents and interest 



6.389.16 



Total Income ' 58,546.11 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ 7.!v>i-»i 

Con»nissions and brokerage-... 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 



10.663. U 
2,715.91 
848.60 



real enio-i.^ c^»/^. o -ia ai 

All Other disbursements .;,mf.»i 

Total disbursements $ 24,800.97 



FOR 



Net amount In force at end of 

the year » w,G.<2,tiV2.'w 

BUSINI-^^^S IN MINNEiSOTA IN 1907. 
Fire Risks- 

Risks written I l-l^-'^^^? 

Premiums received . .-S-iJ 

Losses paid J.^'- 

L^sses incurred , 4.o5«.»4 

State of Minnesota, I>epartment of In- 
surance. 

I Hereby Certify, That the annual state- 
ment of the Northern Insurance company 
for the year ending December 31st, 1907. 
of which the alwve is an abstract, has 
been received and filed in this depart- 
ment and duly approved by me 

JOHiN A. HARTIGAN. 
Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evcuioc il«rald-March 2-9-16, "08. 



ARTICLJ3 KII 

ji Indebtedness or 



lunJt ol ln< 

tlrti Corr 

sul/Jec! Is 



orporation shall 
the sum of 



The highest amo 
liability to which 
at any time be s 
five thousand dollars „^„ 

IN TESTIMONY WKBREOF, we have 
hereunto set our hayda and seals this 
29lh day of February, A^ D l^'S 

JACOB SABLOTZKY. (Seal). 
MORRIS -\L^RJ<. (Seal.) 
LYDIA SCHULTZ. (Seal.) - 
Signed, Sealed and.jiMiverea In pres- 
ence of . .,^r " 

H. J. GRANNIS. »' '>^ 
ROLLO N. CHAFFEE. 



(No. 644.) 
SUMMONS IN API'LICATION 
^REGISTRATION OF LAND- 
State of Minnesota County of St. 

Dlluict Court, Eleventh Judicial 

In'^t'he matter of the applicatiun 1 
of the Felix Investment Com- 
pany to register the title to the 
following desscrlbed real estate 
situated In St. Louis Coun y, 
Minnnesota, namely: Lots num- 
bered Nine (9), Twelve (12) and 
Thirteen (13), all In Block num- 
bered Fourteen (14); Lots num- 
ber^ Nine (9), Ten OO). Thir- 
teen (13) and Fourteen (H), al 
in Block numbered Fifteen (15) 
Lots numbered One (1). Two (2) 
and Four (4), all in Block num- 
bered Forty-seven (47), the above 
described lots and blocks being 
situated in and a part of Hani- 
son's Division of Duluth, accord- 
ing to the recorded plat thereof 
in the office of the Register ot 
Deeds m and for said County of 
St. Louis, Applicant. 

vs. 
City of Duluth, a Municipal Cor- 
poration of the State of Minne- 
sota and all other persons or 
parties unknown, claiming any 
right, title, estate, lien or Inter- 
est m the real estate described 
in the application he-ln^^^^^ 

The State of Minnesota to the above- 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and requlr«l 
to answer the application of the appli- 
cant In the abON?? entitled proceeding, 
and to file your answer to the said appli- 
cation in the office of the Clerk of said 
court in said county, within twenty (20> 
davs 'after the service of this summons 
upon you. exclusive of the day of such 
service and If you fall to answer the 
said application within the tline afore- 
sa d the applicant in this proceeding will 
apply to the court for the relief demanded 
therein. 

Witness J P. Johnson, clerk of said 
court and the seal thereof, at Duluth. In 
said county, this I5th day ot February. 
A. D. 190«. J p JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 

By V, A. DASH. 

Deputy. 
(Seal of District Court. St. Louis County. 

WILSON G. CROSBY. 

Attorney for Applicant. 
Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24, March 
2-9. 1908. 



STATE OF MINNE^trfX. COUNTY OP 
ST LOUIS-SS. . ^ ^ ^ 

Be' it known, that Mr^hls 29th day of 

February, A. D. 1908. ^monally appeared 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 
FOR LICENSE TO SELL. MORT- 
GAGE OR LEASE LAND- 

Stlte of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
In Probate Court. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Cornelius 

The^Slution of Edwin D. Field and 
Elizabeth Field, as representaUves of 



.he alx)ve-namea decedent, having been 
filed in this court, representing, among 
other things, that, for "-masons stated in 
said petition. It Is necessary and for th« 



(No. 007.) 
SUMMONS IN APPLICATION 
REGISTRATIOIN OF LAND- 
State oi Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— ss. 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

In the matter of the application of 
John Ware to register the title to the 
following described real estate situated m 
St. Louis County. Minnesota, namely: 
All of lots numbered Seven (7) 
to Fifteen (15). both Inclusive, 
in Block numbered One (1). ex- 
cept so much of Lots numbered 
Seven (7) to Twelve (12). m- 
clusive. in said Block numbered 
One (1). as is comprised within 
the limits of a strip of land 100 
feet in width across the same, 
50 feet on each side of the cen- 
ter line of the railroad of the 
Duluth, Missabe & Northern 
Railway company; 
Lots numbered Seventeen (17), 
Eighteen (18), Nineteen (19), 
Twenty (20), Twenty-one (21), 
Twenty-two (22), Twenty-three 
(23), and Twenty-five (25), all In 
Block numbered Two (2); 
Lots numbered One ID, Two (2), 
Three (3), Four (4), Five (5), 
Six (6). Seven (7), Eight (8), 
Eleven (11), Twelve (12), Thir- 
teen (13), Fourteen (14), Twen- 
ty-six (26), Twenty-seven (27), 
Twenty-eight ('28). Twenty-nine 
(29), Thirty (30), Thirty-one (31), 
Thirty-two (32), all In Block 
numbered Four (4>; 
Lots numbered One (1), Two (2). 
Three (3), Four (4). Five (5), 
Six (6). Seven (7), Eight (8), 
Nine (9), Ten (10), all In Block 
numbered Three (3); 
The above lots and blocks all be- 
ing situate in and a part of Cen- 
terdale Addition to Duluth, ac- 
cording to the recorded plat 
thereof on file in the office of 
the register of Deeds In and for 
said St. Louis County, 

Applicant, 
vs. 
Frank Carlson. J. T. McKenzie, 
H. H. .Scobie, Peter Kerlinski, 
Duluth. Mi-ssabe & Northern 
Railway company, a Minnesota 
corporation; Peter Herauld, and 
all other persons or parties un- 
known, claiming any right, title, 
estate. Hen or interest In the 
real estate described in the ap- 
plication herein. Defendants. 
The State of Minnesota to the 
named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and required 
to answer the application of the appli- 
cant In the above entitled proceeding 
and to file your answer to the said appli- 
cation In the office of the Clerk of said 
court, in said County, within twenty (30) 
days after the service of this summons 
upon you, exclusive of the day of such 
service, and, If you fall to answer tJle 
said application within the time afore- 
said, the applicant In this proceeding 
win apply to the court for the relief de- 
manded therein. 

Witness, J- P- Johnson, Clerk of said 
Court, and the seal thereof, at Duluth, In 
said County, this 15th day of February. 
A. D. 1908. 

J- P- JOHNSON, Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH. Deputy- 
(Seal of District Court, St. Louis County, 

Minn.). ^„„„ 

WILSON G. CROSBY, 

Attorney for Applicant. 
Duluth Evening Herald— Feb. 24, March 
2-9. 1908. 



Excess of income over dis- 

bursementa :^-: •••„:' \Vu^ 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1907. 

Mortgage loans $ 

Bonds and stocks owned.. 

Cash in office and In bank 

Accrued interest and rents -... 
Premiums In course of collec- 
tion ^ • 

All other admitted assets 



33,745.29 

127,750.00 

23.500.00 

10,0>a.48 

1,656.65 

9.826.40 
213.86 



Total admitted assets $ 17*2.930.39 

^^"^MABlLI-riES DEC. 31. 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ ^-^^f 

Reinsurance reserve ,^;m 

C.mimlsslon and brokerage ^'*?!?$" 

Reinsurance premiums ion«jir>oo 

Capital stock paid up 100.000.00 

Total liabilities '"Eluding cap- ^^^ 

Net surplus • 34,206.86 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS. 
1907 BUSINESS. 
Fire risks written during ^*>®^ 237,099.0( 
Prem^ms received thereon . . - . . 67,299 .7t 

Net amount In force at end of 

the vear $3,674,045.01 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 
Fire Risks— • wm «c nr 

Risks written $ *^lm« 

Premiums received 'qtua: 

Losses paid lil"« 

Losses incurred ^.......... /*t* 

State of Minnesota. Department of In- 

I Hereby Certify. That the annual 
statement of the Milwaukee CJerman In- 
surance Company, for the year ending 
Dec. 31. 1907, of which the above Is an ab- 
stract haa been received and filed in this 
department ^nd^ duly^appr^oved^^by^me. 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald-Feb. 24, March 
2-?, 1908. 



above 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 
FOR ADJUSTMENT OF FINAL AC- 
COUNT AND FOR FINAL DECREE 
OF DISTRIBUTION- , „. ^ , 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Louia. 

In Probate Court- 
In the Matter of the estate of Ann« 
Charlotte Williams, Deceased. 
The petition of Adolph A. Williams, aa 
reoresentative of the above-named de- 
cedent together with his final account of 
the administration of said estate, having 
been filed in this court, representing, 
among other things, that ho has fully ad- 
ministered said estate, and praying that 
said final accjMftt of said administration 
be examinedrad justed and allowed by 
the court alld that the court make and 
enter its IITnal decree of distribution of 
the resldi^e of the estate of said decedent 
to the persons entitled thereto, and for 
the dlscnarge of the representative and 
the sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That .said petition b« 
heard and said final account examined, 
adjusted and allowed by the court, at the 
Probate Court Rooms In the Court House, 
in the City of Duluth, in said County, on 
Monday, the 23rd day of March, 1906. at 
ten o'clock A. M.. and all persons Inter- 
ested in said hearing and in said matter 
are hereby cited and required, at said time 
and place, to show cause, if any there b«. 
whv said petition should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this order 
be served by publication In The Duluth 
TTvpnlne Herald according to law. 
Dated at Duluth, Minn.. Feb. 21at, 1908. 
By the Court. 

J. B- MIDbLECOFF, 

Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis Co., 

DSluth^ Evening Herald-Feb. 24. March 
2-9. 1908. 








18 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



« WEAKENS AT 

THE CLOSE 



Government Report is 
Bearish, But North- 
west is Firm. 

Flax Has a Stronger 

Tone in the Duluth 

Market. 



declined 
were 369 



Duluth Board of Trade, March 9. -Wheat 
had a fair advance during lUe session i.> 
the Ati'.L-ricau markets today, but broke 
Just betore the close, on the issuance of 
the government crop report, which wa.s 
bearish. While ilie prices went off from 
the high level of tli.- day, tlic 
firm as compared with Saturday 
Northw< stern markets. The 
kets were lower. 

The govtrnment tigures for wheat 
148.721,000 bus. put corn ai 
and oats at 2ti7,47G,(?-iO bus. 

DuriiiK tiie nujiiiiiiij 



close wa.s 

in the 

other war- 

wero 
yc::,42'J,ooo bus 



thu 
bug 



luoiiiiiiij news Ironi 
Southwest was buliisn. the gr.en 

in Oklahoma and the lies- 
meUvlontd as a menace tu 



being report', u 
Bian lly being 

Cables were soft. Liverpool closed IVsd 
lower, Berlin IVao lower, liudapesi -Vic 
higiier and Aniwcrp IVic lower, 
bulge In Budapest was caused by 
crop news in Hungary. ,,.,,„ 

''ht May option tlooed Vic higher 
Duluth, hiC lower In Chicago, Vi-;^c' 
higlier in Almnodp.tis and -^sc higher in 
Winnipeg. The JuSy option clo.sed »i,c 
in Dululh. *»c lower in Chicago, 
iviinneapolis, 2c lower 
>:.c liigner in Winni- 



ditlons. The hiffh point for May was 
W>/4c. The close was strong with May ic 
higtier at 64^4(iJ)*8C. 

The oats market was easy. Trading 
was dull. May oats opened .(ifVic lower 
at 52ut-. sold at 63c and tlien 
to &3'**->4f<i'%c. Local receipts 

*^'The provisions market was active 
and prices were firm because of ft 
strong market for live hogs. May pork 
was 15c higher at $12.2«J. Lard was <»^o 
higlu'- at $7.96. Ribs were 5^. Vic hlgh- 

*'ciosef'^V heat-May. 95^^c;; July. W^-tf 
^uc: September, 87<,c- Corn— May. MV<I' 
*ci July, 62c; September, tile. Oais-May. 
5lkc; May, old, d3Vsc; July. 43Vc; Ju y. 
old, W4C. "^'pork-May. J12.l2»iftin2^1a; Ju y. 
512.52Vic. I^rd-May. 7.96; July.- 5J>.lo. Sep- 
tember. p:db. Kibs-May, |«.S2; Ju'V. »'-W 
(r«7.12Mi. Rye-Cash, S2'(/-S3c. Har ley-Cash, 
7tiiV2. Tiinothy-March. H«&- S^^'*' "■,";: 

March, *20.U0. ^'^«>\ ^MUV>^r^;^K°-.. 'x'o'' ■ 
>Hi>«''«l*!»»t.c ■ No. i red, 'J6»/4'^iW^8C , No. - 
]^fr^d •.'v.c^??l.«M%; No. 3 hard. 'Jo^c'iP 
,1 ill; No: V sprtng. 'JSTiC&^l.ll; oiners 
noining doing. t:orn-No. 2, nothing do- 
ing; No. 3. 5t>^GCc. 

TlIK MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

M heat Inci'Hain Pending the Re- 
ceipts of (Government Report. 

Minneapolis, March y.-Uncertainty at- 
tenaed the wheat market, Pe»^>» '»/'»'£ 
receipts of the government »''P"'^."J 
furn.ers' stocks. The Liverpool market 
cKme 2d lower anS. May wlu-al opened 
h'-re ^(U^ac lower uian baluiUay ai 
r'0C%'<ilit%. But the local .situation was 
tlrm and as outside ^^^kets reacted 
.Minneapolis bounded up .iuick!>. May 
uoii.K up 2c. Only 3o8 cars were re- 
r..ivtMl here ajialnst tiU l-st year and 
elevator stocks ceoreased 12..>.^'>j bus lor 
two days. Duluth got 44 cars llga.n^^ 
5^12. The report went around aga.n that 
one ot the big local milling companies 
h.is control of ail the eoniracl wheal 
here, an.l the effect was to m.'.ke Axuy 
reUitively stronger tnan July, and to 
den the .iifference. The reiwi t of 
bus in farmers' hauls eaused a 
break but there was tendency 



Tlie 
bullish 

in 



higiier in 
York and 



higher 
a stiade 
in New 

May cori: closed 
ajvl unchanged to 
pool. May oats 
Chicago. 

Brooniliall cabled 



d recovering again ne.ir the close 



\v 

146.000 
sliarp 

\lay^ opened ' iir'jroG^'fvri.lwU, bigh 11.0^^4. 
low i\X^V;». closed $l.o7 (il.O.'u. July 
closed $l.ii6'8'?il.05V4. „ „ , 

Cash wheal was not so firm. No. i 
northern was quoted early 2c over May 
and No. 2 at May price, eitUer spot 
to arrive, but wheat to arrive was 



ADVANCES 
INjrOCKS 

Prices Touched Highest 

of the Day in Final 

Hour. 

Shares of All Grades Rose 

and Close Was 

Strong. 



New York. March 9.— The stock mar- 
ket opened active and strong with 
only a sprinkling of small declines. The 
usual speculative favorites were con- 
spicuous in the advance and there 
were wide gains In some of the less 
active slocks. Louisville & Nashville 
rose 3, I'acinc Mall 1^. Southern Pa- 
clhc l',i. Cnion Pacific Great Northern 
preferred Brooklyn Tninsit. Delaware 
& Hudson, American Smelting 
Leuii, North 
llonai Paper 
I'acitlc, 
large 



orders each way that North Butte was 
the only actlve-siock with opening prices 
the highest. The metal market Is such, 
that until a l>ig Improvement In the sit- 
uation is apparent to every one .out- 
siders will conMne most of their atten- 
tion to the New York market, so the 
best we look lor Is a dull traders' mar- 
ket, but with an upward tendency, as 
liquidation has been complete and any 
change will Ibfe* an Improvement. 
' • • • 
Houghton, ;Mlvh., to Gay & Sturgis: A 
large, proportion of the refined copper 
from the Hvughton county smelters is 
being shipped for export. Practically all 
of the remainder is going direct to manu- 
facturers, mostly In Connecticut, New 
Jersey and Detroit. Very little is going 
to American trading centers. There Is no 
way of knowing the destination of the 
export copptr. but it Is not felt here that 
it is going direct to consumption. Thero 
is scarcely a normal amount of copper 
on hand here except at Dollar Bay. and 
there the stocks are not alarmingly 
large. It Is not believed either that the 
Calumet & Hecla's Buffalo smelter has 
more than Its usual stock on hand. 



Clilcaco Livestock. 

Chicago, Marcli 9.— Cattle: Recelats, 
about 25,000; market 10c higher; beeves. 
$4.20<^.2o; cows and heifers, J2.0')fJ.^.oO; 
Texans. $4.00(64.80; calves, $5.i)ca"..0o; 
Westerners, $4.00^5.00; Blockers and feed- 
ers, $3.00(g4.90. Hogs: Receipts, about 
42.0*); market 10 c higher; light, $4455^) 
|4.77»/4; mixed, $4.50f«4.80; heavy. $4.5'.>Tj4.S0; 
rough, $4.o('<f?4.65; pigs. $3.S5'54.J10; bulk of 
sales, UX>o<a4.1i. Sheep: Receipts, about 
16.00; market strong to 10c higher; 
r^.e.'/ae.t'O; Westerners, $3.7.V(/0.(«; 
lings. »5..S0f5«.25; lambs, $5.ati{7.10; 
erners, S5. 75^7. 16. 



native, 
year- 
West- 



C. W. F. HEGG 
PASSES AWAY 



Charles W. F. Hegg, treasurer of the 
Federated Trades assembly, member 
of that body for fourteen years, and 
a prominent labor leader, died this 
morning at his home, 224 Third ave- 
nue east, after a short illness. 

Mr. Hegg of late was a dealer in 
lands, but formerly was a member 
of the Retail Clerks' union, and re- 
tained his membership In that body 
and his interest In union affairs after 
going into a different field of endeavor. 
He was prominent on the floor of the 
Federated Trades assembly, and his 
passing away is mourned in labor cir- 
cles in the city. 

Mr. Hegg was 41 years of age, 
is survived by a wife and two 
dren. The funeral 
have not yet been made 



and 
chil- 
arrangements 



lo higher in Chicago 
'ad higlier in Liver- 
closed unchanged In 



and 
de- 



al 
than 



_ >*<1 to 
II. glecled, 
syinpalhy 



44 against 
>iij)Ohs 3'> 
!. total lor 
*.<>; last y<Mr. 
43 last year, 
days.) ugamti 



from Liverpool: 
"Whtat wa3 easy at the opening 
from Pkd lo l',4d lower, ana luriiiei 
clined tid lo -lid during the moinmg. 
Pressure rtsulied trom ilu; wtakuess ia 
American markets on Saturday ili< in 
creas.- in Kan.sas receipts, weakness in 
the continental markets and the ll.iuiUa- 
tlon by recent buyer.^. The market 
mid-da- was weak and 2d lower 
Saturday. . . 

••Corn was easy at the start and 
*4d lower. Ttie n»arket was 
with an easy ui.H.tone and ii 
with the decline * wheat. 

Car receipts at I>urath were 
64 last year, and at Minn 
against C'22 last y: ar. making 
the Northwisl ot 412 ugiMn^i 
Chicago received M ayaiii.st 
Winnip'g !• ceivid 223 (. 

*'piimai*'v".'-;celpts of whr-at wer.- l.'S.-MtO 
bus last" year*^1.02t..u00 bus. Shipm nt 
260,0i.O bus, last year i,^M>^ 
ances of wheal and 

*The"';i.-lble r.upply of v^''<,'tV J?,*;^ h^ls'' 
4 3t*OU<» bus, and is now 41,Jb.,0W ous. 
against ^r>,7rKJ.li00 bus a year ago 

Primary receipts of corn were 
last year lu7,0'ii bus. Shipments 
last year u24.0Wi bus. Clearances of com 
■were 221..O0O bus. , , 

''The visible supply of ^•"'•"/i.;;,'-'^«fj'' 
4 724,iHX> bus, and i* now S,Ohr;.000 bus. 
acainst 12 ar>'.t.«K}0 bus a year ago. 
'SN^Hds'sl.ipnienis of >^ >><-» 'i.nd /•o^;'. 
last weak, i..e previous weik ''"^l ;'"^ 
corresponding wecK a year ago aic bhown 
as tolfows: .^.j,,,^,^. 

Last IMevlous 



or 
of- 
fered later ^c under spot, and near the 
ilose b«st possible spot bids for No. I 
were PAc over. Close: No. 1 northern 
$l.tiSVjn"oi>i/H .'•pot and ?1.0s% to arrive; 
No 2 northern ll.WiVy IvKiTi. spot, and 
JltHJ^ to arrive. No. 3 wheat !H.02^j|].yo; 
Nil. 3 yellow corn 5i}%'ai>'i\r. No. i white 
oaU-=. 49^., I ; No. 2 rye. 77:^4''i ''.♦=>i'- 

Barley was weaker. The first twelve 
cars sold averaged about Ic under Satur- 
day, but later buyers and sellers were 
21<2Vic apart In their views. Closing 
price range 60c to SSc. t^ , .i. 

Flax barely held up to the Duluth 
May l>asis. lUiyern ltie<i to get It cheaper, 
but finally paid May basis, leaving, how- 
ever some of the less desirable lots un- 
sold. Close, $1.15. 

Bran in bulk firm at $2Ki2l.aO. Ln- 
cei taint V and price Irregularity in wheat 
brought the early statement from millers 
that whatever the variation they would 
make no change In flour qunialion.s 
pending receipt of the gfivernitient re- 
port ot farm holdings. With the entry 
of stabilitv into the raw material mar- 
ket or in the event of a decided change 
tomorrow, flour prices will be adjusted 
aeorUingly Shipments. »li«,6rs barreels. 
Fiiat patents. $5. tfi*?! .">. fiO ; second pateitts. 
$5.ai.''«(o.uO; first clears, $4.4u'<{4.jo; second 
clears. ja.GOd/S.tiO. 



of wheat 

Shipm 
bus. Clear- 
llour aggregated 177,- 



.01.00;; bus. 
4;>4,000 bu.->. 



.Aiin'ricaii 

Du- 
luth. 



America 

Russia 

Danube 

Argeiitliia 

India 

Australia 

Aust. -Hungary 
Various 

Totals 



WeeU. 

3.2OS.0<)0 
aiiO.OOO 

. 0.304,000 

32S.O0O 

24,lKX) 

. 208,000 

.I0,7ti!<.000 

CUKN 

. i,r>w).ooo 

, 301,000 

. IST.OOO 

40,000 



We, k. 

4.09f.,UiO 

aoo,Oi.o 

224,000 
[,.SS>«,000 

' '712,000 

i4.d"iO 

11,S&4.000 

2,14j.0CO 
ti<.'j,00.l 
3S-,t)0J 
103,000 



I.ast 

Year. 

2 36s,t)0(i 

!-;o,o 
i.iwo.ooo 

4,(>2«,O.0 

aLs.otfi 

MO.OOij 
2O.s,00j 
112.00(1 

lO.frVS.tOO 

2.4OU.0 
iO'.,(0-t 
414,0«fk 
lOtJ.i-CO 



May— 

()l«-n 

High 

Low 

<Mose 

Close 7 til. 

July— 

< fpi'n 

Migh 

1>JW 

Close .... 
Close itli. 

In \Vinnii)eg, 
Jl.12'8 and JUiy 



Wlioat 

Miniu- 
apolis. 



Market. 

Chi- 
cago. 



.51.tH'«.\;|ll.t»&\-'fi 9o-'>B-*4 
. 1.0. i'l, l.l.i->4 '.»7-'/i 
. l.tXi l.<»6jfc aof^H 
. 1.06B l.u.-'/»B \fi}-tU 
1.00 in l.OtiVi IH»-Jb 



New 
York. 

$1.0.!='* 
1.04Vi 

l.Oo's 

l.OB^U 
1.06 



National 
American and Interna- 
referred 1, and Northern 
American Car, Cenirai Leather 
fractions. 
AdditionaJ gains were made In many 
of tlie less prominent r.iilroads and 
sp.^cjaHies, despite the active selling that 
began in the representative slocks soon 
after the market opened. This realizing 
practically wiped out the initial ad- 
vances and drove some slocks below Sat- 
urday's closing, Pennsylvania losing a 
po.nl and American Smelling preferred 
1»2. Tlie upturn of Vm in Reading laier 
steadied the market, but prices yielded 
again. Central Railroad of New Jersey 
and Canada Soutliern ix*se 2»/i. 

A quarter of a million shares were 
sold during the first hour, but the mar- 
ket dropped back into the same dullness 
as last week in the second hour. 

Prices hovered in llie neigliburiiood of 
the Saturday level. Krle hist preferred 
and Pressed Steel Car preferred ro.se 2 
and Llie .second preferred 2%. North- 
western tell 1^, Delaware & Hudson 1V» 
and American Sugar 1. Bonds were hrin. 
I'urchases of stocks were resumed on 
a moderate scale, but the chief demand 
centered in I'nion Pacillc. St. Paul and 
Reading, which sola at their highest. 
Tlie metals. Industrials and the Hill 
stocks also were in favor, but the real 
of the list was neglected. 

The Improvement In the market con- 
tinued along rather restricted lines, with 
Heading the chief feature. Reading 
touch! d I02>s. a rise of 2^. and United 
States Steel gained a point. The mar- 
ket ruled ahout the highest of the day. 
Pacific Coast improved 2 points. Amer- 
ican Car preferred 1%. Great Northern 
pieierred l^;*. Texas & Pacific lU and 
Chesapeake it. Ohio. Atchison preterred 
and Ontario <& Western, 1. 

Tiie market closed strong and active. 
Prices touched the highest of the day in 
the final hour on buying In moderate 
volume. Union Pacific was conspicuous 
at an advance of 2>4. United States Steel 
crossed 32. Louisville & Nashville rose 
4'4. American Smelting 2*4. Southern Pa- 



I'lio (\)ttoii Market. 

New York. March 9.— The cotton mar- 
ket opened firm at an advance ofS-filS 
points and during th • early session sold 
12 to 15 pcdnts net higher on the active 
months as a result of higher cables, 
good Engli.<«h spot sales and reports of 
more favorable financial and trade con- 
ditions, and rumors that considerable 
sales had been made out of local stock. 
After the first half hour the market *re- 
acttd 2 or 3 points from the best with 
sutx'.s.xiuent fluctuations narrow and ir- 
regular. , , ... 

Spot closed 10 points higher, middhnij 
upland.^ 11.55; middling gulf. 11. '•0. S;>leB, 
3,000 bales. Futures closed steady. Clos- 
ing bids: March. 10.(3; April. 10.07; May. 
10.75; June. lO.Cl; July. 10.J>1; August. 10.32; 
0<lober. $l».lt6. December. 9.98. 

lY<»a.siirv Italaiices. 

Washington, March 9.-Tcday's state- 
ment of the treasury: Available cash 
balance. $268.13S.l.-.2: gold coin and bullion. 
$22,824,619; gold certificates. $36.32.. -00. 



INCIDENT NOT 
FULLY SETTLED 



" Pekln. March 9.— The incident of 
the Tatsu Marus. the Japanese 
steamer that was held up by the 
Chinese authorities on Fob. 7, has not 
been fully settled. Baron Haya- 



ONLY ONE HALF 
ARE ENROLLED 



Not more than one-half of the school 
children of school age. In what Is con- 
sidered the best residence district of 
the city, attend Sunday school, accord- 
ing to figures which have been com- 
piled by Rev. Arthur H. Wurtele, dean 
of Trinity Pro-Cathedral. 

The Endion school has 666 scholars 
enrolled, and at the normal school 
there are 144 more. Inquiry was made 
of all the Sunday school superintend- 
ents, and in the district which the 
pupils of the Endion and normal 
schools are drawn, there are only 432 
Sunday school scholars. 

"The Endion district has the larg- 
est percentage of American born resi- 
dents in the city, and should be a rep- 
resentative pari of Duluth, said Mr. 
Wurtele today. "Yet there is a leak- 
age of nearly 400 pupils. In other 
words, nearly one-half of the boys and 
girls of school age do not attend bun- 
day school." 



DVI«VTH COPPBR CVRB 

WALrTEIt W. CARR 



Private Wires. 
City 'Phones. 1805. 



202-204 »L:VNHATTAN BCTLDKO. 

References: 

CITY NATIONAti BANK. 
Dulutli. Sflnn. 

MARCH », 1008. 



Prtvate Lionc Distance 
•Phones, 1657-1805. 



American- Sa<;inaw . 
Ariz-Commercial . . 
Black ^fountain. . . 
Butte Coalition ... 
Butte & L/ondon . . 
Butte ft Superior. . 

Cal. ft Ariz 

Cal. & Montana . . . 
Col. ft Souora .... 

Carman Cons 

Cliff , 

Comanche 

Copper Queen. ... 

Dal.v-^Vt'st 

Da\iiT-DHly 

I>cun-Arizona 

Kast Bnttc. 

Glolw Cons. 



Bid. 


Ask. 


2.75 


3.00 


18.25 


18.50 


4.00 


4.12 


20.12 


20.37 


.70 


.75 


1.25 


1.31 


100.00 


100.50 


.20 


.25 


6.75 


7.00 


i.iii 


1..50 


.68 


.70 


.04 


.04 H 


1.62 


1.68 


8.00 


8.50 


4JI5 


4.37 


S..'»0 


3.62 


5.00 


5.25 


6.75 


7.00 



Greene-Cananea . . . . 

Hancock Cons 

Kewtx'naw 

Xipissing 

National 

North Butte 

North Butte Kx 

OKI Dominion 

Sup. & PlttsbnrfT • 
Superior ft Boston. 

Shannon 

Shattuck- Arizona. . 
Tonopah Common. 

Trinity 

Warren 

Wolverine- Arizona . 

Tuolumne 

Rut to 3fontaiia 




Bltl.1 

8.121 

5.62 

4.75 

7.25 

.52 

51.00 

1.19 

36.75 

12.25 

1.87 

10..50 

15.25 

5.50 

14.25 

3.75 

1.76 

1.10 

.44 



Ask. 

8.25 

5.87 

4.87 

7.50 

.55 

51.25 

1.25 

37.00 

12.37 

2.00 

10.75 

15..')0 

.■>.75 

11.50 

4.00 

1.87 

1.12 



ZENITH 



1464. 

Reference: 



DULUTH 
Minn. 



1871. 



City National Bank. Duluth 

MARTIN ROSENDAHL, 

Copper Stock Broker, 

414 WEST SUPKRIOK STRKET. 102 M.\NHATTAN 

My own wires to Copper Coimtry 



BUILDING. 
Also connections to Eastern markets. 



Batte-BallaklHva Ii* -tronR tmd hard to buy at ». P^ "-^f;, ""'l ttocw! 
preKont time there are bids In the market lor several big lot- «*-*«*•;; 
TodnT. one trade wa- marte for 2.1MK) Hharoa all in ••»«■ '»*• ""^^ that ba* 
vra- »7.50 per »hnre. I do not think th^re 1- a hIooK «° /"^^ll^'/'luo irt," 
■tood ui» HKHinKt so niuih pre»!.ure brouKht to benr to lo«er *»^, »"*;*; 
Banf kl^^a *lla" Mood aR«ln.t then. ■" -»•- *'•^.,H"!;^*'^^*'*^d other 
country were «olnK to the wall f««it. Thi*. Mtoek sold at *^-**.^' "Jl" "nnT^ 
^to.°k« ».old awav down below their former value. The company has paid 
?«r the miie r'fultand own, the whole outllt trom -"? --'^.«« ViTou" 40^1 
;«H h»« about SL-KMHW In caHh and other a»Net>,. They «I«o '••Jt-"'?""! ,...; 

Inside 



rd-rn-ro^r li: irrrTc;'veV;:"VhaT^n"-L".;„.V.„uVava alongside of th. 
blseeNt nblppern In the I nited States. 

topper Queen 1« Htronjc at $1.62 bid 
aMked. You can trade either way. Greene 
are verv active. Globe <'on«oIIdated 

one-hnlf million on property, and as .^^ 

- - fhlH eouUI probably be sold to pa> 



burg 

They owe 
of Mtoek In 
the debt. 



will place B.nllaklava alongside 

Butte & Superior In »1.25 bid or 

(anaucA and Superior A Pltts- 

Hh<nild find ore after a while. 

there are oa»ly lOO.OOO shares 



the hands of stockholders. 



1.04'^-'f» 'M\if%- 
l.l<3'3 



1.06 

1.0«*4 

LOG 

1.1a;»,j» I.OOVS-V4 'M'/3-% 

i.oti i.ouv* yo''8-'ji 

May wiieai closed 
wi.rul lit !fl.l3»,i. 



at 



yet 



China. 



cltlc. St. Paul 2 to 2V4, Northern Pacific 
and Canadian Pacitlc I'*. There were 
various advances of a point in stocks 
of all grades. 



Quotatlon.«» 
gls, brokers. 



furnished by Oay 
328 West Superior 



& .«;tur- 
street: 



Stocks— 



IHlt:hlIx)wiClo*«? 



Cliica^fo Oat.s, Corn Juul I'urk 

Outs. 
May. 
a2-h 

5aVi 

O^M-VB 

o^U 



opening 
iliSh .. 

1.KJW •■ 

Close . . 



Corn. 
May. 

W',4- 



^ 



Pork. 

May. 

$12.10 
12.17 
12. iU 
i2.10 



Cira'u 

March 



111 .Store. 

.". I"j0i>; 



America . 

Bu.«sia — 

Danube ... 

Argciitinu 

Totals 2.0S8.000 3.2:y.tM) 3.4f,:..lK»0 

Wheal \va8 fairly active during the 
«,ssou 111 the Uuluth market. May 
Whf' U opoiu-d ^,c low.r at $l.0o. '^Jvanc.d 
To $1 OG, declined to il.iA^*. rallied o 
1106*K declin.-d lo Jl.W and cloSi-d at 
thai mice, a Kain of >„c ».ver Satuida> 

Durum vh.at closed \^ lower and c.isl 
•pTing wli.ai was .selling on a has-.s ot 
2c over May lor No. 1 uortliern. 
Flu.\ ^^a•■' 



lainy active ana ii.Md a 
UtlU- siruiii:<r. May tlax op.-md Uc lo^ve. 
at $114^4 declined to $1.1!--. •"»'•' *l to 
tllO'l and clo.-.d at thai pr.ce. a ^-"ii ol 
Sc uv^T Saturday. July Max ''I-'l-'Jit^ 
tower at «I.h>'4, advaiued to Jl.l'n a.iu 
c^^od at mat plicc. uncUuiiKed iioin Sal- 

""coarse grains were unchanged. 

Fullowiuti w.r«; the ^^^'^ ''«,l"'^,:'-io Tu 
Wheal No. 1 hard on track, »1.10. 10 
No 1 norihern. »1.0«. On track: 
uortlurii. Jl.os; .May. JUm; Jmy. 
durum on truck. No.^l. ^>.*\- 
No. 2, >.0'4c; May durum, SrV;; J l> 
durum, SK-. Kl.ix ^*\,^'''''^\ 'V^***' "-"-^ 
on track, ll.H-**; M4>' «1J-''^- 
11. Hi-'*. OiHa to arrive, uuc; oat.-' on 
50c rye. .B-syc; barley. iiO-M)c. 

Cars inspected : W neat . 44, lasl year 
oats. 12; rye, 1; bariey, 1; tlax. U. 

* Kecelpis; Wheat, 2»),!>34; oats, 
barlev, ;iU>; tlax. 13.G14. .,-,., 

Shipments: Wheat. M; outs, o7,(03; rye, 

68ti. 



arrive: 
No. 1 
91.ot>Ui 



July, 
track. 



&4; 
last 



lb.760. 



At l»'iUith, 
W Ilea I— 

.Vo. 1 h.ird 

No. 1 northern 

No. 2 nortliern 

No. 2 spring 

No. 4 .spring 

Hejected 

No trade 

ypecUil bin 

Winter 

Western 

I'uruin 

Mixed 

Total of wheat 

Im-rease during week.. 
Stocks a year ago 

Coaifse O rains— 
Oats 

Oecrease 

Hye 

increase 

Liarley 

Increase 

Flax 

Increase 



..1. 



Uus. 

&2,313 

:ut.741> 
2lt.o4a 
(ja,(>o2 
41,400 

io,u;o 

1.004 1 

2.042.555 

4,02 

33.t>'J7 

3,011t.0.S 

5,014 



.8.431.31W 
. 13o,f>."8 
.6,3S4,U26 

.1,020,804 
75,143 
. 15.002 
'.♦M> 
. 478,tj31 
.. lO.Hoo 
..3.045.372 
.. 100,033 



Atehison ...5 

AinalKHmuted Copper .... 

Sniehlng 

Haltimore & Ohio 

nrooklyn K.ipid Transit. 

Colorado Fuel & Iron 

Canadian Pacific 

F:rle 

I.ou.siville & Nashville... 

An.'icnnda 

Missouri Paclfir 

New York Central 

Ont.-irio Ji Western 

I'eiinsylvaiila Railway. .. 

KeadliiK 

Uo; k Island 

St. Paul 

Southern Paelflc 

Sugar 

I'nit.-d States Steel 

do l>f«l 

Cnion Pacific 

M. K. & T 

Ainerhaii Koconudlve .. 

Northern Paeitlc 

Oreat Northern 

.\merican Car Foundry.. 
National Lead 



52^4 
B4\ 

43-% 

1S>4 

I48I4 
12Vi 
96 
33% 
32Ti 
WVi 
Slvi 

117«» 

102^2 
12 

110% 
72U 

1197* 
32'/4 
96 

120 
20% 
37 

12.-.% 

122 
30% 
50H 



70-"«4' 

t'2>B 

82 
42 
17'4 
146lit 
12V4I 
94 
32%| 

97ti; 

3 ■■■^4 1 

I'O--?* 
12 I 

invi 

:(••%' 

11S% 
31 

947h 
1174 

11% 

3u 

124% 
]2'H 

3<)Vi 



<:: 

52^, 

C4'j 

S2S4 

434 

IS'4 

14S>< 
12«^ 
90 
33% 
32-.S 
99»4 
31-« 

117 

12 
116Vs 

72\i 
1197i 
32 Vi 
9'. 

1I9Tm 
20'^i, 
37 

i2r.-8 

121-^ 

30>,2 

49'^! 49!^ 



shI, the Japanese minister to 
had a conference today with 1 uan 
Shih Kai. grand councillor of the 
empire, but they failed to reach an 
understanding as to the release of the 
steamer, which Is still held by ( hina. 
and with regard to the indemnity. 
China has, however, given satisfaction 
regarding the hauling down of th< 
Japanese Hag on the Tatsu Maru by 
Chinese officers, and Baron Hayashi 
today aj^sured China that Japan would 
meet her desire regarding .supervision 
of the traffic in arms to Chinese 
ritory. He agreed also to the 
proposal for the ultimate dispo.sitlon 
of the cargo of the Tatsu Maru, 
which he again set forth the 
demands of hi.s government. 

m view of the present status of 
t4ie negotiations, linal action by Japan 
will, of necessity, have to be deferred 
for at least two days. 



THOSE WHO HAVE 
PASSED BEYOND 



Detroit, March 9.-Dr. Hal C. ^Vyman. 
widely known as a surgeon and -luthor 
of a well-known book on abdominal sur- 
gery, died today from pneumonia. 

Cadar Rapids. Iowa. March 9.— Hon. 
Stephen 1. Oows. pioneer railroad con- 
tractor and capitalist, died yesterday 
Dayton, Fla.. where he had gone for 
heultii. He was 78 year s old. 

Grand Rapids, Mich., March 9-J"^e'^ 
Alfred Wolcott of the Kent county .^r- 
cuil court, died suddenly at his home 
here yesterday of cerebral 
Judge Wolcott 
Democrats aud 
election iu 19o7. 

Jack- 



al 
hiii 



ter- 



hemorrhage. 
was nominated by both 
Republicans at his lasl 



M. W. LrEE m, CO., Inc. 



BOTH 'PHONES, 209S. ■*»<> \A KS T 

CAPITAI^, *50,000 



Sl'PERiOR STREET. 



BANKCR8 AND BR.OKBIt8. 



Branches at 
Private Wlrca to 



HibblnK. SupeHor. West Uuluth and 
New York, Boston. Copper Country 



Chlcaxro- 
and Ranire. 



Dallas Texas. March 9.— Charles 
son Van' Dusen,' the once famous ockey 
died here yesterday morning. His last 
(^hinese I riding was m Germany, where he rode 
( n'"*'^«^i[^^;"i^r. Weinberg, for Hollenstein and on 
several occasions for the kaiser. 



after 
final 



THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following avt ihe cjoalng quota- 
tions of copi>er stocks at lioston today, 
reported by I'aiiie, Webber & Co., Room 
A, Torrey building: 



BILL PASSES SENATE 

To Allow Transfer of ^liiiiu'sota & 
Manitoha Railway Lands. 

Wa.shington. March 9. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The bill introduced by 
.Senator Clapp to authorize the Min- 
nesota & Manitoba company to con- 
vey certain lands granted to it by 
an act of congres.^, April 17. 1900, 
passed the senate today. The bill 
authorizes the Minnesota & Manitoba 
Railway company to convey, in feo 
simple, to Thoma.s Cathcart, his heirs 
and as.slgnoes, the following des- 
cribed lands: Lots 3 and 4, and 
eastcly 140 feet of southwest quarter 



Saturday 
and a native 



Chicago, March 9.-Frederlck ^arren 
Freer a painter of international repu- 
tation, died at his haine here 
night. He was 59 years 
ot Chicago. 

Mulostan Funeral. 

'The funeral of Stans Milostan. the 
policeman who died last Thursday, 
was held this morning from the resi- 
dence. 903 East Sixth street. Serv- 
ices were held at 10 o'clock at the 
Polish church. Third avenue east and 
Third street, with inteimeni in the 
Polish cemetery. 

The funeral was under the direction 
of the Police Relief association, and 
was attended by the officers of the as- 
sociation and a 8<iuad of twenty men 
as an escort. The pallbearers 
Officers Gleason, arandmaison. 
nors, Sass. Hroulllette and Shannon 








n 

J 

1 




> 
f 


( 

i 

1 

4 


1 


1 

■• — 



Members of 
Boston Stock Excliange. 

Direct and EzcImsIvc 

PrlTste Wires to 

B0ST01V, NEW YORK. CHICAGO, 

CALL MET and HOUGHTON. MICH. 



Diilnth Offlcct Sa6 W. Superior 
Old 'Phone, 18B7. 
R. O. Hl/BBBliL.. Manager. 



St. 



were 
Con- 



Slocks— 



I Bid. I Asked. 



Cu.sli Suh'^' sioiuluy. 

No 1 north.rii wheat, l.oOO bushels 

to arrive J| 

No. 1 northern, 1 car t 

No. 2 north<rn, 1 car 

N. 2 iiortluTn, 2 cars 

No. 3 spring wlieat. 1 car 

No. 3 -spriiiK. 1 car 

No. 4 spring. :; cars 

Durum wluat. 1 car No. 1 

Durum, 1 car No. 1 

Durum. 2 c.irs No. 1 

Durum, W.«00 bu. No. 1 to arrive... 

Durum. 1 car No. 2 

Durum. 1 car No. 3 

O.its. 1 car No. 3 white to arrive. 

F ix, 4.221 bu. 15 lbs 

Flax. 1 car to arrive 

Flax. 7W bu. to arrive 

Flax. 2 cars •• 

Flax, 1 car to arrive 



1.05 

i.or.'4 

.9S\i 
1.U2 
.97Ti 

.88 

.S>i>-/a 
.S8 

.ss 

.85 

l.U""* 
1.1 4>i 

i.nu 

1.14-rt 

1.14-^ 



THE CHICAGO MARKET. 

Wheat Loses at Opening Whith Is 
Regained on Sharp Rally. 

Chicago. March 9.— The wheat market 
was weak at the opening today becau.se 
of a tlecline In all of the Kuropean 
markets. Liverpool being off 2d. A 
sharp rally set In by covering of .shorts 
and all of the early loss wav regained. 
May wheal opened •V<i'i.c lower at I'oVi 
fe9t>c and s<dd off to W'a-^c. Minneapo- 
lis Duluth and Chicago reported re- 
ceipts of 413 cars against 2JW cars last 
week and 719 lars one y»ar ago. 

Demand trom shorts sent the pr.cc of 
May up to 79'(ri'sc. l^ler the market 
slumped oft on reports tliat the restrves 
in the hands ot Uk- farmers was larger 
than had been estimated, and May de- 
clin<d to 95'V"- 'l'-*^ close was weak with 
Mav '4c lowei- at i*b%c. 

The corn marked opened easily along 
with wh<'at and becauso of favorable 
weather for the movement of wheat In 
the Northwest. Later the market ral- 
lied with wheat and because of local 
receipts which were below the esti- 
mate May corn opened a shade to I4W 
%c lower at C3tt63i4c and sold at •.S^c. 
Socal receipts were 309 cars, with 4 of 

*^°rhe"inarke" held strong all day on the 
general .xpectation that the forthcoming 
lovernment report will show bullish con- 



Duliith C'ar Inspection. 

Wheat-.N'o. 1 northt-rii. 7; No. 2 north- 
ern 10; No. 3 spring. 4; No. 4 spring. 1; 
rejt'cted. 1; No. I tlurum. 3; No. 2 durum. 
16; No. 3 durum. 1:; total of durum. 20; 
mixed, 1; total of wheal, 44; last year, 

54. 

Oats. 12; rye. 1; barley. 1. 

Flax-No. 1, IG; No. 2, 1; total of llax. 
17; last year. 9. „ , . , 

Total i>f all cars. .5. Cars on track 
today. 115. 

liiverpool Grain. 

Liverpool. .March 9. -Wheat: Spot, 
firm; No. 2 red Western winter. 7s 4d; 
futures, jiieady; March. 7s *4d; May. 7s 
Id; July. 7» 2V2d. Corn: Spot, st.ady; 
prime mixed American, new. 5s l\'.r. 
prime mixed American, old. .Vs V^d; fu- 
tures. «iuiet; Marci-., .'>s ^^d; May. 5s 2'>id. 

Now York (;raln. 

New York. March 9.— ('lose: Wheat- 
May. »M«»»; July, 97^*c. Corn-May. Ti'^'': 

July, au. 

^IJ.i«»v ISorsr .M.^rk-t. 

Minnesoti Transfer, St. Paul, Minn., 
March ». -Itarrett A: Zimmerman report: 
Trade for the week opens up with a 
promising outlook. Demand tor farm of- 
I ferings continue liberal, but prices show 
' no tendency to ;i(ivance. Gottd second- 
hand horses coiuinue in l,ir»-.e supply and 
I tend to keep down values for fresh con- 
' slgnments. Two cirloads of big young 
j work mules arrived during day. A con- 
.•^l>;nment oi good Western mares, mostly 
I with fo.al. were sliippe<l in by Yegen 
Ihos . N. F .Sheppard accompanyiuK the 
shipment. Fully tKiO head of horses will 
be on hand for the Wednesday sale. 
Trices .show the following level: 

Drafters, extra Jl7.'Vfi2W 

Drafters, choice 125^175 

Farm mares and horses, extra. 14.".'(il7u 
Farm niaivs and horses, choice.. llooiU.'i 

Farm mares, common to good fi.Vff'U'l 

Delivery, choice 12.'.f«lS0 

Drivers and saddlers 145'a210 

Mules, according to size 125({j20j 



Now York Money. 

New York. .March 9.— Close: Money on 
call. e^sy. I»j(fr2 per cent; ruling: rate. 2; 
offered at2. Time loans, tpilet and firm; 
60 days. 3vi per cent; 90 days. S^i^h^ per 
cent; six months. V^f^Lim per cent. Prime 
mercantile paper. r.Vi(f?6 per cent: sterling 
exchange, weak. closinK firm witli actual 
business in bankers" bills at $4.S6.:<ii(fH.Stj.35 
for demand and at $4.S3.4r/a'4.S3..V> for t;0- 
day bills; commercial bills. $4.S3»i; bar 
silver, 5o^»c; Mexican dollars. 47.3c: gov- 
ernment bonds. 8tead>V railroad bonds, 
firm. 



St, Paul Livestock. 

St. Paul. Minn.. March 9. Cattle: 

celpls. 



Re- 

9tX»; steadv to strong. Steers, $4.00 
r«5o..: cows and heifers. |L'.ti6ra4.25; calves. 
II 50^15.25; stockers, r-'.:55'''rtr3.75; feeders. 
saooCotOO Hogs: Receipts. 2,S00. active. 
l(ta higher; range. $4.40^a4.ti0; bulk, $4.45^ 
4 55 Sheep: Receipts, 

Sheep. »4.50^.10; lambs. 
0.711. 



Anurlcan Saginaw 

Atlantic • 

Arcadi;in 

Adventure 

Allouez 

Ahmeek 

.\rizop.a Coinmerc'al — 

ttingliam 

Black Mountain 

Kutie ife Superior 

Uutie & London 

Boston Cons 

BuUe Coalition 

Copper Range 

Calumei iS: Arizona — 

Calumet & lleda 

Cuuiberiand Kly 

Copper yueeii 

Centennial 

Davls-Duly 

Denn- Arizona 

Dalv West 

Fast Butte 

Fr.u.klii; 

Grituby 

Greene-Ciinanea 

Globe Cui.X»lidated 

litlvetla 

Isle Royale 

Lu Salle 

Kevveeiiaw 

•Mass. Gas 

.Michigan 

I .>ri,.-.< 

[ Mercunr 

' Molia wk 

; Nipi.'islng 

I North Butte 

; Nevada Consolidated ... 

I Nevada Utah 

Old D«uninion 

Osceola 

OKI Colony 

Phoenix 

Parrott 

Pneumatic Service 

Pneumatic Service, pfd. 

CJuincy 

Raven 

Rhode Island 

Santa Fe 

Shattuck 

Superior Copper 

Shannon 

Superior & Pittsburg.. 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

I'nlted Copper 

Cnion I..and 

I'tah Consolidated .. 

V. S. Mining 

V. S. Mining pfd ... 

Victoria 

Warren 

Winona 

Wolverine 

Wolverine & Arizona 

Wyanulot 

Amalgamated 

Anaconda 

Butte & Ballaklala , 
Calumeel & Sonora , 



3 


3\4 


1014 


U 


33i 


4 


l'/4 


2 


26*4 


27H 


60 


65 


18>x4 


IS^ 


\ 


'-H 


4 


4Vt, 


l^i 


1V» 


69c 


70c 


1474 


151m 


20>i 


20% 


6\% 


62 


100 


100V4 


690 


695 


7 


7V. 


1 11-16 


1 lo-ib 


22 


24 


4% 


1 4^ 


3:* 


3S 


8 


&Vi 


4Ts 





8 


m 


84 


87 


8^ 


8\i 


6% 


1 ~ 


3Vi 


3V4 


1:0% 


21 


14% 


15 


*%. 


6 


63 


&i% 



of section 
range 31 



35, In 
west. 



township 161 north. 



...1 



1,000. strong. 
Steady, »6.25® 



2';4 

30c 

49«^ 
7»i 
51 

»14 

3'^ 
36% 
81 

'56c"" 
16% 

4H 

11 

83 
1»4 
3^4 
1% 

15 

16% 

10% 

12«* 

64 

14-4 
5 

"3»vi' 

30 

37»4 

3^ 

4M, 

5% 

122 

IS 
66c 

62% 

7 



His 
conditions 



INDIAN PARDONED. 
St. Paul, Minn., March 9.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The state pardon 
board today pardoned Joe Northrup, 
an Indian sent up from Clo<iuet two 
years ago for manslaughter, l'-^ was 
charged with killing a brother-In*. an, 
and has been doing time at the .St. 
Cloud reformatory. Northrup is to be 
sent to tlie Carlisle Indian school, 
where he will remain five years 
going there was one of the 
of ihe pardon. 

DEMOCRATIC MEMBERS 

Of Honse fonimittee AVill Report 
Williams CiiiTeney Bill. 

Washington, March 9.-The Democratic 
members of the house committee on bank- 
ing and currency today agreed 
to the house 
introduced by 
siibatiiuie 



I. Abrahamson Dies. 

L Abrahamson of 1215 East First 
street died this morning at 3 o clock. 
He was 61 years old, and leaves a 
He was o > William, Julius, Os- 

Mrs. J. L. Hirsh 



IBTOI«ELL 

COPPER STOCKS. 



AU TRA!^A»nO!«9 C0NFiaZV7IAL 

204 FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

BUILUl.NG. Dl»LlTH. 

Zenith. 19S» PHOmiS Dulutb, IWtl. 



Both Phones, I49S. 



Room "B." Phoenix Blk. 



J.H. 

Copper Stocks and Bonds 

Curb Slocks a Specialty. LIsJed SecurllJes. 



wife, three sons, 
car, and a daughter, 
of Quincy. 

The funeral will be held 
at 12 o'clock from the Abras Israel 
.synagogue. Third avenue east 
Third street. 



tomorrow 



and 



for 



to report 
the minority currency bill 
John Sharp Williams. a» a 
the Fowler 



WILL GET WEST END SITE. 

Swedish Lutherans Will Probably 
Locate New Hospital. 

The new hospital which the 
Lutherans of 
are going 
ably be 
will be 



be, and he says that If he had t - 
choose his career again he would xti . 
fight shy of b»'ing a railroad man 

He arrived In St. Paul Friday 
morning in a snowstorm and, Icavin. 
his sleeper, he went around the ouo. 
Standing between two tracks, he sav 
a switch engine and a passcng« i 
train come together on one of them. 
The coal and water were thrown ove;- 
the Duluth contractor, and he say.- 
that his hair seemed to lift his hat 
a few inches, at lea.st. 

Mr. McDonnell assisted in getting 
the fireman of the switch engine 
of the wreck, but the engineer 
killed, caught between his c 
tender He says he was altogether too 
clo.se to the wreck to be comfortable, 
and he isn't anxious to see any more 
men killed. 



PaBffiii, W(ilblb@!r i (Do 

■ANKCRB AND BHOKUnS. 



Members New York and 
Boston Stock £xctianges 



DULUTH OFFICE— 

Room A, Torrey Building, 

Sl« "Wrmt Superior Str«««. 



out 
was 
and the 



Swedish 
the l-'ake Superior district 
to erect in Duluth will prob- 
located in the West end. A site 
secured as soon as possible and 
work on the new insl'tution will prob- 
ably begin this summer. The building 
will cost from »80,000 to $10-:t,(»00, 

The committee which has 
nients for the erection 
In hand comprises Rev. 
of Bethany Swedish 
chairman; Kev. J. A. 
rlor, Kev. John 
luth. rtev. J 



bill. 



8 

2% 

35c 
61 

7% 
5IV4 

9^ 



37 
83 
oOc 

$1.00 
17t4 
4^ 
12 
85 



3H 
214 

15% 

17 

11 

12% 

66 

14% 
6% 
1% 

39% 

30% 
M 
3% 



TWENTY-ONE CHILDREN 

BIRIED BY THE (TTY. 

Cleveland. Ohio. March 9.— Twenty- 
one little white caskets were placed 
beneath the ground 
in Collinwood today, 
enteen contained 
tified children 
In the burning 
school last Wednesday 
four caskets contained the bodies of 
Identified children, but were 
the public funeral, as 
will be borne by 



in the cemetery 
Of the.se sev- 
bodies of unlden- 
who lost their lives 
of the Lake View 
The other 
joc 

Included 

the ex- 

the village. 



6 
125 

1T4 
85c 



714 

7% 



in 
pens© 

DIVISION DISCONTINUED. 
Omaha, March 9.-The Missouri Pac 
fie today discontinued its Nebraska di- 
vision with offices in this city, and con- 
solidated the work with Its Kansas City 
and Atchison, Kan., offices. 



the arrange- 
of the hospital 
Carl G. Olson, 
Lutheran church. 
Dinnear of Supe- 
A. Krantz of West Dj- 
Ma^ny of Carlton. Rev. 
A Okerstrom of Hibbing. Rev 
mon.«on of the First Swedish 
church. E. J. Spongborg of 
Ivarson of Carlton, Dr. J 
Duluth. T. N. Okerstrom 
Wis 



Torturing eczema spreads Its burnjrig 
area every day. Doans Ointment quickly 
Its spreading, in.stantly relieves the 



stops 

Itcliing. cures 

drug store. 



it permanently. At any 



r 



K. McLENNAN, 

COPPER STOCKS. 

300-307 Pro^ldeueo IluildliiB. 

»l I.ITII. MINN. 

Old 'IMione 1109. 'Aeoilh Thone 680. 

Dulutb C'prb Stockx n Spoetalty. 



PETITION WITHDRAWN. 



of 



otto 
hold 



Carl Sol- 
Dulheran 
Hibl)ing. H. 
J. Bklund of 
of Port Wing. 
H T Dofggren of Superior and 
Johnson of Duluth. The body will 
a meeting very soon. 



Saw Railroad Wreck. 



P McDonnell returned yesterday 
from St. Paul with a tale of an excit- 
ing experience. He was as close to 
a railroad wreck as he ever cares to 



CopiMT (iOS.<*l|>. 

Havden. Stone & Co.. Boston, to Wal- 
ter vV'. Carr: The copper market opened 
with a firm tone and generally higher. 
Trading was light. There were so few 



ICE DEALERS RELEASED. 
Toledo. Ohio. March 9.— Judge Brough 
of the common pleas court today released 
from jail Baird. Ivtmman and MlUer. the 
tl-ree Ice men sentenced to six months' 
imprisonment for violation of the anti- 
trust laws. 

FIRE AT TOLEDO. 
Toledo Ohio. March 9.— A fire todav. 
auDDoaed to be of incendiary, origin. In 
fhe furniture manufacturing plant of the 
Kelfer Brothers, entailed a loss of $75.- 
000. ^___ 

BAD Fl>OOD EXPEX:TED. 
Gillitxjlls. Ohio, March 9.-Heayy rain- 
fdilia^ again started all the nvers in 
till section to rise, and the indications 
1 Kv^are for a disastrous flood. Thous- 
ands of dollars worth of limber has been 
fostneai Spencer. W. Va. The flour mill 
°niated on Mlil Creek was washed 
away Many houses are flooded and 
much stock hag been drowned. 



D. E. H.. 3-9-'08. 




osiery 



"The SOX that stand the nox.' 
. $2 per box. 

If six pair of Everwear sox 
are guaranteed to wear .six 
months, why ever wear^ any- 
thing but the *' Everwear." 

Seamless, soft and flexible. 

Guarantee: Six Sox six 
months — no holes. 



Lakesiders Object to Vacation 
Fifty-first Avenue East. 

A petition, filed by Lakeside resi- 
dents, for the city's vacation of Forty- 
first avenue east, from London road 
to the lake shore, has been withdraw^n 
n deference to a storm of protest 
from the eastern part of the city. 
The original petition set forth that 
the city had no use for the avenue, 
would never open a roadway 
that they might better be 
hands. Other Lakeside 
couldn't see that, holding that 
the vacation of the avenue would 
off their access to the lake shore 

Another petition has been 
ed for the vacation of Fifty-fourth 
avenue east, but it was never present- 
ed to the council. The protests 
against the vacation were to have 
come up tonight, but the withdrawal 
of the original petition removes 
necessity for council action. 



runners of the sleigh attached to It, 
made a dash down the Sixth avenud 

hill. 

Befjie half the descent of the hill 
was made the horse fell and slid clear 
across the street car tracks, narrowly 
averting a collision with a street car 
that whistled past. The horse rose to 
its feet, shook itself, and leisurely- 
waited for the ap-pioach of the driver^ 
v.'ho was hot-footirig it in the rear. 

People at the Lenox hotel, who 
watched the unique equine slide, said 
that the horse slid over 150 feet in tho 
imitation ski jump. 



and 
there, so 
in private 
people 



cut 



circulat- 



the 



By 




FAVORABLE REPORT 

Committee on BiU for Light- 
house on Apostle Islands. 

Washington. March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— A favorable report 
was made today by the committee 
on commerce, on the bill Introduced 
by Senator Smith of Michigan, ap- 
propriating $100,000 for the estab- 
lishment of a lighthouse 
signal at or 
of Michigan 
westerly end 
consin. 

HORSiThAS long SLIDE. 

Runaway on Sixth Avenue Has Its 
Spectacular Feature. 

A slide that partook somewhat of 
the nature of a thrilling ski jump was 
accomplished by a large draft horse, 
on Sixth avenue west, opposite the 
Lenox hotel, this afternoon. The horse 
was running away, and with the front 



and fog 
near the easterly end 
Island Apostle group, 
of Lake Superior, Wis- 



CONGRE.SSMAN MYER DE.\D. 
Washington, March 9.— Immediately aft- 
er the house of n-presentatives opened. 
Mr. Ransdell of Louisiana Inform-d that 
body of the death yesterday of Adolpb 
Meyer of the First district of Louisiana, 
He offered resolutions of regret, whlclv 
were adopted, and as a further mark of 
respect, the house at 12:12 adjourned. 

United .States Engineer Office, Du- 
luth, .Minn., Man h (i. 1908.— .Sealed pro- 
posals for dredging and hire of dr^-dg- 
ing plant at .Superior entry. Wis., will 
b«,- received here until noon Monday, 
April 6, 1908, and tiien publicly opened, 
information on application. 

GRAHAM D. F'lTCH. 
Major, Engineers. 



ORDER LIMITING TIME TO FILB 

CLAIMS, AND FOR HEARINO 

THEREON. 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Louis.. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Joscpb 

E. Mayhew, Jr.. I>ecedent. 

Letters of administration this day hav- 
ing been grant* d to George H. Mayhew. 

It Is Ordered. That the time withla 
which all creditors of the above named 
decedent may present claims against hi» 
estate in this court, be, and tiie same 
hereby is, limited to three months fron» 
and affr the date hereof; and tiiat Mon- 
day the 15th day of June, 1908, at ten 
o'clock A. M., in the Probate Court 
Rooms at the Court House at I>ulVtt» 
in said county, be. and the same here- 
by is, fixed and appointed as the time 
and place for hearing upon the examin- 
ation, adjustment and allowance of sucti 
claim.s as shall be presented within the 
lime aforesaid. 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order in The Duluth 
Evening Herald as provided by law. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn.. March 9th. 1908. 
J. B. MIDDLECOFF. 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal. Probate Court. St. Louis County, 

Minn.) 
A. C. GILLETTE. 

Attorney for Administrator, 
709 IxRsdale Bldg.. Duluth. Minn. 
Duluth Evening Herald. March 9, 16. 21; 

X90S. 



r 



t 



— 1- 




} 



•'-- 




iJ- 



THE DULUTH EVENING HTEITALD; MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1908. 



19 



Jump at This 

Improved Farm Cheap 

so Acres 40 noren oIenre«l; Owcl- 
liniK houMe, bnru 30x70, «>hl<>kpn 
hnune, binoknniltli iihop. Rood 
spring \v(^ll, l)<>t\vif>n l.LW to 2.0<^ 
cords wood, one mile from railroad, 
elpht mlU's from I>uluth. Owner 
paid JS.otO for this without Improve- 
ments, nothing" cleared. He doesn't 
like farming. 




ADDITIONAL WANTS 

FROM PAGE 14. 



$5500 

Fine modern hoint> on East Fifth 
street Beautiful location; build- 
ing recently completed. Has been 
ocoupled by owner. Contains nine 
ruomsi and all up-to-date Improve- 
ni*»nts. including best hot water 
heating plant. If you look thi.s 
property over you will want to be 
the owner of It 

Mendenhall & Hoopes 

200 IMrsl Xalional Hank Rklg. 




SITUATIONS WANTED— MALE. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 

SmJATIoSr \VANTED WOMAN 

wants washing to lake home. Address 
S. Xi. Herald. 



tilTIJATiON WANTED— POSITION BY 
ihoroughly compett-nt cashier, experl- 
eno'd and capai>te. Z. 96, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG GIRL 
wishes position in doctor's office; wages 
no object. Address X, ;J3. Herald. 



i'l 



DAVID H.^gOSTELLO, 
OENERAt AGENT, 

EXCHAN^fcj^UlLDINU. 

— ETTT^ 

THE PREFERRED ACCIDENT IN 

SLUANCE (i«MPANY OF 

NE\f;fbRK. 

Principal Office,^ L^O^ Broadway. New 
York. N. Y. (UrpahWed in ls83.) Kimball 
C. Atwood. Pri-8l(|(^ijr'; Wilfred C. Potter, 
Secretary. Attornw'^to accopt service in 
Minnesota, Insurance Commissioner. 
CASH C.VPTTAL. $3.')(',000.00. 
INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums received, accident 
and health $1,403,183.72 



Total premium Income .... 
From Interest and rents .. 



...$1,403,183.72 
54,201.3.') 



SITUATION WANTED — WORK BY 
tli>^ day washing and cleaning. 515 Me- 
saba avenue. 

SITUATION WANTED-YOUNG NOR- 
weglan lady who does not speak Englisii' 
wislies plain sewing by the day. R 48, 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED-COMPETENT 

stcnourapiier d'islres position ai onco. 
8 12, Herald. 



• .>i 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 
— UF— 

EMPIRE REALTY COMPAPNY. 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THKSE PRES- 
ilN'iS. That liio undersigned do liereby 
a.'^.'jouiate tUemdolves loyotiier for llie 
purpose of forming a corporation, pur- 
Buaut to the provisions of Ciiapter OS of 
the Revised LaWd of Minnesota ISKfc, and 
the acta amendatory tliereof ana supple- 
mental thereto, and do hereby sign and 
adopt rlie following oortificatu of inoor- 
poratiou: 

ARTICLE I, 
The name of iliis corporation .shall be 
' Eujpiru Realty Company." Tho gen- 
eral nature of Its buslnt:ss shall be buy- 
ing, selling, leasing, dt.aiing in and im- 
proving lands and lenenitiits, con.siriii:l- 
ing, leasing and operating docks, ware- 
houses and elevators, and carrying on 
any kind of lumlnring, agricultural, 
mercantile or transportation business, 
and such other like enterprises as are in- 
cidental to the above .specific purposes of 
this core- 'ration. 

The prui«ipal placo of buslnes.s of this 
corporation sliail be at the City of Du- 
luth, Minnesota. 

ARTIi'LE II. 

The Time of commencenit^nt of this cor- 
poration shall be April 1st, IWrS. and tlio 
period of duration tlieivjof sliall be thirty 
t3u> yeara. 

ARTICLE III 
The names and plaeea yf residence of 
the in<.orporat<jrs ol said company ar-d 
Frank ' 'rassweller. Arthur H. Crass- 
•well-n- atid Elmer F. Blu, all residing at 
Duluth, Mitmesota. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The government of this "corporation and 
tile mauagenient of Its affairs siiail be 
vested in a board of three directors, each 
of whom shall b-i stockholders, who 
shall be elected annually at the annual 
meeting '»f said corporation; a President. 
a Vice Pre.sideiit. a Secretary and a 
Terasur 'r, wiio shall be ele«'ted annually 
by tiie Boanl of Dirertors at the first 
meeting of said BoJird held after the 
ai'.r-.'jal n^ieting of sr-id corpor.itlon. The 
offices of Preaiileni and Treasurer auil 
of Vice President and Secretary may be 
held by the same person. 

Tile aiir.ual meeting of said corporatioit 
shall liK held on the Tuesday after the 
first Monday in January of ejnh year. 

The names and addresses of tlajse com- 
posing the Hoard of I>ir -clors until the 
first el^^cti>n, are as follows, to-wlt: 

Frank Cras.svveller. Artluir H. Crass- 
■weller anrl Klnier F. I!lu. all of Duluth. 
Minnesota, and until tho first annual 
meeting and until their succe.ssors are 
eleof"d and have iiualllted, Frank Crass- 
weller. shall act as Pri>sident and Treas- 
urer, and Arthur H < "r i.ssweller shall act 
as Vi ;e President atid Si-cretary thereof. 
ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the eapital sto ik of 
eaiil ori)oratlon shall be Fifty Thous.vnd 
Dollars ^f'H).<>x».tlO), whi<:h shall be di- 
vided into Five Hundred {.Mn shares of 
the par valup of One Hundred Dotlar.i 
(iltWi)")) .^aeh and such -^tpital stork shall 
be paid ui as called ft»r by the Board of 
Dire'' tors of aald corjioration. 
ARTK'LE VI. 

The highest amount of in<lebtedno.'«s 
or liability to which said corporation 
Bhall h, at anv time subject, shall be 
Twenty-Five Thousand ili^.OOO.tJO) Dol- 
lars. 

IN WITNESS WH?:RF0F. We have 
liereuntj .set our hands and seala thia 
Bth day of Mnn-h, .\. P. 1*>S. 

FHVNi: (RASSWI'.LLKK. (SeaH 

ARTIIUU H. CIt.VSSWELLER. (Seal.) 

KL.VIHR F BLU. (Seal) 

Sigiieii, .Sealed and Delivered in Pres- 
enee of: 

RUBY TURRELL 

AGNES McMAHON 



SITl^ATION WANTED-8INGLE MAN, 
27 years of ago, at present employe<l. 
desires change for various reJisons. 
Have had five years' experience as 
cashier, bookkeeper and salesman. 
Salary to start, <(j5 per month. Can 
furnish the best of references as to 
character and ability. S. 31, Herald. 



SITUATKXV WANTED-WANTED. ANY 
kind of work by middl"-aged man; 
strictly temperate. Address S M, Her- 
ald. 

SlTU.\TION WANTED-AS FIREMAN 
or janitor or any kind of inside work. 
Address X 24, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED-BY COMPE- 
tent young lady dres.smaker in reliable 
private family, Al references, willing 
to assist with housowork when sewing 
Is light. W 160, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED-YOUNG LADY 
stenographer desires a position. Ex- 
perience and references. V. 62, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— POSITION BY 
young lady in office as assistant; can 
operate typewriter; object, experience. 
Z. 61. Herald. 



Total Income $1.4.''>7,3s5.07 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 
Claims paid tnet), accident and 
health $ 482,005.64 



Net paid policyholders $ 4.S2,00r..6l 

Investigation and adjustment of 

claims 6,7S4.93 

CommLssions 465,516. &» 

Dividends to stockholders 84,000.00 

Salaries of officers, agents, em- 
Dloyes. examiners' and inspec- 
tion fees IGO.291.59 

All other disbursements 81.3S7.l5 



Total disbursements .. 



.$1,279,985.81 



SITUATIONS WANTED - BY TWt) 
young men attending business eolhg. . 
clejiumg up offices, etc., evenings. L 24, 
Herald 



SITUATION WANTED — BY NO. 1 
coachman, permanent position. Apply 
15 Lake avenue north. 

SITUATION WANTED-BY EXPERl- 
encf'd bookkeeper and office man. city 
references. S 13, Herald. 



SITl'ATION WANTED - COACHMAN 
with flrst-clatis rcfert-nces desires posi- 
tion. 321 Devonshire street. 



SITUATION WANTED-BY BOY AT- 
tendlng .school, a job of workir.g after 
school and Saturdays; can furnish ref- 
erences. K S3. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED-DRUG CLERK, 
four years' exporienee, wishes position 
at once; good references. Y 47, Her- 
ald. 



WANTED — POSITION 
perienced lath mill man 
run by the thousand. 
668, Cloquet. Minn. 



BY AN RX- 

Lath mill to 
Address Box 



SITUATKJN WANTED— BY BOY AT- 

tendlng sch<M>l. a job of working after 
school and Saturdays. Can furnish 
references. K. 83. Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED - TO «:LRAN 
up one or two offices, from 7 o'clock 
in tho evening. C. 21, Herald. 



SITl'APION WANTED-YOUNG MAN 
of 17, wishes position. V. 51. Herald. 



si^ 



Woman 



^ 



# 



i» Interested atir) stiouM knovr 

»l)i>utt(ie womJTfnl 

MARVEL Vhirling Spray 

I The r)«-«v Tiylnul Ajrlacc JnjeC' 
li'jnanil •Suction. ll.5*t— t«af- 
«it— Most Convenient. 
iCItactri latiauil/ 



Alb TOnr druxf lit far It. 

It h« c.inno; su|i|>iy the 
|M.4R%'IKI., accept no -^ 

Otiifi , l'>!l Rend tlaniti for 
llliuir.iied boi)k— •••Ud. It frtrea 
(ull i>artioul.iri«nd"llrp.-ti(iiiii in. 
Tttlunt)!* to tallies. m.%ll«'KI, ro. 

A* K. aad HT.. XEtv if«nH. 



'^iiV' 



'7 A 



State .if Minnesota, County of St. Louts. 

—So. 

(Jn this .".th day of M.irch, A. D. l*tS. 
before me. a Notary Pul»lic, within and 
f»)r xiid <'ounty, p.r.^onally appeared 
Frank Cras.>-weller, Arthur II. Crass- 
weller and Elniei' F Klu. to me known 
to be till- pi'r.-<vns dc.-icribed in and who 
exee^teil th<- f«»regoing i:;strumenl. and 
acknowledged that they exeeuted the 
same as tlieir free aet and deed. 

RU15Y TURFtKLL. 
Not.uy Public, 
Sf. Loui.-i '-"ounty, .Minnesota. 
Mv Commission Expires September 14lli, 

1912. 
(Notarial Seal, St Louis Co., Minn.) 

State of Minnesota. Department of 
Stat^. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
Btrum>nt was filed for r*>cord in this of- 
fi'^e on the 7th day of March. A. D. 
19<ts, at 9 o'clock A. M.. and was duly 
recordvl in Book P 3 of Incorporations 
on r>age 4J0 

JULIUS A. SCIIMAHL, 
Secretary of .Stale. 



OFFIi'E OF RECilSTKR OF DEEDS. 
State »f Minnesota. County of St. Louis. 

— 33 

I lier.l>y certify th.it the within In- 
stnwiienl was flletl In this office for 
r-eord M.ir. 9. 19ii>i, at \CiM A. M., and 
was iluly recorded in Book 9 of Ml.sc. 
pago 3. 

M. C. PALMER. 
Register of Dee»ls. 
By THO.S. CLAUK, 
Deputy. 
D.ilith Evening H. raid. .M.ir.-'.'-M. 10<H. 



HOTCLr I^EMOX 

Most thoroughly equipped In the 
Northwest. fcanltatlon perfect. 
European, $1.00 and up. American. 

|2>00 and up. 



HHICHESTER'S PILLS 



SUMMONS 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

Disi iet Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 

1 1 ■ . . 
The Duluth Banking Company, a ! 
Minnesota Corporation, 

Plaintiff, 
v.s. 
B. J. Marshall, William W. Henry. 
Jr., and all olh"r persons or 
parties unknown claiming any 
right, title, estate, lien or inter- 
est in the real estate described 
in the complaint liereln, 

pefendant.s. 
The State of Minnesota to the above- 
nam>'<} Defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and required 
to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff 
in the above entitled a;'tlon, whicii Is tiled 
in the office of tlve (.'hrk of the District 
Court of Uie El.-venth Judicial Distriet 
in ami for the County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, and to serve .v copy 
of your answer to th" said complaint on 
the subseriber. iit his office in Room 604. 
First National Hank Huilding, In tlie City 
of Duluth, In said County, within twenty 
(20> days after the serv|ei« of thi.s Sum- 
mons upon you. exclusive of the tiny of 
such service; and if you fall to answer 
the said •omplaint within the time afore- 
said, tin- Plaintiff in tins action will apjly 
to the «"ourl for the relief dumandod in 
the cojiiplaint. 

WILSON G CROSBY. 
At!i>rney for Plaint ifT, 
604 First National Rank Bldg., 

Dulutli. Minnesota. 



LIS PENDENS . 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

District Court. Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 
The Duluth Banking Company, a 
.Minnesota Corporation. 

Plaintiff. 
vs. 
B. J. Marshall. William W. Henry. 
Jr., and all other p«?rson3 or 
jwirties unknown claiming any 
riglit, title, estate, lien or inter- 
est in the real estate described 
in the complaint herein, 

l)efendants. 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN. That an 
action has been commenced in this Court 
upon the oomplaint of th* above-named 
plain' Iff. duly filed in th« office of the 
Clerk of .said Court, against the above- 
named defendants, for the purpose of 
determinini; the adverse claims of the 
defendants, and each of them. In and to th > 
lands and premises therein described, and 
of quit tin^j the title of said lands and 
premises, and determining that said title 
is in the iilaintiff lu>reln. said premises a.s 
in said complaint deseiihed being the fol- 
lowing, situate in .said County of St. 
Louis. State of Minnesota, and d- scribed 
as follows: An eqtial undivided Ono-tenlh 
(1-10) of the Ntuthwesl quarter 1NW4) of 
Section Thirty-four CU). in Township 
Fortv-ninc t49» Nortij of Ranse Fifteen 
(IB) "West of the Fourth Principal Mer- 
idian, aecordlng to the United States 
Government survey thereof. 

Dated at Duluth. Minnesota, this 14th 
day of February. 19<V^. 

WILSON G. CROSBY, 

Attorney for Plaintiff. 
Duluth Evening Herald-March 9-16-23 30. 
April 0-13. IStiS. 



IRAIILiOAD MEWS I 

BACK FROM 
THE WEST 



A. J. Perrin Believes Du- 
luth Is Livest City 
In Country. 

A. J Perrin. general agent In Duluth 
for tho Duluth, South Shore & Atlan- 
tic road, has returned in company with 
Mrs. Perrin from a trip to Colorado, 
California, Arizona and otlier South- 
western points. The Grand canyon of 
Arizona and the elaborate preparations 
being mado by San Francisco for the 
reception of the lluet, seem to have 
made a greater impression on tinj mind 
of the railroad man than anything else 
In connection with the trip, except the 
tact tliat. of the many cities visited, 
Duluth looks to be tho liveliest aid 
most prosperous of them all. 

■•.San Francisco iias raised $liX),i>.») for 
tilt; entertainment of the nun on board 
tile big battleships comprising the fleet 
now on its cruise to the I'acitic, and 
the proposed visit is the one to|dc of 
. oiiversation.'" said Mr. Perrin today. 
•'It will be a momentuous event, and I 
Wi>uld very much have liked to remain 
on the coast until tht affair was over 
with. The day the vessels arrive $6,- 
\HM,*K*i in salary will be distributed 
amoiig the nun. and you can imagine 
that th«re will be something .loing, for 
this is the tirst pay day, and practically 
the tirst opportunity ot spending money, 
sinee the tleet left the Atlantic coast. 

"To me the Graiitl canyon of Arizona 
Is the most Wonderful thing in the 
world. It is undoubti'dly ilie most re- 
mark;ible geologh al and sptHtacular 
phenomenon known to mankind. Its 
terrible magnirteence simply cannot be 
described, and tho painters brush 
never can do justice to it. It is no 
mere cleft, but Is a territlc trough 'J.0i)0 
to 7.1MW feet deep, ten to twenty miles 
wide, hundreds of miles long, peopled 
with hundreds of peaks taller than any 
mountain east of the Rockies, yet not 
otie of them with its head so high as 
your feet, and ail ablaze with such col- 
or as no Eastern or European land- 
-scape ever knew. We sat upon the 
brink of the canyon both at sunrise and 
at sunset, and the ilivine scene-shifters 
gave us a new canyon every hour. It 
IS a miracle of changing color. With 
»very degree of the sun's course in the 
afternoon the great, countersunk moun- 
tains wo were watehlner failed away, 
and new ones, just as wonderful, were 
I'arved out of the shadows." 

RATESWILL 
BE REDUCED 



-^.•cording to what seem to be a reli- 
able reports receBvd in Duluth, this city 
and Northern Minnesota as a whole will 
be given reduced summer rates, despite 
the ettorts of railroads east and west to 
maintain a minimum basis ot 2 cents a 
mile lor passenger bustni-ss. The same 
condition douhtle.ss will apply to other 
points in the West. It Is even said that 
l>ululh may fare better this year m this 
respect than In previous seasons. 

I'resent indications are that the trav- 
eling public will be able to RO to the 
summer resorts at the old reduced rates 
ot about 3 cents a mile for the round 
trip, or a tlat rate of one and one-half 
cents a mile, and that for all the big 
conventions which partake of a national 
or international character a similar rate 
win bo made. The railroads are now 
charging one another with bad faith, 
which is resulting in a breaking down of 
the barrier they were trying to erect 
against reduced rates for summer busl- 
neess. 

italianT\bor. 



Excess of Income over disburse- 
ments % 177,399.26 

ASSETS DEC. 31. 1S07. 

Bonds and stocks owned $1,357,575.00 

Cash in office and in bank 139,652.29 

Accrued Interest and rents 9,917.61 

Premiums In course of collec- 
tion 163,681.33 

Total admitted assets $1,672,826.23 

Assets not admitted.... $146,243.56 

LIABILITIES. 
Claims In process of adjustment 

and reported $ 99,91S.OO 

Claims resisted 19.02o.0'J 

Aggregate of unpaid claims.. $ 118,943.00 

Reinsurance reserve 584,778.52 

All other liabilities and reserve 

for Installment policies 184,444.71 

Capital stock paid up 350.000.oo 



Total liabilities: 
capital 



Including 



.$1,238,166.23 



Surplus over all liabUitles $ 434.660. Oo 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 

Premiums Losses 
■ ,. • Received, 
w;,... .$31,972.11 
^...... 3.095.01 



Accident 
Health . 



•••■••• 



Paid 

$9,64.-i.55 

306.27 



Totals 



.$35,067.11 $9.951. b2 



State of Mlnnesoti, jpepartment of Insur- 
ance. * ' ... 
I hereby certify that the annual state- 
ment of the Preferred Accident Insurance 
Company- of New -York for the year end- 
ing December 31st. 1907, Of which the 
above is an abstrilct, has been received 
and filed in this deijartrnent and duly ap- 
proved by .ne^^^^ ^ „artiGAN. 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald— Marcii 9-16-23, '08. 



hands of otlier nationalities will be re- 
tired, and the work turned over to the 
lialiana. , . 

Tile action comes after a long period 
during which the otticials of the road 
have tried to contend with mixed lab- 
orers, owing to the demand for woikers 
al dlPEereiu seasons of the year, the rail- 
roads have liad to suffer on account of 
desertions from their regular crew.s. 
When the labor In other fields was plen- 
tiful and the wages good, the roads were 
unable to find help for the woik they 
were carrying on throughout the North- 
west, and only when the other means of 
employnn-nt was at an end were the 
companies able to get the necessary as- 
sistance and 11 is the generally conceded 
opinion that the laborers would not re- 
main on section work as long as an- 
other Held was open. This state of af- 
fairs, it Is .s;Ud. ha» kopi tho road sup- 
plied with inexperienced men and has 
led to much trouble and delay. 

THROliaTFREICHT. 




1>IA%>>D IIKAM» riLI.H, for «a 

years known »s Best, Sit«»t. Alwiys KcHi'la 

SOLD BY DRIGGISTS EVERYWHERE 



TEMPLE ROLLER RINK 

Second avenue east and Superior street. 
Open every afternoon .and evening ex- 
cept .Sundays. Matinees Tuesday and 
Saturd.iy. La Brosse's band. Children's 
day every Saturday, from 10 to 12. 



Soo Road Will Employ It Exclusive- 
ly in Section Gan^s. 

The Soo road will employ Italian lab- 
or almost exclusively In Its section gangs 
this year. Hundreds of men of this na- 
tionality are being shipped Into tho 
Northwest from the I-:ast to take up the 
wiirk on various divisions of the Soo. 
whioh has heretofore been done by a 
cosmopolitan class of laborers. Section 



Lofts! Lofts! Lofts! 

FOR RENT — Some very desirable space on Michij;an street, 
suitable for wholesale, or manufacturing; has all conveniences, 
inchuling electric elevators and trackage. Rents* reasonable. 



CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO., 

220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Mihvaiikee Road Establishes One Be- 
tween Twin Cities and Lombard. 

Arrangements have been completed by 
the Milwaukee road for a through freight 
train between Minneapolis and Lombard. 
Mont., which Is to be put in operation at 
once and is to be known as No. 63. The 
immense amount of freight which is being 
offered the road by the Twin City ship- 
pers for Lemmon, Hett ridge. Bowman. 
Terry. Miles City. Hariowton, Lewlstown 
and Ix>mbard has made It Imperative to 
put on the new freight train at on^e. 

The Inauguration of this train is to be 
epochal in tlie Milwaukee's history, as it 
is expeced that for all time "No. 63" will 
be typical of the fast freight service 
which tlie Milwaukee Is to establish to 
Seattle when the line is comple'ed. Al- 
though there will be several freight trains 
opt?rated through the coast, "No. 63" is to 
stand for what the "Pioneer Limited ' 
means to passenger.< between Chicago and 
MInneapoUs. Shippers who want to send 
carloads of freight to Lemmon and other 
new towns on tin; Milwaukee's extension 
will ask to have them put on "No. 63" 
when speedy delivery is required. The 
first through fast freight on the Milwau- 
kee to Montana points and heyond Is then 
to date historically from March, 1908. 

Steel Corporation Interested. 

Theie Is a report in circulation, in 
Milwaukee and Chicivgo railway circles, 
that the United Stat.'s Steel corporation, 
which Is builder and owner of the manu- 
f.tcturlng town of Gary. Ind.. is tlnan- 
ciallv Interested In the present move to 
reorganize the Illinois, Iowa & Minne- 
sota road, which has been renamed the 
Chicago. Milwaukee & Gary Railway 
company. It Is also reported that the 
new company intends to reach Milwau- 
kee principally in the Intciests of the 
Illinois Steel company, which Is an aux- 
iliary of the United States Steel corpor- 
ation, and also for the direct t>enent of 
the Allls-Chalmers company, in which 
several of the big men of the steel cor- 
poration are Interested as stockholders, 
directors and chairmen of boards. 

New Superintendent. 

Crookston, Minn., March 9.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Superintendenst F. S. El- 
liott, formerly of Wlllmar. but recently 
ai pointed superintendent of the North- 
ern division to take the place of T. S. 
Lowrj-. who goes to Havre, Mont., to 
take the Montana division, arilved in 
Crookston Friday and he will take 
charge of the work on this division at 
once. 

Cal Stone in Costa Rica. 

Cal E. Stone, foimerly assistant gen- 
eral passenger agent of the Great North- 
ern, and also well known In Duluth, 
where he had headquarters while acting 
in a lesser capacity, was host at a 
Washlngtons birthday dinner in Central 
America, where he Is traveling at the 
present time. The affair was held at 
San Jose, Costa Rica, and was the ttrst 
obseivance of the day ever given m 
Costa .Rica. At the conclusion of the 
dinner. Mr. Stone was presented with a 
beautiful steamer chair, made from 
Costa Rlcan mahogany. 



VS'ages Reduced. 



CLAIM P ROMPT LY PAID. 

Everyone tly.^^r^^o.. Accident Insurance \^ZL Preferred IL Prompt ?X-y 

The following letter to David H. Costello, general agent for the Preferred 
Accident Insurance Company of New York, speaks for itself: 



DAVID H. COSTELLO, Geneawl Agent, 

E:xchang:e Builduig, Duluth, Minnesota. 



Dear Sir: — 



IN RE WAIiDO E. KNAPP CLAIM: 



Enclosed liere«ith is a copy of my letter to »Ir. Sill, Saperintendent, acknowl- 
edging receipt of check for $5,000 in payment of Mrs. Knapp's claim. We were 
delayed in comi)letlng the necessMiry proofs, but the Company waiving their right 
to withhold payment for thi-ee months, paid on Uie next business day after proofs 
were presente<l. 

We are all ver>' grateful to the Company, yourself and all connected with tne 
matter for the prompt and exceedingly satisfactory way in which the claim was 
adjusted. Ven truly yom^. bRAINARD AVERY. 

Enclosure — BA ELS. 

Mr. Knapp was well known in Duluth, having been connected here with 
the Lakeside Land company. The following particulars of the accident, which 
caused his death were taken from a Middleton, Vermont, paper: 



WALDO E. KNAPPS 

Death Resulted From Re\olver Bullet Wound — Gun Fell From Hlg Pocket and 
Was Discliarged — Bullet Severed Arterj- in the Leg. 



The details in connection with the unfortunate accident, which caused Mr. 
Knapp's death, have just been received. He was acting as resident manager for 
the Red Cliff Lumber Company of Duluth. Minn., which has large interests on 
Puget Sound. On November 26, while at his duties in Victoria, B. C, his 
revolver, a 38-caliber weapon, slipped to the ground, and was discharged, the bullet 
passing through his right leg below the knee and severing the main artery. He 
was removed to the Jubilee hospital, but before arriving there had lost consider- 
able blood. His wife, Mrs. Lena Gray Knapp, was sent for immediately, and 
arrived four hours before his death, which came five days after the accident, 
and before he became unconscious. 

TBE PREFERRED AaiDENT INSURANCE CO. OF NEW YORK, I 

°' I 



DAVID H. COSTELLO, General Agent. 



Exchange Building. 



Salt Lake City. March 9.— The News 
.ways that the wages of every telegraph 
operator emploved by the Denver & 
Rio Grande railroad have been reduced 
to $60 a month with fifty cents subtracted 
each month for hospital fees, making the 
net salaiy $59.50. This Is according to 
circulars Issued by. the company. The 
reduction came in with the new nine- 
hour law. 



Good For Everybody. 

Mr. Norman R. Coniiei. ?. prominent 
architect, in the Delberi fiuildin^. .San 
Kran.'i.Hco, says: "X fully endorse all that 
has been said of Electric Bitters as a 
tonic medicine. It Is ^ood for everybody. 
It corrects stomaoh. liver and kidney 
disfrders In a prr-nivni and efficient man- 
ner an.d builds 'jp- the system." Electrio 
Bitters is the beat syrlnK medicine ever 
sold over a drugg:f^'«. counter; as a blood 
purifier it is unequaled. 60c at all drug 
stores. 



POLITICAL 
SITUATION 

W. L McEwcn Says That 

Johnson Will Get State 

Delegation. 

T. T. Hudson Says That 

Favorite Son Report 

is False. 



W. E. McEwen, state oil inspector. 
who Is In the city today from St. Paul, 
says politics is sizzling hot down 
around the Twin Cities. In regard to 
Governor Johnson's boom for the pres- 
idential nomination on the Dtamocratic 
ticket, he says that unless there is a 
remarkable change in public sentiment 
between now and the time for holding 
the slate convention, the Minnesota 
delegation will undoubtedly go to the 
national convention under instructions 
to vote for Johnson. 

"It Is rather unfortunate that a line 
should have been drawn between the 
friends of Johnson and the friends of 
iJryan In Minnesota," said Mr. Mc- 
Ewen. "The friends of one really are 
friends of the other. Both are leaders 
of national prominence, and the fol- 
lowers of both fespecL and admire 
both. Everybody is talking politics 
around St. Paul and Minneai>olis now, 
and one can scarcely hear anything 
else. State candidates are commg in 
for a goiKi deal of attention. Oa the 
Republican ticket, Jacobson seems to 
be receiving more attention than any 
one else. It looks to me as if Johnson 
« ould certainly get the support of the 
Minnesota delegation for the presiden- 
tial nomination, unleiss a remarkable 
change takes piiuce in public sentiment 
between now and the stale conven- 
tion." 

* • * 

T. T. Hudson, national Democratic 
conimlttetanan from Minnesota, and 
one of the most enthusiastic of Br>'an"s 
backers in this state, says he does not 
believe there is anything to the report 
that Mr. Bryan will follow Taffs ex- 
ample and not contest the states where 
favorite sons are announced candl- 

"If Mr. Bryan followed out that pol- 
icy in Minnesota, he would have to 
follow it out elsewhere, and with 
enough favorite sons in the field, he 
would not have any support at all with 
such a system," said Mr. Hudson to- 
day. "The Bryan supporters in Min- 
nesota will conUnue to do everything 
In their power to get the Minnesota 
delegation to the national convention 
for Bryan, and there is no doubt In my 
mind that they will be successful. We 
shall control the state convention. If 
there were any truth to that report 
from Washington regarding the plan 
to be adopted toward favorite sons, 1 
certainly should have heard of It be- 
fore this. Anyway» Mr. Bryan said in 
his statement that he would leave It to 
the people whether they wanted him 
for a candidate or not. and If the ma- 
jority of people In this state make it 
evident that he is their choice for 
president, I do not see how he can In- 
terfere." 

• • • 

R. D. Haven, chairman of the Eighth 
district congressional committee, says 
this district is not affected by the fol- 
lowing dispatch from Washington, be- 
cause there is a regular district com- 
•mlttec here: 

"Washington, March 9. — Repre- 
.sentative Davis of the Third Minne- 
sota district has come near running 
Into a snag in arranging preliminaries 
for the Republican convention in that 
district to select delegate.? and alter- 
nates to the national convention In 
Chicago. Apparently In some of the 
other Minnesota districts the mis- 
take has been made which Mr. Davis 
was on the point of making. 

"It seems that it makes a big dif- 
ference who calls the district con- 



ventions, and that if they are called 
by committees not designated by the 
national committee for that purpose, 
the way is opened for contests at 
Chicago. Mr. Davis has been think- 
ing that It would be proper for his 
personally appointed campaign com- 
mittee to issue this call in the Third 
district, but consultation with national 
committee officials here today shows 
that unless there is a district commit- 
tee, duly appointed by the convention 
which selected delegates to the 
Roosevelt convention in 1904, it 
properly falls on the state committee 
to issue the call. 

"Accordingly, under this view ot 
the case, the Minnesota state central 
committee will be asked to issue the 
call for the Third di.strict convention, 
there being in that district nobody 
appointed for such a purpobe by the 
district convention which selected 
'delegates in 1904." 

Guy Eaton, formerly head of the 
committee, says he believes the na- 
tional committee members quoted are 
wrong anyway, and that the state 
central committee has no right to 
interfere. He says the chairman of 
a personally appointed campaign 
committee should have as much 
right to go ahead and call the dis- 
trict convention as the chairman of 
the state central committee, ap- 
pointed by the governor, has to call 
a meeting of the .state committee. 
He asserts that in the pa.st such 
chairmen In this district have called 
conventions without conferring with 
the state central committee. 

Mr. John Riha. of Vining. la., says "I 
have been .selling DeWltt's Kidney and 
Bladder Pills for about a year and they 
givt' be^tter satissf action than any pill I 
ever sold. I have used them myself with 
fine results." Sold by all druggists. 

jurYc^ 

ON TRIAL 



Jury trials were begun in the dis- 
trict court this morning befoae all 
three judges. Up to this noon Juries 
had been selected in two cases, and it 
was expected that the jury would be 
completed in the third action early 
this afternoon. 

The damage action of Wilfred Ber- 
neohe against John W. Hilliard. In 
Judge Cant'e room, is being tried for 
a third time. The supreme Court or- 
dered the case back for a second trial, 
but the jury, at the last term of the 
district court, could reach no agrea- 
ment. Mr. Berneche was injured while 
working on a Ijuilding for which Mr. 
Hilliard had the construction contract. 
The plaintiff claims that his injury 
was due to the negligence of the con- 
tractor, through fellow employes. He 
demands $5,000 for his Injuries. 

In Judge DJbell's room the jury Is 
hearing testimony in the case of Stan- 
islaus Kocinski against the Sattler 
Liquor company. The action is one for 
the recovery of goods taken under a 
chattel mortgage foreclosui-e. 

The trial of the action instituted by 
the Law Reporting company agajn.'^t 
the H. Poehler company is being trieu 
in Judge Dlbeli's room. The case !•- 
one In which the plaintiff, a New York 
concern, seeks to recover $600 for sonv 
testimony taken before the interstav 
commission at a grain h^^aring ;•• 
Washington, some time ago. Tb-^ 
plaintiff, it is .said, notified the loca' 
grain company that it was prepared 
to furnish reports of the hearing, an J 
the defendant agreed to accept t!v 
same; believing that it was a rep>i '• 
published In the usual book of pamph- 
let form. 

It was alleged that the report war' 
sent along in two Installments; 
that it was comprised of carbon copies, 
some of which were illegible, and that 
when the last Installment arrived with 
It came a bill for $600. This price wa;s 
charged against the local grain finn. 
on the "oasis of 10 cents per folio. Tli-- 
fl. Poehler company, it is said, sent the 
report and the bill be.ck to the Law 
Reporting company, and the latter be- 
gan suit to recover the $600 alleged to 
be due. 

The case is of interest, by reason o." 
the position that the' defendant cot"-- 
pany takes In declaring that it was in- 
duced to take the report under a mis- 
apprehension as to what It was com- 
prised of, also that the interstate com- 



mission is .said to have paid 50 cents 
per folio for the original report, of 
which that the H. Poheler company re- 
ceived is claimed to be a carbon copy. 
W. E. Culkin and W. E. Whipple rep- 
resent the plaintlfC, and Reynolds & 
McCleary represent the H. Poeftiler 
company. 

Tho following cases for jury trial are 
on call for today, if they can be 
reached: Butte & Superior Copper 
company against John McAlpine; San- 
dra Ekblom, administratrix, against 
the St. Croix Luni'ber company, and 
Tony Pintar against the Pitt Iron Min- 
ing company. 

The cases on call tomorrow are Mike 
Sokesh against the Consumers' Ore 
company, and Cosmos D. Hone against 
J. Alfred Mellin. 



r>eWltfs Little Eearly Risers. All drug- 
gist .s. 



ARNOLD IS 
A BUSY MAN 



C. W. Arnold of Minneapolis, a cam- 
paigner against improper reading mat- 
ter, accomllshed the somewhat lively 
feat of speaking m five Duluth churches 
and the Y. M. C. A. In Superior yester- 
day. 

jiir. Arnold estimates that 1.400 per- 
sons heard him talk yesterday. His 
schedule did not permit him to remain 
long in one place, and his talks lasted 
but a few minutes. 

Mr. Arnold believes that there are too 
many improper advertisements In the 
periodicals of today, and it was to preach 
against them and other forms of i|ues- 
tionable readig matter that he came to 
the Head of the Lakes. 

Yesterday morning the Minneapolis 
man found time to give short addresses 
at Plymouth Congregational and Elim 
Swedish Lutheran church in West Du- 
luth and Zioii Norwegian Lutheran 
church In the West end. 

The evening's iinerary included Bethany 
Swedish Lutheran church and tha First 
Swedish M. E. church, both of which 
are located in the West end. It was dur- 
ing the afternoon that he appeared at 
the Superior Y. M. C A. 



Red Cross + Cough Drops. 

Make the throat feel glad. 5c per box 

MAN CHARGED^ITH 

ARSON ENDS LIFE. 



Chicago, March 9. — Abraham Peder, 
49 years of age, a wig maker, who 
was arrested on suspicion of having 
conspired to set fire to his home, com* 
mitted suicide in a cell at the Raw- 
son street police station today by 
hanging himself with a handkerchief 
from the upper bar of his cell. He was 
to have been arraigned before Munici- 
pal Judge Scovel today. Peder re- 
marked to a policeman during tho 
night that he was not guilty of tho 
charges preferred against him and 
that he "would never live to suffer th«» 
di.sgrace." 



<^ F. D. DAY & CO. 

Fashionable Jewelers 



PRICES OF 
DIAMONDS 
ARE RISING 



ripHE latest authentic report* 
11 froin London indlo«^e that 
th* prlOAs of diamonds 
will b* aavanoed v«ry shortly. 
Having purchased a larg* 
number of loose and att 
atones In Eastern markets 
laart fall we received price 
conceffslone wntch enables us 
to offer dlamoiMs at inviting 
prices, espeolally If they are 
to be purchased as an invest- 
ment. Every stone l»«are our 
unqualified guarantee. 

Loose stones or those In an~ 
tlquated mountlnge reset In 
new original and fascinating 
designs for a moderate ex- 
penditure. 



i 

f 



315 West Superior Street 



i 



ES^^ 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. ""'""■''■ '^""- '"* 



I 




Ask for the Kind of Emptoye You Want 



He's to be Had, and He Reads Herad Ads 





324 J 



'>N 



One Cent a Word Kach Insertion — No 
Advertisement liess Than 15 Cents. 

"shopping 
by telephone. 

Old New 
•Phone. 'Phone. 
MEAT MARKETS — 

B. J. Tobe.i 23 22 

Mork Bros 1690 1S9 

LAI NDKIES — 

Yn!e Laumlry 479 479 

Lutes Launili-y 447 447 

Troy I>iuiniiry 257 -57 

Hoiiip [.aiin.lry 1044-M 112« 

DKlGtaSTS — 

Etldie Joronimus 1243 1072 

Boyoe 163 163 

BAKKHlJt:^ — 

The Bon Ton 1729-L, 1128 

PLlMIJlNCi AND IIEATINC;! — 

McGurrIn & Co 815 983 

Archie .VIc.L>ougall 17i3 916 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Atlvertiwnient Less Than ^^_}^^J^^ 

HELP WANTED— MALE. 



BUSINESS 
BUSINKSS 
BL'SINKSS 



MEN 
MEN 
MEN 



Supplied with competent stenographers 
and accounianis. FREE OF CllAKUE. 

Apply to 
W. C. McCARTEK, Business University. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 

INSURANCE AND 
RENTAJ^^^AXjENCIES^ 

John A. Stephenson, Wolvln huiUlinK. 
B. D. I'Meld Co.. 203 ExchaiiRe bulldlnR. 
L A. L.'irsen Co.. 215 Fruvldt-nce buildinf?. 
PuUoid. How & €.o.._3l'9_Exclumge HUlt;. 



WANTED -FOR U. &. ARMl. ABLE- 

bodi.'d iininarried men, between ages or 
IS and 35; citizens of United blutes. of 
Kood churacn-r and temi>crale_>ai^''t». 
who caa speak, lead and write English. 
For informaiion, apply to Rtcruitm? 
oJIice, Torrey building. Duluth, Minn. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
AdverlLscinent ix-ss 'I'han 15 C<*nt». 

lliLP^WANTED^^FEMALEl 



M Rd. SOM BRS' 
tite, 17 Second 
'phonts. 



EJMPL,<JYMENT 

avenue east. 



OF- 

Both 



RELIABLE HE1.P ALWAYS TO BE 
had at Mrs. Callahan's Employment of- 
fice, 16 Lake avenue north. 



WANTED— EVERY WOMAN TO TRY 
Dr. Le Oran's Female Regulator, guar- 
anteed. Kugler. Your Druggist, 10b 
West Superior street. 

SOLICITOR. 515 PAL- 



WANTED-FOR THE UNITED STATES 
marine corps, men beiwet-n liio ages ol 
n and 35 An opporiuiiiiy to sew the 
world. For full intorinatlon apply In 
person or by lelli-r to No. 5 South 
Fifth avenue west, Duluth, Minn. 



WANTED— LADY 

ladio building. 

WANTED - EXPERIENCED 
ladv and apprentices. Miss 
No.' 3 West Superior etrttl. 



SALES- 

Meining. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

MDITDOML 



PERSONAL. 



WANTED - FIRST-CLASS STENCG- 
rapher; state salary. Ado i ess b -»• 
Herald. 



UPHOLSTER nOG^&^REPAIRING. 

ED OTT. 121 W. FIRST St. Bot h 'ph ones. 

•PHONE ZIMMERMAN & JACKSON. 
S06 E. Superior S'.. and they will call. 



We repair and reflnlsh furniture. Larsen 
&, Ivtrson. Old. 73}<-L: Zc-nith. 1678- A^ 



WANTED — FIRST - CLASS MILL- 
wnghts for repair work, at once. Ad- 
dress Shevlin-Malliieu Lumber com- 
pany, Spooner, Minn. 



WANTED— CiOOl) SHINGLE SAWYER, 
mar city; good wages to right man. 
National Empioymeni. company, 5 South 
Fifth avenue west. 



WANTED - A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. Fred Kugltr, ISJl 
Dingwall sircet. 



WANTED - STENOGRAPHER WITH 
some experience in bookkeeping. Ad- 
dress Insurance. Herald. 



MONEY TO }^OMl. 

IX) YOU NEED MONEY? 
Money loaned In Duluth or Superior to 
salaried people without security. Also 
on pianos, furniture, horse«<, wagons, etc. 
Business absolutely confidential. Call and 
get our rales and terms. Monthly or 
weekly payments as desired. No good ap- 
plicant refused. 

WESTERN LOAN CO.. 
621 Manhatlati Building. 
New 'phone. 930. Old 'phone, 763- R. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 

DON'T BE DECEIVED 

ty rerkless advertising. We are the 

originators of the ea.sv payment plan. 

75 CENTS I'ER WEEK 

pays both Interest and principal on a 

$20.00 L tAN. 

Call and let us prove it. 

SALARY AN D (Ml AT TEL LOANS. 

DTTLUTH FINANCE CO.. 
30J Palladio Hldg. 



WANTED-TWO FIRST CLASS Ex- 
perienced edgermen iMid one first class 
blacksmith for large lumber company 
In Arizona. Want men to go about 
March 2ui.h. Must have good refer- 
ences. Farts advanced if desired. Ap- 
ply In person to National Employment 
company. 6 Souih Fifth avenue we«t. 

ji ~~ 

WAN'rEl>-DAY 
restaurant. 



PORTER. HALEY'S 



.Men to learn barber trade; special op- 
portunity; big wages paid; C"^. free. 
Moler Bar. Col.. 27 Nlc. Av., Min:u-apol.B 

WANTETV^'KRY MAN AND WOMAN 

to try Nervo Tablets, tlie j?reat nerve 
regenerator. $1 per box. Kugler, Your 
Druggist, lOM West Suncrlor street. 



WANTED - WOMAN FOR GENERAL 
housework: wages JlC per week; eighi 
people to cook for. Jessie Burns, Aitkin, 
Minn. Northwestern 'phune. No. 100. 

WANTED^ GIRL FOR GENERAL 
houstwork. 1101 East Fourth str eet. 

FOR 
East 



WE REPAIR AND RECOVER ALL 
kinds ot lurniture. Larsen & Ivtrson, 
carpenter and cabinet shop, 123 First 
Ave. \N . Zenith, 15(S-A; olu, -Sfc-L. 

PERSONAL - COFFIN'S DANCING 
academy. Ifc Lake Ave. N. Phone i24d. 

Ptreonal- Mrs. Smith. Maeeeuse, 
pouy, etc . over Day s. Phone, 



chlro- 
I&i<j-Y. 



WANTED-COMPETENT GIRL 
general housework. Apply 16u2 
First street. 



PERSONAL - DRESSMAKING. REA- 

sonable prlcee. 21 Eleventh avenue 
West, mam floor. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less llian 15 Cents. 

FOR RENT— ROOMS. 

Ralston Hotel, new mansyjement; steam- 
heated rooms with or without board. 
12i-24 East First street. 

FOR RENT - TWO FURNISHED 

rooms, all conveniences, tine location. 
6<i6 Eaat Second street. Old 'phone, 
77«i-U 

FOR RENT-A MODERN FURNISHED 
roo.m; will allow light housekeeping. 52( 
Efest Fcurth street. Zenith 'phone, 
ll»72-D. 

FOR RENT-rURNISHED ROOM; ALL 
conveniences; suitable for two. 905 East 
Second street. 

FOR RENT-LARGE FRONT ROOM, 
facing the lake, with all conveniences. 
2ir. Second avenue west. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Tlian 16 Cents. 



FOR SALE-ONE MAHOGANY PIANO. 
In perfect condition, rented for six 
months, at $136. Terms, »10 cash and 
$5 per month. 



FOR SALE-ONE WALNUT PIANO, 
used one year, almost as good as new, 
for |11U. Terms, |10 cash and $5 per 
month. 



FOR SALE-ONE FANCY WALNUT 
case piano, used three months, in per- 
fect condition, a snap at 5150. Terms, 
$10 cash and $5 per month. 



Ccr. 



FRENCH 
Third Ave. 



& BASSETT, 
West and First 



St. 



PERSO.NAL-DR. BURNETT. DEN- 
tlst, top floor, Burrows building. 



V> ANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework; one who can go home nights. 
Call mornings. 712»^ East Fourth street. 

WANTED - GIRlT TO ASSIST WITH 
h(^i:sework and care of baby, three In 
family. 67i.>6 London roaU. Zenith 
■phone, 506&-K. 



PERSONAL-I. GILLEN. FASHION- 
ablfc dressmaker, 1714 Jefferson street. 
•Piicnes, lyi'i»-R old, 2262, new. 



W^ANTEI»-NURSE 
Third street. 



GIRL. 414 EAST 



' AGENTS WANTEEL 

NvXi^ri^D^^ATrENTH. MEN AND WOM- 
en for large portrtilt house, call be- 
tween 8 and 10 a. m.. llS Tliiid avenue 
west, basement. 



WANTED - THREE FIRST - CLASS 
waitresses for c>ut of town. Mrs Cal- 
lashans employment oflice, 16 Lake 
avenue north. 

WANt'eD^YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIS T 
with liglit hou.«-ework. Will accept one 
attending school or normal. 127 Tenth 
avenue cast. 



WANTED — GIRL F(»R 
housework. 120.''. Eaet First 



GENERAL 
street. 



Private hospital before and during con- 
Ilnement, 1930 Cimton Ave., Mjls, Minn. 



PERSONAL-HAVE CAMERON REUP- 
holster your furniture with leather, 
tapestry, etc. Hair njattrtsses tc order 
Both phones. 113 First avenue west. 



PERSONAI^DRESfiMAKING BY Ex- 
perienced seaniBtress. ReascnaLK 
prices. 6o3 We»t First street. 



PERSONAL - MASQUERADE C08- 
tumes. Fanny Roswold, 115 First avt;- 
nue east. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED BEDROOM 
and sitting room. 222 East Second 
street. 

FOR RENT - TWO FURNISHED 

rooms for light housekeeping. Every 
convenience, $15 per month. No. 5 
South Fifth avenue east. 



FOR SALE— IRON AND WOODwORK- 
Ing machinery and supplies, pulleys, 
shafting, hangers, boxes, etc , new and 
second-nand. Northern Machinery com- 
pany, Minneapolis. 



FOR SALE — IRON 
Call New phone 
1231-K. 



FOLDING 

162. Old 



BED. 

phone 



FOR RENT - NICELY FURNISHED 
room and board. Ill Second avenue 
east. Zenith phone, 1250- Y. ^ 

FOR~RENT-ROOM6 FROM $2.50 PER 
week and up. Newly renovated 
throughout. Metrcpole hotel. Cargili 
& Kenny, proprietors. 



15 



l«K>CK>00<><30<»Oa<Kl{KHX)H5<K«K>i3a 

Q ClilCKKKlNG, <jt 

FISCHER, O 

FRANKLIN 

I'lANt^S. 

EASY PAYMENTS. 
HOWARD, FARwELLi & CO. 
120 East Superior Street. 





FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS 
water. $9. Apply 627 East Super 



a 
o 

Q 

a 

a 
O 

Q 



Phones; Zen., Hib-X; 
\V. J. All»*ii, manager 
Mann, expert piano 
organ tuning. 



Old ir52-K. 

Fred R. 
and pipe 



Q organ iuniii|i. v 

WITH C<H:i< ?Vi>0<H.-i.^i;H;i<K:-U<H:><H>O<H:'O^ 
ior St. ! — : TTZZT^^.. , ^ ^^.^^^^ 



FOR RENT — 
bedroom, use 
326 East First 



SINGLE 
of batli, 
street. 



FURNISHED 

$C per month. 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOMS, 
single or en suite; newly furnished; 
strictly modern; hot and cold runn ng 
water In every room; $3 per week and 
up Special rates by month. Hotel 
Chrlstoplier. First Ave. W. and First St. 



PERSONAL-THE BPIRELLA CORSET 

parlors are now located at 114 W. Sup. 
St., ov»r Folz's. Old phone, 1722-B. 



Dr Mitchell, tlectro-mngr.etlc sr^cialiet. 
Treatc all diseases. 325 W. First St. 



OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 

E^^E Esterly, manufacturing Jeweler, 
Spalding hotel, 12.S West Superior 
Street. New 'phone, 1S*J«>-X. 



MONEY LOANED ON HOUSEHOLD) 
furniture, pianos, horaca and otiier pr;r- 
»onal property the same day applied 
for. Loan.« can l>^ pnid in e.-isy install- 
ments All busincFs confidential. Low- 
est rates In the city. 



Zenith, 



MINNES- 
205 
883. 



»TA LOAN CO.. 
Palladio. 

Old 'phone. 



630- M. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

^^ITiX'^TrAN^x'iN^ GRADL ATE MIp- 
wife- female complaints. 413 Seventh 
Ave. east. Old 'phone, 1594; Zenith, 122q, 



FOR SALE— HORSES. 



MONEY H) LOAN ON DIAMOND.^, 

watciies furs, rifles, etc., and all goods 
of value, $1 to $1,000. Keystone Loan 
& Mercantile Co.. 116 West Superior tot. 

Money" supplied to salaried 

people and ttlurs, upon their own notes 
without security, easy payments. Of- 
fices In sixty-three cities. Tolman's. 509 
Palladio building. 



Furniture nud srilaried 
Loan comp.iny. 210 I'n 

MUSIC. 



loans 

lladlo 



by TTnlon 

building. 



MUslC .\SD MU: 




IC.AL MhKCll.^NDISE Of 
every description, t-ili 
»on tliunutfr tpi:s, band 
and or^lasira inatiu 
meats, p;au»s & ur^ai>.'<, 
luKVttlti WEsiG.A.AKU. 
; anU V !•>'*' A^*- ^Vest. 



H(>RSi-:S 
HORSES 



I-tjR SALE. 
1'*<)K SALE. 
IKJR.^ES FOR 
1H.>RSKS FOR 
HORSES FOR 



WANTED - GOOD GIRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. CIS West Second S t. 

WANTED- COmI'ETENT NURSE. 21b 
Tenth avenue east. 



WANTED - TEACHERS, STUDENTS, 
workers wanting to travel and earn 
money during vacation investigate our 
twenty-five lines of work Call 514 
Palladio. 



Private home fcr ladies before and dur- 
ing confinement, expert cart, every- 
thing confidential, infants cared for. 
Ida Pearson. M. D , 2b4 Harrison ave- 
nue. St. I'au^ 



PERSONAL - MECHANICAL AND 

iiatent office drawings done reasonably 
f.y C. H. Loftus, 22 Fourth avenue 
west. 



WANTED - LAUNDRY GIRL ^A HO 

thoroughly understands running shirt 
machine, collar sharer and neckband 
ironer: good wages. Inquire bookkeeper, 
Troy laundry. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 

132 Twelfth avenue east. 



SALE. 
SALE 



SAL?:. 
SALE. 
SALE. 
HOUSES FOR 
HttRSE.S FOR 
FOR SALE - LOOC.LN'G A.ND DRAFT 
horses; we have for sale at our barn, 
oi.po.slte the postofflce. the finest 
bunch of big logging and draft horse.^ 
ever brouglit to Duluth. They must 
be sold and you can »>uy them at your 
own price. Part time given. If de- 
sired. Barrett & Zimmerman, Duluth. 
Minn. 



WANTED - 

housowcrk. 

W A Nt1kI)^NOR W EG I A N MAN WITH 
good home at Eveleth wants a houte- 
kevpor no objection to ciilldicn. Ad- 
dress letters to Box IW. Eveleth, Mmu. 



PER.SONAI^WANTED-YOI'NG CHILD 
to board. P R., 72 Herald. 



QUICK AND GOOD PRINTING. CALL 
eld "phone, 1604. Trade News Pub. Co. 



FOR RENT — 
electric light, 
month. Zenitli 
saba avenue. 



FURNISHED ROOM. 

bath and heat; $7 per 
■phone, 1812-X. 456 Me- 



FOR RENT-MODERN FURNISHED 
room. In desirable Uication. Rent rea- 
sonable. Address 12 West First street, 
flat "G. ' 



FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOM 9 
West Second street. 



FOR RENT-FOUR 
West Third. 



RCKJMS. CALL 226 



FOR 

ture. 



SALE 
ttoi East 



HOUSEliOLD 
Fifth street. 



DID IT EVER OCCUR To YOU THAT 
It would be protitable to prowl .".round 
our book store or write tor what you 
want'.' We buy, sell, exchange all kinda 
of books. Lundberg & Stone, 231 W eat 
Superior street. 

FOR SALE —OAK COMBINATION 
tKiokcase and writing desK. 2j15 East 
Fourth. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

MASONIcT 
PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 79. A. F. & 
A. M.— Regular meetings first 
and third Monday evenings 
of each month at 7;30 ociock. 
Next meeting, March 16, 1908. 
Work— Second degree. Edward 
K. Coe, W. M ; H. Nesb.tl, 
secretary. 

IONIC LODGE. NO. 186, A. F. & A. M.- 
Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 ociock. 
Next meetiing. March 9, 1908. 
Work— Third degree. Cail F. 
Wiberg, W. M.; Hugh R. Bur- 
go, secretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER, NO. 20. R A. 
M. — Stated convocations sec- 
ond and fourth Wednesd.ay 
evenings of each month, at 
" :30 o'clock. Next convoca- 
tion March 11. Wcrk-R' yal 
Arch degree. Wilson. H. P.; 
Alfred Le Richleux, rcccr.ler. 

DULUTH COUNCIL NO 6, R. S. M. 
Regular meetings first and 
third Fridav evenings of each 
month at 7:30 ociock. Next 
mooting March 6, ItW*. Wotk- 
lloval and Select Masters. 
.N'ewton H. Wilson, T. I. M.: 
Alfred l^eRlchleux. recorder. 

DULUTH tX>MMANDERY. NO. 18, K. T. 
-Stated conclave first Tuesday 
of each month. Next conclave 
March 3. Gonor.al biis.ness 
and election of officers. Will- 
iam A. Abbett, eminent com- 
mander; Alfred Lt Rlchieux, recoreler. 

SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings evcrj- Thurs- 
day evening (ff each week at 
30. Next meeting. March 6, 
19t».S. Work— C>rgan recital. J. 
E. Ccedey, secretary. 







FOR SALE-COUNTRY EGGS. PHONE 
us your grocery order. We trust tiil 
pay day. Thatcher.' 312 West Fourth St. 

MALE AND FEMALE 
107 East Superior street. 



FOR SALE- 
canary birds 



FOR RENT - TWO 
rooms .central. 222 East 



FURNISHED 
Thiiel street. 



FOR RENT - THREE NICELY FUR; 
nished rootns lor light housekeeping. 32( 
Eighth avenue west. 



GREATEST PIANO AND PLAYER 

bargains art here this wei'k. 
Novelty drawing roo:n piaiio. $86. 
Large size Kingsbury p:ano. $198. 
Good medium size square, $37.50. 
One of the best large size squitres. $45. 
Star piano and Appollo player. Jiy.S 
Good oak piano and player, $345. 
Fine mahogany piano and pianola, $390. 
The above prices arc the greatest ever 
offered. Call at once. 
KORBY PIA.NO CO., 201 E. Superior St. 



ZliNITH CHAPTER, NO. 25, 
Order of Eastern Star. Regu- 
lar meetings second and fourth 
Friday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
mee'iniT March IS, 1108. Work- 
Balloting and initi.-vtion. Carrie Freimuih, 
■W. M. ; Ella S. Gearhart, secretary. 




EUn.TD LOIHIE. NO. 19S. A. F. &. A. 
M.— Regular meeting first and 
third Wednesday evenings ot 
each month at 7:S(t o'clock. 
Next meeting March 18. Se*0- 
ond de'gre-e. E. G. Wal-luder, 
W. M., A Dunleavy. secretary 



Office furniture, bar fixtures, reflnlshed. 
"French Polish' cr "Missli n Finish.' 
furniture retuUt. Zen. 1887. Wtsterlund, 
cabinetmaker. 



PERSONAL-OLD MIRRORS RESIL- 
vered. St. Germain Bros., 121 1st. avt. w. 



WANTED - GIRL FOR 

housework; small family, 
Third street. 



GENERAL 

1112 East 



WANTED-A 

housework, 
avenue west, 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
7«) North Flflh-btvtnth 
West Duluth. 



I-ERSONAL- CENTRAL BATH PAR- 
Ion- »4 We it Suiierle>r street. 



TIMBER-LANDS^ 

I BUY STANDING TIMBER. ALSO 
cut-over lands. George Rupley, 404 Ly- 
ceum building. 



FOR RENT - NICELY FURNISHED 
room, all meidern conveniences; hot 
water heat. 623 East Third streeL 

FOR~RTENT-FURNIieHED ROOMS. NO. 
1 Munger row. West Duluth. 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FTm'I^ENT'^^^'lnNEtfT EIGHT-ROOM 

thoroughly modern flat in L»-uluth, 
East end. T. W. Wahl & Co, Lons- 
dale l-ullding. 



FOR RENT-FIVE ROOM FLAT. AD- 

dress V. 57, Herald. 

$16 



Herairlnsj done cheaply on all talking 
machines. C. C. Novef ty Co.. 130 \V^Mich. 

PHONOGRAPHS AND MITSICAL IN- 

stiuments. S;nd your orders for popu- 
lar songs and records to Zenith Music 
Co., No. 6 East Superior street. Duluth. 

MIrin. ________«^— .^— 



FOR SALE, CHEAP - ONE GRAY 
hortH., weight 1.400; 4 years oid. Black 
hor.se, weight 1,450; 4 years old; alsj 
deliveiy wagon. 2;. Eat^t First street. 

FORSALElBUNciToF HORSE.'? ALL 
Wnds Will sell cheap If taken at once. 
(•.(IS North Fifiy-si.\th avenue west. 
Zenith phone, aool. 



W ATC H ES^REPAI RED. 

WILL REPAIR WATCHES THAT 

other« liave failed to fix. Send by regis- 
tered mail to S. J. Nygrcn. Jeweler. 
West Duluth. Minn. 



•GRUESKN. 
Duluth. New 



ROOM 

'phone'. 



4. OVER 

1393. 



BIG 



Guarantee-d 
ch .uud.Jl. 



Main 

1 1. iron 



Spring. 
Pri>s.. 21.1 



$1: 

West 



watch 

1st St. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE^ 

Removed— Gust Holmgren, 42H South 2t3t 
avenue east. Old 'phone, 794-K. 



REPAIRING J^D^NWORK^ 

BHEET IRON. COPPER WORK. ROOF- 

Ing, guttering, spiuiting. done to order. 
C. J. Gauss, Zenith 'phone. 2292. 



FOR SALE-CARLOAD OF DRAFT AND 
delivery horses, cheap if taken at once. 
Inquire at barn opposite Bridgtman- 
Russell company. 20 West First street. 

FtmSAI.E-FOUR YOUNG DELIVERY 
horses. l.StK) and l.-iOO pouiKls e-ach; 
work single or double. S. M. Kaner, 
1219 East Seventh street. 

7 YEARS 
311 West 
taken at 



WANTED-A NU'E GIRL WHO IS 
working and takes her meals out. to 
stay nights with n lady for company. 
Inquire 19 Seventh avenue we^t^ 

WANTED^gTrL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1401 Eaet Ihird street. 



WANTElw— A COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1732 East First bt. 

WANTED^VOMAN TO r»0 WASHING 

and mending for two gentlemen. Apply 
at once. Address X 27. Herald. 



FOR SALE-lftO Al^RES IN TOWNSHIP 
f7-2:. M. GibseriS cruise Mackey J. 
The.mpee»n, 514 Pioneer Prew- building. 
St. PhuI. Minn. 



FOR RENT-FOUR ROOM FLAT, 
per month. C. H. Graves & Co. 



SELL US YOUR LANDS AND TIM- 
ber. Hepkini Realty company, 600 Tor 
rey building. 



FOR SALE-A GRAY MARE, 
old. Weight, l,5oO pounds. 
Michigan street. Cheap if 
once. 



FOR SALE-HORSES AT 826 EAST 
Third street. Herbert Inch^ 

FCMl^Su'E^rEN" aT HEAVY SLKKUi 
teams. Red Cliff Lumber company. 
Thirty-ninth avenue west^ 

She^inglame horses my specialty. Give 
me a trial. I. Randall. 2(9 W. First .^t. 



WANTED-GOOD GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework: good wages. 217 Second ave- 
nue east. ^^ 

GE.NERAL 
street. 



I BUY TIMBER IN COOK OR LAKE 
counties. Alse furnish abstracts of title. 
Alex. McBean, 40€ Burrcws building. 

fS13 
15(H. 



WANTED-A GIRL FOR 
housework. 232 West Fifth 



WANTED-NURSE GIRL, COME DAY 
time. Call 2601 East Fifth street. 



WANTEl>-COMPETENT WO.MAN TO 
dc washing and ironing. Call 924 East 
Fifth street. 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework. 2<»20 Jefferson street. 



PIANO TUNING. 
X^'oREGORrTzENrrTPp^ 



WANTED- MILLINERY 
Frelmuth'e. 



MAKERS AT 



WANTED-8ALESLADY FOR ART 
department. Freimuth's. 



FHELI'ON-MATHER TIMBER CO. 
First National Bank bldg. Phone, 

Anyone wishing timber and homestead 
claiiiis, write J. T. Joyce Ashriwa, Minn. 



FC»R RENT-TWO 
room flats; electric 
complete. Kt30 West 



MODERN rOVB. 

light and gas range 
First street. 



FOR SALE-SAFES, OFFICE FURNI- 
ture fences, etc. J. S. Ray & Co., iOt> 
West Superior street. Both 'phones. 



FOR SALF.— $125 TAKES A 
right piano. Big snap. 
\N est First etrect. Room 



FINE UP- 
Call at 212 
6. 



FOR SALE-COD LIVER OIL. SWED- 
berg. 3 East Superior street and 20i& 
West Superior street. 




FOR SALE-WOOD SAW 
and seeond-har-d gasoijne 
luth Gas Engine works, 
south of ueilal bridse. 



RIG; NEW 

enginer=. LHi- 
thice block.-: 



CHAPTER: NO 59. R. A. M.— 
Mt>et8 at West L>uluth second 
and fourth Tuesdays of each 
month at 7:.'iO p. m Next 
meeting, March 10. Regiriar 
business J. H. Oppermari,. H. 
P A. Dunleavy, secretaxy. 



FOR RENT-FIVE 
flat, very central. 
very neat. T. W 
Loiisdale building. 



ROOM MODERN 
all hardwet'd floors; 
. Wahl & Co.. 208 



FOR SALE-ENDION r>IVIS10N LOl ; 
will take pity in excavation work. H. 
C. Fulton, Zenith 'phone , 52. 

OASOLINE 
$L'2.r.Ct, good 
street, up- 



FOR SALE-<jUlCK-MLAL 
range at a t.argain. i>>st 
as new. 617Vi West i- irst 
stairs. 



LODGE NO. 28. I. O. O. F- 
Mcets everv Friday evening 
at Odd Fellows' hall 16 l^ake 
avenu. north. Next meetinjX— 
March b. Initiatory d^tree. 
John Andrews, noble grand, W^ H Konk- 
ler, recording secretai j , A. H. I aul, linan- 
eial secretary. ^ 

~ K. O. T. M. 

Duluth Tent. No. 1, meets 
( v<ry Wednesday evening at 
Maccabee liall. 224 West First 
mreet. Visiting members al- 
ways welcome. Office m hall; 
hours. 10 a m. to 1 p. m. tially. 
A J Amierson. commander, 

COl East Fourth street; J. P. Gelineau. 

record kee-per. 224 West First street. 




DYE WORKS. 

ZENITH CITY I YE 'wOpTkS^^LARG- 
est and most relial le. All work done 
In Duluth. Work called for and de- 
livered. Phones: Old, ll.''.4-R; New, 1S88. 
23:: East Superior stree-^t. 



MOVING AND STORAGE. 



PEOPLES MOVING & 
2o7»4 West Supesncr 
'phones, 601. 

Dl'LUTH 
pany, 210 



STORAGE CO.. 
street. Both 



VAN & STORAGE COM- 
West Superior street. 



DULUTH DYE WORKS-FRENCH DRY 

cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old 'phone. 
12(rj.R: New. 1101-A. :i30 East Superior 
street. Suits pressed by the month. 



FOR SALE 
coat, gray 
maeh : size 
cash takes 



- LIGHT SPRING OVER- 
extra good <juality and well 
3'j three-tiuarleis length; $10 
it. \V.. Herald. 



FOR 

ture. 



SALE-HOUSEHOLD 
312 East Fifth street. 



FURNI- 



FOR SALE CHEAP - THREE GOOD 
ruK«? and some furniture. Inquire -14 
Fourlh avenue we&t. Zenith 'phone. 2210- 
D. 



FOR SALE-ONE HANDSOME COt-K- 
er Spaniel dog. Ten months old. -t-J 
West Fifth street, city. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

JxTuNT^^^^iI? ^'eST SUPERIOR 
street, near Twentv -sece'Ud avenue, fur 
scarf. Owner <an have same' by paying 
for ad. 1823 West Superior street. 



Call up F'opkln. 1S.'.7-X. at ISth 6th Ave. W 



FOR 

No. 



FOR RENT— STORES. 

RENT-FRt>.NT HALF OF STORE 
3 West Superior street. 



BOARD OFFERED. 

$5 a week; modern, ceniral. 120 Fourth 
avenue west. 



BOARD OFFERED - 
rooms anel board. 218 



- FCR.NISHED 
West Tlilrtl .St. 



JPARMJLANDS. 

FOR SALE-EIGHTY ACRES. VERY 
gooei seiil, wiih some iinprovemeats, 
eight miles from Grant.-bur^;. Wi.^.; new 
niilroad being built within four miles. 
Apply U. Ander.son. 1907 West Firs: 
street. Duluth, Minn. 



FOR SALE-SELECTED FARM LANDS 
In the agricultural sections of Northern 
Minnesota, and hume.sieiKls and timber 
claims in the timber district. Easy 
terms of payment. Correspondence so- 
licited. R. C. Mitchell. Jr., 312 and 
313 Torrey building, Duluth. 



BOARD AND ROO.VI-CHOICE TABLE 
board, beautifully furnished rooms 
and all modern conveniences; reason- 
able terms. 919 East First street. 



BOARD AND ROO.VI OFFRRED-TWO 
gentlemen; private family. 318 Third 
avenue west. 



WANTED - GIRL. 

light housekeeping. 
street. 



ABOUT 17 
922 East 



FOR 

Fifth 



WANTED - EVERY WOMAN. MAN 

and child that has rough skin or chaos 
to use Kugler's Karnatlon Kold Kream. 
the great skin food, 26c. Kugler. Your 
Druggist, 108 West Superior street. 



LIQUOR HABIT CURED. ^ 

G l^ARANTE K fo ^ tn^RfcpYOu" 1 N 
two weeks. No danger to health 1L> 
East Superior, thit U. Prof. J. B. Fisetc. 



LOST - BETWEEN FIRST AVENUE 
east and Se-cond street and Fourth 
avenue west and Superior street, e»ne 
ge.ld hunting case wat' h and g"!d fob, 
wUh initials C. B. P. Finder please re- 
turn to No. CIO First National Bank 
building and receive reward. 

LOSTWn^8E~"vV EDN ESDA Y, ON SU- 
perieir street east, between Second and 
Third avenues; contained old-fashioned 
brooch- for which reward will be jiaid 
if returned to The Herald. 

BOA~AT FIFTH AVE- 
Third street. Loser call 
Third street. 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 

ir;uNTma''''TND'"'TAP^ 

done at rea*onai)le prices. I. Oness, 
1106 Ea*t Sixth street. Zenith, 1057-D. 



FOR PAINTING. PAPERING. CALCI- 

mining, hardwood finishing, etc. An- 
drew R'.ngsrtd, 322 East Sixth street, 
Ctid, 513-M" 



M. 



MILLINERY. 

cox. 330 'eAST^OURTH ST. 



MRS BRANI'T, 114 WEST FOURTH ST 



FOR SALE-I WILL SELL m SHARE.S 
of White lion Lak" stock cht-np. in- 
quire at 17(6 Piedmont avenu e west. 

FOR RENT - ALSO 
Edmont, 410 We-t Su- 



MODEJtN SAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL. NO. 1, 
meets at Elks' hall every 
Tnursday eveffiing at a 
o'clock Benefle.nt degree. 
Itrst and third Thursday. 
Srimaritan degree sec-ond ana 

scribe FirVt Natlo/ial b.ink bulding; 
Wallace pWelbanks, scribe. All Sa.n- 
aritans invited. ^ , 




TYPEWRITERS 

for sale. $25 up. 
perior street. 



OPTICIANS. 



C C STAACKE. 305 NEW JERSEY 
building, 106 We«t Superior street. 



OPTICIA.VS - WKNNERLUND & NEL- 
son. 1925 West Superior street. 



FOT-ND-FUR 
nue east and 
at 62;«^ East 



BOARD AND ROOM, ?5.50 PER WEEK; 
modern conveniences. The D.ikotah, 
117 W. Second St. New phone, 1445. 



ROOMS OR BOARD - TREMONT 
hotel. 12 Lake avenue north. 



I CAN LOC.\TH YOU ON RICHEST 
farm lands in Willow river and Little 
Fork valley. New rail and county 
road.s through valley. Pat. Greaney. 
Gheen. Minn. 

FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 

tracts to actual settlers; small pay- 
ments down ;iiul balance on fifteen 
years' time; on 4ir b.fore privilege, t^ill 
or address, land department, D. & I. R 



RaihvMy company, OIJ 
Duluth, Minn. 



Wolvln building. 



Proposals for Contract 



Wds will be recelveel up to 10 o'clock 
'Wednesdav .March llth, IfiiS, for the dis- 
cing and relilllng of test pits for the pro- 
posed t^jurt House, as per ptans and 
speclflcations on file at the office of the 
Court House Commission at No. 321 Pro- 
vidence Buileling. 
Viaen*.e ^^^6 ^^ CLAYPOOL. 

Secretary. 



TABLE BOARD 
room. Steam heat 



AND FURNISHED 
313 West Third St. 



Room and Board-noi East Third street, 

WANTED TO RENT. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 

FOir'liALE^^^Sr''^\r"'TcANE^ 

great number of fresh milch cows, 
sL>me Jerseys among them. 1219 East 
Seventh stre-et. 



FOR SALE-E. CARLSON WILL AR- 

rive with .i car of fresh milch cows 
Saturday, March 7. Twelfth street and 
Twenty-second avenue west. Zenith 
1651-D. 



UPHOLSTERING. 



LOST-GOLD WATCH BETWEEN AL- 
benber- s store and First National 
l>ank "Reward if r« turned tc HeraM or 
402 West Fifth street. 

BETWEEN 111 SEC- 
aiid Armory. Reward 
Second avenue east. 



LOST-FUR BOA 
ond avenue east 
for return to 111 



BUSINESS^CHANCES____ 

FOR SALE - LIVERY, DOING GOOD 
business; good reason for selling. Ad- 
dress C. Herald. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



•WRITTEN 
Cooley & 



IN BEST 
Underbill, 201 



CO.MPANIES— 
Exciiange bldg. 



NOTICE OF TRU.STEE'S SALE-FOR A 
few days I will receive offers for the 
furniture and fixtures of the lee cream 
parlors and confectionery and cigar 
store known as "Roll's Place'" on 
Belknap street. In the city of Supe- 
rior. Wis., consisting of hack bar, 
showcase, counters and other equip- 
ment; can sell separately if desired; 
three good locations arc open for 
such a store. J. O. Krause, trustee, 
1413 North Fifth street, Superior. Wis. 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED 

LADIES^AND GENTLEMEN. ZENITH 
Valet, 21'1 W. First St. Both phones^ 



JOHN MUELLER, a»2 JVV EST FIRST ST. 
PANTORlUAlTlTs FIRST AVENUE W. 





ancier. 



A O U W 

Fidelity lodge. No. 106. meets 
at M^.ccabre hall. i:.;4 West 
Fir-t street, every Thurseiay 
at I p. rn. Visiting nK-iQl>ert 
xvelconie. W. J. Stephens. M. 
\V • W W Fensterniacher. 
recorder: O. J. Mui-\'old. Itn- 
East Fifth street. 




1908. B 
Hoopes, 



STENOGRAPHERS 



W.\NTED TO 
of years h.v 
with e-ement 
First street, 
eater! ng and 



New 
L. 22, 



building 
Herald. 



LEASE-PXIR A TERM 

respeinsible parties, store 

basement. Superior or 

lower side preferred, for 

fancy Ice c-tajji business. 



proposition considered. 



WANTED TO RENT-ROOM IN PRT- 

vate house, not too far from Gla.sa 
Block: willing to nay $o per month. Ad- 
dress L 23, Herald. 



WANTED TO RENT-HOUSE ON MIN- 
nesota I'olnt. from May 1; five ro«)ms or 
more; good localily; gas and city water: 
rent miL'st be reasonjible. Wlmt <an you 
offer? R GOO, Herald. 



IT PAYS ro HAVE CAMERON 
holster vour furniture. Both 
123 First' avenue west. 



REUP 

phones. 



LADIES 
pi)und; safe. 
Druggist or 
La Franco, 



MEDICAL. 

L>R. L.V FRANCOS 



spe^edv regulator: 25 
mall. Itooklet free 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



COM- 

cents. 

Dr. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

f^oiT'I^ale'^cheap"'^^^^ 

cottage, 3615 Minnesota avenue. Park 
Point, bay side. Must be sold at 
once. Old 'phone 003-K. 



STOVE REPAIRING.^ 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10 (00 different stoves and ranges. C. 
y' wiggerts & Sun, 217 East Superior 
street. Be'th teleiil.or.es. 



SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES. 

''itchhiir irritable, chafing, chapped skin 
healed healthy _by Satin skin ere aLm_25c^ 



FOR RENT-MODERN 
house. 1429 Jefferson 
next dexjr. 



EIGHT 
street. 



ROOM 
Inquin.' 



PICTUREJFRAMING^ 

DECKER-S. 16 SECOND AVENUE W. 
GUS-TAV HENNECKE. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 
POIRIER^&'^foTTM'Ea^r^uperloT^ 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

MArTa gThNDERENO MASSEUSE? 
graduated frvun Dr. Arve-dson's Inst., 
Sweden. 300 Burrows Blelg. Zen. ir36-X. 



A. E. HANSON. 
Jersey building. 



MASSEUR. 
Old 'phone. 



4^ NEW 

1826-K. 



CLAIRVOYANTS^ 

CLAIRVOYANTS-IF YOU HAVE AL 
ready made nil»take.=, thrown aw.iy 
monev and Utst confi3ence through 
dealing with much advertised and self- 
styled Palmists and Cl.iirvoyaniE and 
their cheap clap-trap methods, start 
from the b'-irinnhiB. and consult this 
famous Egyptian lady. She will tell you 
everythlr.g pertaining to your future 
life and happine.ss: reading dalij Mad- 
ame Luettria. 11 First avenue east. Dii- 
luth. 

CLAIRVOYANT LADY FROM EUROPE 
reads in many ways, will wait on la- 
dles at their hon>e, has many things 
of great interest, will give to each 
customer free their planet for 1908; 
guarantee sure advice on love and 
family troubles. Send sealed envelope 
with your address to S. 34. Herald of- 
fice, Duluth, at .4>Dce. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES.^^^ 

FORaALE-TEN-ROOM HOUSE, BUILT 
five vears at West end, one block from 
car line; "all hardwood floors-, on very 
easy monthly payments. Property can 
be had for $1,200 to $1,500 less than it Is 
worth today. Must be sold immediately. 
$500 to $1,000 win handle. For sale ex- 
clusively at 205 Palladio building. 



FOR SALE — FINE TEN-ROOM HOME, 
modern, central, large lot, fine con- 
dition, beautiful inside and out. Ad- 
dress X 29. Herald. 



FOR SALE — NEW 13-ROOM HOUSE, 
rented to three families: total rents 
$50- slcne foundation; bath, $4,200. C. 
L. Rakowsky & Co.. 201 Exchange 
Bank building. 




FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 



FOR SALE. CHEAP-SIX LOTS COR- 
ner Forty-first avenue west and Fifth 
street. Address J. D. K.. 1186 LIncoin 
avenue. St. Paul. Minn. 



FOR SALE CHBAP-A HOUSE AND 
two lots at 505 West Michigan street. 
H. M. .Tohnson. 



FOR SALE- FIVE ROOM COTTAGE, 
water and sewer: electric H.ght and 
barn. Albert Swenson. 1220 East 
Fourth street. Zenith 'nhone. 2i)G2-Y. 



WANTED TO BUY 




WANTED 
safe. S 



WANTED TO BUY'— 50-FOOT LOT, BE- 
tween Lake and Sixteenth avenues east; 
mention best cash price first letter; 
owners only. Address A. Heitmann, 
general delivery, city. 



ROYAL LEAGUE. 

ZENITH COUNCIL. 

Royal league, meets 

hall, first and third 

evenings at 8 o'clock 

S. Palmer, archon, city hah: 

Andrew Nelson, scribe, 309 

First National Bunk building. ^ 




NO^ 161, 

in kiks' 

Mond.ay 

Charlis 



WANTED 
for cash. 



TO BUY'— HOUSE 
I 80, Herald. 



AND LOT 



WANTED TO BUY — A LARGE OR 
small tract of land for Investment. I 69, 
Herald. 



MODERN MACCABEES. 

ST LOUIS BAY TENT. NO. 
1045, meets every first and 
third Mondays, at Gilleys 
hall. West Duluth. Matthew 
Eiti'nger, commander, WS 
Eighteenth and One-Half 
avenue west. New phone, 
a099-X Finarce keeper, Edward Shan'^s, 
23 North Fif.y-elghth avenue west, rec- 
ord keeper. C. C. Low. a. 12 Wadena 
stieft. - 




I O F. 
COURT COMMERCE. NO. 
32S3. Independent Order of 
Foresters, meets first and 
third Friday evenings f«t 8 
o'cloek. at RowU'vs l"*" No 
111: West First street. Next 
re>.u.ar meeting. March X. 
M Buckminster, C. R. ^^ W. 
R. S. . 

M. W. A. 

IMPERIAL CAMP, NO 2206, 
meets at Maccabee hall. -4 
West First street, second and 
fourth Tuesdays of each 
month. George Lindberg. 'V. 
C, C. P. Earl, clerk. Box 41L 

NORTH STAR LODGE. NX>. 

25. Knights of Pythias, me-ets 
every Tuesday night. John 
J. Lumm. C. C: Jame^ A. 
Wharton. K. R. S. 

c'TFWART NO. 50, O. S C, 
^^ mlc^rnVst and third Wednes- 
(lavs each month, » P. m . 
Folz hall, 116 West Supeno'- 
street. James D. McGhl--. 
chief: Don Mcl>ennan, secre- 
-tary John Bt:r:iett. financia 
.'xreaary. 413 First National 

Bank building. Benem dance for Mts. 

Dalglelsh, March 18. isoo^ ^ 

•'•^i5^^ A Kalamazoo block. Mrs. 
iiertha Cameron, captain gen- 
eral H. V Holmes, paymas- 
...,-. .tlo i-if.-er,tii :.v<nue east; 
E. F. Helier, recorder, 230 
West Fifth street. 






C. H. 

Fourth 




A. O. U. W. 
DULUTH LODGE. NO. 10. 
meets at Odd Fellows' hall 
every Tuesday evening, at 8 
o'clock. Andrew Hager, M. 
W. : R G. Foote, recorder; 
T. J. St. Germain, financier, 
l2l First avenue west. 



1044. meets e\ery second ami 
feurth Friday of the inoi.^h 
at Kalamazoo hall B. Com- 
mander, Charles K. Norman. 
K.IO Minnesota avenue, record 
keeper and ""^"je »tei;P««;' 
Looniis, residence 429% i-ast 
street. Zenith. 2270-Y. ^ 

COURT E.VSTERN STAR. 

Court Eastern Star. No. S«, 
U O F.. meets every first 
arid third Tuesdays in the 
fionth at Maccabee hall. 224 
West First street. James 
Kelley. C. B., 518 Fourth- 
avenue east. Joseph Wilde, 
secretary. 452 Mesal>a avenue. 
Milncs. treasurer. Office at hall. 

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD. 
ZENITH CITY CA.MP. NO. :. MEETS 
every second and fourth 
Wednesday at the old Ma- 
sonic temple, fifth floor, John 
Haugen, <.'. C.; A. M. Holmes, 
banker, 720 West Fifth street, 
flat E; Robeit Forsyth, clerks 
817 East Second street. 





A 



I 



f 



I 



» *- 



\ 



\ 



i 



I 



* 



i. 



^ 



i 



J 



ft 

1^ 



\ 



DULUTH EVENINGHERA 




1B PAGES 



r 



TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR WEDNESDAY MORNING. MARCH U. 1908. 



GREAT BRITAIN ADVISES 
JAPAN TO ARBITRATE ITS 
CONTROVERSY WITH CHINA 



THREATS TO REPETmON OF TERRIBLE 

COLLMWOOD DISASTER IS 
AVERTED BY FEW MINUTES 



Calls Its Attention to 

Treaty With England 

Regarding War. 

Points Out the Advisi- 

bility of Waiving Its 

Technical Rights. 

Action of British Adds 

a New Phase to the 

Situation. 



*[ GERMANY EXPELS 
\ DRUNKEN PRINCE 



^k 



Hamburg, March lo.— Prince ;^ 
Ludwig Menelik of Abyssinia | 
has been expelled from Ger- | 
many as an undesirable for- ^ 
eigncr. The prince is a near rel- % 
ative of the king of Abyssmia, % 
and a negro. He was born at $ 
Addis Abeda. and for a long ^ 
time past he has been making * 
unsuccessful efforts to organize | 
companies for the exploitation ;jt 
of mines, rubber and cotton in ^ 
the kingdom of his relative. He 
has been charged repeated y 
with drunkenness and disorderly 
conduct in various parts of Ger- 
many. 



Toklo. March 10.— According to a 
well-authenticated report, the center 
of interest In the Tatau Maru affair 
ha^' been removed to London. When 
the Britisli srovernment was Informed 
of JaF>anf^ announcem«nt that, 5n ihf 
cvtnt of a refusal by China ^to enter- 
tain her demands, Japan propo.s«d to 
take "indopendent action," the British 
foreign office asked Count Kcmura. 
the Japanese ambassador in London, 
what steps Japan pnu'osrd to take, 
calling hi*" atttntion to the clause in 
the treaty with Great Britain cover- 
ing the question of war between Japan 
and any other nation. Great Britain*^ 
interest therein being understood here. 
Ambassador Komura, being unable 
to give a definite answer, asked the 
foreign office in Toklo for Information 
•which found the attitude of the British 
government an unexpected phase In 
the situation. It is stated here that 
the British government is advising ar- 
bitration on the (luestlon of the restor- 
ation of the arms seized, and has 
pointed i«ut the advisability of Japan 
admitting the moral side of the ques- 
tion wltile doubtless technically correcv 
This new turn of events has created 
a deadlock here, and the foreign office 
»8 now awaiting advices from Am- 
bassailor Komura. 

indianurF 
fine viorkers 

So Says the Man Who 

Managed Work on 

Colorado River. 

W'ashingti^n, March lO.-lToof that 
♦'Poor Lo" is not the lazy man he is 
at times represented to be is furnished 
In a letter from H. T. Corey, general 
manager of the California Develop- 
ment of Caiexico. Cal.. to Charles L. 
Dagcnett. supi-rvlsor of Indian em- 
ployment at AUmqueniue, X. M. The 
letter has jusi been received at the 
bureau of Indian affairs. 

Mr. Corey gives his experience with 
Indian la?.or in the work of the. diver- 
sion of the Colorado river Into Saltan 
sink, which resulted in the farmmj.' 
of the Salton sea. and also with the 
attempts lo close the break In the 
bank- of the liver, and again divert 
Its entire tlow down Us old channel to 
the Gulf of California. In this work 
60^1 Indians, consisting of Yuma. Dig- 
eno, Cocopah. Maricopa, Pima and 
Papago tribes were employed. In 
sp« aklng of the efficiency of the Indian 
laborers. .Mr. Corey says: 

••This Indian labor was In the high- 
est degree satisfactory to us— In fact 
I am Certain that the work could not 
have be»n carried to a successful con- 
clusion without it. 

•The triVtes particularly are thor- 
oughly acelimattd to the desert and 
to long hoi sunuuers. and seemingly 
work with no di-'-comhture at 120 degs;. 
in the shade. We found them timid. 
but very willing to do their l>est as 
soon as they were convinced of the 
right track. With foremen, who un- 
derstood their character, they are the 
most efficient laborers obtainable in 
thi.s r» gion." 



WORLDWIDE 
DELEGATES 

Gather at Washington 

to Discuss Welfare 

of the Child. 

Meetings Held Under 

Auspices of National 

Mothers* Congress. 



BLOW^BANK 

Made by Anarchist Who 

Demands Large Sum 

of Money. 

Omaha Official Averts a 

Possible Disaster by 

His Calmness. 



Omaha. Nfb.. March 10. — An unknown 
anarchist entered the Merchants' Na- 
tional bank of this city today and de- 
manded a large sum of money, at the 
same time displaying a bottle believed 
to contain nltro-glycerlne. and threat- 
ening to blow up the bank If his re- 
<iue8t was not compiled with. 

The man asked to see Vice President 
Luther l>rttke in his private office. 

Drake seated himself opposite the 
man. who began talking In a rambling 
manner aOout .'lavjng iiad $5,C<K> In the 
National Hank of Comnterce in Kansas 
City, when that bank tailed. "And since 
all you fellowB are in together, you 
h.'wi Just better hand me over my 
money or 111 blow you and this bank 
and til] of us to hell. ' suddenly said the 
fellow, producing :i three-ounce bottle 
containing a thick yellow liquid. 

■'L'on't you make a move. This is filled 
with nif ro-glycerine. If you move you 
i»rf :i dead man." 

•You don't want to die yourself, do 
yc»u?" coolly asked Drake. 

Canio In Kcady to Die. 

'•Oh. yes. I came In here ready to die," 
responded the stranger, "iiut when I 
die." I'll take everybody In this build- 
ing with me." 

■ Well, I'll KO and get you the money, " 
said IiTake rising from his chair. 

•■J^lt down. " Bald the anarchist. "If 
you get up again without permission 
I'll Just drop this bottle. You know 
what win happen. " 

Drake sat down. Drake then told the 




Big School Building in 
Toledo Completely De- 
stroyed by Fire. 

Blaze Started About 

Fifteen Minutes Before 

800 Pupils Arrived. 

Building Burned With 

Lightning Rapidity and 

Was Soon Consumed. 



(ON TRAINS. FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



NIGHT RIDERS SHOOT AND 
WHIP NEGROES AND BURN 
TOBACCO IN KENTUCKY 



THAW TRAGEDY 



* 



PLAY IMMORAL I 



Newark, N. J., March lo.— At ^ 
the close of the performance of ^ 



Washington. March lO.-LHlegntes rep- 
resenting every state and territory in the 
union and the leadmg countries of the 
world assembled here today to attend 
the International Cimgress on the Wel- 
fare of the Child, under the auspices ol 
the National Mothers' congress. It is 
estimated tliat upwards of ^CH* delegates 
are h.rc jn addition to four Or tlve hun- 
dred visitors. The congress will be in 
session for one week and promises to 
bo one or the moat notable of it* kind 
ever held. At leasl-a dozen nations are 
represented in the asserWtily., among 
them being Great Britain. tJermany, Hol- 
land. Japan. CJreecc. Fnince. Switzerland, 
South Africa and other countries. An 
interesting pioRiiini has l>een prepared, 
and prominent men and women from 
this country and abroad are nchecluled 
to speak on ^n^^•.stl()n^: l>»-iir1ng upcm the 
care and culture of t hlldren. 

Subjfccts to lie Dlsfusst'd. 
Among I 111- Hulijt ri« to l>t lUscussed 
are child lal>or. licusehold economics, 
luime ami school as8jKlatlc)ns. public eil- 
uejition, the education of the deat and 
blind, the care of the defective, play- 
grounds, day nurseries, Juvenile courts 
and the treatment of erring and depend- 
ent children. 

The notable speakers will t>e Commls- 
si<mi-r of Kduiatlon Einer E. Brown, 
wlio will ofriclally represent the Tnited 
^*tates; James Ltryce, the British ambas- 
sador; United States Commissioner of 
Labor Charles l*. Nelll. l»r. Harvey W. 
Wiley, of the bureau of chemistry of the 
department C)f agriculture; Judge Ben 
l.uulsay of Ct>lora<lo; IJen. Francois Jou- 
bert-I'lenaer of Angola, Africa, and 
others. 

The feature of the opening day will be 
the reception and address to the dele- 
frates by President Itoosevelt at the 
White House at ~:'iO o'clock this after- 
noon which will inarkf the forma] open- 
ing of the congress. The president will 
speak on some phase of tlie chlld'.« life. 
The real work of the congress will l>e- 
gln tonight when tlie »leiegates will meet 
at the Metropolitan Methodist Episcopal 
church. 



Continued on page 13, second column.) 

greaTrevival 
in philadelphia 

Plans Made for Religious 
Services in Forty- 
Two Churches. 



S. N. D. NORTH, 
Director of U. S. Census Bureau, Who 
Is Accused by Herman Ridder of 
Giving False Figures on Print Paper. 

PoinsoaT 
barcelona 

Young King of Spain 

Guest in Hotbed 

of Anarchy. 

Warmly Received and No 

Disturbance of Any 

Kind Occurs. 



Toledo. Ohio, March 10.— Napoleon's 
Union school, the largest building of 
the kind in the state, which was com- 
pletely remodeled only last April and 
had cost the county $110,000 altogether, 
was deBtroyed by fire this morning. A 
repetition of the Collinwood horror 
wa,s possibly averted by only a quarter 
of an hour In the time of the starting 
of the Are, as the children were on 
their way to school, and some were 
I playing in the yard when It was dis- 
covered. At 9 o'clock, when the 
school pupils should have been in their 
seats, the main part of the building 

was a mass of flames. „rv--. 

Supt. Bomer and Principal White 
were the onlv persons in the building 
when the fire broke out, the other 
teachers not having arrived. The two 
men ran to the stairway leading lo the 
attic and were driven back by a shower 
of sparks and a great volume of 
smoke. The Are had evidently caught 
from a defective flue of the furnace 



Philadelphia. Mareh K'.— The greatest 
religious revival in tlie history of Phila- 
delphia is promised by the promoters of 
The slmultfineons evangelistic services 
which are to begin •in forty-two churches 

on Thursday and will be ccmtinutd In. 
every Prctej'tant church that will throw 
open itii: door? to the evangelistK until 
April 19. Although public meetings will 
not be held until Thursday night, •the 
mission was praoMcally started last 
night when mote than r>.000 personal 
worker}^ assembled in the 20f< ciiurc hes 
and received instructions from trained 
workers .ippoinled by Rey. I>r. Wilbur 
Chapman and Charb.V M. Alexander, the 
singinK evangelist. At the s:-UTie time 
l.jciO members fro church choirs assembled 
in Grace Baptist Temple for a rehearsal. 
Pernupt' the most sigjiificant feature 
of tlie evening of pr'^parrtion was a ban- 
Oiiet wh»Te more than 'JOO ministtrs in- 
cluding pastors of the churciiCK where 
the services will begin on Thursday, as- 
sembled to lisfn to addresses from men 
of other cities, who told them of the 
success of l>r. Chapman's work in every 
section of the country and Canada. 



Barcelona, Spaip.r, fltHir-y 1*— Klnp 
Alfonso, who left Madrid lani ji.ght, 
arrived in this city >hlB morning. He 
has taken up h's ref Sdence at the home 
of Oen. Llnarci?, captain general of 
Catalonia, where he will stay during 
his visit here. He was given a warm 
welcome by the people of the city. No 
disturbance of any Wnd marked the 
arrival of his majesty. 

The r« yal train drew Into the sta- 
tion at 9 o'clock, and its arrival was 
announced by the firing of salutes from 
the Austrian and Spanish warships in 
the harbor. The big 'square outside the 
ra!lrc»?.d station was lined with troops 
and the civil guard, who had difflculty 
in keeping back the surging crowds. 
As the king emerged from the station, 



(Continued on page l3, first column.) 



(Continued on page 13, first column.) 

STATrWHl" 
NOT BE LONG 

I In Presenting Its Evi- 
dence Against Mur- 
derer of Priest 

Denver, c'olo., March 10.— W'Tien thcs 
trial ol Giuseppe Alia, charged with the 
murder of Father L-eo Helnrichs was re- 
sumed at 10 o'clock today before Judge 
Greeley W. Whitf>^>rd in the criminal di- 
vision of the district court, the indica- 
tions were that the state would be able 
to present Us entire case, IncludinR the 
testimony of its sanity experts, before 
the close of the day and tliat the pnson- 
ers defense would be heard tomorrow. 
The jury is composed of business men 
all non-Calholic. who have declared un- 
der examination that they are not od- 
no«ed to hanging and would not be In- 
fluenced by the fact that the murdered 
man was a priest. 



A Millionaire's Revenge" at the 

1 Columbia theater here last night 

i the police arrested George W. 

^ Jacobs, the manager of the the- 

% ater; John T. Pearsall, manager 

^ of the Mittenthal Brothers' 

y Amusement company; Harold ^ 

* Vosburgh, Gay Rhea and Louis ^ 

i C. Miller, members of the com- 4 

1 pany. They are charged with ^ 

^ producing an immoral play, f 

^ which was founded on the Thaw % 

% tragedy. % 

HASNOWORD^ 
FROMBRYAN 

As to What Will be Done 

in Minnesota, Says 

Abbott. 

Bryan Has Uttered Many 

Words of Friendship 

for Johnson. 



I A LEAN BONE THAT MAY CAUSE A BIG FIGHT. | 



C) 




FIFTY-FOUR YEARS A(JO 

Ills Field Sei'Ui'pd First Baeklnj!; 
for Snimixiiino Tt'lcprapliy. 

New York, March 10.— Today is a 
notable erne in the history of sub- 
marine telegraphy, for although the 
fiftieth anniversary of the sending of 
the tirst message under the Allanllc 
ocean does not occur until Aug. 17 of 
this year, attention has been called 
by the approaching semi-centennial to 
the fact that it was Just lifly-four 
years ago today that Cyrus W. Field. 
fired with the enthusia.sm for the 
seemingly impossible project, induct d 
the men afterward associated with 
him led by the venerable Peter Cooper. 
to promisee the material supiiort that 
made the cable a succes.s. At the home 
of Mr. Field, in this city, on March 
10, 18.">4. a conferince was held by Mr 
Field with the prominent men he had 
induced to listen to his story, the up- 
shot of his pcladings being that be- 
fore the meeiing adjourned ho had 
Induced all present to sign an agree- 
ment to support the Atlantic cable 
project. 

A historical palntlnj? marking the 
date of the agreement, done by Daniel 
Huntington, now hang.-i it» the cham- 
bei of commerce in this city. 

IIOHHKUY AT HIS.MAKCK. 
Hisinarck. .N. Li.. March lU.-Uinxlars 
Sunday nlKhl entered tu- .«tore o\ K 1. 
Hem & Co.. through a back window an.l 
leisurely selecKd seyeral outfits ol cloth- 
InK and haberdashery. The stock was 
rummaHed eomplelely. and the casli 
drawer broken open and the loose change 
taken. There Is no clue. 



KING WRITES 

TO EMPEROR 

Edward Explains to Will- 
iam the Lord Tweed- 
mouth Episode. 

Berlin. March 10.— A local news 
agency declares today that it has 
learned from an unimpeachable au- 
thority that King F^dward has sent a 
letter to Kniperor William, couched in 
conlial and friendly terms, concerning 
the revelation by the Lcmdon Times of 
the existence of private correspondence 
between the emperor and Lord Tweed- 
mouth, tirst lord of the British admir- 
alty. According to this agency dis- 
patch. King Edward, in his letter, 
takes the view that the British parlia- 
ment and the public, as well as an im- 
mense majority of*^ the press of Eng- 
l;ind. sharply disapproves of the ac- 
tion of the Times. 

Continuing, the dispatch says that 
the attempt of the Times to exploit a 
private and non-political exchange of 
correspondence in a sensational way. 
and in a manner antagonistic to Ger- 
many, caused the British king to write 
as he has to Emperor William. The 
king's action, it is added, will create 
the best impression both in Germany 
and in England. 

MOVEMENTS OF AUTOS. 
Laramie. Wyo., March 10.— The 
American car in the New York to 
Paris race left here at 7:3ri this morn- 
ing for Rawlins, eleven miles west. 
The roads are reported to be in bad 
condition. 

Grand Island. Xeb.. M;arrh 10.— The 
Italian car in the New York to Paris 
race left here at 8:10 thLs morning 
with fine weather and good roads 
ahead. 




FROM THE HER-\IiD 
WASHINGTON BUKEAU. 

Washington. March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Herald correspond- 
ent called yesterday on Willis J. Ab- 
bott, who is the recognized represen- 
tative of William J. Bryan here, t nd 
asked him whether there was any 
truth in the story telegraphed from 
here to Duluth thai Mr. Bryan, at his 
request, had decided to notify his Min- 
nesota representatives not to oppose 
the election of a delegation favorable 
to Governor Johnson. Mr. Abbott re- 
plied that he "he had no word from 
Mr. Bryan concerning what was to be 
done in Minnesota. The Herald might 
Inquire at Lincoln, or of the men who 
are regarded as Mr. Bryan's friends in 
Minnesota." 

However, Mr. Abbott was willing to 
say that for many months past he has 
never heard from Mr. Bryan one word 
of criticism or of hosftilllty to Gkivei- 
nor .Johnson, but many words of 
friendship, nor In so far as Mr. Abbott 
has attempted to express the views, 
not of Mr. Bryan himself, but of Bryan 
Democrats, has he ever heard or pub- 
lished one word in opposition to the 
right of Governor Johnson to aspire to 
the presidential nomination. 

It is said in Democratic circles here, 
however, that Mr. Ablx)tt and other 
strong Bryan followers have urged 
Mr. Bryan to prevent any trouble In 
Minnesota and concede the state to 
Governor Johnson without any opposi- 
tion. 



Take Possession of Bir- 
mingham After Previ- 
ously Warning Negroes. 

Brooksville Raided and 
1,500 Pounds of 
Tobacco Destroyed. 

Men Were Unmasked, 

But Were Unknown 

to Anyone. 

Paducah, Ky., March IC— One hun- 
dred masked night riders rode into 
Birmingham, Marshall county, last 
night, shot six negroes and whipped 
five others. The riders took posses- 
sion of the town and shot Into a negro 
cabin in the place. In one of these, 
John Scruggs, his wife and three 
children, and a grand-daughter, were 
struck by bullets. Scruggs is prob- 
ably fatally wounded. The riders 
then took five other negroes to the 
banks of the Tennessee, where they 
whiped them. After warning about 
twenty-five other negroc^>s to leave the 
place, the masked men rode away. The 
raid foUo-wed a warning of two weeks 
ago to all negroes to ieavt Birming- 
ham. 

Planter's Tobaccw Burne<1. 

Brooksville, Ky. March K*.— Fifty or 
more night riders came into town 
early todav In buggies and on horse- 
back and before they left 1.000 pounds 
of tobacco belonging to Robert Stan- 
ton, one of the wealthiest planters: in 
this section, had been burned. The 
men were heavily armed with shot- 
guns and revolvers. A number of 
the men went to the local exchange of 
the Bracken county telephone and kept 
guard over the operator. Miss Holton, 
so that no word could be sent for as- 
sistance. 

The men attempted no violence nor 
did they destroy the warehouse, but 
took the tobacco outside and set it 
on fire. After seeing that it wae all 
destroyed they departed as quietly as 
they came. They wore no masks, 
but are not known here. 



A LITTLE GIRL 
DIES OF FRIGHT 

Caused by Reading a 

Note Signed by Black 

Hand. 

New York, March 10.— Physicians 
yesterday declared that the death of 
Grace Seamans, 8 years old, daughter 
of Arthur Seamans, which occurred at 
Piermont, N. Y., was the direct result 
of fright over a 'Black Hand ' letter 
which she picked up 'at the door-step 
of her home. Feb. 20.- The letter was 
addressed to Henry Schuster, landlord 
of the house in which she resided with 
her parents. Its lurid wording, spelled 
out by the child was enough to cause 
the highly-strung young girl to go Into 
hysterics. From that time until she 
died she was in a state of fear and 
excitement that puzzled the attending 
physicians. She refused food and fre- 
quently screamed and cried with ter- 
ror over the evil she believed to menace 
her Her one thought was that the 
"Black Hand" v.as after her life. En- 
deavoring to divert her mind and sur- 
round the child with new associations. 
Mr. Seamans moved his family to the 
r-eighboring village of Sparkville. This, 
however, resulted in no change in her 
condition. The father was arranging 
to move to Brooklyn when the end 
came. 



WORK FOR IjNEMPIX)YED. 
Philadelphia. March 10.— Se%-eral thou- 
sand unemployed men of this city will 
receive employment on public works, in 
all probability, in about a mouth, by the 
passage of the $10,000,000 loan The council 
will authorize the floating of the loan at 
Its next meeting, and Mayor Reyburn 
will immediately advertise for bids. 

MURDER AND SUICIDE. 
Omaha, Neb., March 10.— James Rath- 
bun here this morning entered the kitchen 
in the home of Judge R. Hall, where 
his wife worked as a servant, shot and 
killi-d Mrs. Rathbun and then commit- 
ted suicide. The couple had been sep- 
arated. 



Young Man Fatally Shot. 

Clarksville. Tenn., March 10— Near 
Woodford, about fifteen miles from 
this city, Brown Bennett, a young man, 
the son of an association tobacco 
raiser, was found early today in the 
public road in a dying condition with 
a bullet hole through his head. Near 
Bennett were two dead horses and 
three empty shotguns. It is believed 
the young man was attacked by n»?nt 
riders. An investigation is being 
made. 

FlREMEfTnURT 
IN NEW YORK 

Scores Are Injured by 

Showers of Falling 

Glass. 

New York, March K» -A score ot fire- 
men were injured, several of them seri- 
ously, hundreds of persons were driven 
from their homes and many t)uiiding» 
were threatened by a fire early today 
which destroyed the six-story brick 
building at No. 'S6 West Eighteenth 
street. The big Siegel-Cooper department 
store was seriously threatened at one 
time. The lire also got into the ad- 
joining building at Nos. 32 to 36 West 
Kightecnth street and before It wa« 
checked had caused a total loss of 
>;:oy,uw. 

A back draft which blew out every 
window in the burning ttuildlng and scat- 
tered a shower ot broken glass, v.iuj re- 
sponsible tor the injuries of so many 
hremen. Some of the men were so se- 
verely cut by the flying glass that tliey 
are in a serious conUition. With tho 
free draught furnished by oix-n windows 
the names spread rapidly through the 
building and within a low minutes sev- 
eral nearby buildings were threatened. 
Several persons in a lour story boarding- 
house adjoining the burning building es- 
caped with considerable dilticulty after 
the house tiad become tilled with smoke. 
Window frames In the Siegel-Cooper 
store caught ttre several times, but the 
names were extinguished before anf; 
serious damage was done. 

HKJH LIVING CAISED 

DOWXFALj^OF CASHIER. 

Winona. Minn.. March 10.— While Jo- 
.seph Ruth, cashier of the bank of Ar- 
cadia. Wis., reported to be short in hi» 
accounts, has not been arrested, he Is 
under police surveillance, and it would 
be a difficult matter indeed for him to 
get away from Arcadia. 

It is said Ruth's troubles are largely 
due to high living. 

In addition to being cashier of this 
bank he was the village treasurer. He 
will have to make a report on March 
IC concerning his handling of the vil- 
lage funds. If any shortage develops 
her^i however, the village will not suf- 
fer as Ruth's bondsmen will have t» 



make good the deficiency. 

It is said there is small chance of the 
Bank of Arcadia recoverinif much of 
the mi-ssing money from Ruth, but thi» 
need not worry depositors, as the as- 
sessment made on the stockholders g;ve» 
them full protection. 

DULUTH MAN IN CHARGE. 
Minneapolis, Minn., March 10— (Special 
to The Herald.)-F. H. Bamaid of Du- 
luth has assumed his duties as command- 
ant of the Minnesota Soldiers' home. Mr. 
Barnard resigned his position as assis'.ant 
Dostmaster at Duluth lo succeed the late 
Capt. James Compton as commandant at 
the home. 



I 




I DEFECTIVE PAGE 







DEADLOCK POSSIBLE IN 
THE NEW Cin COUNCIL 




THE DULUTH EVENING HER^Lfi: TUESDAY, MARCH 



SUPERIOR ST.-FOURTH AVE. W. 



SPRING 
FASHIONS 

FOR YOUNGER MEN ! 




Body Equally Divided 

Between the Democrats 

and Republicans. 

Appointments May be 

Held Up— The Mayor's 

Message. 

FKOnAIiLK APPOINT>IKNTS 
OF MAYOK IIAVKN. 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY CO.. 

522-5^4 West Superior Street. 
Bolb Phones 428. 

Our Shirt and Collar Dept. 
Given Special Attention. 



LAUNDRY BURNS. 
Bl.>^)mington, III.. March lO.-The 
Inun.hv building of the Soldiers' Or- 
T>hans" home. her-, was de.^troyed by 
fire today. The structure wa.s close to 
'ithp main building, sheltering 3i» boy.s 
and girls. All were taken out safely 
through tha fire escape. The losa i3 
$10.01 »0. 



city Eiifflneor — K. K. Coe. 

Ilt'ultli CtMnmi.-ssioner — Dr. F. 
B. Pnttoii. 

BiiiUlint; In.-*pt*ctor — Etiwurd 
\a*\\v. 

City .Vttorncy — C. S. Wll.son. 

First As-sJstant City Attorney 
— E. M. Morgan. 

SfC4>na .Assistant City .Attor- 
ney — rklwin J. Konny. 

MiMiibor Hoard of I'ubllc 
Works — .1. \V. l»rrst«>n. 

POINTS MAYOR'S MESS.VOE 
WILL PROBABLY DIS- 
CUSS. 

Enforcement of saloon laws. 

Regulation of public danct's. 

Questionable hotels. 

lieturdinjs of public iinprovc- 
nients. 

Controversy l)Ctween Federal- 
ed lYwles Alilaneo and Builders' 
Exeliange. 

Improvements aimlnia: to make 
Dulutli the city beautiful. 

Nt^eessity of cUixens working 
togetliei- for Greater Dulutli. 

General taxation and taxatl<m ^ 
for public linprovenient.s. ^ 

The annual meeting of the city csoun- 
cll win be held tonight, and from all 
indications about the city hall today it 
will be one of the warmest annual ses- 
sions hold by the legislative body of 
Duluth for several years. All sorts of 
rumors are in the air, not th« least of 
which is that the Democratic alder- 
men will hold up some of Mayor Hav- 
en's appointments, and that there will 
be a deadlock over the election of a 
presidfjnt of the council. 

With the Cromwell-Bloedel contest 
in the Second ward still undecided by 
th.» court.s. and AMerman rromwell re- 
taining hi.s .seat, the council presents 
an even break politically. With all 
aldermen standing together on party 
lines', it i.s p.-»ssible for neither side tt 
do anything, except defeat the other. 
The make-up of the council tonight 

will be; , , . T^ 

Ucpublioanfl— Mooro. Foubister, Ken- 

n*>dy, MoKnight. Cromwell. Trevilion. 

Moo and Olson. 

Di'nuM^rats— Tes.'^man, Oetchell. Fili- 
al ra tilt. Jordan, Shartel. Ribenack, Ho- 
gan and Mueller. 

\ blanket of alienee settles down 
upon every alderman approached on 
the question of the presidency. There 
are no plans, they say. It's a pretty 
certain gu'^ss that the Republicans 
have gr*K)med Wats^m S. M«>ore as 
their candidate, but the Democrats 
are unswervingly non-committal. The 
choice lios b.Hweeji President Tessman 
and Alderman Getchell. with a shade 
in favor of Getchell as the probable 
candid-xte. 

It has been customary to concede 
the presiding officer of the council to 
the party having a majority, but this 
year there Is no majority and a dead- 
lock is more than possible. It Is 
thought the aldermen will stay by 
their party lines and not allow their 
"lid" and "anti-lid" tendencies to In- 
fluence them In thtdr vote In organiz- 
ing the body. W'ith an even break 
and but one candidate from each 



party, a deadlock appears the only 
possible result. If all vote with their 
party, and the outcome will be inter- 
esting. , , . 

The rumor that the mayor s appoint- 
ments will suffer has occasioned con- 
siderable discussion. It ia said the 
Democratic aldermen have lined up 
strongly against some of the men 
Mayor Haven has settled upon as 
members of his official family. With 
th;; exception of the member of the 
board of public works, the council ; 
must confirm all of the appointments ' 
mentioned above, and a solid Demo- 
cratic vote against any one would hold 

It up. 

Just what appointments have not 
met with the approval of the aldermen 
differing with Mayor Haven in political' 
faith have not been mentioned. It Is 
believed, however, that his seleoUons 
of a city engineer and a building In- 
spector are frowned upon and will 
come under the ban. The health com- 
missioner's office is also said to be in 
for the adverse vote, but the other ap- 
pointments are believed to be satisfac- 
tory. 

In addition to the appointments re- 
quiring confirmation by tlie council, 
the mayor will also submit apiwint- 
ments tonight of a member of the 
board of fire commissioners, a member 
of the board of water and light com- 
missioners and a member of the board 
of civil service commissioners. One 
member of the board of park commis- 
sioners will ai.so be appointed, con- 
firmation to be made by the judges oi 
the district court. On the first Tues- 
day in May, three members of th»^ 
library board will be appointed, and 
on the first Tue.sday in September, a 
city assessor. For the latter office. It 
is believed C. L. Rakow.sky, candidate 
for alderman from the Third ward in 
the last election. Is slated. ^ 

No opposition has developed to c ity 
Clerk W. H. Cheadle, who has held his 
office continuously since 1S94, and It 
is believed the new council will re- 
elect him tonight. 

There Is some speculation on tne 
probable contents of the mayor's mes- 
sage but It is believed he will spring 
no .surpri.ses. following out the Issues 
of his campaign and the expressions he 
has made since t aking office. 

Beautifying methods that injure the 
skin and health are dangerous. Be 
teautlful without Injuring you"^'^ ^^ 
taking Hoilister's Rocky Mountain 
Tea Linely complexions follow lis 
use.' 35c, Tea or Tablets. Ask your 
druggist. 




House Moving an.l Repairing; 
Stone and (Vouri-to Foundations. 

CAMELON BROS., 

Contractors, litl4- West Superior St., 
Duluth, Minn. om Phone, 301b-L. 
New 'Phone. n;28-Y. ^^^^^ 





noon. The action was started for the re- 
covery of 5&,«00 tor the death of young 
Akin, who Is claimed to have died as the 
result of injuri.s received wliile working 
for the mining conipany. Samuel Ander- 
son represents Itw lulniinistrator and 
Baldwin, Baldwin & Dancer represent 
the defendant coinpiiny. 

Sleighing Party. 

Ine members of th.- First Presl)yierian 
Christian Endeavor society and their 
rrl<nds will enjoy a JBleish ride this even- 
ing, meeting at the ^ huroh at . ;30 u clocK. 

Meet With Miik. II. W. Greely. 

The ladltes of ilie First Christian 
church will meet with Mrs. H. W . ^»;;'e- 
ly. ^'» Fifty-sixth .ivenue west, at -:J« 
o'clock tomorrow afternoon. 




©I1TYM|FSJ 

ThwlMK-Stewart to.; l»rlnlli»K, Blndl«K. 

Engraving; aiO-i:_WJnd St. i'hones 114. 

Win Make .^wardn. 

A B.-ithering of ski ri.lers and club mem- 
J>er.s will be held at tiie club »»«"?« ^^^^^ 
the l>uluth Ski olub at Chester hill to- 
night when the awurd.s will be made to 
the winners of events at the national 
tournament Sunday. Refreshm. nts wiU 
be served. 

Woman DlscliarKed. 

Esther Marsh was dis.harged Of a 
drunkenness charge in uiunltipal court 
yesterday afternoon. She was ar'""«';t;i ! 
Sunday night at her h.-nie on y^vtu^h 
av.nue e:ist on complaint of h^r Uu^- 
band. The court though the arrest un- 
justified, and discharged the woman. 

Siiake-siR'an^ Cluh. 

Th'^ regular meeting of tne Sliakespoaie 
club was held last ^^■•;"'Vf • ,'"'^ ,L'\ J* 
vol.- ■KinK Lear" w is decided on as the 
next- play for stud v. L. A. La Vote will 
lead the club. At the next meetmR the 
study of ••Hamlet" will be continued. 

CIdUl Pa.s.s«'s Away. 

Eliza, tlie 7-year-old dauKliler of W. 
H VVilliama, died last evening at the 
family home, «W Second avenue east. 
Tile funeral will be held tomorrow morn- 
ing with services at the cathedral, and 
interineni in Calvary cemetery. 

Ladles' Guild. 

The Liidies' B'lHd of tlie St. Luke s 
Episcopal ^church will '"^et Thursday att- 
ernoou at 12:30 o'cloi-k. with Mrs. Oray. 
iW7 West First street. 

Question *luh. 

.V 1. Williams of Superior will speak 
be'forcUie Question club "^.''t f .""' f >' 
afternojn on Theo.sophy and Its tonlil- 
butlons to Science." 

Sons of Veterans. 

The Sons of V.a.-rans will hold a mf-et- 
Ing this evening to take hnal action on 
their han<iuet pn^parations. and to initi- 
ate a number of new members. 

Father Asks for Damase«. 

Th^ damage .ase ot I'oter Akin, ad- 
ministrator ot til- estate of 1^'f J*;>" l^y 
the same name, against the Oliver Iron 
Minlne ennipanv and others Is being 
I ii...,i in .Tu.l^ie Ki..-mns ro'>ni this after- 



Stipulate for DLsmissal. 

The damage ease siart.U by Dan bul- 
livan against the Minnesota Land As 
Construction coiiipaiiy has been dls- 
inisseU from the district court on the 
.•itipulation of the partins. 

Ca.st» Reaches .Jury. 

The civil action brought by the Law 
Reporting Company of New -^oik, 
against The H. Poehler company, a 
K-rain commi.'-sion tlrni of this city, to 
recover $»J00 alleged to be due for a 
transerlpt of the testimony before the 
interstate commene » ommission in the 
grain c.'Yses. was given to the jury tins 
afternoon. The. arKunieiUs were be- 
gun this morning. The trial began yes- 
terday afternoon. 



COPPER STOCKS 
FAIRLY FIRM 



Finds Mortiiage Was Paid. 
A verdict in favor of StanUaus Ko- 
cinski against the Saltier Lhiiior com- 
pany was returned in the d strict court 
By a Jury in Judg^ Ensign's room this 
morning. The »»«'t involved a chattel 
, or t gage r.,vec\<r:.iXf. and the question 
for the lury «o determine was «« fol- 
lows; "Was . the mortS.iKe descii .d 
In the pleadin>?9 herein, together with 
the indebt'dness described in and s- 
cured by said mortgage fully paid at 
the time the ^)^eclosure proceedings 
on said mortgage ^•'"'"""♦;P^«^'l„^,,?Ji*' 
jury answered the question airirma- 

tlvely. 

Xellls Demands Damages. 

£R>SErii!s^HE%:"!i Market Shows But Little 

alleged breach ot contract oi' * >^^'M,\"? 
Ket out posts snd ties during the past 
winter Nellis claims that he was 
driven off the work by Harding, aiid 
that he suffered, daniases by reason of 
being unable to earrv out his contract.. 

Wife Alleges l>esertlon. 

Adel« Mack, Sn 'years old. has sued 
Charles .Mack. 38 years old. for a di- 
vorce, on the .ground of desertloij^ Ac- 
cording to the complaint flhd In the 
dLstrlct court this morning, they were 
married In May. 1*7 and had two chil- 
dren, one of \fliich is living. 



Why Accept the Mere 
"Semblance" of a Garment 

When you are entitled to the real thing at the same price? Aa 
a dollar bill is backed by the government in whicj^ou have 
implicit confidence, just so your gar- 
ments should be backed by a depend- 
able house — one which demands that 
best materials, best workmanship and 
best form be the ingredients of its 
composition. 

Our name in a woman's garment is 
its guarantee, and you can rely upon 
it — a guarantee not only of what has 
been put into the garment, but of what 
you will get out of it. Yet the prices 
are no more than the ordinary store 
asks for wearables of far less merit. 

What We Have to Offer at $35. 

For the popular price of thirty-five dollars we 
are able to place before our patrons four dis- 
tinct models in a dozen different materials, each 
and every one pure w^ool to the last thread, and 
tailored according to the standard of the best. 
Styles similar to illustration or in Modified 
Prince Chap and semi-tight models. The cloths 
are navy and brown serges, shepherd checks, fine English homespuns and 
summery suitings. We believe these suits will score more points on "style' 
and fine tailoring than anv other $35 garment nft'ered in this part of the coun- 
try. AMONG THE JUNIOR SUITS WE OFFER 

A special line of handsome checked and striped summer suitings, in swagger 
models at $15. 

** Correct Dress for Women, 




Good Printing; Xorth-Land Prlntery. 




IFEIRSOi^L 



These kitchen cabinets are of ex- 
tra heavy construction with good 
solid loRS— two large easy w«^rking 
fl.nir bins with strong handles— a 
bread and moulding board, smoothly finished and tNvo deep drawers in the 
tin' fo? cutk-ry and for towels and kitchen lincn. hxtra heavy basswood 
table tops that give you plenty of working space. 

A Strong ^A HZ 
Well Made V /• ■ » 
Cabinet- •J 

.\ pastry cabinet, one extra large 
tlour bin, a good sized drawer for 
knives, forks, spoons, etc — solid, 
well constructed basswood table 
ti,p — good, strong, well made cab- 
inet, nicely finished with heavy 
legs— golden oak finish Kvcry 
kitchen shouM be equipped with 
one of these cabinets. 







IDFY 



One Cent a Word Klacli lnserti<in — N« 
Advertisement Lew Than 16 Centa. 

S I'x T Kl^>rp110TOS FOR 50c. SHOKT 
time only. Fenny & Adams. 131 N) eat 
Superior street. New 'phone, laJ»-x. 





Fashionable hair aiesamg, manicuring 
scalp and face treatments. Miss Kelly 
orr<^8ite Glass Block, ups tairs. 

LADIFrS- TURKISH BATH AND HAIR 
dressing parlors. 24 West Superior 
street, upstairs. Knauf Staters. 




.75 



For This 

Quartered Oak 
Leather Scat Rocker 



Rocker is e.xactly like the cut— has 
handsomely panelled quartered oak 
back with hand finished carvings- 
solid shaped arms with shaped ppnels 
underneath— genuine leather seat, hand 
tipholstered. A well finished, well 
made rocker that other stores ask 
from $11.50 to $12.50 for. 

You will find this rocker on sale on 
our second floor together with a great 
assortment of equally good values. 



BIRTHS. 

jTmONlMOUS-Born to Mr. and Mra 

HiU>ert Jeronimous, 119 East Seventh 

street, March 4, a boy. 
JC>HNSON-Horn to Mr. an.l Mrs. Frans 

\V. Johnson. 708 South Twenty-third 

.avenue east Mareh 4. a eirl. 
BLO.MSTRAN D-Horn . to Mr and Mrs. 

AuKust Blomstr.and. 619^ East Fifth 

street. M.-ireh 5, a boy 
TUOMPSON-Born to Mr. .nind Mra. W. 

V Thompson, Mt: West Fifth street, 

Mareh 9. a girl. 



Mrs. John W. Powell of Nineteenth 
avenue east left hust evening for a two 
nionth.s" toUr of the South. 

F W Winship. jciiieral as-nt of the 
Mutual Transit eninpauy. r-turnod yes- 
terday from a several weeks" visit to 
the Paoinc coast. 

Sickening headaches, indige'^tion, 
constipatiun. indicate unhealthy condi- 
tion of the bowoLs. Hollister's Rocky 
Mountain Tea makes the bowels work 
laturally and restores your system to 
perfect health and happiness. 35c. Tea 
or Tablet-s. Ask your druggrlst. 

Seleotcd real estate mortgage* for Bale. 
W. M. Prlndle ft Co. 

MAN KlTlslnFE^ 

( HILD AND HIMSELF. 

th^e'^?i^U?'^'c^hi.K'~^^ iJ^'^^an^^Jrr^' 
David Davis of Pattytown, went Into 
their parents' bedroom to.luy they .saw 
their nother and a little 1-year-old 
hlld iy?ng in bed with their head, 
crushed by an ax. The deed was com- 
mitted by the woman's husband, who 
tr e,l to kill him.self with the same 
weapon F nding he could not end his 
Ufe In that manner, he went to the 
hirn and hanged himself. Davis was 
insane because^ of his Inability to pay 
a mortgage. Mrs Davis and the child 
are not expected to live. 



Change From Pre- 
vious Day. 

North Butte. Amalgamated and some 
of the other leading issues were a little 
weaker, but the rest of the copper stock 
market closed fairly firm today. The 
metal market was a little stronger. 

North Butte opened at $51.25. went a.s 
high as $51.37»/s. declined to $50. reacted 
to 151 and closed at «5y Did and $o0.i> 
a.-iktd. Amalgamated opened at JoL^O-Vi, 
went as high as $53.37V2. declined to >a-..o 
and closed at $52 bid. 

Greene-Cananea opened at $8.25, ad- 
vanced to $8.37^1. declined to $8.25 and 
closed at $.V12»4 bid and $8.2o asked. 
Butte Coalition opened at ♦-'^ -»• , ^'^: 
.lined to $20.1.Vi! and closed at %-V but 
and $20.50 asked. Calumet & Arizona 
opened at $100. advanced to $loo5.j and 
closed at $100.00 bid and $hJl asked. Ana- 
eonda opened at $32.87Vg. advanced to 
$3a.:57V2 and closed at $J2.8<^ bid. _ 

Superior & Pittsburg sold at $1-... ^-2 
and $12.25 and closed at $\2.U^ hUi am 
$12.25 asked; Denn-.Vrizona at $3.5<J .nnd 
$3tJ2Vi and closed at $:i.37V4 bid and ti.oO 
asked; aiol>e at $'i.87',2 and_ $0.<o and 
closed at $6.75 bid and $b.s.V.j ''''^'^L'; 
Butte & .Superior at $120 and closed a^ 
$1.12Vs bid and $125 "sked; Calumet & 
Sonora at $7 and closed at $b.8.Vf! bid and 
$7.!2V8 asked; Copper Queen of Idaho at 
$l.ti2Vi and do.sed at $l.ti2V4 l>id and $1'0 
asked; Bulle-Balhjklava at %..^b jind 
closed at $7 bid. and National at 53 
cents and dosed at 52 cents bid and &J 
cents asked. ,,101/ o.,/i 

Black Mountain ."old at $4.12^ and 
closed at $4 bid and $4.12Vi asked. 

Red Cross + Cough Drops. 

Druggists have none "Just as good." 




TAJAMA^S 

$L50 and $2.00 qualities at— $2.50 and $4.00 qualities at— 

93c ^l. 75 

About 1 2 dozen to choose from our regular stock. 



Sick Headache Cured! 

Quickly an< positively by a simple and 
harmless Home Remedy. Positively NO 
drugs sold or recommended. Send $1 
cash, stamps or check for recipe, and 
full partlcu!ar.s. THE HOME REMEDV 
CO.. Dulutb, Minn. 



TO ADJOURN IN MAY. 

.\l)propriation Bills in CoiiRress Un- 
usually Advanced, Says Tawney. 

Washington. March 10. — Represen- 
tative Tawney. chairman of the appro- 
priations commltttee, is by virtue of his 
po.sitlon the best authority in con- 
gress on the question of the adjourn- 
ment of a session. He said yester- 
day that appropriation bills are thi.s 
year about thirty days ahead of the 
usual time and that there is no reason 
why congress .should rrot be in a posi- 
tion to adjourn by the middle of 



IF YOU WANT 

A warmer house In winter. ▲ 
[•ooler house in summer. A quiet 
house all the time 

Ask About "Linofelt" 

A. H. KRiEGER GO., 

408 Kast .Snf>erior Street. 
'Phones l."tl3. 



1 

1 

1 




1 
* 








1 


. - 



May, and possibly a little earlier, un- 
less something comes unp that is not 
now exi>ected. 

No fear need be felt of the Indlgestl- 
bility of hot bi.scuit If they are made 
light and flaky by th^ use of Hunt's 
Perfect Baking Powder. Our extracts 
are the best. Try them. 



jc. 



DEATHS. 

SPKLLMAN-Baby Spellman aged 9 
months, died March S at 19o7 West Su- 
perior street. 

ABU.\lLVMSt>N — Isaac Abrahamson, 
aged n: years, died March 9 at 121^ 
Hast First street 




CARD OF THANKS. 

W^'^WISiT'tO^^^HANk" our MANY 
kind friends and relatives for their 
kindness and sympattiy shown us at 
the death of our l>elovod husband and 
father Mrs. S. Mllostan and Family. 



"One (lice wriil not suffice. 

You will Wftat more* 



FLORISTS AND DECORATORS. 

gT^inTP^>rBRO&.y 121 "WKST^IJP. sY 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

A permit was Issued to L. Sinott 
for an addition to a frame 
building on the east side of CJar- 
fleld avenue, to cost 



|20» 



McMillans 

PARAGON MAM & BACON 
PURE KtTTLt RENDERED LARD 



TREED BY WOLF PACK. 

Trappers Forced to Remain All 
Xight in Tree Top. 

Port Arthur. Ont.. March 10.— Com- 
pelled to cling to the branches of a 
tree through the whole of a winter's 
night, both without food and drink, one 
with clothes partly torn from his 
back, and with a pack of howling 
timber wolves prowMng around eager 
for Just such morsel as they would 
provide, should they fall prey, w-as 
the fate that overcame two Port Ar- 
thur trappers while on a trip to their 
camps in the neighborhood of Silver 
mountain. The men were Patrick 
Murphy, a trapper, who has been oper- 
ating in this district for several years 
and William Murphy, whom he had 
hired to go with him to his camps near 
Silver Mountain, as assistant. They 
were treed by wolves, which came on 
their tracks in the early dusk. There 
were about twenty In the 
pack Early next morning Patrick 
Murphy shot four of the animals be- 
fore they left, at daylight, and will 
collect a bounty of $15 each for their 
heads. The two Murphys returned to 
the city ye sterday. 

Only One "BROMO QUININE," that is 

t^^ axative B romo Oidniiie 

Cures a Cold in One Day, Grip in 2 Days 



M 



^^/^T»^ 



on every 
•box. 2^ 



lEWELBY 

AUCTION SALE! 

There's no questioti about the extent of the values offered 
by our Auction Sale of 

J. Gruesen's Bankrupt Stock 

Piece by piece, the entire remaining stock is selling to the 
highest bidders. You get high-grade goods at practically 
your own price. Come and see. 

T. E. REINHART^ 

J. Gruesen's Old Stand, 
129 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

W. D. GORDON CO., Auctioneers 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALP: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



1 



A GREAT SUCCESS 

''On Saturday I did the biggest one days business 
in the seventeen years history of the store, and today 
has been a close second]' said John J, Moe, proprie- 
tor of the big West end department store yesterday, 
''In spite of our corps of extra salespeople, we couldnt 
begin to luait on people pfoperly. The store has been 
packed since the sale began; its an unqualified 
siiccessl' 



SOCIEIY IS 
ORdANIZED 

•If 

Uplift Braifh Elects Per- 
manent Officers and 
Acting Board. 

Society Now Has Four 

Subjects Under 

Treatment 



PRODUCES 
EVIDENCE 

J. L Cromwell Intro- 
duces Oral Testimony 
In Election Contest. 



The Only Daily Paper Used by Mr. Moe for 
His Opening Announcement Was The Herald 

A double page advertisement, designed and written by L. E. McComber, 
salesmanager, was used. The ad was a very striking one and was the subject 
of encomiums from professional ad writers and readers alike. 

The Herald is the Only Newspaper That 
Thoroughly Covers Duluth and Nearby Towns 



John Erickson Claims In- 
tent Was to Vote for 
CromwelL 




\ 



BlI^EOTlDI^Y OF 



WHKltE TO (iO TONKiHT. 



LYCEL'M— Mack-I>'one Flayers, in Ihe 

Case of Hohtllious Sutan." 
Mhi'lROPOl^ITAN MiirI(s<iuo. 

GOOD BILlTt HI.IOU. 

"The Laiij^hiiii; Horse" and "Bar- 
gain Mad" Features This Week. 

Ono of the big ItatuieH of a rt-mark- 
ably cifcver bill, at the Bijou this woek Is 
-The I-aughiTig Horse." presented l>y 
Harris, Grove, Milton, Clayton Bisters 
and company. The piece has a circus 
sotting, and Introduces many good songs 
and dances. 

The nirtain is rai.'^ed by the Eugene 
trio, triple horizontal bar stars. Mart 
M. Fuller lollows with a funny mono- 
logue stunt, and I.«ador Sliver make a hit 
with his illustrated song, "For the Ked, 
White and isiue." Tho Illustrations 
show the Holt Kvans' tli-et. 

A big feature of the bill is "Hargaln 
Mad." a playlet bemg put On by Flor- 
ence Alodena and company. It Is full 



of high class novelty features. « anney. 
Hrower & Mcfoarl have a gtxjd dancins 
and singing stunt. The moving pictures 
art- very good, and go under the titles oi 
•The Shnmi)er" and •Condemned to 
\ Marry." 

THE BIKLESUIERS. 

Dave Marion's ''I)reainlanders" Have 
One of Best Attractions of Season. 

Given with the dash and go of a big 
liroadwny niusical comedy, the Dream- 
land Burlesi)uers have a show at the 
Metropolitan this weeK tnat ought to get 
the money, if any T)urUsciuo attraction 
of the season is entitled to It. 

Dave Marion's "Newport" is suggest- 
ive of Lew Field's "About Town," one 
of the Rogers Hrothers" shows and sltni- 
iar offerings and there Is a lot ot class 
to It. The skit Is in two acts and is 
more or less of a satire on society, as 
'well as a riot of color, good cheer and 
eoniellness. The book and si-ore were 
furnished by Mr. Marion and he takes 
letiding roles. , .. 

He appears first as ixird Hrltton Oi the 
English aristocracy and then a.s Sniffy, 
a cabman. In the last-named character 
he has the house In an uproar all of the 
time The scene in which the hansom 
cab and h<jr'ie are introduced is especial- 
ly amusing. , ..,, 

Jlarrv Fox, who used to sing I v? 
Said My L.a«t Farewell." finds a con- 
genial role this se.i.son in Dandy Dan. 
He and Marlon h:iv.-, some amusing s!t- | 
uatlims. Will Lawrence. Agnes Behier. | 



Kose Darling and a host of others com- 
plete the cast of principals and there Is 
a large. well-garbed and carefully 
trained chorus of peaches. 

Dave Marion and Harry Fox, as.slsted 
by the entire company, have the most 
pretentious act of the olio. It is really 
a new and better edition of "Walk, 
Walk. Walk." The boot-blacks make a 
distinct hit. 

Tile Three Hanlons offer some feats of 
strength that are not easily dupli- 
cated. Theirs are not all the convention- 
al strong man's sum's, 'i'he/ have some 
inw ones and they are great. 

The Liberty Four scores well with Its 
vocalizations and Darling and Reynolds 
have a good sister act which starts the 
olio under way. 



Bryan and Johnson See It. 



Within the last week both Governor 
Johnson and William Jennings Hryan 
have seen "The Man of the Hour," and 
pronounced It good. 

Urvan saw tho play from a box In Lin- 
coln, Neb., last Friday evening, and last 
night c;<Jvernor Johnson witnessed the 
production In St. I'aul. 

i'resldent Rc»os"velt has 
the play and given It bis 

Tliiall. the manager of , 

therefore claims the endorsement of two 
presidents, as he is a good enough Demo- 
crat to claim that either Johnson or 
Hryan will be tho next president. The 
play will return to Duluth for a brief 
engagement next week. 

At the Lyceum tomorrow morning the 
sale of seats will open. 



also witnessed 
approval. Sam 
the company 



Permanent organization was effected 
at a meeting of the Duluth branch of 
the Uplift society, held last night in 
Judge Windoin's office, In the city hall. 
The following officers for the year were 
elected: 

President— W. L. Windom. 

Secretary— T. W. McManus. 

Acting board— W. L.. Windom, presi- 
dent- Rl. Rev. James McGolrick, T. W. 
McManus, Mrs. R. S. Forgy. Mrs. J. 
W. Kreitter, Mrs. W. J. Bates. 

Officer— F. E. Resche. 

The acting lK>ard has jurisdiction 
over all cases brought to the attention 
of the socie<ty. The members will de- 
cide whether the subject is a flt one 
for the efforts of the society, and on its 
decision action will be based. The 
duties of the officer consist in looking 
after the subject after his return from 
the home. He watches his movements, 
reports irregularities, and Is supposed 
to do his best to keep the patient on 
the straight path until he gels his 
bearings after retuniing to his regular 
haunts. 

The success of the society In carrying 
on its work is now assured, as it is 
firmly organized, with people at the 
head who have the Interests of unfor- 
tunate humanity at heart and are anx- 
ious to assist those struggling- against 
the evils engulfing them. The sum of 
$2,000, which the society set out to 
raise to carry on the w'ork, has been 
almost raised, and will be complete 
in a very short time. It is expected 
the sum will carry the society through 
very nicely. 

Since its organization, a few weeks 
ago, Ihe (Society has taken up four vic- 
tims of drink, who are being treated 
at the sanWarium at Minneapolis now. 
The society provides the funds for 
treatment, taking the patient's note 
for the money, the notes to come due 
after the cure is effected and the pa- 
tient returns to work. In other parts 
of the state the percentage of back- 
fellders is very small, and the Duluth 
society looks for success in dealing 
with those coming within its scope in 

this city. 



D. E. H.. March 10. 1908. 




Movini; Day in Vcnloc. 

Moviny ilav in Venice is (jiiite a dif- 
ferent affair from ours. Their moving 
vehicles are the barcas, large boats, 
without the graceful gondola lines. It 
Is a pleasant sort of moving for the 
hou.s»'keeper when her cherished pos- 
sessions can be packed in a boat 
inKMrred al the door, and guaranteed to 
takt» them to the new home without a 
jolt. Nothing so refreahf^s the tired 
housewife as a glass of golden grain 
belt beer at mealtime and before retir- 
ing. It induces restful sleep and aids 
digestion. Order of Duluth branch 
Minneapolis Brewing Co. 

FIRES BULLETS 
INTO THE CASTLE 

Insane Man Says He At- 
tempted to Kill King 
of Norway. 

Christiana, Mareh^lO.— A Swede, appar- 
ently Insane, fusilladed the royal castlo 
here with a Remington rltte at noon to- 
day. He fired altogetluT a dozen bul- 
lets, several of whlca crashed through 
the windows and embedded themselves 
In the Interior walls of the eustle. 

The'*nmn was promptly seized by the 
police and disarmed. At the police 
station he declared that It was his In- 
tention to kill King Haakon. He still 
had forty or lifty cartridges In his 
pockets. 

King Haakon and Queen Maud were 
absent fruin tile castle. None of the 
pal.ice officials or servants was in- 
jured. 



Wireless Telegraphy For Common Use 

Wireless telegraphy has come to stay 
for there is no longer any doubt as to its 
success. A short lime ago 15,000 words 
were transmitted between this country 
and Ireland without an error or need of 
repeating. The rate* for this service are 
going to be so cheap as to make It a 
commercial utility. There is no longer 
any doubt as to the merit of Hostetter s 
Stomach Bitters, 'or during the past 
64 years it has boen proving Its ability 
to cure aliments of the stomach, liver, 
kidneys and bowels with wonderful suc- 
cess Thousands of people have tes- 
tified that the Bitters was the only medi- 
cine that could cure them, although they 
had 4ried many othes. If you are still 
experimenting, stop It at once and com- 
mence taking the Bitters. It cures 
flatulency heartburn, headache. Indiges- 
tion, dyspepsia. costiveness, grippe, 
spring fever and malaria. 



NO WONDER^HE DIED. 

Miihijran Man \\ ho Had Both Ap- 
pendicitis and Smallpox. 

Ishpemlng. Mieh.. .March 10.— (Special 
to he H> raid.)— A peculiar case is re- 
ported from the Oot^eblc Iron range. 
Suffering from appendicitis, and taken 
to a hospital, it was discovered that 
Henry Schmelr. aged 84 years, of 
Wakefield, was In to serious a condi- 
tion to undergo a surgical operation. 
Permitted to remain In the institution. 
It developed three dsys afterward that 
th.' man had smallpox also. He was 
speedilv rcmove»l to the pesthouse, 
where he died the following day. The 
hospital has been fumigated and all 
the Inmates have been vaccinated. 




(5) 



UCORICE TABLETS 

REUEVT. ALL COUGHS & COLDSi 
gc 4 10' mCKAGES. 



Listeners' Opera Class 

WITH MRS. STOCKEH, 

10I4 Kn*t Second Street, 

Wediiendnyw, lit 2t30. 

SECOND SERIES — March llth to April 

8th, (Inclusive.) 

•2.80. 

ASiTNBrfRIAL" 
FOR J. R. VfALSn 



Chicago, March M.— Application for a 
new trial for John R. Walsh, former 
president of tho Chicago National bank, 
convicted of illegal use of the funds, 
was made Ujday in the United States 
district court before Judge Anderson. 

One hundred and fourteen reason.s for 
the granting of a new ^/'al were pre- 
sented by the attorneys for Mr. Walsh. 

Numerous affidavits were submitted 
in support of tlie reasons given in favor 
of a new trial. Four were made by 
Juror rainier, all of them l^lng to the 
effect that he signed the vtrd'ct because 
of his poor physical condition and the 
worry tV which he had been subjected 
by the other jurors. ^tfxAc^..^ 

Juror Charles Davey made an afflda\ t 
In wliicli lie declared thai he had doulK55 
as to the guilt of Walsh, and ^'^^^^^ .\^^ 
obtain further instructions from the 
court. He says the Instructions were de- 
nied him. In another.,. affidavit Juror 
Davey said he .saw bailiffs whisper to 
members of the jury. 

An affidavit made by D. A^ Todd set 
forth th.-,.i he heard H E. Kellogg be- 
fore being chosen as a juror say that h9 
would like to become a member of the 
jury, and that if cliosen. he would hold 
out to the last until Walsh got his 
deserts. ^ 

Notice IO Our Ciistoiiiers, 
We Jrt-e pleased to announce that 
Foley's Honey and Tar for coughs, 
colds and lung troubles Is not affected 
by tlie National Pure Food and Drug 
law as it contains no opiates or other 
harmful drugs, and we recommend It 
as a saf^ remedv for children and 
adults. Sold by all druggists. 



The Bloedel-Cromwell aldermanic 
contest case was tried today beforo 
Judge Cant of the district court. Up 
to this afternoon George Bloedel, who 
is contesting James L. Cromwell's seat 
in the city council, had introduced his 
evidence in the way of the report of 
the ballot inspectors appointed by the 
court. On the strength of this report, 
Mr. moedel claims the election as 
alderman In the Second ward by a 
margin of three votes. 

Mr. Cromwell, who is tlie contestee 
In the action, claims that one of the 
votes thrown out by the election 
Judges should have been counted for 
him, and that two of the votes count- 
ed for Mr. Bloedel were illegal. Ac- 
cording to Mr. Cromwell's contention, 
the vole was a tie and he should con- 
tinue to occupy the aldermanic chair 
by reason of winning out when the 
lots were drawn for the place between 
Mr. Bloedel and himself. 

It is believed that Judge Cant will 
render an early decision in the mat- 
ter, possibly, by this evening. If the 
trial is completed, today. 

The feature of the morning's session 
was the introduction by Mr. Cromwell 
of the oral testimony in support of his 
contentions. 

Mr. Bloedel, through his attorneys, 
Joseph Reynolds and M. H. McMahon, 
objected to any oral testimony be- 
ing introduced in an election contest, 
and Judge Cant finally decided to hear 
It, with the reservation that it would 
not be taken into consideration of the 
court should it afterward determine 
that it should not be received. C. E. 
Adams represented Mr. Cromwell. 

John Erickson, a cement worker, re- 
siding at 512 East Sixth street, tes- 
tified under oath that ne is a natural- 
ized citizen, that he has resided in the 
city seven years, the Fourth precinct 
of the Second ward six months, and 
that he voted at the municipal elec- 
tion held Feb. 4 last. 

W'hen shown a ballot containing his 
name written in two places, Mr. 
Erickson identified it as the ballot 
which he cast at the election. He de- 
clared that he did not write his name 
for the purpose of Identification of the 
ballot, but because he thought it was 
customary to indicate preference of 
candidates by writing his name in the 
square meant for the X mark, accord- 
ing to the directions on the ballot. 

Mr Erickson claims that he had 
never voted before, that he did not 
read the directions very carefully, and 
supposed he was following the usual 
custom of casting a ballot. 

Under cross-examination by -Mr. 
Reynolds, Erickson dfr.iied that he put 
an X mark after the name of Ernil 
Tessman. He was positive that all he 
did was to write his name after that 
of Mr. Tessman and again after that 
of Mr. Cvomwell. His vote was one 
of those thrown out by the Judges. 
Mr Reynolds urged that the testimony 
be barred on the ground that Mr 
Erickson's placing his name on the 
ballot was equivalent to identifying 
the ballot, which, under the statute 
makes a ballot Illegal. 

Just before the noon adjournment ot 
the court. City Clerk Cheadle wa* 
called to testify as to the registration 
Hst and the poll list of the Third pre- 
cinct of the Second ward in which ap- 
pears the name of C. Claus, who cas 
a ballot for Mr. Bloedel, and whlcl 
Mr. Cromwell maintains was an illegal 



Last w^eek of tke Demonstration 

For your form's sake, don't miss this chance of iin- 
proving your figure. It won't cost you a cent, only the 
jrraciousness of your presence on our third floor, where 
Mrs L. G. Stebbins of the famous "Redfern designing 
and fitting department is giving free demonstrations in the 
new spring models. , 

The American woman's figure is essentially composed 
of curves — more or less accentuated curves. As the latest 
decree of fashion is the hipless form, the reduction of 
these natural curves becomes a matter of first importance, 
in "Redfern Whalebone Corsets" are new and beautiful 
models, with extremely long skirt, completely enclosing 
the abdomen, hips and back, flattening and sloping the 
form, with any height of bust to suit the varying types ot 
forms. Boned with selected Arctic whalebone, i"'^""ded 
and celluloid, dipped to prevent breaking through the finest 
fabrics. The attached hose supporters have the famous 
Security rubber button tips. ♦3-50 to »i5 per P"' 



*'R 



oseberry Coats 

Are the very best for automobiling, driving, traveling and 
general street wear. They are lustrous, handsome, have 
no rubber or odor, and yet are guaranteed rainproof 
They are good for good weather and best for bad weather. 
To be found only here, and at these prices $25, $37-50. ♦29-5» 



diildren's ^Vask Dresses 

For tots 2 to 5 years, have arrived. New spring fab- 
rics and patterns, among them pretty chambrays, linens. 
Repps, piques and Galateas. And all so reasonably priced 
that you will take home a half dozen as a matter ot 
course. ^^-^^ ^ ^^ 

Tke New Silks 

New fancy taffetas and Louisine Rayes, checks and 
J^icquard cflfects are here in a beautiful assortment of pat- 
terns and colors. Also a new showerproof Foulard in 
handsome shades and styles. 

In Rajahs and rough Pongees we are told that our as- 
sortment leads in this city, and, judging from the hcaw 
sales, we know we are told correctly. At $1.00 we shov 
an all-silk, rough-weave Rajah effect, in all colors, .'<> 
inches wide, and worth a quarter more. The real Raj an 
sells for $1.35, altho in the cities they get $1.50 for .:. 
Don't take our word for this, but write to any large city 
store and ask them. 



1 



Dress Good{ 



France, Germany, England and America contribute to 
this dress goods show, and surprisingly beautiful are the 
fabrics they conjure up. There are new spring shades 
galore, the new Athenian and Copenhagen blues and the 
new Blondines, Champagnes and tans, the new Raspberry 
and Pompeiian reds— in fact, everything that is really new. 

The .spring suitings are of serges, panamas, worsteds 
and chiffons, not omitting the perennially fashionable 
voiles. Some stylish desirable fabrics are as low as low 
as $1.00 and less per yard, while others mount to 



$3.50 



one. 



The trial occurred In court room No. 
3 before a small audience, comprised 
mostly .of the hill district, 



definite conclusion was reached, and 
similar meetings will be held in the 
future to give more study to the prob- 
lem. Under -the present system it is 
claimed thait it requires several days 
to get a car into the train after it is 
loaded with coal, and several more 
days to get it to the Industry or yards 
to which it is consigned, after it leaves 
Superior. 

Condition is Critical. 

John Street, who was struck by a 
falling cake of ice in the rear of a 
commission house, Sunday, is still alive 
at St. Mary's hospital, but his condi- 
tion Is critical. He has been delirious 
at times, relapsing Into a comatose 
condition. 




SytPE^DOIB iiW 



I sy 





GLYCERINE TABLETS 

RELIEVE HOARSENESS 
& ALL •niRQAT AFFECHONS. 
10«&25<^ POClxETTlNS. 



CLAIMS ELOPEMENT. 

Louis Burnett Searclies for His 
W ife and Alleged Paramour. 

Louie Burnett of Superior has ap- 
pealed to the police to help him locate 
his wife, whom he believes to have 
eloped With a bartender named Joseph 
Des Laurier. Burnett has offered a 
reward of $50 for information leading 
to the apprehension of the pair. It Is 
supposed that they have gone to one 
of the towns in Northwestern Canada. 

Mrs Burnett is 40 years old. She Is 
described as a comely woman, and Des 
Laurier is described as a "handsome 
man " In the police circular. 

Mr Burnett claims that his wife told 
a friend she had been called out of the 
citv by the sickness of a relative, but 
some time has elapsed, and the hus- 
band is now convinced that the sick 
relative plea was made to deceive him. 

Freight Men Hold Meeting. 

At a meeting of the local Freight 
AKcnts' association, yesterday, ways 
and means for expediting carload ship- 
iments, especially coal, through the ter- 
minals of Superior to the industry for 
which the commodity is destined, were 
discussed. The meeting was well atten- 
ded bv local freight and coalmen. No 



Took Poison by Mistake. 

John Soderlund, aged 60 years, was 
given a dose of carbolic acid by mis- 
take at a camp, near Hine's, and is in 
a serious condition at St. Mary's hos- 
pital. As soon as the mistake was dis- 
covered, Soderlund was given an 
emetic, and he was taken to the hos- 
pital for medical aid. It is believed 
that he will recover. Soderlund resides 
at 421 Hammond avenue. 



»^ « • • • • 9^ 

^§VRoller Bearinr 




Ibodi Upright mkI Horizontal tectioiM. 



N« Pull— No SlioT*-Mo J«rk. 
- JUSTGUDE- 



1 



Got Drunk and Lost His Money. 

On the complaint of Eklward Gornxan. 
a woodsman, who claimed that he had 
been robbed of $1.5 while on a drunk, 
Robert McGihon. John Mayock, Walter 
Wlese and Charles Craig were arrested 
yesterday. Goi-man was unable to 
Identify them as the men with whom 
he had made the rounds of several 
saloons, and the four men were re- 
leased after they had satisfied the court 
they are regularly employed and not 
liable for vagrancy. 

Secretary Resigns. 

Secretary A. M. Lent of the Superior 
board of trade, this morning, an- 
nounced his resignation from the po- 
sition of secretary. He will file his 
resignation with the board at their 
next regular meeting, next Monday. 

CHILD'S CLOSE CALL. 
Negaunee, Mich., March 10.— (Special 




PLATING'^ 

Wc will refinlsh and make the I 

same as new. ■ 

BrniiH BedH, Fixtures, H 

Fire Place Framem. Candelabra, II 

Cbaflne DiMben, ■ 

or any one of the many articles B 
of material about a house, and H 
Its cost Is a mere trifle. ■ 

Richardson Electric Co., 

210 West First Street. 



to The Herald.)— Drinking the content* 
of a pint flash of whisky that he found 
about the house, the lO-year-old son of 
Fred Anderson ot Rapid River. Delta 
countv. had an exceedingly close call 
from death. Not until a physician had 
worked over him for several hours was 
he pronounced out of danger. 



Hair falling? Consult Knauf Sisters. 

NATIONAL BANKSNEVER 

LOST CENT FOR PATRONS. 

Marquette. Mich., March 10.-(Spcclal 
to The Hcr.-xld.^-In all the years they 
have bfcn In bu«lneP.«. the national 
banks of Upper Michigan have never 
lost a cent of their .lenoFitors money 
Tlie flrst Instltution-tb):' First National 
bank of MarQurttc^Of -Which Hon Peter 
White is tho founder and president- 
was organized In -M^, and since then 
not one of the mdny national brinks 
established has gone to the wall. 



Easy Terms at Ihe Cash Price! 



SOLD B\' DBUGOISTS BTRYWHERE 
OR 5EKT Upon REttlPT CF PRICE BV 
'^b^4f^ 863 VKMJHKL KtWYUK 




KILLS HIS WIFE. THREE 

CHiLDREyXND HIMSELF. 

Seattle Wash.. March lO.-W. W- Mc- 
Kay of Tenino, Tlmirston county, killed 
his" wife and thre* cHlldren last night 
and then shot hlw'pw 

DT'LUTHIANS Xf '^'ASHINGTON. 

Washington. Mitclv.lO.-lSpeclal to 
The Herald.)-R. ^ HMnler. Mrs. John 
C. Hunter and Miss Hunter of Duluth 
are registered at the New WlllJurd. 




Standard Edison 

Talking 3Iach!ne With 10 
Records. 

$28-50 



Victor No. 2 

Talking Machine Witli 10 
Records. 

$3fi.oo 



limited Special Otter 

Fdison Standard. $28.50. and Victor No. 3. $36, including your cholo* 
of 10 records, on small weekly payments. 

Come In and let its show you. 

We carry the largest stock of records in Duluth. 

We do repair work on all kinds of talking machines at reason- 

!S. 

DULUTH MUSIC CO. 



EDMUND G.. CHAPMAN, Mgr. 



232-234 West First Street 






i 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD :_ TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



YOU GET UP 

WITH A LAME BACK? 




Oil THE IHON MN6 




llava Yoxi ICKeum&tl«m« Kidf\«y« Lrlvar* 
or Bliiaa«f- Trouble? 



To Prove what Swamp-Root, the Great Kidney, Liver and 
Bladder Remedy, will do for YOU, all our Readers May 
Have a Sample Bottle Sent Free by Mail. 

Pain or dull ach* In the back la I ness. Indigestion. Bleeplewneee. nenr 

^ . »..»x.- a/^.v^at-imAa thj» Vi*nrt ant 



•vldence of kidney trouble. It ia 
nature's timely warning to show you 
that the traok of health U not clear. 
Danflrer Signals. 
If these danger signals are unheed- 
ed more serious results follow; 
Brlghfs disease, which Is the worst 
form of kidney trouble, may steal 
upon you- 

The mild and Immediate effect of 
flwamp-Root, the great kidney, liver 
and bladder remedy Is soon realized. 
It stands the highest for its remark- 
able cures In the most distressing 
cases. If you need a medicine, you 
should have the best. 

Lame I)a<*k. 
Lame back Is only one of many 
■ymptoms of kidney trouble. Other 
symptoms showing that you need 
Swamp-Root are. being obliged to 
pass water often during the day and 
to get up many times during the 
night. 

Catarrh of the Bladder. 

Inability to hold urine, smarting In 
passing, uric acid, headache, dizal- 



ousnes.<^, sometimes the heart acta 
badly rheumatism, bloating, lack of 
ambition, may be loss of desh, sallow 
complexion. 

Pre valency of Kidney Disease. 

Most people do not realize the 
alarming increase and remarkable 
prevalency of kidney disease. While 
kidney disorders are the most com- 
mon diseases that prevail, they are 
almost the last recognized by patient 
and physicians. «^*« content tKtynselvM 
with doctorina tiu- rffecU, while the iiriginaX 
di«ea»€ undermines the system. 

A Trial Will Convince Anyone. 

In taking Swamp-Root you afford 
natural help to Nature, for Swamp- 
RoDt Is the most perfect healer and 
gentle aid to the kidneys that has yet 
been discovered- 

If you are already convinced that 
Swamp-Root la what you need, you 
can purchase the regular ttfty-cent 
and one-dollar size bottles at all the 
drug stores. Don't make any mis- 
take, but remember the name. Dr. 
Kilmer's Swamp-Root, and the ad- 
dress. Blnghamton. N. T., which you 
win And on every bottle. 

SAMPLE BOTTLE FREE. — ^To prove the wonderful merlta of Swamp- 
Root you may have a sample bottle and a book or valuable Information, 
both aent absolutely free by mall. The book contains many of the thou- 
panda of letters received from men and women who found Swamp-Root to 
be Just the remedy they needed. The value of Swamp-Root Is so /veu 
known that our readers are advised to send for a sample bottle. Address 
Dr Kilmer & Co.. Blnghamton. N. Y., and be sure to .say you read this 
generous offer In the Duluth Dally Herald The genuineness of thla 

offer Is guaranteed. 



resolution was adopted urging the 
sui>erinten(lent of public works to 
hu-sttn work on the DurhamvlUo 
aqueduct. 

liUnic Shoulder. 

Wh(-ther resulting from a .<«praln or 
from rheumatic pains, there l.s nothing 
.so K'xxl for a lame shoulder as Cham- 
hiM-hiiji's Pain Balm. Apply it freely 
and rub the parts vigorously at each 
applicnrioii and a quirk cure is cer- 
tain. For sal.' by all druRBists. 

WEREPARTEDBY 
A GAME OF GOLF 



TAKES IODINE TO 
END HER LIFE 

Despondent Over Loss of 
Lover, Woman At- 
tempts Suicine. 

Mamie Cooper, employed as a house- 
keeper in a St. Croix avenue resort, is 
In a 3erloii.s condition at St. Mary's hos- 
pital, as the result of an attempted 
suicide late yeslerduv afternoon. De- 
spondency over the loss of a former 
admirer, who ha.s nvently married, was 
thf niotivt' Lliat prompted the woman to 
drink iodine in an attempt to end her 
life 

Willie It is b.'lloved that «he will re- 
cover, it WA» stated at the ho.>>i>iial thai 
her condition i.^ still serious. 

Early Morning Blaze. 

Fire, at 6:45 tills morning, threat- 
ened the Richard.son Electric com- 
pany's store at 210 West First street. 
It evidently originated from a defec- 
tive wire in the ceiling, near the rear 
of the store, and burned through the 
ceiling, scorching the lloor above. The 
blaze was quickly extinuuisliod by the 
Are department with slight damage. 

Ml:( H (iUAIN IS AWAITINT, 
SHIPMENT ATVLAKE PORTS. 

Boiffalo. March 10. — There are 15.- 

000.000 bushels of grain now in, „. .... „ _. 

store in upper lake ports awaiting i hoitly contested the two ever playinl. It 



Rockefeller and Carnegie 

Could Not Agree on 

Final Score. 

New York. March 10— John D. Rocke- 
feller and Andrew Carnegie, once boon 
companions of the golf links, have not 
measured drives and puts for several 
months. Mr. Rockefeller has not vis- 
ited 1093 Fifth avenue during the same 
period. Neither has Mr. Carnegie 
stepped into the porch-surrounded 
house at Pocantico hills. Friends of the 
oil king and the steel king say that, to 
the best of their knowledge the two 
richest men In America have had no 
social or business communications 
since last fall. 

According to the story, which is 
firmly, though sorrowfully believed by 
the associates of the multi-million- 
aires, the game was one of the most 



BLIND PIGGER 
GIVEN BEATING 

lie Resists Officers VVith 

Shot Gun and is 

Worsted 

Aurora, Minn.. March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— John Erovlch, an Aus- 
trian, lies in the jail here covered with 
blood and battered to pieces in general. 
Erovlch Is said to have been running a 
blind pig at the Bangor mine, and yes- 
terday morning was arrested by Mar- 
shals Knutl and Lang, after a hard 
struggle. Erovlehs home Is some three 
miles west of Aurora and situated on 
the top of a hill. He saw the officers 
driving up and, surmising they were 
after him, he pulled a shotgun on them. 
Knuti knocked him down, and after a 
struggle in which Erovich got the worst 
of it ne was handcuffed and brought to 
Jail. ■ Erovlch was fined >90 last fall for 
blind pigging. 

STRIPPING WILL 
RESUME MAR. 16 

Drake & Stratton to Take 

Up Work at 

FayaL 

Eveleth, Minn., March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— At the Kayal mine, Drake 
& Stratton will resume their stripping 
contract March 16. The work that the 
company had done near the old No. 3 
Fayal shaft waa completed by the Fay- 
al company. The work that the Drake 
& Stratton organisation Is going to do 
is situated in the opposite part of the 
pit. At the commenceuiont, tlie Intenlion 
la to use no more tlian one shovel, the 
number of shovels being gradually in- 
creased as the work demands. 

The work of preparing for the strip- 
ping has been going one for some time. 
The pumps of the old No. 3 shaft of 
the Fayiil have been gradually taken out 
during the past two weeks. Only a f»w 
are iefi. These will remain for some 
time as they may he nee.led during the 
spring rains and for pumping water from 
the stripping operations. 

At tile remaining mines there is no t1#- 
ible efforts on the part of the mining 
captains to increase thealr underground 
crews, although many men are expect- 
ing such news. 

VIRGINIA CHARACTER DIES. 

"Con" Carey, Weil-Known Lumber- 
jack, Tells Last Story. 

Virginia, Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— An attack of pneu- 
monia that proved too tough for him 
claimed "Con" Carey, one of the old- 
est lumberjacks In this section, a sort 
of a character around Virginia, whoso 
stories, told in a quaint yet interest ing 
'manner, had given him more or less 
local notoriety. He was about 55. and 
died Monday at the I^enont hospital. 
He had no relatives in this section, so 
far as known. He was possessed of a 
fair education, and it was the belief 
of his friends that If he had applied 
himself he might have seen better 
things He will be burled at the ex- 
pense of friends, having left nothing. 

EVELETH SPORTING NOTES. 

New Basketball Team Orpanized— 
Baseball Interest Pitking Up. 

Eveleth, Minn., March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Though w^mewhat 
late In the season, a new basketball 
team, calling themselves the Eveleth 
Independont.s, has been organized, to 
take the place of the Young Men's club 
team which has ben disbanded, and 
they are trying to get games with out- 
of-town teams, especially Pi-octor Y. 
M C A. and the Nelsou-Dewey htgh 
school of Sui>erior. They are irynig 
to get the new roller skating rmk as a 
place in which to play their at home 
games and will probably he success- 
ful in th.>ir effort.s. as the rink man- 
ager is favoring them. 

Baseball prospects are tiuklng an up- 
ward bound In this city of late, and 
besides the professional team that will 
be secured, a junior team Is being or- 
ganized amojLg the ytmng fellows, who 
played last year on the team. The lat- 
ter will secure an entire new outfit 
this season. Including new suits. They 
Intend to make a success this season, 
and will play their games at the local 
enclosed ba.seball park. 

A number of local ski enthusiasts 
journeyed over to Hibbing Sunday to 
witness the ski tournament held there, 
and they say the jumping was excel- 
lent, considering "the conditions. 



I Kane, Is In charge of the hospital of the 
Oliver Iron Mining company at Coleralne. 
There are two other villages, Taconite 

I and Holman. In tCts township, and the 
fight Is bolns ^rjti>-d to them also. The 



voting populatloa'ipf the town Is about 
1.600. ^ • 




rs JURY 
LEARNS NOTHING 

About Unknown's Identi- 
ty and Finds Death 
Suicide. 

Tower, Minn., March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The identity of the young 
man who was killed at Tower Junction 
Saturday morning remains a mystery. 
The coroner's Inquest held Saturday 
found that the case was one of suicide. 
The local switch crew were at work m 
the yards, the engine pushing two box 
cars, when they saw the man ahead on 
the track. Kepeated warnings were 
given and the crew auppjs»td the man 
wouid heed the signals and move off the 
track, but he failed to do so and It was 
not until after he had been struck that 
the train was brought to a stanasim. 
It was then found that ho had been 
killed instantly, and Ins remains w-ere 
at once brought to town. His neck haa 
been broken, the skull crushed and both 
feet cut off. ^ V, ..,„ 

Deceased was a stranger here, having 
arrived only the day before. He was 
about 30 years of age. No papers were 
found on his person, only a 1-ceut piece 
and a Jackknite. This leads to the sup- 
position that he was stranded financial- 
ly and probably had other reasons for 
his rash act. . .v, -., 

Rumor has It that he has two brothers 
at Smith-Alger camps, but the tact is 
not yet proven. So far. no meana of 
identification have been found. The re- 
mains are being held at the m orgue. 

WED I^TVIRGINIA. 

ChisholmConple Steal Away to Near- 
by Town and Marry. 

Chlsholm. Minn., ^arch 10.-(Special to 
The Herald. )-CoJlin A. Monroe has been 
married to Mis.s Ruth Neally. The bride 
Is a daughter of Charles A. Neally. pro- 
prietor ot thfe ciisliolm Hotel. The 
groom is proprietor of the Chlsholm 
moat market. Mr. Monroe Is also a Chls- 
holm ball team member. The marriage 
took place at Virginia. Thursday and 
has only just become known. 

DRILL MAN HURT. 

Hlbblng. Minn.. March 10— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Arvid Johnson, who* oper- 
ates the diamond drill at the Adams 
ndne received senoud Injuries whl'e at 
work and is confined to the Adams hos- 
pital His hand Incoming entangled In 
the rope attached to the drdl he was 
hurled aloft against the druin. break- 
ing his shoulder hlade and coUaf bone. 
He is about 5*) and unmarried. 



shipment to tide water via the Krle 
canal, and the canal men cannot 
close contracts for the tran.sporta- 
tlon of the great volume of grain 
unices they are assured that the Erie 
canal will be opened and ready for 
business on May 1. That was the 
substance of a report made to the 
canal commission ot the chamber of 
commerce at a meeting today. A 



Omeda Oil 




took place on the nine-hole course at 
I'ocantico, over which Mr. Rockefeller 
plays almost daily. 

When they faced toward the home 
green, Mr. Carnegie's strength chanced 
to overcome Mr. Kockefeller's skill at 
the last moment, and he made the 
linal hole in three strokes, against Mr. 
Rockefeller's four. 

"My Ho to your 86." Mr. Carnegie 
.said, according to the story. "I win by 
one stroke. But you gave me a close 
race." 

"Quite the contrary." is the accred- 
ited reply of Mr. Rockefeller. "My »6 
to your 87." 

They dismissed the caddies and re- 
turned to Mr. Rockefeller's house, still 
di!l>ating the score. Someone surely 
had won by a single strike. Mr. Rock- 
efvller thought he was the one. Mr. 
t^arnegie was equally as sure of his 
own victory. 

Hut at all events the lord of Sklbo 
didn't stay to dinner at the home of 
the Standard Oil magnate. And since 
that day he has not set eyes on Pocan- 
tico. 



GONE T(r[IRGINlA. 

Negaunee, Mich.. March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— James and Bert Chap- 
man and James Jenkins, young men who 
were raised in Negaunee. have gone to 
Virginia, Minn., whf're they will lake po- 
sitions with lUe \JkXiiX iron Mining com- 
pany at a property where a new shaft 
is being sunk. All are first class miners. 

DLLITH FIRM PI R( HASES 

HOTEL AT DEER RIVER. 

Peer River. Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
to 'Ihe Herald.)— The Uuluth Brewing & 
Malting company has purchased the 
Morrlsaey hotel here from the Mornssey 
estat." for $2:J,5»)0. The Duluth concern also 
purchased a lot on the main street from 
tlie estate tor $1,000. 

RANGE MAN ATTENDS 

LEAD COMPANY MEET. 

Chlsholm. Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
to Th.- H.»rrild.>-W. O. Shane has gone 
to Platievllle. Wis., to ;ittend a meet- 
ing of the Exca-llbur Lead company, in 
wliioh he and others are Interested. 
There is some Mltle trouble or other, 
an<l Mr. Shane goes down as a represen- 
tative of the range stockholders to as- 
sl.sf In straightening It out. and Inci- 
dentally he t;Utes with him proxies for 
lO.OOO of the 22.OI0 shares. 

EASY FOR_G.\NDSEY. 

Hibbing Candidate for Recorder is 
Without Opposition. 

Hibbing. Minn.. Maroh 10— (Special to 
The Herald. )-f The election Is proceed- 
ing here to.iay without much Intere.st 
being shown." and' It looks as though 
the ticket he.ndwi by Dr. Weirlck for 

C resident will IJt elected from top to 
ottom. the efforts to get up an opposi- 
tion ticket that could draw votes prov- 
ing unavailing. 

Oscar WIdHtrand. who has been in the 
field for recorder In opposition to Re- 
corder Gandaey. withdrew yesterday, 
leaving Gand.sey a clear field. 

In case l>r. Weiriek is re-elected he 
will be the first president of the village 
to be re-elected In fourteen years. 



NEURALGU-— Omega Oil has the 
peculiar virtue of being a liniment 
that acts directly upon the nerves. 
That ia why it in so good for Neuralgia. 
Rub the Oil on the face, and often the 
pain vnll be gone in a moment. 



JIDGE PRIM E RESUMES. 

Eveleth. Minn., March 10.— (Special to 
The Hei-alJ.)— After a lull of five days 
Judge Prine. s court has begun to grind 
again. The following cases wore di.s- 
posed off today: Charles Mau.ska. fined 
$1) and Costs for being drunk and dis- 
orderly; Ananias Pold. flneil f2:> for in- 
decent exposure, and Jame.s MeTaggart. 
Miitencetl to thirty days for v.igrancy. 

IM John.xon's case for drunkenness 
and disorderly conduct was postponed 
until Tuesday. 



AITKIN PEOPLE MAY 

Resist Proposed Operations North 
of Deer River. 

Orand Rapids, Minn.. Maroh 10.-(Spe- 
clal to The Herald.)— Legal proceedings 
instituted by certain people in Aitkin to 
prevent the digging of slate ditch No. »:, 
north of Peer Rlvor. the contract ff<r 
whieh was awarded last Friday In St. 
Paul are expected, according to current 
reports. Some legal flaw Is alleged to 
have been diseovered in the proceedings. 
and on this the AUkin parties will base 
th« ir action. , 

The proposed ditch commences a few 
miles north of Deer River and runs north- 
ward to connect with the Big Fork river 
The state drainage commission let the 
contract for $iT.5')0. 

TWOTOWNS^FIGHTING. 

Bovey and Coleraine Mixin*? in Iron 
Ran^e Township Eleetion. 

Coleraine. Miim.. March 10.-(Special to 
The Herald.)— The election today In Iron i 
Range town.ship Is certainly not a tame 
one, both this place and Bovey being 
deeply interested In the outcome. Erlok 
Johnson, the present Incumbent, is a can- 
didate for suixrvi.^or. and Is opposed by 
Dr. Kane of this place, so that It Is a 
regular rival town affair. , w - 

The present supervisor, Erick Johnson. 
i.>< a general merchant of Bovey. and until 
recently postmaster. His opponent. Dr. 



OUT FOR SHERIFF. 



Grand Rapids. Minn., March 10.— (Spe- 
cial to The H.rald.*— William Hurlburl of 
I>epr River walked into Auditor Spangs 



office a few da>-s ago and. planking down 
$10 officially f\led as a candidate for the 
office of sheriff of Itasca county. Minn.. 
on the Republican ticket. Mr. Hurlburt 
has been a resident of this county for a 



COMING EVENT 

Big Sale of 
Granlteware 

Thursday and Ftiday the days 
WATCH FOR IT. 




Where Style, Quality and Values Harmonine 
Superior Sl.—L.aKf A.'Ot.— Michigan JV. 



COMJ-SG EVENT 

Big Sale of 
Granlteware 

Ttiursday and Friday tlie days 

WATCH FOR IT. 



High-Grade Furs 
at Half Price 

The Greatest Fur Values Ever Offered 
in Duluth at Any Sale I 

This sale comprises all of our remaining stock of Furs — and 
bears our positive guarantee for reliability and correctness of style. 

Here's an opportunity seldom offered on merchandise of such 
character. Furs that are stylish and durable; that lend-tone and 
distinction. Furs that arc worth their regular price to anyone, 
on sale for two days only — Wed. and Thurs. — at Half Price ! 

Price any piece (they re all marked in plain figures), give us 
one half, retain the'other and take the fur. 

Take advantage of this sale — provide yourself with a stunning 
fur piece of dependable quality and style for next season. They'll 
be good for ten years to come. 

Reg. Price. 5aU Price. ^ j , 

Bjlk Squirrel Neck Pieces $5.00 $2.50 ^^ 

^^ Squirrel Muff $ 8.50 $ 4.25 

^ . ^^ Mink Neck Pieces $17.50 $ 8.75 

Mink Neck Pieces -$39.50 $19.75 

¥JSF^ ^Ii"k Neck Pieces $57.50 $28.75 

'^h f^zHr /'\\ - Mink Neck Pieces $79.50 $39.75 

' \3 Mink Neck Pieces $100.00 $50.00 

-^ Natural Mink Muffs $25.00 $12.50 

Natural Mink Muffs $30.00 $15.00 

Natural Mink Muffs $47.50 $23.75 

Natural Mink Muffs $95.00 $47.50 

Natural Mink Muffs $100.00 $50.00 

^n^mv Natural Mink Muffs $150.00 $75.00 

^'*^ Chinchilla Neck Pieces. .. .$39.50 $19.75 

Chinchilla Muffs $59.50 $29.75 ^.^ 

Ermine Neck Pieces $39.50 $19.75 ^^^ 

.^^««»-i« Ermine Muffs $59.50 $29.75 £^^^' 

Ice Fox Set, worth $30.00 $15.00 vf^^ 

IVTouflon Set, worth $25.00 $12.50 ^^^^ 

n^jS Fox Sets, worth $20.00 $10.00 

ym^frn 'm%\ Fox Scarfs, worth $13.50 $6.75 xyTV^Mf;! 

4«M .%|^ Pox Scarfs, worth $22.50 $11.25 '^^^^mAt 

t^t Fox Scarfs, worth $29.50 $14.75 ^ v™r^ 

Fine Beaver Pillow Muff. . . .$30.00 $15.00 

Fine Jap Mink Scarfs $ 9.75 $ 4.88 

Fine Jap Mink Scarfs $19.50 $9.75 

Fine Jap Mink Scarfs $35.00 $17.50 

Fine Jap Mink Muffs $47.50 $23.75 /^ ' 

V Blended Squirrel Muff's. .. .$29.50 $14.75 







numl)or of years. Is at pre.'<cnt a justice 
of thf! peaco of Derr River, a logger ami 
an all-round 'hustler. He propoae.-j to b.- 
In the fjame early and keep a-golng all 
the time. 

EASTERXERSViSITMlNES. 

Hibbing. Minn., March 10.-(Speclal to 
The Herald.)— A party of Eastern meti. 
presumai>lv inloresud either in the TTnlt- 
ed States Steel corporation or some of its 
allied indu.'^tries, are on the range looking 
over mining properties. They were at 
K' Uy l^ake yesterday looking over the 
mines and tJi«'v inspected the Crosby 
mine of the Wisconsin Steel company at 
Nashwauk. 

coir\ssEfm>E(TtaN. 

Cohasset. Minn., March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The election for the vil- 
lage of Cohasset and the township of 
Bass Brook being held today Is a very 
quiet affair, and the Indication point 
to the re-election of the pres-nt set of 

officer*. , „ n , 

The village ticket is as follows: Presi- 
dent Morris O'Brien; trustees, John Xel- 
eon,"Owen Skelley and W. W. Fletcher : 
recorder, M. H. Jones; treasurer. H. H. 
Carrier; justice of the peace, Joseph St. 
Peter; assessor, James Ro-ss; constable. 
Mike 'Stapleton. 

Th(- township ticket: Chairman. George 
Becker; for two supervisor j hold over on 
two and three-year terms: treasurer. H. 
H Carrier; justice of the peace, Pat 
Kenney and W. A. Walker. 



Merry Widow Tid Bit 

A New One! 

We want the women of Duluth to come and learn how to 
make this appetizing luncheon dainty. 

Armour's Extract of Beef demonstrator is here for two 
weeks, and at your service. Tomorrow — the Merry Widow 
Tid Bit. Come and sample it. 



I 



.^ — ■* 

[ 

__ . , — 




iP** 



n* 



VIRGINIA REVIVALS. 



church this week by Rev. O. t.. Clark, 

the local pastor. A feature of the 

Virginia. March 10.— (Special to The I meetings is the special music in charg» 

Herald.)— A series of revival meetings of Prof. Arnold, a negro singer of coa- 

\:i being conducted at the Methodist ' siderable abl'vty. 



Take Hood's 
Sarsaparilla 

To purify, vitalize and enrich your blood, 
create an appetite and pive you strength, 
liquid or tablets, 100 Doses One Dollar. 




BigSnaponMcn'sHose 



Tomorrow is the day of the Bigf Hosiery Sale. 600 

pairs of high-grade, good wearing cotton hose 

— hose that sells regularly at 25c a pair, 

in tan and black, 

full regular made — 
at exactly half price 
— as long as they 
last, per pair 



egularly at 25c a pair, 

121c 




Men's Furnishing Dept. — Annex. 
Superior Street— Lake Avenue— Michigan Street. 



1*' 



ii 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY. MARCH 10, 1908. 



> 



CONSIDER METHODS OF 
RELIEF FOR UNEMPLOYED 




Aldermen Try to Find 

Work for Bread 

Line. 



Brewery Saloon Licenses 

Are Again Up for 

Discussion. 



I WHAT THE COINCIL DID. * 



OnlcTTd liivrstlpatlon of oni- 
pioynit'iit ofluvs by roinmitU'e of 
Uirt'e ahlfriiieii uiul cliief of po- 
lice. 

f<iiisidt>rc(l iiicasuros for relief 
of nMfiiiiiloyt'cl iiu-n In the city. 



KccoiisidcnHl ait Ion on ap|)ll- ^ 

cation of A. S. .Scliniid for sa- «r 

loon license at 5ia West MIclil- j| 

pan -trcct, and fjranud license, i. 

Anihorlxcd vacation of avo 

nues in l^ast Dnhitli to allow 4»f Sf 
n-plattinj?. 

On an appeal from a committee of 
the Question club, hoaded by Rev. J. 
T. Moody of the Bethel, and James 
Walsh p{ the state free employment 
bureau, the city council last night con- 
eldered measures for the relief of Du- 
lulh's "army of unemployed." The 
fiame apptal brought out disclosures 
of illegal practices on the part of some 
employment offices of the city and. 
after a long discussion, during which 
the employment offices came in for a 
Igorous grilling, a committee of the 
coucil was ai)pointtd to act with the 
chief of police in investigating the 
employment offices. The chief was 
also instructed to notify employment 
offices to tear down all signs which 
mlsrepre.sented the wo rkthey had to 
offer men. 

Numerous measures were proposed 
for the relief of unemployed men. 
Some of the plans called for the Im- 
mKliate beginning of work on the re- 
moval of the point of rocks, and thtj 
filling in of St. Croix avenue, the start 
Ing of the Ktone crusher to prepare 
Btreet material for the summer's work, 
the building of the West end police 
station, the building of the horse hos- 
pital, the transferring of money ap- 
ropriated to the use of the board of 
public works to finance the cutting 
away of the point of rocks, and even 
a re.solution providing for the con- 
struction of a new sidewalk In the 
West end. larried wltn It a sut;- 
gei-tlon that as many men as po.sslble, 
uneniployed at present, be given work. 
The upshot of It was a resolution by 
Alderman Moore urging the board of 
pui>lic works to expedite its prepar- 
ations for the work on the point of 
rocks and the St. (.'rolx avenue revet- 
ment and also any other work it may 
have in eontemplatioif. 

A written appeal was received from 
the Question club, setting forth the 
conditions in the city and urging the 
council to take any action it might 
have In it.s power to relieve the con- 
dition of the unemployed men and 
suppress illegal piaelicea on tlu- part 
of the employment agents. Rev. 
Mr. Moody of the Bethel appeared to 
support the first appeal and James 
Walsh of the state free employment 
bureau told the council of the em- 
poynient office evil. 
Mr Moody said hi.^ attention was 



have 
boards 



with 
in Du- 





Eczema Began When a Tiny Babjf 
and Lasted 7 Years— Tore Crusts 
from Face Till It was All Raw- 
Screamed with Pain and Could not 
Sleep— Though Specialists Failed 
• 

CUTICURA EFFECTED 

A WONDERFUL CURE 



••Wh«n my little boy was six weeks 
old an eruption broke out on his face. 
I took him to a doc- 
tor and §iit ointment* 
and medicines but his 
face kept on getting 
worse until it got so 
bad that no one could 
look at him. His 
whole face was one 
crust and mu.st have 
been very painful. 
He scrattVied day and 
night until his face 
sometimes looked like 
a raw piece of meat. 
I was nearly insane 
with hla scratching 
day and night. Then I took him to 
all the best specialists in skin diseases 
but they could not do much for him. 
He sometimes screamed with pam 
when I put on the salve they gave me. 
•When he was two years old the 
•czema got on his arms and legs so 
that I had to keep thom bandaged up 
and I made gloves for his hands so the 
Dails could not poison him worse. We 
could not get a night's sleep in months 
and my hu.sband and I were all broken 
up. Then mv mother asked why I 
Qui not give "up the doctors and try 
Cuticura. So I got a set and he felt 
relieved the first time I used them, 
the Cuticura Ointment felt so oool. 
He used to wake up and ask for Cuti- 
cura to be put on wlien he itched so 
badly that he couUl not sleep, and he 
would say. 'Ohl Mamn. that makes 
nay sores feel so good!' I gave the 
Cuticura Remedies a good trial and 
graduailv the eczema healed all up 
and now" ho is as well as any other chil- 
dren. He is Ti w seven years ild and 
the cure hn^ i.isffd two months, so I 
think it will never return. I can't 
tell you how glad I am that Cuticura 
did such wonderful work in our case 
and I shall recommend it everywhere, 
Mrs. J.ihn CI. Khimpp. SO NlaRara St., 
Newark, N. J.. Oct. 17 and 22, 1907." 

A Blngla BPl of Cuticura RemedlM. ir-nsisIlnR of 
Cutleur* 6o»p (25c. \ OlotmfCt (6(tc^>. and k»-sol- 
i?nt iSOc ) or Plll» (2r,c. per vial of 0O> Is oft-n 
fU-Tlrl^nt tooure. Solrt f!iro\ighout the world Potter 
buW A Chern forp.. Solf Prop* . Bocion Mas.'* 

•rMalikd 1 rce, Cutlcurft Booii oa btln Ulseaees. 



first called to the state of things by 
the large number of appeals for help 
ai tJie Bethel around tli«' hrst of Feb- 
ruary, fie told of the starting of the 
free berakfast and the increase in the 
number of men availing them.stlves 
of it from eighty the first day to 190 
last .Sunday morning. Ytsterday 
morjiing, he said, IH'J men had tiled 
in for the free breakfast. 

He attacked the contention that the 
men didn't want to work. He said 
they were hungry, penniless, unem- 
ploved men, willing to work, but un- 
able to And anyliiing to do. He also 
attacked liie claim that the men we-re 
not Duluth citizens, but merely drift- 
wood, which had come this far and 
was unable to gel farther. He said he 
analyzed the crowd yesierday morn- 
ing and of the entire number only 
twenty-three had never been at the 
Bethel before. He said most of the 
men had made their headquarters in 
Duluth for periods ranging froni one 
to ten years, had put thousands of 
dollars in circulation in Uuiuth, and 
were entitled to the consideration ot 
the council. , , 

Mr Walsh attacked the employment 
otflce evil. He said some of them are 
undoubtedlv conducted in a legitimate 
manner, but others are not. Kver> 
week, he said, he has fbur or five men 
come to him with stories of ha\ ng 
been sent out to a job and not finding 
anything to do. He cited one case of 
a party of men having been f'^nt out 
103 miles, working one day, and being 
discharged. When asked the reason, 
they were told that another crowd was 
coming. Leaving the place, he said, 
they met three different parties going 
to the same camp. 

•'Its pretty hard on a man to pay 
his last dollar for a job and then not 
get the Job," he .said. 

He al.^o called attention to the fact 
that many empl')yinent offices, 'which 
haven't a job on their books, 
their walls and advertising 
luridly placarded with calls for help 
He said pooph' going to the union sta- 
tion see Michigan street bright 
.signs, report plenty of work 
luth, and laborers are brought to the 
city under the misleading reports. 
\\hlch are inspired by the signs. 

Alderman Foubister introduced a 
resolution that the chair appoint a 
eomnilttee of three aldermen to Inves- 
tigate the employment offices and re- 
port to the council. Alderman Filia- 
trault suggested that the chief of po- 
lice would be the proper person to 
make such investigation, and moved It 
as an amendment to Alderman Fou- 
bister's motion. 

Chief Troyer cited some of the diffl- 
cuitiea encountered in efforts to prose- 
cute emT'loytnent agents for illegal 
practices. He said it Is practically im- 
i)o«sible to hold witnesses, as they iisu- 
ally pay their last dollars for the tick- 
ets, and are not able to remain in Du- 
luth long enough to prosecute. He 
said in other ca.ses witnesses, who 
would be necessary to support the 
laborers word a.gainst that of the em- 
plovment agent, are In Wisconsin or 
some other state, beyond the juris*lic- 
tion of the council or any local court 
and cannot be brc-ught to Duluth. He 
psked that, if he Is to make an Investi- 
gation, he be voted funds to pay the 
board of witnesses he wishes to hold 
to testify before the court or the coun- 
eil. 

The motions of Aldermen Foubister 
jind FUiatrault were merged, to pro- 
vide for a joint investigation by the 
louncil committee and the chief of 
police, and adopted, and the commit- 
tee was authorized to spend not in ex- 
cess of $UK) in holding witnessses for 
prosecution. 

The eniploynienl omce question dis- 
n..sed of, tlie council turned to tiie con- 
shleraiion of providing t-mploymeiit for 
ihe uiu-iuployed nun. No report was re- 
ceived fr.>m the board ol public works 
and city .iiKin'tn- on the advisability ol 
loliig ahead ullli cutting away th.- p«}ia: 
ot roeks and .-^oine of the alderrnt-n re- 
ported tliat tlio boiud was not ready to 
report but svst.inatlzliiff the work in 
ord.r that u" might be done properly. 
Some of the aldermen were tor Kieat.>r 
haste but It was pointed out that the 
work would employ only a few nie:i any- 
w:;y Ald.rmaii Keiin.dy suggested mat 
Uie stone crusher might be set to work 
lo prepare rock for the coining Bununer's 
work and that would employ about twen- 
ty live men. Alderman Sliartel's motion. 
iiVglng the board ot lire cuiiunlssioners to 
lui.ee.d with the erection of the horse 
hospital by dav labor, was declared Il- 
legal by the city attorney. Alderman 
Moore's motion that the board of public 
works bo uryt'd to expetlite the prepar- 
ations for any work It may have In hand 
was the only definite action taken. 
• • • 
Aldfrman Olson, the new member of 
! tlie eoimeil from the Sixth ward, sprung 
a surpris,. la.st night by showing a 
change of h»art and moving to recon- 
sider the action Of la.st week In turning 
down thi> application of A. H. Schmid fur 
;i saloon license at ',13 West MicblKan 
Street. In explanation of his motion, 
he said he had undergone no ch.inge of 
opinion as to the Issuing of brewery 11- 
CfU.sc!*, but he felt that an Injustice had 
been done the proprietor of the saloon, 
in thus summarily refusing him a re- 
newal. He said it was necessary to keep 
the saloon closed until the true owner 
could ni.ikc appikaflon. and he thou!?ht 
that due notice should be given the 
brewery interests of the stand the coun- 
cil Intended to take In reference to the 
Issuing of licenses to brewery agents. 

Alderman McKnight endeavored to 
have tlie motion to reconsider tal-led, but 
he failed bv a vote ot to 10. Alderman 
Moore asked that the motion be laid 
over for a i\cek. but the Interests behind 
it refused. 

Alderman McKnight made a vigorous 
attack on the motion. He said that Mr. 
Sehnild had deposited his money for his 
license with the clerk during the p:HJ»t 
week and he conten<Ud that Schmid 
knew the mind of the council, before it 
had expressed itself, or even after It 
had expressed itself the other way. He 
IKilnted out that Charles Peterson, the 
true owner of the saloon, had an appli- 
cation for a license filed and by waiting 
two weeks, the council would have an 
opportunity to srant a bon.a fide license, 
ti.. stead of one to a "dummy" brewery 
apent. He said It is the council's busi- 
ness to Issue licenses to people, who can 
be lield responsible for them, not to 
"dummies," who secure the licenses only 
that the saloon may be safe from the 
result of prosecutions of bartenders for 
violations of the law. 

Alderman Moore also opposed the mo- 
tion on the ground that the grantlns 
of licenses to brewery agents concen- 
trated powers with the breweries and 
that the people had expressed themselves 
against Just such concentration at the 
last election. 

The motion to reconsider and a motion 
to grant the Ucenise went throuKh bv 
the same vote, 10 to 6. The vote stood: 

For the lic<n8c— KilUatrault. Foubister, 
Hogan, Jordan. Mueller. Olson Rlben- 
ack. Shartel, Trevilllpn and Tessnian. 

.\gHinst th>' license— Cromwell, Getchell, 
Kt nnedy. McKnight. Moe and Moore. 

Alderman Foubister Introduced a re.so- 
lution last night, which will result In 
a definite declaration of policy on the 
part of th> council. It was laid over for 
one week and will com» up to a vote 
next Monday night. It follows: 

■•Resolved, that It be hereby expressed 

as the policy of this council, that after 
April 1, 1^8. no licenses to sell Intoxicat- 
inir liquors will be granted, except to 
persons, who are to operate or conduct 
the .saloons wher^ the license are asked 
to b.' granted. It helnj? the Intention of 
this redoluiion to provide that the licensee 
shall be responsible for the debts thereof 



CARPET SALE! 

la fast drawing to a close and 
we urge you. If you have not 
already bought your carpets 
for spring, do so at ome. 
Many line paterns yet remain 
— but they are going fast. 



"Dependable QucUiiy' 
' 'Reasonable Prices' ' 



Stove 

PI 

107 W. SUPERIOR ST. —TWO STORES— 1828-30=32 W. SUPERIOR ST. 



^E TKU51 TM II PEOPLE 



HALL FURNITURE! 




MATTINGS 



THIS STORE IS DIFFERENT 

From just the ordinary Furniture store— is conducted on more modern and 
progressive lines than other stores, a fact that is appreciated by Dukith peo- 
ple as evidenced by the constantly increasing trade accorded this store, and 
This in the face of a so-called "Panic and Hard Times." THIS STORE does 
not need an excuse for a "sale" (?) in order to reduce its prices 40 to oO per 
cent, because our regular "Reasonable Prices" compare favorably \vith other 
stores' widely heralded "Bargain Sale Prices." WE GUARANTEE 

LOWEST PRICES— EASY PAYMENTS. 



The particular 
housewife I s 
very careful 
about her hall 

and Its fur- 
nishings. W e 
call your spe- 
c I a 1 attention 
to our splen- 
did showing of 
den and hall 
furniture I n 
mirrors, seats, 
hall racks 
chairs. tables, 
etc., priced at 

$2.n5. »3.75, 

94J5A, f5.75, 

97^0 aud 

912.50. 




n 



SAVE THE DOLLARS 



This seems to 
be the "motto" 
of eve r y o n e 
just now, and 
to such — or 
anyone who 
feels the need 
of economizing 
— this store 
appeals to very 
strongly. Du- 
luth people are 
fast learning 
that this store 
Is different. 




% 



THIS GREAT SALE 
STILL CONTINUES 



This sale offers you exceptional values In high- 
grade Mattings, which make the very best cover-, 
ings for bedrooms, halls, summer 
Mattings are getting more popular 



cottage«. etc. 
every year. 



18c 

Malting 
This 
SaFo 

9C 



25c 

Matting 
This 
8a le 



30c ! 40c 



Matting 
ThiH 
&alc 



Mat I ins 
This 



1 rx 22'/^C 



$19.50 ADJUSTABLE 
END DIVANS $12.75 

Here's almost a necessity In every home and a 
luxury in any home. When ends are folded up. 
as shown in cut. it occupies a very small space^ 

Can be opened 
as full size couch 
to sleep on. We 
offer special this 
week a fine divan 
— regular price 
$19.50 — Fpt'iial 
this week only 



V^^ GO-CARTS! 

We want you to see our elegant line of new Go- 
Carts. embracing every stylo and kind worth 
while. Many new ideas in all steel Folding 
Carts not shown In Duluth before, as well as a 
big line of the larger Reed and Rattan Carts. 
It will pay you to see our line before you buy. 
Note Uiese prices: 

$1.45, $2.45, $2.95, 

$3.75, $5.75, $7.50, $9.75 

$12.50 and up 






GENUINE MOORE'S STEEL RANGE $25 

To be able to BUY a genuine "MOOHE'S" Steel 
Range at this price means much to YOU. To be able 
to SELL a genuine "MOOIU:-S" Steel Range at this 
price means much to US. Yes. there are ranges you 
can buy for less money, but they are not a 
"MOOIiE'S." 

THIS RANGE, EXACTIY LIKE CUT, SIX BOLES 

stcol. (Note: — When 
tin, as Is the case of 
know of.) Fine large oven. Be sure to 
this range before you buy. 

m TAKE BACK YOUR OLD STOVE IN TRADE 

And will allow you full cash value for it. The 
balance you can pay at , 




Is made of fine blue polished 
we say steel, we do not mean 
ranges we 
see 



$1.00 A WEEK 





$3.00 DINERS $1.89 

The second big lot of these 
fine Chairs go on sale tomor- 
row morning — chairs 
are like cut — have 
heavy box seat, made 
of Solid Quartered oak 
— genuine leather 
seats — regular price 
13.00 — special at ...» 

$1.89 

$3.50 DINING CHAIRS $?.S5 

Here's another grand value In a fine chair. 
Similar to above, but a much better chair — 
finely polished and finished — 
regular 13.50 — special for... 

$25 BUFFET, SPECIAL, $15.T5 

Here's a chance 
to get a fine buf- 
fet cheap. This 
buffet is similar 
to cut, with mir- 
ror In top: beau- 
t I f u I •■.Vlisslon " 
pattern; w e a t h - 
ered finish; ham- 
mered br>^i trim- 
ming; a big value 
at $^.00; special 
this week, only— 

$15.75 



I 



n.s well an for the proper conduct of the 
saloon." 

During the debate on the reconsidera- 
tion of the Schmid license last night, 
Aldermen Olson and Trevillion cxpr-sscd 
themselves In favor of the Foubister reso- 
lution, althoujth thev voted lor the grant- 
ing of the one license to Mr. %t*thmld. 
They said they were in favor of giving 
the breweries notice of the Intention of 
the council, although opposed to the 
uranting of licenses to brewery agents. 

A risoUuion Intruduced by Aid- r;iian 
Rkionack, providing for the restricting 
of Ihf numb( r of saloons in the district 
Utwecn Fifth and Seventh avenues west 
on Superior sirtet to the number there 
at present was adop'ed. The resolution 
also providi-d that a?>v licenses lost by 
revocation should not be replaced. 

• • * 
A "Joker" resolution, which laid out a j 
few days work for Citv Clerk Cheaule. , 
was handed Alderman Moore before t:ie , 
meeting. He Introduced it and it was 
adopted. It instructs the citv clerk to 
furnish the council at Its next meeting 
with a compl.-te list of all saloon licenses | 
!n thp name of any brewery- or of anyone • 
conntct'-d with 



last week on account of a verbal agree- 
ment h< h:id made with a Mind woman on 
selling the pool room formerlv owned 
bv iiim. Th. alderman from the Fourth 
ward siild there was no objection to the 
gr.ant;ng of the For-^man license and tne 
application was granted. 

• • • 

The Northland Country club 
prote«tK acainst th- vacation of 
and avenueji and the condemning 
others in Kast Duluth on the . 
•hat It wc.\ild damajre their property. 11 
wap the only pruost filed and the coun- 
cil then-fore gra.ited the request of the 
Kast f'uluth I^nd company for the vaca- 
tion of av(nuts ani streets to allow re- 
platting, the n<^w plat takinjf m tne 

Tischer park plan. 

• « • 

Thp clerk nnnoimced that C. F. Judd 
would be unable to proceed with the 
printing of the c:tv «« ■ <^^^P' r^P^J'.L'' V\)i 
was ready to withdraw his bid. The bid 
of F H. Lounsberry was but 60 
higher than tliat of Mr. 
contract was awarded to him 



proposed legislation before congress.' 
gan Its Investigation today. 

Chairman Boutell stated that no wit- 
nesses had yet been summoned but that 
Representative LiHey had been requested 
to apptar before the committee; that as 
vet the conuniitee has nothiuK before It 
i and win not be In a position to summon 
en'ered i witnebst-s unti! Mr. Lllley lays the facts 
streets : before th^m^ 

^rou.?d| JEROME MAKES ANSWER. 



Mavor llavtn 



emploved bv or connected with any ^^ _ 

brewer, the names of the actual owners, j j,,^^, ^f jiarry H. Lament private ^ec- 

proprieiors or managers of the saloons i ri-tary and Chauncey H. Troyer chief or 

legalized by such licenses, the names ^ p^^nco. 

of iireweries makins payment for liquor^ • • • 

licenses, and the names of the persons j ,^ application was received from H. 

In whose name such payments are made, j^ ycung for the position of janitor, or 

the names of all person? now acTinK as i ^.j^^jp^^j^,, ^f ti,^, ^,l^y. hall, the position 

proprietor." or m.^nvgers of ^^Iwrns. who ^^^-^ j^^.j^j ^ j^^^ Prian. 

were within the preceding year of the i __ 

Issuance of the license, under which the j 
raloons are operated, convicted of viola- 
tion of the ifqtior laws. ! 

• • « 

Applications of Theodore E. Reinhart 
and M. Hendrickscn for »n extension of 
their lewelry auction licenses from five 
to thirty days were granted. 

• • • 

An application was received from Jacob 
Forsman for a Hcensc to opr-rate a pjol 
room at 344 l..akc ivenue south. The lo- 
cation is that which Martin H. Makl 
made application and was turned down 



District Attorney Denies Charges 
Made by William King. 

Albany, N. Y., March 10.— District 
Attorney Jerome of New York filed 
yesterday with Grovernor Hughes Ms 
answer to the charges preferred aginst 
him by William F. King, former presl- 
^^uie'dent of the New York Merchants' as- 
sociation and a committee of minority 
stockholder of the Metropolitan Street 
Communications w©r3 received from Railway company, In which the gover- 
annoiinclnx the appoint- j nor is asked to remove Mr. Jerome 

from office. The answer Is a gen- 



Jndd and 



A HARD STRUGGLE 



Many a 



Dululh Citizen Finds the 
Struzslc Hard. 

With a back constantly aching. 
With distressing urinary disorders, 
Daily existence Is but a struggle. 
No need to keep It up. 
Doan's Kidney Pills will cure you. 
Duluth people endorse this claim: 

Leander Sinotte, rug manufacturer 
and carpet cleaner, of 1701 Michigan 
St.. Duluth, Minn., and living at the 
corner of Michigan St. and Eighteenth 
Ave., says: "Some six years ago 1 
gave a testimonial in favor of Doan's 
Kidney Pills, because 1 felt so well 
pleased with the prompt relief from 
trouble with my kidneys and back 
which the use of this remedy brought 
me. 1 had been annoyed with constant 
dull pain across the l&ms and through 
the kidneys. To stoop or attempt to 
lift anything was sure to bring on 
sharp twinges of pain. The action of 
the kidneys was irregular. I tried 
many remedies until I got Doan's Kid- 
ney Pills, but found little relief and no 
permanent benefit. This remedy com- 
pletely drove out the whole trouble, 
and as six years have passed without 
any return of the complaint, I consider 
my cure a permanent one." 

For sale by all dealers. Price 60 

cents. Foster-Milburn Co., Buffalo, 

New York, sole agents for the United 

States. 

Remember the name — Doan's — and 

take no other. 



TRADE OF THE 
IINITBSTATES 

With Its NoncontlguGUs 

Territories During the 

Past Year. 

Washington, March 9.— The trade of 
the United Slatoa with Its noncon- 
tigous territories aggregated last year 
$]47,00ti,0o0, or more than our trade 
iwth all foreign countries In 1830, and 
practically half as much as our trade 
with all foreign countries in 18a0. 

The term "concontiguous lernlories 
Includes Porto Rico, Alaska, the Ha- 
waiian Islands, the Philippine Islands, 
the Midway Islands, Guam and Tutu- 
lla. To those territories was sent from 
the United Slates in the calendar year 
1907, fTO.OOO.tl'O worth of merchandise, 
and from thom was sent to the United 
States f78.0(>O.W.O worth of merchan- 
dise ami $12.y(»0.oo0 worth of gold pro- 
duced within Alaska. 

Of the $70,000,000 worth of merchan- 
dise sent to those territories during 
1907 Jll.fKlO.OOO worth went to the Phil- 
ippine Islands; fl6,000.00O worth to the 
Hawaiian Isla.'ls; 1175,000,000 to Alas- 
ka, and »25.00rj,000 to Porto Rico. Of 
the S78.000,oo<r wOi»11 of merchandise 
rf<^elved from those territories, $11 000.- 
000 worth was from Alaska; $12,''t00.000 
worth from the PhilipiJines; $23,000,000 
from Porto Rico aiid $32,000,000 from 
Hawaii. ;£ 

TO mR luleyITrst. 

Committee Will^JwilSnmmon Wit- 
nesses in InTesfigatlon. 

Washington. March 9.— The special com- 
mittee of the house apptjlnted by Speak- 
er Cannon, at the request of Represen- 
tative Lllley of Connecticut, "to inves- 
tigate the conduct of the Electric Boat 
company of New Jersey and their pre- 
decessor, the Holland Boat company. 
respec:lng the methods employed by said 
companies in connection with past or 



eial denial of the charges. The gov- 
ernor said he would announce the 
procedure to be followed after he had 
examined the documents. 

The district attorney's answer de- 
clares that the charges against him 
were based on assumptions which are 
purely gratuitious; that in each in- 
stance of alleged failure to prosecute, 
the matter did not as a matter of law 
constitute a crime, or if crime had 
been committed It was by reason of 
some defect of evidence, such as the 



lack of corroboration where the law 
forbade a prosectaoin unless there was 
corroboration, impossibility to sus- 
tain a prosecution, and that the law 
and the obligations of his oath of 
office alike forbade him to institute 
prosecutions in the absence of evi- 
dence to Justify them. Each of the 
twenty-three charges against him 
was taken up by Mr. Jerome and an- 
swered in detail. 



BISHOP OF LONDON 



Appeals for Funds for the Regen- 
eration of the Metropolis. 

London, March 9. — Inspired by 
the success of his experiment in 
Wall street, last October, the Right 
Rev. Arthur F. W. Ingram, bishop 
of London, made an appeal in the 
city this afternoon, which he hopes 

will largely augment his fund for the 
spiritual regeneration of the metrop- 
olis. The meeting, which was very 
well attended, was held in St. Mich- 
ael's church, Cornhill. 

The problem of London's spiritual 
needs was the theme of the bishop's 
discourse, and he told his hearers 
that having himself given every pen- 
ny he possessed, he felt Inclined to 
ask their help to stand by him and 
make the bishop of London's fund a 
first charge upon their charity, for 
without work and money, London, 
from the point of view of the 



church, 
place. 



soon would be a pagan 



Tills Is Worth Renien»f>ering. 

Whenever you have a cough or cold, 
just remember that Foley's Honey and 
Tar will cure it. Do not risk your 
health by taking any but the genuine. 
It Is in a yellow package. Sold bj 
all druggists. 



ATTACKS RICH PARENTS 

Head of Boys' School Declares Chil- 
dren Have Too Much Money. 

Boston, March 9.— Rev. Mr. Peabody, 

head master of the famous Groton schoo) 
which probably educates more boys of 
wealthy families than any other Insti- 
tution in the country, had very little good 
to say about rich parents ye.sterday when 
he addressed the Harvard Teachers' as- 
sociation at Cambridge. 

His theme was "The Training and Re- 
sponsibility of Parents," and in the course 
of his arraignment he declared that th« 
rich of New York lavish too much money 
upon their growing children, while the 
same class In Boston act as if embarrass- 
ed in the presence of their offspring, and 
don't want to have children around. 

"The modern teacher," he eaJd. "ha» 
no time for the theory of leaching. Th« 
rea.son for this is that children are not 
so well 'brought up' as they were i|l 
years gone by. They are lop worldly 



well fed 
money. 



and too much lavished 



top 
with 



i&mia 



ne -way 



Xol 



oni 



m 



All -tKe -way 



Saiiiale 



March 
Honored 
berth rate. 
Harvey meals ; 
ballast road-bed, oil- 
sprinkled part of way and 
dustlcss. You can stop en 
route and visit the Grand 
Canyon of Arizona. 



Tickets on sale daily, 
I to April 30. 



tourist sleepers on payment of 

Three fast trains daily; Fred 

block - signal protection ; rock- 



0. 0. CaipeDter, Paaa. Agent, 

A. T. 4 8. F. Ry.. 
Guannty Bldg., Mizmeapolia. 



Ask for "CtUfcrm* in » Tourtst Stocpcr" 

~ knd "San Joaquin Valley" land folder. a 



Twin Cities 






THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD r^ TUESDAY, MARCH 



1908 






• -« • . 'S' 



,.« 






•^ 









:■€. 






.\ 






i\ 



hitc Co 



»-j 






/--M-' 






['< 



os^ 






*' 



•»« 



Lfi 



•5% 



.\ 




• i' 



s^S5aR\52^ 



'^\ 



£^BH\S^ 



■"^T" 






GRAND. 



m 



<'^^-^' 

;^^: 



,r^ 



■s s 






^ 
i^\ 



Colossal Sale 



."•♦"N** 



D 



^*, 



.t^*! 



. >-' 









of The American Printing Company's New Wash 






t IS 



*A 







WASH GOODS 
COUNTER 

(West Aisle.) 

Price of All 

Per Yard 

7c 



A Few of 
Them! 

Mercerized Dress Ginghams. 

Indigo Foulards. 

Calcutta Fancies. 

Mercerized Plaids and Checks. 

I'.lack and White Plain Checks. 

r.lack and White broken check ef- 
fects. 

Blue Grounds— Striped, dotted 
and figured. 

Light Fancy Checks and Plaids. 

Foulard Silk Fabrics. 

Dress Gingham Styles. 

American Shirting Styles. 

Cardinal Reds— with Pin and 
Polka Dots. 

And Innunierable Others 



EGINNING on Thursday mo^xiing and continuing until gone—we 
g™, place on sale this enormous pufthase of New Spring Wash Fabrics. 
Our sale of last season, record breakef as it was, amounted to less than half 
our purchase of this season. Beside -the 50,000 yards of last year's buy- 
ing and selling, our immense purchase of this year consisting of 



''9' 



40 Cases 



2000 Pieces 



110,000 Yards 



Looms up as the most important 
purchase and sale ever attempt- 
ed at the Head of the Lakes, by 
any house. 

This immense purchase com- 
prises a splendid showing of 
everv weave and color manufac- 
tured by the American Printing 
Co. for this season's wear, their 



American 




beauty of design and colors— 
and their possibilities of makeup 
are shown in the dresses dis- 
i*- played in our windows — and at 
our wash goods department. 

Fashion Sheets for 1908 with 
models of various styles of cos- 
tumes will be given away with 
every purchase. 



WASH GOODS DEPARTMENT— West Aisle. 



A Few of 
Them! 

Cardinal Reds, Stripes and Checks 

Fancy Checked and Figured Grays 

Oxfords and Light Gray Fancies. 

Claret Reds— Checks, Plaids and 
Stripes. 

Claret Reds— Fancy Figured ef- 
fects. 

Black and White Plaids. 

Black and White Checks with 
White Dots. 

White Grounds, Black and Col- 
ored Figures. 

White Grounds with Checks and 
Plaids. 

And Innumerable Others. 




WASH GOODS 
COUNTER 

(West Aisle.) 

Price of All 

Per Yard 

7c 



ImDorters' Sale of Real Hand-Made Princess Laces-Thursday, Friday and Saturday. 



0„ Thursday wc will display at the lace department a grand purchase ol Real Hand-Made 
Princess Laces Goods which we purchased at about hfty cents on the dollar. 

itts nrofte that we can secure goods at so advantageous a ttgure, hut the late strm- 
eoncv i 1 c \ew York market has nutde many things poss.hle. These goods are now on 
ds^'^y ., ne of our west windows, and they must be seen to be apprec.ated They are al>,o- 
h Ov'co r c to swell trin.ming. staple as well as fashionable, and con.e m bands, edge-, galoons, 



insert ings, medallions and flouncings. They are without doubt the finest lot ever shown in this 

"'^'we secured them at half price, and in pursuance of the Pant on & White Co. method we 
oass the benefits to our customers ! Therefore— on Thursday, Friday and Saturday the)- will be 
sold for just half the price we could sell for, if bought in the regular way. Pnces range from 
75c, $1, $1.25, $1.48, $1.75, $1.98; worth up to $5 a yard. 








CONCERNINe 



"Why." inquired the man who la In- 
vited out. "if girls want to do ponance 
dutlns L.ent do they not mak« them- 
eelves U>arn how to play briiigo?" 

"Wliy (vorybtxly knows how to play 
brlJj?''." 1^*" was airily an.swt-n'd. 

'Tanlou m«>." said the man who Is 
Invited out. "but very few people know- 
how to play bridge. How my wrath 
rlse.-j when I sit down ti> fool away an 
evening and call it playing hndge! 
Why n-u make It i"a.'<ino. or old maid, 
or tlincli, or some oth»M- exeiting but 
simple i>astime. where the two spot 
and any jack will take any jack, and 
where you may put a two spot on aji 
eight spot and say eight and two 
make ten,' and then wait for the nex: 
hand around to take It with a ten. 
Why, I ask. do thty not do that rather 
than inveigl'.' iK-opl.- who really like to 
aerloi'.^ly !)lay bridge into an evening 
of torture?" 

"WVll, you'll have to k.^ep right on 
asking. f'>r I don't kni)w the answer." 
he wa.-^ told. 

The man who is Invited out looked 
•'Imi)ulsfs to produce sudden 
.irise within me," he continued, 
he looked as placid as a blase 
.It pivsture. ''when about the 
hand around the maiden ex- 
)>etwten little hysteric shrieks 



glum, 
death 
whiU. 
she.p 
fourt! 
claims 



of laughter. 'Oh. my! Which hands 
the 1-ad in?* And when that inevitable 
chirp. What's trump?' comes out. the 
cup of In-mlock whieh dlsjwsed of an 
eld'^rly gentleman in ages gone, seems 
to me the drink of all drinks that I 
could iiuiiff with blithe spirits. And 
then," said the man who is invited out. 
as ho heaved a sigh ami started in 
ajain. "when It's your own deal, and 



you've helped yourself Ui four or live 
aces and the kings and cjueens and 
jacks, and things that follow, art's of 
the two maidens in whoi»«> company 
one l3 suppo.sfd to be experiencing 
hours of delight, with airy persitlage 
says. 'Oh. I iiaven'i a gt>od hand— let a 
Duneh.' " ^ . 

"Tell your thoughts of the moment 
following," he was urg-^d. 

"They're not so bad," he iwild. "con- 
sidering. I think. -What a fool.' and If 
she happens to be pretty. I think. 
What a pretty fool." and 1 smile like 
a fatuous monkey and try to look as 
If I desired of all things on earth lo 
bunch those aces. That's gallantry 
and chivalry and politeness." said the 
man who is Invited out. "But why 
don't they learn to play bridge or stop 
it, one or the other?" ho demanded 
fiercely. 

"Because, there Isn't a woman on 
earth but who would prefer to have 
the man oppjslte her think. 'What a 
pretty fo-il,' than that he should be 
admiring her skill at bridge," said the 
betrayer of .secrets. And any woman 
with sense would prefer to have a nice, 
soft. Huffy, naturally curling p«-)mpa- 
dour hiding a wide, low, smooth brow, 
to having a bumpy brow that would 
help her to remember those perfectly 
useless pieces of information about 
where the lead is. and what happens 
to be trump. If they could remember 
k once for all. but it changes so often, 
and then you must admit yourself that 
there's always some Inveterate stickler 
for facts around who will know and 
tell In crisp, decided tones. It is the 
conversation of energy which Induces 
most women to make It a rule not to 



lather reme!«iiM'ring what trump is. 
r.or where the lead Is. A pr^'ity woman 
who would bother doing that would 

be " 

You needn't tell me what she'i he 
.Sh. 'd have to be an angel first, and 
have entered into that realm where 
they know all things." *iid the man 
In a superior manner that is quiie ex- 
asiH'rati.ig. ^ ^ . 

".So." he was adv'sel. "Instead of 
l»thorlng coaching up on bridge, the 
woman of wisdom uses that extra time 
in sunning her hiir and inducing the 
strands which do duty as the golden 
rteece In her life, to curl in as much a 
natural manner as possible, and she 
jnassages in c<>M cream, where It will 
do the most good, and puts lemon juice 
on her complexion, and tries the etYect 
of cinnamon roll pufT\ or one thick 
Madonna-like braid. And her reward 



What Retail Markets Offer. 



Strawberries, 70 cents a box. 

Caulillower. 2.'> to 3."> cents a head. 

Radishes. 10 cents a bunch. 

Pineapples. 40 cents each. 

Lake .SuiH-rior trout. 15 cents a lb. 

Flounders, 15 cent.'* a lb. 

Red sna|M>erfv. IS cents a lb. 

Skinned perch. 15 cents a lb. 

Smelts, 10 cents a lb. 

Straw berries, the most exclusive or 



the articles in the market, are begin- 
ning to have a ripe, luscious look that 
is hard to resist. Ripe and luscious 
though they are. they do not yet have 
the prodigal and lavish appearance 
which the fruit takes on In June and 
Julys I'lustt-r raisins, at 3.S cents a 
pt)und. are among the desirable things 
of the market, a.s well as fresh rhub- 
arb and dully brilliant radishes. 
And then there is flsh. 



Rusty nails, 
dull saws, 
nicked chisel. 

Give these to a carpenter. 

Ask him for good work! 

It's just as absurd to expect 
good work of your cook if you 
give her poor flour. Give her 

Gold Medal Flour 

made by Washburn-Crosby. 

Her delicious bread and 
biscuit will be ample reward. 



Gold 

Medal 

Flour 

Sold by 
Grocers 
Everywhere. 




for all this is that when she coquet- 
lishly oxolAims. •<:)h. let's bunch the 
cants' is that you ait optxjsiie and 
think What a pretty foil!' Learn to 
play bridsfe. Indeed! Whit's the use?" 

EARLY APPLICATIONS 

For Class in Applied Design 
Requested by Art School. 

The board of managers of the Du- 
lu'.h Art .school desire lo emphasize the 
imi>ortance of Immediate application 
for studentship in the school. €la.sses 
in the appl'.od designs will be organ- 
ized at once and matters will be 
greatly expedited if tho.^e desiring in- 
struction In any one subject will make 
known their choice at the earliest pos- 
sible opportunity. Classes in the de- 
sign and application of stenciling. In 
copper work, and leather to^illng and 
basketry will be organized if the num- 
ber warrants them. A large number 
of Duluth women have mquired re- 
garding such clas.ses and If applica- 
tions are sent at one- to Miss Poirier 
of the library the arrangements will 
be completed. 

Informal Party. 

Miss Minnie Du.Selle wa.s the guest 
of honor at a delightful informal party 
last evening at the home of Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Walker of Twenty-first street. 
Park Point. The aftair was a cob- 
web party enjo yed by twenty guests. 

Palestine Party. 

The third party in the series being 
given during the winter by Palestine 
Assembly will l>e held Saturday even- 
Ine of this week at the ball room of 
the Masonic Temple. The committee 
in charge of the affair consists of 
Messrs. Andrew C. \ oik. H. J jWc- 
Cl^arn, J. W. Krcltter. A. H. Ahrens 
and C R Pattinson. The reception 
Committee consists of M H. Alworth. 
John W. Comstock. William A. i.ov- 
eniry Harry R. Armstrong and L. B. 
^inoid and"^ the fl->>r committee * 

composed of ^i^"'•l•..;{^'"■^^'' Kkaki' 

bert H. Dresser. 'William A. Kaak^ 

Henry E. Grleser and Marvin C. Mc- 
Laren. ^^___ 

All Day Meetings. 

The first meeting of the Ladles' Aid 
society to be held in the new Bap- 
Ust church at the corner of J'^^^ 
avenue east and First ^^treet w ill be 
an all-day session, to be held tomor- 
?ow:^ LunJheon will be served at noon, 
m the afternoon the regular mo^t/ily 
himble bee will be he d and the 
women of the fongregation and their 
friends are invited^ to ^be present. 

The members of Circle 4 of St. Paul's 



Episcopal church will meet tomorrow 
I for an all day meeting with Mrs. Fred 
1 Reynolds of 220 East Third street. 
I There is much work to be done and a 
i largo attendance la desired. 

Opera Class. 

The second series of lectures in the 
Listeners' opera cla.ss, under the 
leadership of Mr. Stella Prince Stock- 
I er will begin tomorrow afternoon at 2 
o'clock at tlie home of the leader. 1014 
East Second street. The list of operas 
to be studied is as follows: 

March 11.— Mozart's "Magic Flute. 

March 18.— Mozart's "Don Giovanni 

and Figaro." . ,. 

March2.— Gay's "Beggars Opera and 
a sketch of Debussy's new opera 
"PellPas and Melisande." , . . ,. 

April 1.— Meyerbeer's "L'Afncaine 
and • Le Prophete." 

^urll n —Various settings of Faust 
story Music from Berlioz's "Damna- 
tion of Faust." Boito's "Mephisto- 
pheles, Gounod's "Faust." 

In th.^se meetings the principal opera 
Is played through with abridgements 
and a number of the voca solo-s and 
concerted pieces are supplied by as- 
sisting musicians and sometimes b> 
the help of phonographic records. "The 
instrumental parts and explanations 
are given by Mrs. Stocker. 



est Is being taken In the preparation 
of costumes for the evening. The 
party will be the regular March so- 
cial, although the costume feature 
promises to make It a social event of 
more than ordinary charm. 



Travel Class. 



were married at Winnipeg March 2. 
Mr. Dubuc. who Is a lawyer of Win- 
nipeg, is a son of Chief Justice Dubuo 
of the king's bench court of Manitoba. 
• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Fuller have re- 
turned from a seven weeks' visit in 
California. 



Afternoon Social. 

The members and f/lends of the 
Ladies of the Garfield <.'"-c»e of the 
n \ R will be entertained at a so- 
aaf tomorrow afternoon at the home 
of Mrs. E. Robinson of 42. W^est Third 
street. 

Costume Party. 

The members of the Young Women s 
rhristlan association will celebrate bt 
PaJdck's dav with a costume party. 
March 18- The affair -^"Ji« "-^,^,f. 
to the members only and great Inter 



Tadies^Tailor 

/ 522 Jeffenon St. Duluth, Minn. 

zenith Phone 303>i-Y. Old FKone 172 1- f . 



An open meeting of the Travel cla.ss 
of the Twentieth Century club will be 
held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock 
at the club room of the library. The 
members and guests are requested to 
note the change of the day of meeting. 
The regular meeting day of this class 
Is Tuesday, but has been changed to 
Wednesday this week. 

Personal Menton. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McGonagle 
returned today trom Rochester. Minn. 

• • • 

Mrs J. W. Kreitter left today for a 
few days' visit with Mrs. George Prud- 

den of St. Paul. 

• • • 

Miss Lou Smallwood has returned 
from a short visit at Minneapolis. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Patrick will 
leave tomorrow for a short visit at 

Chicago. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. H W. Fisher left this 
afternoon for the East and will sail 
soon for a several months' trip abroad. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Anionic Dubuc of 
Winnipeg have been the guests of Dr. 
L M. iBrunet. Mr. and Mrs. Dubuc 



FrNER.\L IS HELD. 

Isaac .4brahamson Left ManyFrieuds 
Amonis; Residents of Duluth. 

The funeral of Isaac Abrahamson 
was held at 1 o'clock today from the 
Adash Israel synagogue. Third avenue 
east and Third street. Interment was 
made at the Jewish cemetery. 

The funeral was attended by a large 
number of friends. Mr. Abrahamson 
had been a resident of Duluth for 




Fashions in Jewtir 



iKPRidErs 



:at 



FLAKE CELERY aaWBlBlJ 

N» breakfast food can compare with it, 
am It contains all ths elomsnU found ia 



It pays b«»t to offer our cus- 
tomers the best style, finish 
and quality of jewelry of all 
kinds Our new stocks are 
well selected and represent the 
latest designs and most artis- 
tic styles for the fastidious 
purchasers as well as the pop- 
ular styles for all. We call 
your attention to our new 
styles of Diamond Rings, Qola 
and Gold Filled Watches, Wed- 
ding Rings. .Signet Rings and 
a complete line of novelties In 
Gold. Silver and Cut Glass. 
Don't fall to see our display. 




I 



ISAAC ABRAHAMSON. 




fifteen years previous to his death. He 
was president of the Hub Clothing 
company until it went out of bu.slness 
a few years ago, and when he retired 
from active business about three years 
ago, he was proprietor of the Sterling 
Wine house. 

Mr. Abrahamson was also one of th« 
most prominent members of the Jew- 
ish synagogue and was extremely ac- 

. tive in raising the funds to build the 

' church. 





THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUES DAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 






2112 West Superior Street 

NY DAY now you may expect the announce- 
ment and when it comes your wildest dreams 
will be more than realized. 





'WAIT FOR the BIG SHOW 

FOR IT NEVER HAD AN 

EQUAL. 



JOHNSON 



M'DONALD-SMITH 
CASE SETTLED 

Long Litigation Over Big 

Commission Comes 

to an End. 

It is understood that the case of Ken- 
neth A. McDonald against Patrick A. 
Smith of the Rat Portage Lumber com- 
pany has been settled, although no pa- 
pers to that eftect have yet been filed 
in the district court. 

The case has been In litigation for a 
long time and has been tried twice. Mr. 
McDonald sued lor 110.000 which he 
claimed was due him as a commission on 
the sale ot some timber lands in the 
Pelican Lake district from Mr. Smith to 
John McAlpine of this city. Although 
Mr. Smith is said to have repudiated the 
deal, Mr. McDonald claimed that he ful- 
liUed ills contract to get a purchaser at 
the price agreed, and demanded his com- 
mission. He won at the ttrst trial, but 
the supreme court set the verdict aside 
and ordered a new trial. Mr. McDonald 
won at the second trial and Judgment 
was ordered lor J13.700, the full amount 
he claimed, with Interest. 

A few days ago Mr. Smith's motion 
for a new trial was argued at a special 
term of the district court and the mat- 
ter was under advisement at the time 
the reported agreement for a settlement 
was reached by the parties. 

The basis of the settlement Is not 
known, dehnltely, outside the principals 
to the action and their attorneys, but It 
is understood that the amount is less 
than the last Judgment. 

H B Prvborger represented Mr. Mc- 
Donald and" W. D. Bailey of Washburn. 
Bailey & Mitchell represented Mr. Smith. 

roos'evelt¥ 
not to blame 




MO 




STOCI 



is to be sold quick, and the prices named will com- 
pletely paralyze all attempts at competition. 

WANTED, AT ONC E. 1 00 MORE SALESPEOPLE . 

EMMA J. JOHNSON. 






FIGURES ARE 

MISLEADING 

Census Man Cliarged Willi 

Erroneous Statements 

on Print Paper. 

New York, March 10.— Charges of 
ofTiclal dereliction are made again.st .S. 
N. D. North, director of the census. In 
a letter which has been sent to Presi- 
dent Roosevelt by Herman Riddct. 
j^resident of the American Newspaper 
Publishers' 
charges 



Representative Dalzell, on the sub- 
ject of news print paper for a period 
of rtftecn years. Director North gave 
ix series of •false and imisleading 
figures." He cliargcs tliut the director 
failed to exercise diligence in seeking 
for information, and that he u.sed 
wortlilc-^s and secondary sources of 
iiiforinatlon. 

"That letter has been u.«ed on the 
llcation.' " says Mr. Ridder in his com- 



lication,' says 



association, 
that in a letter 



Mr. Ridder 
written to 



Mr. Hidderln his com- 
munication to the president, "and it 
was declared by Chairman Payne of 
tlie ways and means comuiittee, to be 
as accurate as can l)e. 

"I charge that the director of the 
census has issued, in that letter, a 
series of false and misleading tlgures, 
and that, whether intentional or not. 
ho has served Uie purpo.se of a group 
of combinations which are aiding to 
add $(50,000,000 per annum to the bur- 
dens of priJiters and publishers." 

He points out that in Director 
North's letter there is a lapse of 



mi 



1 



Eagle 



The Lesson of the 
and the Weasel 

The familiar story goes that once, when an eagle 
pounced upon a weasel and soared with it high into the 
air, the weasel fastened its fangs deep into the eagle's breast 
and commenced to draw its life-blood. The eagle tried to 
shake the weasel off, but the weasel hung on until the 
eagle fell lifeless to the ground. 

There is a moral in this for every sufferer from coughs 
or colds. Don't let your cough hang on — for 
every day it weakens your lungs and gradually wears 
down your system until serious lung troubles develop. 

DR. D. JAYNE'S 
EXPECTORANT 

is the oldest and most reliable cough remedy known. For 77 
years it has been successful in relieving and curing Coughs, 
Colds, Bronchitis, Pleurisy, Inflammation of the Lungs, 
Croup and Whooping Cough. It is sold by all druggists 
in $1.00, 50c. and 25c bottles. Get it for your cough today. 

Jayne's Tonic V«rinifaf(« is a genUe and effective tonic for 
adults and children. A saJe Worm Cure. 



three years for the period from Jan. 
1 1S97. to Jan. 1. 1900. when paper 
dropped to 131; a ton, or Jlh less than 
tile present aslting price. Mr. Ridder 
savs that in those three years thirty 
mills were merged into the Interna- 
tional Paper company. The letter ; 
says, also, that "the lowest price ap- 
pearing anywhere In that extraor- 
dinary compilation of the director of 
the census is 6 per cent in excess of 
the lowest price at which paper has 
been .«oUl in New YorK," and that 
"no books of any large paper manu- 
facturer will show such prices: as are 
credited by Director Xoith." 

(OMEiTrO AN END. 

All Testimony Taken in the Shea- 
Rabb-Cronia Case. 

Tlie Shea-Rabb-f'ionin ca.se. involv- 
ing the title to lands in the Cedar 
Island lake district, which has been 
occupying the attention of the local 
land ofllcials for the last six weeks, 
came to a close last evening. No de- 
cision is expected for several weeks. 
This is said to be the longest hearing 
on record at the local office. 

Relatives of Shea claim the man was 
not in his richt mind when he relln- 
nuishcd his claim, a few years ago. A 
man named Vnnderllp filed on the 
tract of land, and it is alleged that he 
paid .Shea %1,'M for his rellnijulshment. 

TAXrEL GOLDMAN LECTURES. 

La>v-Abi(ling People of New Tlni 
Desire Xo Anarchistic Teaching. 

New I'lm, M'.jm.. March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The local Turnverein has 
cancelled the engagement of Enmm Gold- 
man to deliver two lecture* in their hall. 

The lectures were Ixioked for March 
23 and 24 on the topics of "The Revolu- 
tKinarv Spirit in M«Mltrn Prama" and 
the 



band hopes that there will be a recon 
cilia tlon. There has been an estrange- 
ment between them, but there has not 
been anv such outbreak on the part 
of the husband as has been described." 
The story referred to said there had 
been a violent scene between Thaw 
and his wife during the latter's last 
visit to her husband. 



COMMIHED 

NO OFFENSE 

The Supreme Court Up- 
holds Decision Freeing 
Schmitz and Ruef. 

San Francisco, March 10.— The state su- 
preme court yesterday refused a rehearing 
in the case of Former Mayor Eugene G. 
Schmitz, convicted of extortion from 
French restaurant proprietors and sen- 
tenced to five years in the penitentiary. 
The opinion was unanimous. 

This sustains the decision of the dis- 
trict court of appeals, which set aside 
the Judgment and order of the lower court 
here, sustained the demurrer to the in- 
dictment and order the discharge of the 
defendant on the ground that under the 
law no offense had been cominltteJ 
Abraham Ruef. who was jointly indicted 
with Schmitz, pleaded guilty, and hi3 
sentence Is now pending. 

Yesterdays decision of the euprcme 
court also applies to him. It Is believed 
that Schmitz will immediately apply- fur 
release from the county jail, and Kuei 
may do likewise. The prosecution pur- 
poses to at once bring to trial some uf 
The many other charges preferred agalnsr 

The court sustained the appellate court 
in its decision that the Indictment upon 
which Schmitz was convicted was defc- 
tive in that it did not aver that Schmitz 
was mayor: that Ruef, his co-defendant, 
was a political boss practically in con- 
trol Of the city: that as such they were 
in position to exercise power and undue 
Influence over the police comm Is.- loners, 
and that it did not show that SchmiU re- 
sorted to unlawful means in threatening 
to have liquor licenses withheld. 

The decision practically nullifies Ruef s 
plea of guilty, invalidates the remaining 
four extortion indictments against the 
former mayor and Ruef. and will enable 
Schmidt to gain his "berty . on bail after 
eight months' confinement in the county 

^Vciunsel for Schmitz announced that 
steps would be taken for the formei 

"The decision demonstrates," said For- 
mer Mayor Schmitz. "that the highest 
^urt in the state believes what I J^avo 
always claimed, that I was removed from 
office and railroaded to prison. 

THE wIfLEY^ 
CASE HEARD 

Evidence in Impeachment 
Proceedings Given Be- 
fore Committee. 

Washington. March lO.-A special com- 
mittee appointed by Speaker Cannon to 
determine whether there is sufflcien. 
ground for the impeachment of l^bbeud 
R Wilfley. judge of the United States 
court for China at Shanghai, who stands 
accused of misconduct in office by Loria 
S Andrews and other American law'yers 
residents of Shanghai, yesterday heard 
arguments and took the case under ad- 
visement. . , ^, .„„ . 

Representative Waldo of New York, 
upon whose resolution the Investigating 



FIRST WEAR 
OUT Wmi AGE 

Kidneys Get Weak and 

Inactive and Few Know 

What to do. 






This Recipe Relieves Kid- 
ney and Bladder Trouble 
and Rheumatism 



Judge Morris Says the 

Money Stringency Was 

Not Due to Him. 

"Modern Tendencies" was the subject 
of an address delivered by Judge Page 
Morris of the federal court before a reg- 
ular monthly meeting of the Men's club 
of the First M. B. church last evening. 
The speakers remarks dealt largely with 
the big business Interests of the country. 
He expressed the belief that the modern 
tendency Is the evolution of the people's 
conscience, not the revolution of the peo- 
ple's Industry. „ 

Judge Morris contended that Roose- 
velt Is but the exponent of a modern 
popular movement that was inevitable 
and was not to be avoided. He declared 
that President Roosevelt had made no 
investigation that did not show fraud, 
and commenced no prosecutions where 
the law had not been violated. He said 
the money stringency was not due to 
Roosevelt's radicalism. He also said the 
people had signed another declaration 
of Independence, to Keep the corporations 
from overshadowing the nation. 

Vncqwaltxl as a Cure for Croup. ,^„ __- 

Besides being an excellent reme-dy --->';rth"r^ughr'"tt'- ta\"i1.g"S? /et 

tlmony. as Mr. Andrews' counsel, made 
the opening argument against Judge \\ u- 
flev whose impeachment he strongly 
urged. Judge Wilfley followed in hi.s 
ow-n behalf. Ho entered denials of 
wrong doings and denounced his ac- 
cusers as one who had strung togetlier 
a long list of half trusts and on their 
strength was trying to satisfy a personal 
enite Represent.atlve Denby of Michi- 
gan, Judge Wilfley's counsel closed for 
the defense. He asserted the complete 
absence of anything on which to base 
impeachment procedlngs. Mr. Andrws 
closed for the prosecution. Ho reUerated 
his charges against Judge Wilfley .and 



The great majority of men and woni* 
en at the age of 50 years begin to feel 
the first signs of advancing a«e la 
some form of kidney trouble and blad- 
der weakness. Few are entirely fre» 
from that torturous disease, rheuma- 
tism, which is not a disease in itself 
but a symptom of deranged function 
of the kidneys which have become 
clogged and sluggish, failing in their 
duty of sifting and straining the pole- 
onous waste matter, uric acid, etc, 
from the blood, permitting it to re- 
main and decompose, settling about 
the joints and muscles, causing in- 
tense pain and suffering. 

The bladder, however, causes the old 
folks the most annoyance, especially 
at night and early morning. 

A noted authority in a recent artici* 
stated that he has wonderful succesa 
with the old-time "vegetable treatment. 
He states: "Of sixteen cases of blad- 
der troubles and rheumatism whioli 
have been treated with this treatment 
only one very complicated case failed 
to fully yield to its remarkable in- 
fluence. It is the most harmless treat- 
ment I have ever found to clean the 
system of rheumatic poisons; remov« 
irritation of the bladder and relieve 
urinary difficulties of the old people 
It is a true vitalizing tonic to the en- 
tire kidney and urinary structure, re- 
invigorating the entire system." 

What he terms "old vegetable treat- 
ment" consists of the following simple 
prescription, the Ingredients which can 
be obtained from any good pharmacy 
at small cost: Compound Kargon, one 
ounce; Fluid Extract Dandelion, one- 
half ounce. Compound Syrup Sarea- 
parilla. three ounces. Shake well in a 
bottle and take in teaspoonful dosee 
after each meal and upon going to 
bed. also drink plenty of water. 

This prescription, though simple, is 
always effective in the diseases and 
afflictions of the kidneys and bladder. 



for colds and throat troubles. Cham 
berlain's Cough Remedy is unequaled 
as a cure for croup, * says Harry Wil- 
son of Waynetown. Ind. When given 
as soon as the croupy cough appears, 
this remedy will prevent the attack. 
It is used successfully in many thou- 
sands of homes. For sale by all drug- 
gists. 



"Child and Its Enemies." 




ESTRANGEMENT 
BETWEEN THAWS 

Harry's Wife Desires a 

Separation, But He 

Does Not. 

New York, March 10.— Col. Franklin 
Barrett, the lawyer who has been en- 
gaged by Mrs. William Thaw to assist 
In straightening out the troubles of 
her son. Harry K. Thaw, is Quoted as 
making the following statement re- 
garding the reported break in the 
relations between Thaw and his wife, 
Evelyn Xesbit Thaw. 

The reports that have been printed 
to the effect that Mrs Evelyn Xesbit 
Thaw has been shadowed for evi- 
dence in a divorce proceeding are 
without truth. 

".Mrs. William Thaw is Inclined to 
be fair and just with her son's wife. 
In so far as I am concerned as coun- 
sel for the mother, I would not use 
any such means are are suggested in 
the frequently printed stories. I be- 
lieve that Mrs. Evelyn Xesbit Thaw- 
has every reason to expect consider- 
ation in her treatment by myself as 
counsel for Mrs. William Thaw. Mrs. 
Evelyn Xesbit Thaw desires a separ- 
ation from her husband and her hus- 



Prof. II. A. Ilowrll. of Havana. Cuba, 

lloconimrnds CluinilK'rlain's 

Cousin ItcnuHly. 

"As long ago as I can rememb< r my 
mother was a faithful user and friend 
of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy, but 
never in my life have I realized Its 
true value until now," writes Prof. H. 
A. Howell. <'f Howell's American 
School. Havana. Cuba. "On the night 
of February 3rd our baby was taken 
sick with a" very severe told, the next 
day was worse and the following 
night his condition was desperate. He 
could not lie down and it was neces- 
sarv to have him In the arms every 
moment. Even then his breathing 
was difficult. I did not think he 
would live until morning. At last I 
thought of mv mother's remedy. 
Chami>rrlain's Cough Remedy, which 
we gave, and It afforded prompt re- 
lief, and n.w. three days later, he 
has fully recovered. Under the cir- 
cumstances I would not hesitate a mo- 
ment in saying that Chamberlain's 
Cough Remedy, and that only saved 
the life of our dear little boy." For 
sale by all druggists. 

SOLDIERSlOLD 
ANNUAL BANQUET 

Members of Company C 
Have a Pleasing So- 
cial Affair. 



The banquet given by Company C of 
the Minnesota Nattonal Guard at the 
St. Li'Uis hotel last evening was a very I 
happy event. The affair was f-iUv at- 1 
tended. The company has Its full quota ' 
of se^-enty-six men. a fact that was 
recorded on the menu card by the num- 
ber "76." 

Bently P. Neff acted as toastmaster. 
:.r\d a pleasing program was rendered 
after the fea*t. Capt. F. D. Knowlton 
of Company C resp<..nded to the toast 
"Esprit de Corps;" Lieut. Chester Shep- 
ard of the West Point Military academy 
gave an interesting talk about thai 
famous institution; Maj. H. V. Lv-si re- 
sponded to "The Ladies;' Capt. O. "• 
mockery, the United States recruiting 
offictr sialloiitd here, talked of the regu- 
lar army; Lieut. W. O. Fiodm responded 
to "Our Company; Sergeant Fred "• 
Wood discussed "The Bniisted Man. and 
John O. Olson responded lo "Memoirs. 

MENTAL HL4LER HELD. 

Minneapolis. Minn., March 10.-(Special 
to The Herald.)— W. A. birkholz, a men- 
tal healer, has been held to iht-^ federal 
grand Jurv bv United States Commls- 
Fioner Howarl Albott on a charge of 
using the mails to defraud. He wag re- 
leased on furnishing bonds in the sum 
of $l,t»00. 



CONSTRUCTION 
WAS DEFECTIVE 

Says Report of Commis- 
sion Which Investigated 
Quebec Disaster. 

Ottawa. Ont., March 10.— The report of 
the roval coninussion on the collapse of 
the Quebec bridge in whicii eighty live.s 
were lost, was presented to prnllameiii 
yf<!ter<lav. The commission ttnds that 
the collapse wivs due to defective con- 
struction and that the parts of the bridge 
that gave way were the lower chords 
In the anchor arrangement near the 

main pier. ., . , ■,, 

The failure cannot be attributed di- 
rectly to any cause other than errors 
In Uidpinent on the part of these two 
engineers, the report declares. 

The report then continues: 1 hese er- 
rors In judgment cannot be attributed 
either to lack of common prijfesslonal 
knowledge, to neglect of duty or to a 
desire to economize. '1 he abinty oi tne 
two engin' ers was tried in one of the 
most difficult problems of the day and 
proved insufficient. 

"A grave error was made In aasuinmg 
the dead load for the calculations at too 
low a value and not afterwards revis- 
ing this assumption." 

•rhc failure of the Quebec Bridge com- 
pany to appoint an experienced bridge 
engineer Is criticised. The work of the 
I'hoonix Bi dge company in mak;ng the 
drawings, ai.d planning and execut ng 
the erection of the bridge and ot the 
Phoenix Iron company in fahrlcating 
the material is commended. I he steel 
r"ed was of good .luality, the rei^irt de- 
clares, the serious defects being lunda- 
mental error in de.=lgn. . .,. ^ 

The professional knowledge of the day 
concerning the action of the steel col- 
umns under load, the rep<^rt concludes, 
is not sufficient to enable engineers econ- 
Ifr>Tif^fliiv to design such structures as the 
i"Sc\.r^2e: ^A bridge <^^ ^'\^f^,^^'l^'^^, 
span thai will be safe can be built, but 
a much larger amount of metal must be 
used. 



sought to impress upon the committee 
the sinister motives prompting the judge a 
alleged acts of gross favoritism, neglect 



elation or take what comes. 

Warden Conley of the state peni- 
tentiary at Oeer Lodge. Mont., who wajj 
<;eriouslv stabbed while frustrating a Jaai 
break, is improving and will probably rs- 
cover 

Loss of about J12.000 worth of silver- 
plate, jewelry and precious stone* 
through a theft by burglars at his home 
in the East side fa:?hionable residenc« 
district, was reported to the police Moii- 
day night by Kdward S. Rapallo, an at- 
lorney PracJcally the entire house waa 

ransaced. . ,^ ^^, 

\ P<re Marquette pissenger train col- 
lided with an extra train near U yomlnf 
yards, Michigan, Monday. One perron 
was killed and several were Injurea. 

Dr Giovanni Grana, a prominent phy- 
sician, his brother-in-law, John Orflno, 
and a friend, Alfonso Mule were 



IIIIU. 

shot 



from ambush last night In \obor City^ 
Fla by four men who had .^ecrete* 
ihemselves in tiie grounds of St. Josephs 
cathedral. Mule will probably die. fh* 
others were only slightly wounded. 



of duty, prejudice and abuse of POwer 

The committee has not announced the 
probable tim e of its report. 

OLSOWSENT 
TO REFORMATORY 

Young Man Sentenced 

for Chinese Restaurant 

Robbery Case. 

C^eorge Selmer Olson was found 
guilty of participating in the hold-up 
of Joseph Charnego in a local restau- 
rant last December, was given a refor- 
matory sentence yesterday afternoon 
by Judge Cant. Olson was taken to St. 
(Moud today to begin his term 

It was alleged by the state that Ol- 
•jon and two other men relieved Char- 
nego of his money, $16 in all, as the 
latter left the restaurant. When 
Thomas Anderson, the alleged accom- 
nlice of Olson, was first tried, the 
jury disagreed. At the second trial. 
Anderson was found guilty, but the 
court has since ordered a now trial. 
Olson also moved for a new trial, but 
his application was denied. 

DAMAGE^SE^ 
IS DISMISSED 



HOUSE 




*i 



INDIANS GOOD SENSE. 
Cove, Minn.. March 10.-(Sptcial to The 
Herald.)— John Davis, one of our pros- 
r>erouR Indians who recently received 
%X(*<i> to J4,<iOO from the sale of timber on 
his allotted land »t White Eiarth, has 
lately Invested quite heavily In lots at 
Wahkon. John shows good Btnse in 
put tiny bls mooey Into Wahkon lots. 



THE DOCTORS GIFT. 
Food W orth Its Weight in Gold. 

We usually expect the doctor to put 
us on some kind of penance ajid give 
us bitter mtdicines. 

A Penn. doctor brought a patient 
something entirely different and the 
results are truly interesting. 

"Two years ago," writes this patient, 
"I wi's a fre<iuent victim of acute indi- 
gestion and billiousness, being allowed 
to eat verv few things. One day our 
famllv debtor brought me a small 
pa<"kage. saying he had found some-, 
th'ng for me to eat, at last. 

"He said it was a food c^led Grape- 
Nuts and even as Us golden color 
might suggest, it was worth its weight 
in gold. I was sick and tired, trying 
one thing after another to no avail, but 
as last consented to try this new food. 

"Well! It surpassed my doctor's 
fondest anticipation and everj' day 
since then I have blessed the good doc- 
tor and the inventor of Grape-Nuts. 

"I noticed improvement at once and 
in a month's time my former spells of 
Indigestion had disappeared. In Uvo 
months I felt like a new man. My 
brain was much clearer and keener, 
my body took on the vitality of youth, 
and this condition has continued." 

"There's a Reason." Name given by 
Postum Co., Battle Creek, Mich. Read 
•The Road to Wellville," in pkys. 



Berneche-Hiiliard Case is 

Settled After Long 

Litigation. 

The damage case of Wilfred Bernoche 
against John W. Hllliard. after a Ions 
litigation involving two trials and a start 
On the third, was settled out of court yos- 
terdav and dismissed. The jury was 
drawn yesterday morning and the trial 
opened but the settlement was eff«'cted 
before any testimony was introdu>ed. 

Berneche sued for $5,000 damages. He 
won at the fir.<»t trial, but the supreme 
court directed a new trial. At the second 
trial at the last term of the district 
court, the jury disagreed and the case 
came up this term for a third trial. 

Mr Berneche was represented by Jonn 
Jenswold, Jr., and Mr. Hililard by Howard 
T. Abbott. ^ 

BRIEF TELEGRAMS. 

Capt Daniel Stewart. 94 years of age. 
died Sunday at the home of his grand- 
daughter, Mrs. John H. Diamond, at 
I'pper Alton, 111., after lying in bed 
twenty-seven years, during the greater 
part of which time he smoked a pipe. 

The Jones & Laughlin Steel company 
has ordered work resumed on Its new 
plant at Aliquippa, Pa., which was stop- 
ped last fall. The company also reports 
a gratifying increase in orders and the 
belief that steady improvement will con- 
tinue. 

A dozen or more tobacco growers 
around Hickory Grove. Ky.. have re- 
ceived warning notices from Night Rid- 
ers advising th«n(i to set Into the asao- 



Tliousands of American women 
in our homes are daily sacriticing 
tiieir lives to duty. 

In order to keep the home neaft 
and pretty, the children well dressed 
and tidy, women overdo. A female 
weakness or displacement is often 
brought on and they suffer in silence, 
driftuig along from bad to worse, 
knowing well that they ought to 
have help to overcome the pains and . 
aches which daily make life a burden. 

It is to these faithful women that 

LYDIAE.PINKHAM'S 
VEGETABLE COMPOUND 

comes as a boon and a blessing. 
as it did to Mrs. F. Ellsworth, of 
May\'Ule, N. Y., and to Mrs. W. P. 
Boyd, of Beaver Falls, Pa., who say i 
" I was not able to do my own Tvork, 
owing to the female trouble from which 
1 suffered. Lydia E. Pinkham's Veee- 
tableCompound helped me wonderfully, 
and I am so well that I can do as big % 
day's work as I ever did. I wish every 
sick woman would try it. 

FACTS FOR SICK WOMEN. 

For thirty years Lydia E. Pink- 
ham's Vegetable Compund, made 
from roots and herbs, has been the 
standard remedy for female ills, 
and has positively cured thoujsands of 
women who have been troubled with 
displacements, inflammation, ulcera- 
tion, fibroid tumors, irregularities, 
periodic pains, backache, that bear- 
mg-down feeling, flatulency, indi^s- 
tion,dizzines8,or nervous prostration. 
Why don't you try it ? 

Mrs. Pinkham inrltes all sick 
women to write her for advice* 
She has guided thousands (• 
health. Address, Lynn, MaMi 




n 



x 



THE DULUTH EVENING TiERALD: .TUrSEAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



THE EVENING HERALD 

•\N iVDi im:m>f,nt nfwspapfr. 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY. 



Published at Herald Bldg.. First St.. Op. P. O. Square. 

TiiF hi:h.\li> comp.wy. 

•Phones: Pountlng R«>om. 32 4; Editorial Rooms, 112^6. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 
liV U. S. !i;.\I!.. IH)ST.\GK PKKPAIO. 

Daily, vr yoar. In utUmu x- *o'oo 

Dailv, si.x months, in mlvanoe -• 

Dally, ihr.'.' months, in advance *•"" 

Daily, one nioiith. In a.lvanre •* 

Entered at Duluth Postolfloe as Second-Class Matter. 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



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;.:;' .Ktioii of lii:i:r;y. and wlio crawl oii kiiccs yrown c;il- 
Uniscd by the practice to ask the slightest parliamentary 
favors fumi the czar who wields the scepter? 

Mr Nelson is to be commended for his courage and 
Iilain speaking, lie point out a real danger to the se- 
curity of the republic, and shows how representative gov- 
ernment has been prostituted to the service of greed. It 
would be well if there were more such brave congress 
men. and if they can be had in no other way the pc^iilc 
ought to furnish them in place of those now shamelessly 
crooking the pregnant hinges of the knee before the seat 
of all real legislative authority, the speaker's chair. 



Down at Mar&ttM. Wis., according 
>nK>V a traveling sales- 
wt^e Lenox yesterday. 



BY CARRIER, IN THE CITY, TEN CENTS A WEEK. 

KVF.RY KVFMNt; — DFIilVERFD. 

S 02 

Single copy, dally • 43 

One month i'.jq 

Three months goo 

Six months 5 00 

One year 2i =^' ' - '-■I 

TO SUBSCRIBERS: 

It is important when deslrlnR the addre-ss of your 
paper changed to give both old and new addresses. 



HEARTLESS BRUTALITY. 

If half that has been told about the practices of em- 
ployment agents is true, the city council perf..rmcd a 
useful service last night when it set aside a conlmgcnt 
fund to be used l)y the police department in conducting 
an investigation. 

Beyond doubt there are men in the business of con- 
<lucting employment agencies that are as honest and as 
conscientious as any engaged in .uher lines of activity, 
and it would be very unfair to brand the whole business 
as evil because of the misdeeds of a few. But there can 
be no question that some of the men in charge of em- 
ployment agencies use very little honesty and no hu- 
manity whatever in their dealings with the unemployed 
and these should be scourged out of business and pun- 
ished severely whenever it can be proved that they have 
swindled laborers. 

It was charged by a committee headed by Rev. J. T. 
Moody >>i tlie Bethel that some of these agents will take 
the last dollar from a man looking for work, and send 
him out on a wild goose chase. There can be nothing 
tnore cruel and heartless than this. To the ordinary hu- 
man being a man with a lone dollar in his pocket, seeking 
honest work, is a subject for humane treatment and for 
sympathy, not for plunder. The agent that will take that 
dollar on false pretences and send the man away in hope- 
ful search of work tliat does not exist, can have little 
heart or conscience. 

Chief of Police Troyer said that the police department 
had had many complaints of dishonesty against employ- 
ment agents, but that tlie officers had found it difhcult. 
as a rule, to bring the otTenders to trial because the wit- 
nesses usually had no money to keep them while waiting 
to appear to prove their charges. The council, therefore, 
aet aside a small sum to be used in boarding such wit- 
nesses until trials of accused employment agents can be 
had, and if the charges that have been made are true, it 
•will be money exceedingly well spent. 

Honest employment agents will no doubt welcome this 
' move, because it is to their interest that the odium at- 
tached to their business by the inhuman conduct of the 
dishonest agents be removed. The way to remove it is to 
put out of business those who have so little principle as 
to rob a needy worker by taking his last dollar on the 
false pretense that it will buy him a job. 

The stories that are told hint, too, at collusion be- 
tween foremen and the dishonest employment agents. A 
case was cited in which four men who paid an employ- 
ment agent for jobs found them as represented, but were 
discharged after a few hours by a foreman who brutally 
stated that they had to go to make room for the next 
crowd. 

The employers of such a foreman would no doubt be 
glad to kn(»w it if their men are engaged in such heart- 
less enterprises. A foreman who would do this — if there 
as a foreman so unconscionably brutal— is fully as deserv- 
ing of punishment as the empoyment agent. There 
should be swift and severe penalties for both. -\t least 
the employment agent should be fined and his license re- 
voked, and the foreman should be discharged; it would 
not be too much punishment if both went to jail. 



WHAT ONE CITY HAS DONE. 

The modern purpose of society toward its erring mem- 
bers is not to degrade them and punish them so much as 
it is to redeem them and make men out of them. 

Nowhere is there a more striking example of this 
modern attitude than the city of Cleveland ha» furnished 
in the last six years under Mayor Tom L. Johnson. The 
story of its accomplishment in the redemption of men 
should be in the hands of the municipal authorities of 
every city in the land. 

The customary oflf-hand way of dealing with common 
drunks, for instance, is to sentence them to a term on the 
rockpile or in the county jail, an experience which tends 
to deprive them of whatever pride they may have left, and 
to confirm them in their intemperance if it docs not make 
criminals out of them. Many magistrates have adopted 
the parole system with first offenders, with excellent re- 
sults. Cleveland does better than any of them. It puts 
them on a farm where by hard work, wholesome air and 
clean surroundings, their abused systems are given a 
chance to recuperate and their diseased wills are given a 
basis on which to re-establish themselves. 

Help rather than punishment is what Cleveland holds 
out to its drunks, its vagabonds, its petty offenders, young 
and old, male and female. The Cleveland farm colony 
is one of the most interesting experiments in the country. 
It is a farm of igoo acres, pleasantly and salubriously 
located. Upon it is a municipal tuberculosis hospital, an 
infirmary and a workhouse. The "prisoners" are put at 
useful, wholesome work. They are not surrounded by 
walls or hedged in by armed guards. There isn't a gun in 
sight on the place, .^id almost never does one of them 
try to escape. The prisoners come there weak, unstrung, 
feeble of body and will. They go away stronger, better 
and more hopeful. They are treated like men. and it 
makes them want to be men. 

While serving sentence, those who will accept it — and 
lew i)l them refu.se it — are given something of the educa- 
tion they lack. There are classes in which young men 
and old have a chance to pick up some elementary knowl- 
edge. Some of the prisoners are teachers. Some of them, 
when discharged, come back nights to continue their 
studies. Former prisoners have formed a "brotherhood" 
which takes charge of released prisoners and cares for 
them until they get a firm footing again. In two years 



to llio stateme 
man, who was 

there is one oKthe largest chicken 
farms In the World. They raise so 
many chickens that even the owner ha.s 
given up attuiuprtiat to figure out the 
exact number orNfajvl-** he has iu the 
egg-making line^| 

Of course, hav»jf so many chickens 
it is only natural that there should be 
a very large chiwk«Hi house. There Is. 
In fact, it is one of the largest in the 
world. The size of the chicken house 
and the industry of the hens gave the 
owner an idea. Not that he had never 
hud any before— because he was a very 
bright man. 

He conceived the idea of cultivating 
patriotism among the fowls. It is 
ijeedh ss to say iijat many of tnem were 
Plymouth rocKs. rio ht; rigged up a 
large set of thim.-s, tliat in some man- 
ner connected with the feeding plaza 
of the Plyninuin rocks. Every time 
one of the Plymouth fowls gave the 
corn holder a- resounding lliud with Its 
bill some enchanting sound was re- 
flected on the iliimes. When some four 
thousand hens were at work picking 
at the corn that was fed to th»m at 
sun«,iry iiours of the day. one can im- 
agine the medley of popular airs that 
resulted from tlie gastronomic efforts 
of the chicks. 

When the hens were exceedingly hun- 
gry they used to substitute a ragtime 
fey the more even rythm of the martial 
airs. Upon Sunday. It Is said that sol- 
emn airs and music related to the deep- 
er devotional shin of life were played 
by the asstmiblod chorus of the hen 
bi-lgade. They are not allowed the free- 
dom of unrestrained liberty on .Sunday, 
owing to religious scruples of the 
owner, and therefore before the coming 
of dfwcy eve th.- neighbors in the vi- 
clnliy of the musical chicken house 
have about all of this style of music 
they can stand. 

This Is the tale the drummer tells, 
and he alone will have to answer for It. 
• • « 

C. W. Kllnem. who .•'♦^lls everything 
from cheese at an. e.'cpe.-^sive figure, to 
bllllaril tables anci hymn books, was 
telltng a story of the Southern negro's 
lazlne.ss. 

"All of them are lazy." he said, "yet 
some itrit more laay than others. It's 
a case of possess!^ the don't move 
habit in a more or loss degree. This 
negro had It In Its most malignant 
form. 

Finally the citizens of the community 
threatened to bury him alive If he 
didn't go to work. Tli.> threat had no 
patent effect on him. and one day they 
put the oft repeated threat Into exe- 
cution. 

"He mu«t eUh«r go to work or be 
burled alive. Thejr were getting pretty 
near the last r«{^lng place and be- 
gun to get the frigid pedal extremities, 
for they were ofrald lest the cloud 
would KO to the grave without protest— 
burb d bv defa\ilt. In other words. 

"When they got to the outposts of 
the burying ground they halt.-d the 
parade and aske.l the star performer 
whether he .otill wanted to be hid under 
a bunch of terra flrmu." 

"What do I have to do to escape the 
penalty?" he asked. 

"You have to plant a load of corn, 
came the rf<?>ly from the about-to-be 
mourner.s. 

"Is dat corn husked." anxiously In- 
quired the big l>lark. 

"Nix." came the reply; "life Is 




THE \VEATiiEI^. 

Though there wa.s 
still a wintry chill 
in the air this 
morning. just a 
mere reminder that 
spring Is not yet 
here, there was also 
a balmy touch that 
sugges ted that 
.spring cannot be far 
off. It was clear 
and altogether de- 
_J liglitful. Last night's 
lowest temperature 
was 11 degs. and yesterday's highest was 
19 degs. The weather man says it will 
be warmer and partly cloudy tonight and 
tomorrow, and that the wind will be from 
tJie southwest. 

A year ago today it was bright and 
warm. 

The sun rose this ifiorning at 6:31 and 
sets tonight at 6:0G. makinR'n hours and 
35 minutes of sunlight. . 

.Sayj; Mr. Ricluudson of conditions: 
"Barometric pressures remain about sta- 
tionary, high over the Ohio valley and 
Wyoming, and low over Alberta. These 
conditions caused colder weather 
throughout Atlantic and Oulf states and 
higher temperatures In the Northwest, 
while rain or snow fell during Monday 
or last night in Atlantic states, Texas 
and over Lake Superior. Indications favor 
milder temperature and partly cloudy 
weather in this locality tonight and 
Wednesday." 

Following were last night's lowest tem- 
peratures: 

38 I Medicine Hat 



TWE NTY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date, 1888. 



***Dr. Ames' candidacy for the 
Democratic nomination for vice pres- 
ident is no longer looked upon as a 
huge joke. He is believed by his 
friends to be an available man, and 
the Democrats profess to believe they 
might carry Minnesota on the tariff 
issue. 



Abilene 

Asheville 

Atlanta 

Hattleford .... 

Bismarck 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Calm 

Calgary 

Charleston .•• 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Concordia 

L)avenix)rt 

IJenver 

Detroit 

l>evils Lake 

1 )odge 

Duluth 

l-Idmonton ... 

Kl Paso 

Escanaba 

Oalveston 

Grand Haven 
Green Bay . . 

Havre 

Helena 

Houghton .... 

Huron 

Jacksonville . 

iN.a HI loops .... 

Kansas City 

KnoxvUle .... 

La Crosse .. 

Ljander 

Little Rock . 

Los Angeles 

Marquette ... 



...30 Memphis 

...41 Miles City .... 

...a; Milwaukee... . 

...20 Minnedosa 

14 I Modena 

...•M \ Montgomery. .. 
....3b' i Moorhead ... . 
,... 3 I New Orleans 
,...4« ! New York ... 

,...32 I N'orlolk 

....32 I Northtield .. .. 
...30 'North Platte . 
...'M\ Oklahoma .. .. 

....24 Omaha 

....IS I Plioenlx 

20 i Pierre 

....20 ' Pittsburg .... 

11 Port Arthur 

....:«' Portland. Or. 
....38 ' Kapid City .. 

... 4 Keglna 

52 8t. Louis 

....18 St. Paul ...... 

16 I Sunt Antonio 

28 ; San Franci-sco 

28 Santa Fe 

.. — 2 S. Ste. Marie 

14 Shreveport .. 

..o.) Spokane .. .. 

32 Swift Current 

36 Washington.. 

32 Wichita 

a-i Willlslon .... 

....0 Winnenmcca . 

40 \Vinnip<'g ... . 

46 Yellowstone .. 

6 



..38 
..38 
. 20 
. .28 
.. 8 
..20 
. .*S 
..12 
..54 

.22 
..36 

— S 
»»■» 

. !»') 

..36 
..44 

. . 2<; 

•> 

'.'.40 
..2S 
..12 
..'36 
..IS 
..42 
..5;) 
..IS 

• » 

!!42 

..34 

..30 

..28 

. .2S 

..2.5 

. . .2.) 

...8 

...12 



♦••The city hall and courthouse 
scheme seems to have been abandoned, 
even by Its friends, and Mayor Sutphin 
now recommends the erection of a 
city hall on the property purchased 
for that purpose by the city two years 
ago. 

•**On March 8 Hon. E. P. Martin, 
judge of the municipal court, cele- 
brated his sixty-ninth birthday. He 
says he feels like a youth of 20, but 
reckoning by the fun he had, thinks 
he must be about 300. The city ofti- 
clals and other friends presented him 
with a congratulatory addre.ss, accom- 
panied by an easy chair and a box of 
cigars. 

•••John Cormack of Ely ha.s the 
contract for clearing the townsite of 
Ely and will begin work at once. 

•**R. C. HeydlaufE, formerly with 
Little & SImonds of this city, was 
elected alderman at the recent election 
in Ashland. 



•••Wieland Bros, intended putting 
up a fine four-story building next to 
the Y. M. C. A., where they now have 
a wooden building. Now their plans 
are -stopped because no vacant store 



they are forced to delay building until 
next year. 

•••The Scandinavian Elevator com- 
pany, C. C. Wolcott & Co.. agents, has 
put its name on one of the board of 
trade windows. 

•••A Chinaman has opened a gro- 
cery store at the West end. 

•••At the regular meeting of the 
firemen last night. J. H. Meining was 
made a member of the finance com- 
mittee, vice W. T. Rorbach, retired. 
The annual ball netted $102. 

••♦L A Gunderson and family haro 
just arrived here from Fergus Falls 
Mr Gunderson will open a restaurant 
in the building next to the harneas 
shop on Third .street. Rice's Point. 

•••The theater on Third street. West 
Superior. Is to be tini-shed and ready 
for occupancy by April 1 under the 
management of F. S. Hickock of Du- 
luth. 

•••George C. Stone, who is tha 
largest stockholder in the Lakeside 
Land company, states that trains on 
the Duluth & Iron Range will be run 
so that persons living at New London 
can reach Duluth at T and 8 a. m., 
while in the afternoon trains w'lll 
;eave here at 4:30 and 6:20. The mid- 
day trains will be continued. It la 
expected that the Iron Range will 
eventually become a great suburban 
line. 

•••George S. 'Shaw of the Cloquet 



in the entire city can be found to ^^- U^„,j,- Company is in the city. 



commodate their present tenants anc 



MEANT TO BE Fl NNY. 



Department of Agriculture. W ealhei 
Bureau. Duluth. March 10.- Local forecast 
f<jr twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Wednesday: Duluth. Superior and vicm- 
Itv, Including the Mesaha and Vermilion 
Iron ranges— Partly cloudy and wanner 
weather tonight and Wcdne.'iday; lowest 
temperatures tonight, 15 to 20 degs. abovo 
zero; southwesterly winds. 

II. W RICHARDSON. 

Local Forecaster. 



no 
, , , cinch— you will have to hu.sk It your- 

427 men have been passed by this brotherhood from the self." 

. , .- _i r ^» ^^A ...„f..l ..„,..]«». "Let thp funeral proceed," cried the 

negro, »•< he burrowed deeper Into the 
oft depths of his temporary bier." 



farm colony to places of permanent and useful employ 
nient. This shows that the prisoners think of the new 
way of dealinis: with them. 

The old system of handling such offenders hardened 
them and confirmed them in their ways. This new sys- 
tem softens them, bttilds them up and makes men out of 
them. The old system pushed them down; the new sys- 
tem pulls them up. It is a new view of society's duty to 
its weaker members, but it is a noble and uplifting one. 

The mailed hand of stern justice has given away to j ^;^m.t ^the^ camion •;'?". before ^the^^np- 

the helping hand of humanity. It is altogether good 
Each city should have its "farm colony." 



• • • 

It la claimed by those who profess to 
be in the know, that the stomach Is 
overworked and that man o.ats too much 
to he In flrst-c1.ass fighting form, like 
the fuzzy wnzzy of Kipling fame. Local 
borlfaces have derided that they 
are called upon to do thp part of Dr. 
Mnnvon and help their brothers. They 
th.Tefore will set a well established 
price mark after eirh .■separate .article 
of digestive enjoynietit. thinking thusly 



THE RULE OF CANNON. 

While the tendency is by no means so general as it 
ahould be, it is encouraging to note that here and there 
is found a Republican congressman who has tlie courage 
to .speak right out in congress and tell what he thinks of 
the aui'icratic, despotic manner in which Speaker Cannon 
decider what legislation shall be passed and what shall 
not be considered. It is common knowledge tliat the 
speaker refuses to permit the consideration of several 
law;> tliat the people overwhelmingly favor, and that his 
power is so great that he is able to prevent their being 
considered. 

Recently Representative John M. Nelson of Wisconsin 
talked plainly in the house on this subject, and there is 
matter of great interest and importance in his speech, a 
•complete copy of which is at hand. He told how it hap- 
pened that the present rules of the house, which give 
the speaker his power, were adopted. During Speaker 
Reed's time he was hampered, at first, by a dilatory min- 
ority, until he took matters into his own hand and by 
arbitrarily counting a quorum when there was none and 
by refusing to put dilatory motions, he solved the diffi- 
culty easily. At that time he appeared to be acting for 
the public good, and as there was no thought of the uses 
to which that power could be turned, there was little 
but praise for his autocratic rule. 

"Now," said Mr. Nelson, "the pendulum has swung 
over to the other extreme, and instead of a few minority 
members, goaded by harsh legislative treatment, resort- 
ing in the open to ill-advised tactics of obstruction, we 
have a few majority members so intrenched in the forms 
and usages that under the cloak of the majority they are 
enabled to perpetuate their own rule and control the 
house for their own purposes." 

What are those purposes? Does the waiting public 
find any progressive legislation proceeding from them? 
Does it not, on the other hand, find that the clique that 
controls the house — and that clique is absolutely dom- 
inated by Cannon — -uses its power to defeat everything, 
irom tariff revision down, that the people are demanding? 
"It is the consensus of opinion," continued Mr. Nel- 
«on, "that practically all of the power of this body has 
been merged in the speakership. The speaker is the 
house." 

Wliat becomes of representative government under 
such conditions as this? What becomes of the people's 
wishes when the man that holds this power battles for 
interests hostile to the people? What kind of men are 
these congressmen who cower tamely under such a gross 



JUSTICE TO CORPORATIONS. 

The Herald is indebted to one of the Northwestern 
railroads for a pamphlet copy of a brilliant and entertain- 
ing article by Henry Lee Higginson. published in the At- 
lantic monthly and entitled "Justice to the Corporati«jn3." 
In this article we are informed that the corporations 
have wrought great material benefits to every country 
which has used them, and that every country which has 
not developed the system of corporations has been left 
far behind in material progress. We are told that they 
have made p<:>ssible undertakings so huge that individual 
enterprise could never have accomplished them, and that 
they have made possible the concentration of capital and 
energy, creating a new and mighty force that is of great 
advantage to civilization. 

.Ml true, every word of it. Yet it was hardly neces- 
sary to write an article to prove it, since nobody denies 
it. It was hardly necessary to make a plea for justice 
to the corporations, when nowhere are they menaced by 
any serious injustice. 

The trouble is that most of those who plead for jus- 
tice to the corporations — though this is not true of Mr. 
Higginson — really mean that we should let thetn alone 
ti) do business as they wish, which means as their di- 
rectors wish. That is impossible and unthinkable. The 
strongest argument in their favor proves that. The cor- 
porations accomplish work that individuals could 
not d">, and they accomplish it by virtue of their great 
strength and almost unlimited power. Having set up 
these strange new giants it would be unjust to humanity 
to let them go unregulated. The very power that gives 
them their abilitj- to accomplish great things becomes a 
menace to human liberty if it is not supervised iti the in- 
terests of the people. 

The plea for the preservation of individualism cannot 
be made in behalf of the corporations. By taking up the 
work where individual effort reached the limit of its 
power, they have practically destroj'ed individualism, re- 
placing it with a sort of semi-socialism. If this new power 
is permitted to work unhindered, tyranny is the inevitable 
result, because this power is in the hands of a few men' 
who are using it, so far as they are able, for their own 
selfish ends. 

If the people, through government, strictlj' regulate 
the use of this new power, it can be made a benevolent 
and useful public servant. If it is unregulated, it cannot 
fail to be, as it has already been proved, a hard and re- 
lentless master of tlie public. 

Corporations .should have justice, but no more than 
justice. They must be made the servants of the people, 
and not permitted to become despots over the people. 
That is what the people intend, and no more than that. 
There is no injustice involved in putting this new power 
under control, and vast injustice is involved in allowing 
it to go uncontrolled. 

There must be justice to the corporations, but first 
there must be justice to the people. 



entirely from .i spirit of brotherly love 
that the bonlfacea have decided to mark 
each little menu thuslv. 
• • • 

At the Lenox: W. O. Williams and 
wife, Hlbblng; George W. Flanders, Min- 
neapolis: O. A Beckjord. Chicago; Louis 
Pavlan. St. Paul: <V li. Adams. St. Paul: 
O. L. Honwell. Mlnn-^apolls; H. .\. S'ln- 
berg. MInne.T polls: Thomas B. Scofl'ld, 
Krie F. K. Ketler, Chicago; C. S. Fowler. 
Minneapolis; John M. Martin, Virginia; 
D. J. Perkins, Minneaiiolis: A. J. K< Uy, 
Virginia; W. R. Brennan, St. Paul; 
George Orr. MInneap<dls; H. K. Krause- 
neck, Minneapolis; F. Thompson. New 
York; Charle.« Oli'on, Aurora; R. B. 
James. Mudi.son; M. 1>. Kelly. St. Paul: 
J. F"Yederlck. Wausioi; A. T. Gordon, 
Mount Iron; W. C. McCray, Minneapolis; 
James F. Rowe, Hlbblng; W. C. Bell, 
New York; R. Randolph, Chicago; Fred 
T. Lincoln Huno-k: F. G. Guzor, Minne- 
apolis: D. hlckev. St. Paul; R. Ciemlnson, 
Miehlgamme; Ever Everson and wife, 
Aliken; W. H Mantor, Bralnerd; T. E. 
Leonard, St. Paul; D. P. Thomas. St. 
Paul; F. A. Hall, Minneapolis. 
• • • 

At the St. Louis: -E. H. Ross, Chicago; 
F B. Rosson, Virginia; Thomas Sullivan, 
St Paul; A D. Head. Minneapolis; S. F. 
Denny Chicago; W. M. Derr. Minneapo- 
lis; l5. C. Peacock. Hlbblng; J. F. Ken- 
ned v, St. Paul; Ferry Naught- )n, St. Paul; 
A E I»freund, HIbbing: Charles Spring- 
ier Marqu.nte; H. Picher, Marquette; H. 
Ne'unian and wife. MInneajvills; A. Cardie. 
St Paul- S. C. And-rson, St. R-gls. Mcnt.; 
a' J Shea. Eveleth; W. B. Nelson, Min- 
neapolis; H. J Kimball, St. Paul; W. C. 
Oerberhh. St. Paul; Harvey Cohen. Min- 
neapolis; Carl Thiel. HIbbing; C. A. Rem- 
ington, HIbbing; G. Kelly. Rhinelander: 
G^-orge L. Brojich. Ely: H. E. Martin, 
Chlsholm; W. G. Shaw, Chlsholm; C. H. 
Webster, HIbbing; J. A. Ross, Maniuetie; 
O M West Detroit; Thomas Brady. HIb- 
bing;' \. H.' Rose. St. Paul; V. A. Klass. 
Hlbblng; Charles Roberts. Marquette; C. 
J Macbeth. Mankuto; J. A. Broad. Vir- 
ginia J A. Salnie. St. Paul: J. \\ . Lord, 
Iron 'River; A P. Kusch. Croukston. 
• • • 
At the Spalding: B. L). Battle, Minne- 
apolis- J. F. Ginber, Rochester. N. Y.; 
Robert L. Bowen. Minneapolis; C. E. 
Hoedel Butte; -A^. J- Halter. Coppertleld, 
Col'i. \ E. Davis. Philadelphia; C. U . 
Rice." Detroit; Frederick White, Minne- 
apolis; S. A. Anderson. St Paul: P NNal- 
ler, Minneapolis; John McL arihy. Mln- 
r..ap.jlls; S. H. Kirby. Hlbblng; John L. 
tJault. Chicago; F. D. Lyon Minneapolis; 
J. Kelly. Minneapolis; ^- J- V"^>'«' ^J*'" 
.iijro \rnold Schniitz. Brooklyn; J. W. 
Fllelit * Chicago; ^^■• H. l»we. Mnine- 
Av\ful' W S SulliN-an. «!hloago; H. L. 
Johnson, ishpeinlng; C. ^•,Ai"»|aP; >'»]'- 
ciiifo T C. Robinson. Chicago; C. D. 
(Njvvles St. Paul, J. E. Neyaud. Chica- 
Ko W W: Conklin, St. Paul; G. Good- 
el ' St.' Paul; J. H. L-ms, Youngstown. 
Ohio A E. Barneby. New \ork; \N. C. 
l^loyd. Milwaukee; John Hmchey, Pllis- 
burg. 



When a man realizes that the fact that things are as 
they are is not satisfactory proof that they are right, he 
is in a position to learn something — not before. 



The Princeton Union, run by the man whom Gov- 
ernor Johnson defeated four years ago, says: "There are 
many who believe that Governor John's lecture proposi- 
lii.>n will prove to be a huge fiasco — that it is merely a 
pretentious undertaking." Surely this is the limit for 
sour, jealous, small-minded churlishnc&s. 



At the McKay: C H. Towne. Cass 
Lake Ethel Chase, Minneapolis; Edna 
urines TuxicanU. Mex. ; Emma ^^ ilson. 
UfhSfng; .\nna Wise, HIbbing; Al Herck- 
heimer Chleaao; Miss Minnie Stevens. 
Proctof : John Kerr. Helena; John Lucey. 
St Paul- A. Pullman. Minneapolis; E. 
F.' Grlswold, Minneap«>lis; G. M. Beck, 
St Paul; Charles Palmer, Hlbblng: ^^ . 
m' Havnes and wife. Two Harl)ors; H. 
Crawford St. .-loud; J «. Steffens St 
Cloud: J. J. Marsh and wife, HIbbing, 
William Baynton. Mountain Iron; \. H 
TelTev Tower; J. Gilbert. Minong: T. D. 
Knight, Proctor; Day F. Stac>-^ Mlnne- 
anolls- C R. Johnson, Eveleth; J. E. 
Hiird ' Mlnneap-ills; George Kotze. Eve- 
leh: "Gabriel Snole. Eveleth: L'harles T 
Nel-son, Aurora; Lizzie ^^ f^^. Ely : Fred 
Chase Knife River; Mrs. L. M. \% asrner. 
Kiv \f J ON-*l, Philadelphia; W. Bag- 
s' Bemidji: Mrs. J. A. l>alpch. Grand 
Rapids: A. M . Gordon. Minneap olis. 

Rloo niMl Frrors, 

Rochester Herald: Willtnm James, th-^ 
famous psychologist of Harvard, said: 
"Th" oddest the most momentous as^ci- 
atlons oftentimes attach themselves to 
the most trifling things^ 

•Thus at a dinner that I once at; 
tended the hostess said to a sour-face' 
man on her left: w.^n^ 

•• May 1 help you to some of the boiled 
rice, M'r. Smith?* 

• •Rice" No, thank you; no rice for 
me," Smith answered, vehmemly. 'It is 
iissoclated with the worst mistake of my 

hf.- '• 



Chicago, March 10.— Foieciusts until 7 p. 
m. Wednesday: I'pper Michigan— Fair and 
warmer tonight and Wednesday. 

Wisconsin— Fair tonight and Wednesday; 
rising temperature. 

Minnesota— Fair tonight and \\ ednes- 
day; warmer In north portion. 

North Dakota— Fair tonight and Wed- 
nesday; warmer tonight. 

Ijiglit FYoin Darkness. 

Drunken, bedragged. besotted, unclean. 

Blotchy, disfigured, with horrible hair. 
Uglier, wreicheder object, I ween. 
Ne'er In the streets of the city was seen. 

Why do I stop at that creature to 
stare? 

Gaunt and inhuman, with red, swollen 
eyes, 
Patcnes of blac^ mixed with patches 
of bluet 
Painted by vice with detestable dyes. 
Nothing about lier that any could prize. 
Why do i gaze at that thing as 1 do? 

Foul-mouthed, foul-odored. and reeking 
with sin. 
Sneaking along like a cowardly cur. 
Sodden wiia lliiuor from marrow to skin. 
Only in form to hunmanity kin. 
What can it be that attracts men to 
her? 

Something I caught from her features by 

chance. 
Something that suddenly shone and 

then fled— 
Was it a turji of the head or a glance?— 
Pierced to my heart like the point of a 

Taking one back to the days that are 
dead. 

Who would believe that a creature Bo 

vile 
Thus could remind me of one who was 

dear, „ , ^ 

Pure and white-hearted and guiltless of 

One who was dead, but whose beautiful 
smile 
Beamed on me then, and whose imago 
was ntar? 

Yes. it was something to wonder about. 
Something to force me to stop and to 

Something to cause me to question and 

doubt; 
Yet it was true, and my heart was drawn 

out. 
Even to her in her wretchedness there. 

Money I gave her; she stared in amaze; 
Soon, I suppose. It was sQuanden?d for 

Well, 1 should pay for my wondering 

When from her foulness there came to 
me praise, 

Visions of purity out of her sin. 
—EDWARD WiLLETT in New York 

Weekly. 

Pointed Pai-asraplis. 

Chicago News: What man has done 
woman can undo. 

Help the actor along by giving him the 
glad hand. , ,. , 

It is easier to cultivate a girl s Imagin- 
ation than her voice. 

Lots of men would be good husband? 
if thev had better wives. 

He's a brave man who tries to stop a 
woman's runaway tongue. 

I.ack of credit prevents some people 
from living beyond their means. 

No man Is half as smart a.s his wife 
tries to make people believe he Is. 

A. man who owes another a grudge Is 
sure to be Johnny on the soot on pay 

Many a man gets ahead by Inducing 
other men to put their shoulder to his 

^ You' can learn a little each day— unless 
you happen to be one of those wise 
nersons who know it all. 

The man who neglects to put his best 
foot forward when he has a chance niuy 
feel like kicking himself later. 

It's easy to convfnce the world that 
you "have sense after you have succeeded 
in accumulating a large pile of dollars 

According to statistics, one woman out 
of a million can open a telegram with as 
little emotion as she displays m opening 

^ n^'prohn>itlon were to spread Hke a 
urlversel mantle over the entire country 
and really prohibit maybe the first robin 
would not be seen so soon. 



Chicago Tribune: "You never c.\n tell 
ob.served Uncle Allen Sparks, -what last- 
ing results may be accomplished by an 
earnest word spoken at the right time. 
Many a man has had the shape of his 
nose changed for life by calling another 
man a liar." 

Washington Herald: "Did you g:et any 
of that bargain ribbon?" 

*^Ye«.." answered the athletic girl 
proudly. "I bucked the line for seventeen 
yards." 

I.,ife: "They say wages are going to be 
reduced all along the line." 

••That's too bad. Pretty soon our plumb- 
ens' helpers won't be making any more 
than a regular army officer.'" 

Nashville American: "He is of the 
romantic school oi poets." 

•What are they?" 

"The kind th.u think they have no 
troubles as long as they can have 
groceries charged." 

Wtvshlngton Herald: "Why are you 
clapping your hands, me gcjod man? 
asked the cook. , 

"I was trying, madam." answered 
Yorick Hand'out. "to give that cup of 
cawfee an encore." 

Bohemian: Old Lady (who had given 
the tramp a nickel)— Now, what will you 
do with it? 

Hungry Hobo— Waal, ye -see. mum. ef 

I 
to 

schooner 



buy an auto, there am t enough left 
hire a shofur. So I gue.ss I'll gel a 
I kin handle that meself. 

Philadelphia Press: Towne: Lu.schman 
is troubled a great deal by his wile's 
insomnia. 

Browne— I didn't know that before. 

Towne— Yes. she usually has a severe 
attack of it every night when he coires 
in late and then the trouble begins. 

London Opinion: Betty-That case 
hasn't come on yet. Isn't the law's de- 
lay maddening? „ , ., 

Cissie (absent-mindedly) — Perfectly 
frightful! I've been six months gettting 
that young barrister to proiwse! 

Arkan.sas Democrat: Mr. Shylxiy— H '.s 
very cheerful within, but very dismal 
without. 

Miss Ketchem— Without what? 

Mr. Shyboy—Why-er-er- without you. of 
course, dearest girl. 



MINNESOTA OPINIONS. 

Buffalo Journal: The Minnesota stftt* 
convention will no doubt send Taft 
delegates to Chicago, but the date is so 
late that It may be all over but the 
shouting, and this state will have no 
great credit for getting on the band 
wagon at the tall *;nd. 

HIbbing Tribune: It seems sort of 
foolish to pay several hundred con- 
gressmen $T.5«.0 a year apiece to make 
laws when one speaker can do it Just 
as well all alune. 

Rush City Post: All this talk of n«w 
candidates for governor Is falling nat 
with the people. They tirnily settled on 
J F Jacobson as their man. and they 
win have no other. Jacobson has been 
a friend and advocate of the common- 
ers' Interests during all his puldic life, 
and they remember him. The peopi* 
mean harmony this year. 

Two Harbors Iron Trade Journal i 
Just about the time some.me gets ready 
to sit down in that Republican guber- 
natorial chair, someone eise slips up 
behind and pulls it from under. The 
silence that follows Is Intense and is 
broken only by the dull thud of the 
dropped aspirant. 

Redwood Revlelle: Justice is what 
the working classes want in this coun- 
try, and not charity. 

"F. M." In Stillwater Gazette: The 
average man does not have to take 
very many contortion lessons before ne 
can pat himself on the back. 

Montlcello Times: A few years ago, 
according to the Minneapolis Journal, 
Ed Young was a dishonest politician, 
which It proved by his votes as a Re- 
publican legislator In the state senate. 
Now the Journal Is boosting him for 
governor. Ed Young by his vote once 
cost the state several hund-ed thou- 
sand dollars. The people don't owe 
him a cent. 

Bemldji Pioneer: Sometimes a woman 
refuses to t.ll a secret because she 
doesn't know It. 



"A ProplHH'y." 

It was a pleasant day in June. 

And great was the convention — 
The sun was riding high al noon. 

And the land was all attention. 
•Alabama:" culled the clerk. 

And the office crowd went daft 
When a U. S. .Marshal showed his head 
Out In the seething mass and said. 

"Count twenty-two lor Taftl" 

The Cannon men turn pale as ghosts. 

And the Hughes men gasped f«>r bn ath- 
The men for Fairbanks hung to pi>sls 

As colorb .S3 as death. 
•'Arkansas:" the clerk exclaimed, 

And the nail .^hook fore and alt 
When a spry postmaster, white of hair. 
Hopped to the main deck of his chair. 

And cried. "Eighteen lor Taft:" 

The Fairbanks men exuded groans, 

And the Cannon men shed tears— 
And the Hughes men uttered none but 
moans 

That once had uttered cheers. 
"California:" boomed the clerk. 

And the whole convention laughed 
^\'hen a revenue collector rose. 
And shrilly whistled thn»ugh his nose. 

"Count twenty more for Taft!" 

The Hughes men looked at the Cannon 
men. 
And the FalrV>anks men, from pray rs 
And grieving, ioined the others when 

They pulled their Teddy Bears. 
And they all rushed up on th-- platform 
high ^ , 

As men who had made read> — 
Anil when the din and the tumuli died. 
And the dust had s-ttled some inside. 
The candidate was Teddy. 

—St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 



Fairmont Sentinel: The chaplain of 
the lower house of congress, as ex- 
pressed by an ancient aphorism, 'mud- 
dled the fountain that gave him drink." 
A few morning a o he prayed fervently 
for the army of the unemployed. 

Red I..;ike Falls Gazette; The wise 
farmer knows It is better to have a lit- 
tle land, all paid for and well cultl- 
valeil. than a great »ilg farm burled In 
debt and not half worked. 



Walker Pilot; The man who h.as a 
ten-dollar tag on his vote Is again com- 
ing out of his two years' hibernation 
with his nostrils dilated in an attempt 
to scent the campaign l»arrel. 



R<»fler«loii.s of a Ilacholor. 

New York Press: The most siiccessful 
love affair is when It's Imagination. 

We all Ilk'- bibieg because we know It 
•wasn't their fault. 

The only chance a man has to make 
money in speculation Is to go against 
his judgment. 

If a j[irl won't let you put on her rub- 
bers for her, it's becau.se her ankles 
aren't dressed for It. 

The reason a woman gets so much en- 
joyment out of her unhappinf^s is sh» 
knows it's beeaus.- sh;s a good wife. 

Worthy of the County. 

Hibbing Tribune: The b-)ard of county 
commissioners last week authorized the 
purchase of the necessary ground for 
the so called grouping plan for the new 
St. Louis county courthou.se. 

This means that St. Louis county will 
have a courthouse worthy of the richest 
countv in the state, set in surroundings 
suitable for such a public building. 

Ninety-nine per cent of the people of 
the c<junty are well plea.sed with the 
action of the board, and after a few 
of the newspaper boys of th.- range are 
delivered of dlverJ doleful croaklngs over 
tlie extravagance of the Ixjard, every- 
b<jdy will be happy. 



Tlif Pullman W'lilsk. 

Honston Po.st: The Pullman company, 
h" h"g abohshed the sale of liquor In Its 
?ars ought to institute one more reform 
and bani sh the infernal whisk broom. 

Watciiets the Wind. 

Galveston News: A Pol't''^}^" .'^l^^J's 
wants what the people want when he 
finds out th ey are going to ha\ e It. 

\\lioa-I)a. IKinon Kuml 

Demon Rum. he's a-runnln' fast. 

Whoa-da, Demon Rum; 
He'q like to stop, but he doesn t dast. 

Whoa da. Demon Rum: 
■Whoa-da, Demon, while I gets my pall 
Whoa-da. Demon, have yo" any mixed 

till I up an* salts 



Are of Some Vac. 

The Confidential Banker: Mining stock 
should be bought in the dark of the moon 

from a total strangeT. If i>J8sible, pay ; fuVnaces'ln this district are being blown 
him in lead mon-^y 



lluslnoss Picklns I'p. 

Birmingham News: One by one the 

. . ,. ^.~ .-. ,,arnaces In this district are being blown 

Mining stock Is us.^- | j,j f„i. .^ resumption of operations, and 



ale 
Whoa-da, Demon, 
your tail— 



Whoa-da, Demon Rum! 

—New York Sun. 



fi'dfor several things. The long and nar 
row certificates are good for laying upon 
pantry shelves. The short, fat ones can 
he used In the bottom ot drawers. Th.! 
liandsomely engraved certificates, on 
hand-made paper, can be rolled up and 
used for killing nies. You snould. or 
cour.se. buy your stock carefully and 
choose the size which will come in hand- 
iest. Low-grade mining stock should bo 
l.ou^ht Just before house cleaning. It 
• an "then be laid under the carpets during 
the summer. I^te in the fall it can b- 
taken up and used for beddmg the 
horse. 

Illiterates In the Vnlted Stat4?s. 

American Journal of Education: 'The 
following list shows the numljer of illit- 
erates in each l.OO) of population, accord- 
ing to the last United States census: 

"^ . 23lConnecticut v) 

. 25 Pennsylvania fil 

.29 I Montana 61 

. 31 i New Hampshire... €2 

. 31 ' Missouri 64 

. Sr Rhode Island 84 

40 'Maryland HI 

. <0 West Virginia — 114 

. 41 ; Delaware 12) 

,4^1 Nevada 13.3 

. 42 Texas 14.1 

. 42 ' Kentucky !*>•'> 

. 46 Arkansas 2<)4 

46 ; Tennessee 207 

. 47|F!or:da 213 

. 4.N Virginia 229 

. r,0 North Carolina ...287 

. 6t Arizona 290 

. r« 'Georgia 30 > 

. 5") 1 Mississippi 32^) 

.re, New Mexico 332 

. 58 Alabama 340 

.')9 S:>uth Carolina ...359 

.,,.„^ r,9 Louisiana 3*5 

AH the" states before Mar>-land In the 
foregoing list have compulsory attend- 
ance laws, hut they are not. as a rule, 
enforced rigidly. Three of those that 
come later in the list have such laws, but 
they are practically dead letters through 
lax administration. 



the outlook becomes steadily brighter. 



AMUSEMKNTS. 



Iowa 
Nebraska ... . 

Kansas 

Washington .. 

Utah 

Oregon 

Ohio 

Wyoming ... 
Minnesota ... 

Illinois 

Michigan ... 
Colorado ... . 

Indiana 

Idaho 

Wisconsin . . 
California ... 
South Dakota 

Maine 

New York 

Oklahoma ... 
North Dakota 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 
New Jersey 



LYf^UIN 



TONIGHT AND 
ALL MEEK. 



Tbe Mark-Leone Playere tn 

^^THE CASE OF RE- 
BELLIOUS SUSAM'' 

By HENRY ARTHUR JOW«S. 

Mntlneea WcdneKday and iiaturdnT* 
I'Mual prlc«>«. 



MARCH 16 — FRANK DANIELS. 



Tuesday & \%'edne«iday, March 17-lS 
MATINEE \VEDNESD.%Y. 

<'MAMoftheHOUR" 

SEATS TOMORROW. 



METROPOLITAN 

THE HOI SE OF MIRTH. 
TenlKbt "nd All Thle ^'eelc. 

Dreamland Buriesquers 

with D.WE MARION in Hie 
Latest Snceeae, 

. ^^WEWPORT" 

IfBXT W^BEK — HiKh Sch««l Girls. 



li' - 



\ 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 




^•* 



-H- 




i 



I- 
I 



i 




I 



4» 



I 



l,« 



» 






..-L 



THE DULUiH EVENING MZRALD : TUrSCAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



THE EVENING HERALD 

AN IM>I l*rM>i:XT XFAYSl'APKH. 

OFFICIAL PAPER OF ST. LOUIS COUNTY. 



PubUsh-d at H.rald Rldj?.. First St.. Op. P. " .Square. 

THi: 111 :n\M> compavv. 

•Phon.... <'ountinK K<">m. .'524; F..lit..,i..l U.w.ms. 1126. 



SUBSCRIPTION RATES PAYABLE IN ADVANCE 
IIV U. S. SiAIK. l»*)STACii: Plll-PAJI>. 

l">aily. i> r y.-ar. in ii<hiin<«'. 

r)aily, six months. In a'lvuntc 

Dally, the.' ni«»nths. in atlvjin. •• 

Daily. '>n,^ month, in iulvan- ■ 

Ent.'iv.l at Uulutiv P.istMth.-,; a.s cs.'cuna-Cla.-^s Malt. i. 



$1.00 
. 1.00 



DULUTH WEEKLY HERALD. 



:.;: a. t..ii ..: i:i..; y. iiuci wlio rrawl .-h kiK-<.-> -^cown cul- 
Icni.sed by tin- praotite to a.-^k the slightest parliamentary 
favors f oni tlu r v I » vvicUls the scepter.' 

.Mr Nelson is to be comtnernkMl for his coiir.i.ye and 
plain spcakiuR. lie point out a real danger to the se- 
curity of the rrpnblie, and shows Ipnv representative gov- 
ernment has bit n prostituted to the s».r\ ire of greed. It 
wonid be well if tliere were more sneli brave congress 
men. and if they can be had in n<i other way the pe M''^" 
ouglit to furnish tlu in in place of those now shamelessly 
crooking the i>rcf,'n;oit hinge, of the knee before the seat 
..f all real legislative authority, the speaker's chair. 



Per y.' ir. in .•i<lvani»' . 
Six lU'intli.x. in aiivani--. 
rhr< >• !n«>nihs. in advance. 

K,i- ■ ■ .• I»ultith T'os'ot'i ■■ • 



WHAT ONE CITY HAS DONE. 

Tile modern purpose «>f x.cicly towarti iis errinsj; mem- 
$1.00 ! l,ors is not to degrade them and pimish them so much as 



.r>o 



i*2o i '' i^ to redeem them and make men out of them. 



.Sii. ..n,l-i 'hiss Matter. 



IIOTIiL G035ji>. 



1 HE WBAIIiiil^. 



BY CARRIER, IN THE CITY, TEN CENTS A WEtK. 
i.viKV I vi;MN<i— i>i.i.ivi.iii:i). 

daily 



filngl'^ .-opy. 
i)n<' montli 
rhret* ni'inih 
Six months 
One y«'ar 



$ .02 
.15 
i.:{0 
2.00 
5.00 



Nowhere is there a more striking example of this 
modern attitude than the city of Cleveland has furnished 

III tlie ... - V years under .Mayor Tom L. Johnson 

>torv of a- a. 1 ..nu)lishmcnt in the redemption "f men n.-, t.-.i .,u tli.- . :iim.V«" wiu-n .s.mu- four 



lr,»wn at Mar^ttv. \VI».. accor'Hiig 
to tlie slatemoiij^f a iravoliiift siles- 
nuin. who was a^tho Lt-uox y< ."^t.i <iay. 
llHTi- i.s uno o||^_(hf lirgtal ciiickeii 
lurniM in the worM. Th^y raise .so 
niiOiy eliiekens tli.ii «'ven the owner ha.s 
)i;iven up atltuiprji^ lo tiguri' out tlie 
fxsici suimber <>f fdwl.s he ha.s in l!ie 
I'yff-niakiiiK line--.' i 

Of eourse. hiivS%i( so many ehicken.s 
it is only natur.ii thai tliere sliould bu 
a very lurifu diitkfn liovinf. Tlu-re is. 
lu l"a<t. it is i»ii»- of llu- larKv.si in the 
wurl'l. The aiz.- .)f tho chicken house 
and I he indu«try of tlie hens save the 
owner an i>Ji-a. Not that ho liad never 
iiaii .iri.v «><--for'-'— because he was a vi-ry 
inig^ht man. 

H«' . <iii<eivt-«i I he i'iea of cultivating; 
patriot l.siu aiinHiK "'e fowl.s. It JS 
II. ••<lh .s.s to s.iy Hull many of luem wert- 
IMymowth rocKs. 8ii ht rlRSed up a 
lafKo set of 'iiim.si, that in some nian- 
m-r connevted with th-' fetdinj? plaza 
of tin- t'lyiui"Uiu rock.s. Kvery linn? 
, one of the I'lymouth fowls gave the 
Ihejforn hoM»T uT' .SKunding iliud wiiii Its 
bill sonio enihantiuK sound was re- 




It 
paiM 1 



iHl 



TO SUBSCRIBERS: 
portant when d.siring th- addrcs-s of your 



;,,ni,'. d fo <\y- '>'"h Old and new addr-ss.-s. 



HEARTLESS BRUTALITY. 

M radices of em- 

C'.'uncil performed a 

■>ct asid.- a 

irtmcti' 



If halt 


ih;.' .i. 


, 1. ■■ n '•■1 


ploytnciit 
11 set' 


ai4f: 


irue. til 


fiiiv: 




■\\^^ pol: 


an 1 







^Uj 



> .iitmgent 
nctinj; 



duct!-!-: 

ronsc!'-; 
aiui :■ ■'• 
as <■ 

be I i tl - 

ployiiicn; -i.-i^-'ii' ''■ ■ " 
nianily wha'ivcr 
and these 
i.,h.-.! - •. ■• 
swinfilcd laii'^i l ' -. 

It wa-. ch.i'' ••■'' b 
Moody < 't t!i'- 
the la- 
him oiu o: 
more cruel ..mi i 
man beinu ri niai- 
honest 
synip:)! 

■dt)lla' ■ •'! liii-' I't '•' ■ ■■' 
ful scar.-li •A '.v^ik \'> 
heart ■ >r . oii^ 

Chief of Poll- 
had h id many cor.:; 
iiicut .itjcnts. but '' 
as a rule, to bi n'. 
lics^e- ti--i:;i!Iy '\ !■! '■: 
to app<' 'I ' I ;>'o\ > 
set a-idf .1 .-.ni.ti! 
noses mni! tria! 
had, ani 
will b' I I" 

lb >tu ^t cuipi' ■:. 1 
movt", t>!r.ii!-.i- i' 
tached 
dislionc-^i aifi!* ' '» 



l)U«: 

, 1', 



a uw 



Willi l.!( 



■nail 1'' 
-0 clia. 

-. i|,m: : 



• con- 

..nd as 

^ 1.1 activity, 

' )le Imsiness 

I'.ut there can 

l.ar^c of em- 

aiid no hu- 

• '.imr.iployed 

- , auil pun- 

ii they have 



a'!-l l.y Rev J. T. 
■ -■ r..;: ':' ^ ^.\'\\ take 

; M-ild 
, lu ij.- .i.lhinn 
. ti.c ordir.ary hu- 
ll!- ]-■ Kk<t. -(•■d<iiig 
i-atment and for 
I at will take that 
T-. 1 \\ .', \- III hoj)e- 
IJttle 



thouK.uul h»'Us wer»f at work picking 
;it tile i-orn that was f»^d lo ih'-m at 
.sundry hours of Ui-- day. one can im- 
aKlii>> ih'_- medlt-y of jopular airs mat 
rtsultotl from the gastronomic efforts 
of tht chb'ks. 

Wlun the hens were exceedingly hun- 
igry tiiey used to .substitute a ragtime 
f(4r the more even rytlun of the martial 
airs. I'pon Sunday, It Is said ilsal sol 



ThouRh there was 
still a wintry chill 
in the air thi« 
morning, just a 
imre reminder thai 
sprinc is not yet 
h« re. there was also 
a balmy touch tha: 
suffges led I li a t 
.•jpniiK cannot l)e far 
off. It was clear 
and altogether dc- 
ligaiful. l..ast niathfa 
lowest temptiaturv 
was 11 dega. and yesterday's hight .st wa.s 
19 degs. The weather man says it wiij 
be warmer and partly cloudy tonight and 
tomorrow, and that the wind will be from 
the southwest. 

A year ago today it was bright and 
warm. 

The sun rose this looming at 0:31 anu 
sets tonight at G:0;i, makin»;'ll hours and 
35 minutes of sunlight. . 

.Say.< Mr. Hicliard.^on of conditions: 
"Uafometric pressures remain about sta- 
tionary, high over the Ohio valley and 
Wvomlng. and low over Alberta. Tnese 



TWE NTY YEARS AGO. 

Taken From the Columns of The Herald of This Date. 1888. 



•**Dr. Ame.s* candidacy for the 
Democratic nomination f«»r vice pres- 
ident is no longer looked upon as a 
huge joke. He is believed t>y his 
friends to he an availal>le man. and 
the Democrats profe.ss to believe they 
might carry Minnesota on the tariff 
issue. 



♦**The city hali and courthouse 
scheme seems to have beeii abandoned, 
even by its friends, and Mayor Sutphin 
now recommends thi- eie<.tion of a 
city hall on the property purchased 
lor that purpose by the city two years 
ago. 



***On March S Hon. E P. Martin, 



Wyoming, and low over .\lberia. t "•"»' judge of the municipal court, cele- 
oonditions fiusvd ^"oV f,!; -t-iTe^* imi brated his sixty-ninth birthday. H.^ 
IS'tl^^^liS^es"^ '^S^^o^^^. says he feels bk.^ a youth of ...hut 



they are forced to delay building unttl 
next year. 

••*The Scandinavian Elevator com- 
pany, C. C. W.jicott & Co., agents, has 
put its name on one of the board of 
trade windows. 



th"y eaji stand. 

This is tlw t.. 
and be alune wiU ii; 



se 
)f music 

drnnimer tells. 
::-\\.v for it. 



C. \V. KUnem. wi..t .■*• il- • v-rytiilng 
from .hee.se at an exee.-sive ligure. to 
bllliaril tables and hyinn l>oiiks. was 
telitng a story of the Southern negro's 
laziness. 

•All of them are laay." he said, "yet 
some a'e more lazy than otliers. It's 
a ease of possessing the ilon t move 
habit in a more or less degree. T'nls 
negro had it in lt» most malignant 
f<nin. 

Finally the citizens of the romnuinity 
tbreat<'tied to bury him alive if he 
didn't go to work. Tl;e threat h.id no 



li 



put <jut of bustncs-> ill 'sc v.lio !kp. < 



to roll a nee 
false pr-tcn- 

Ti 
twecn 
ca 
m 
.!> 

crow I i 
'1', 

Sjlad to ki'o' 

le.--. I 1.' ; 

;sh..;I 
til. 

yoke 

lli.l h 



' ! 'p-irtment 

;i-.n Mi< "<i\ .if.^.Mii-'i cinj)ioy- 

. r- ha<! fo-;iid it dillkult. 

;iu,se the wit- 

,1 cp tiiem whde waiting 

, ■; i;^. Tin- council, therefore, 

• t)c u^ci 111 ''..>r.!ini; such wit- 

..•d emi)lo\ ; ii^eiits ■\\\ be 

il li:i\'' l)crU MM Ic • ■. it 

" -^pellt 

,,.;>-,;i^ Will no doubt ...;.. r.ic this 

their imc-est that the odium at- 

, ', • man conduct of the 

. ,N . 1 ) »o remove it is to 

> little principle as 

'.!■; l.ist dollar on the 



should be in the h.mds of tlie municipal authorities ol 
(•very city in the land. 

Tlie customary off-hand way «»f dealing with common 
drunks, for instance, is to sentence them to a term on the 
rockpilc or in the county jail, an experience which tends 

to deprive them of whatever pride they may have left, and 

, ... .• . I . „ ♦ „,..L-.. I •■"«" *'''s and musiij related to the deep- 

to eontirm them m their intemperance it it doe.-, not make | ,,,. ,|..votional side of life were playd 
criminals out of them. Many magxtrates have adopted hv^tlie .^.s.-mbi.,, ^.-h^ i he ^ ben 

the nan)lc svstcni with hrst offenders, with excellent re- 1 dom of unrestraiu.-d iiln rty on .Sunday. 

.',,,, I r »t 1* ^..♦^ owing to reli>>|.ius seriiples of the 

sult> ' '. \. Iriral doe, better than any of them. It pi^t> | „^,„,,. j,„,j ther. fore hef-ue the coming 

ihcm on a .arm where by hard work, wholc.ome air a-»<l | -[.jl^^^v "^,^'-;^X'^^'Xw^r^'^Jl 

clean surroundings, their abused systems are Riven ajhave aiiont all .t tlas styl 

chance to recuperate and their diseased will-. i:e ^\\v\\ a 

basis on which to re establish themselves. 

Help ratlier than punishment is what Cleveland iiolds 

out r.. its drunks, its v.igabouds. its jietty ..tT -ndcrs, young 

and o!-!, male and female. 1. Clevel in c d my 

isw h. nio-,1 interesting exi)eriii >untry. 

It is a farm of 1900 acres, pleasantly and -..dubriously 

located. I'p-n it is a municipal tuberculo.sis hospital, an 

iniirniary ami a workhouse. The ''prisoners" are put at 

useful, whole-Mill, work. They are n -t -urroimded by 

walls ..r liedKCti in by armed Rtiards. There isn't a Kim in _ 

. . ,• , , I .- .1. .., I patent eftect «»n him. and one d.iy ib'-y 

sight on the place, .-^id almost never docs one ot tlam p^^ ^j,,, ,,ft rep. i!.i tiueat into exe- 

try to escape. The prisoners come tl'.crc weak, unstrung, 
feeble of body and will. They u- : ; onger. better 

and more hopeful They .nr -d like men, and it 

makes them want to be men. 

While serving sentence, those \vlio .vill accoi)! it and 
few of them refuse it — arc given something of the educa- 
tion they l.ick. There are classe-. in which young men 
and old have a chance to pick up some elementary knowl- 
edge. Some of the prisoners are t'Mchers. Some »f tliem, 
when dUili.ugcd, come back nights to continue their 
studie lucr prisoner.s have formed a "brotherhood" 

which takes charge of released pristmers and cares for 
them until tluy get a firm footing again. In two years 
4J7 men have been passe<l by this brolherln)od from the 
farm colony to places of permanent and useful employ- 
ment. Thi.s shows that the i>ri3oners think of the new 
way of dealing with them. 

The old system of handling mich offcmlers hardened 
them and contirme<l them m their ways. This new sys- 
tem s(»ftens them, btlilds them up and makes men out of 
them. The old system pushed them down; the new sys- 
tem pulls them up It is a new view of society's duty to 
it.s weaker members, but it is a noble .m.l uplifting one. 

The mailed hand of stern justic ;;iven away to 

the helping hand >)f humanity. It is altogether good. 
1". V should have tt.s 'farm colony." 



while rain or snow fell during Monday reckoning by the fun he had. thin.ts 
or last night in Atlantic states. Texas | he must be al>out '300. The city otu- 
aiid over Lak»' Superior. Indications favor j dais and other friends presented him 
milder temperature and partly cloudy ^vith a congratulatory addre.ss. accom- 

patiied by an easy eiiair and a box of 



weather in tills locality 
Wednesday. 



lonighi and 



Following were last night's lowest lem 

pera lures: 

JS Medicine Hat 



.Abilene 
.\slieville 
-\llanta .. 
Hat tie ford 
Bismarck 
Hoston .. 
liunalo .. 

Cairo 

I "algary 



•mtititi. 

"He must either no 10 work or bo 
hurled alive. Tliey were getting pretty 
near the last reK^le.R pi.ice anil t)e- 
Kan to get tiie frlgi.l pe.i.il extremities. 



.for they Were afr.iid lest the cloud 
I would go to th- gr.ive without jootest — 
burl' d l>v defniU. hi oth'-r words. 

"When thev got to ihe outposts of 
the I>urvlnsr groiinil they hali.-d the 
parride and ask- d the star performer 



Chicago 

Clnetnnatl — 

Coi.cordha 

Davenport — 

l>enver 

P'troit 

IM'Vlls l-ike 

li.vlK.- 

Dultilh 

IMnioiiton ... 

l-:i I'as 

Kseanaba 

<;alveslon 

t.;rand Haven 
iJreen Hay ... 
Havre 

Helena 

H'lUKhton 

Huron 

Jacksonvlliu 
ivaiiiloops .... 
Kansas I'iiy . 
Knoxville .... 
Iva I'rosse ... 

Uand'-r 

lattle Koek .. 
L<OS Angeles 
Marque tlu ... 



,..:«! I Memphis 
...41 1 MU.-s City ... 
...a; Milwaukee... . 
...I'd Minnedosu .••• 

...14 I .Mod.na 

...•M .Monigomery 
...a; Mo.iilK ad ... 
... 3 1 New Orleans 
...¥> New York .. . 

..Ml Norto'.k 

:;- I .Noithiield .. . 
. . .:;.» .North t'laii.- 
. ::*\ Oklalioma .. . 

. .U oniaha 

...IN riioenix 

. ..L';> I'ierre 

...''• l'iitsl>ur,af 

...11 i-nil Arthur . 
...:a I'ortland, Or. 
...3S U:ipul City 

...4 Kegina 

...'\1 81. Louis 

...IS St. Paul 

...Hi S.ini Antonio 
...2S San Fraiu-isco 
..._'>» , Santa Ke 

— li ; S. Sle. Marie 
...H SlireVelKUt .. 

..... Spnkaiif .. .. 
...;t: SwUt Current 
...3ii I Washington. . 

...il i Wichita 

. . .:^; j w iiiiston — 
... I) 1 Winneinucca . 
...40 j Winnipeg ... . 
...4'> I Yi'Uowstonu .. 
(i ; 



..38 
..3S 

. M 
. .-.IH 

.. S 

. :i>) 

..4.S 
..54 

— s 



cigars. 



***John Cormack of Ely has the 
contract for clearing tlie townsite of 
Ely and will begin work at once. 

•♦*R. C. HeydlautT. fi>rjnerly with 
Little & .<imoi!ds of this city, was 
elected alderman at the recent election 
in -\shland. 



•♦•Wieland l!ros. intentted putting 
up a fine four-storv Imilding next l«> 
the Y. M. C A., where they now have 
,a wooden building. Now their plans 
••:!!' are .stopped because no vacant store 
in the entire city can be found to ac- 
commodate their pre.seut tenants and 



.3^ 
..44 



..40 
. .:;s 
. .lU 
,.*! 
..is 

..4:: 
..5» 

..IS 

"4 man a bar. 
!!3i» 



•••A Chinaman has opened a gro- 
cery store at the West end. 

• ••At th-^ regular meeting of the 
nremen last night. J K. Meining was 
made a member of the linance coni- 
mittee, vice W. T. Rorbach, retired. 
The annual ball netted $1"2. 

• ♦•L. A Gunderson and I'.unily have 
just arrived here from Fergus Falls. 
Mr Gunder.son will open a restaurant 
in the building next to the harness 
shop on Third .street. Rice's Point. 

♦•♦The theater on Third street. West 
.*!uperlor. Is to be tinished and ready 
for occupancy 'oy April 1 under tha 
management of F. S. Hickock of Du- 
luth. 

• ••George C Stone, who Is the 
largest .stockh.ilder in the lakeside 
Land cinpany. states ilrat trains on 
the Duluth & Iron Range will be run 
so that pensons living at New London 
can reach Duiuth at 7 and S a. m.. 
while in the afternoon trams will 
leave here at 4: SO and 6:2-V The mid- 
day trains will he continued. It Is 
expected that the Ir-n Range will 
eventually become a great suburban 
line. 

• ••Oeorge ^J \Shaw of the Cloquet 
Lumber company is in the city. 



3IINNKS0TV OlMMONS. 



)!E.\XT TO BE FINNY. 

Chicago Tribune; "You never cm tell." 
ot>.served Cncle .\nen Spuks. "what last- 
ing results may be accomplish, d by an 

earnest word ^l'''''^7\ ,^\,;^;j;;,^f.'\»r"Jl'^ ! shouting, and this stat 
Many a ni.in n.is had the shape ot "'";.„...„, r.-iiit for irettin 
no.se ehanged for life by calling another tva^.',,,^'a.l V^' ' '''^ ' '' ' 



Buffalo Journal: i ne Minn ■sot.^ state 
eonvemion will no d.»ubt send latt 

deleg'ales to Chieago. bu' ' oe is so 

late that it may l>e al. »'i iho 

: \-.- no 
hand 



. .»s 
.. s 



Deparlment of .Vki ieuliure. Wealbei 
liurrau. Oululli. Mareli Ht.-I>ieal foreeasi 
fi>r iwi'ntv-four hours « iiding at 7 p. in. 
Wednesda\ : Uululh. Superior and vicin- 
ity. Including the Mesaha and Vi-ruulion 




mo timers. 

"!■» <l.it (V-)rn husked." anxiously in- 
qulrf^d the big blaek 

"N'lx." ennie the reply; "life Is no 
eineh— you will have to husk It your- 
self." 

"Let the funeral pr.^ceed." cried the 
negro. 8 4 he burrowed deeper Into the 
oft depths of his temporary bier." 
• • • 



Chlexgo, Mareh la.-Foieea.sts untjl 7 p 
m. Wedn.sda> : I'pi'er Michigan- Fair and 
warmer lonighi and Wedne.=;day. 

Wls«-onsii;- Fair tonight and Wednesday; 
rl-^liiK lemperalure. , „. , 

Minnesota— Fair ttmight and Wednes- 
day; warmer in north portion. 

North Dakota- Fair lonight and \N ■ d- 
ncsday; warmer lonight. 



Hibbine: Tri^-. s.-.-ms sort of 

Washington IbniM: "Old y >': - 'uy j,,,,|i^ij ^^ ^jy sev.jai hundred con- 

of that barj;ain ribbon?" . ur"ssmen $7.*.'i a V'-ar apieee lo make 

"'Ye.s,," .inswered the atUi't;,- Birl|r|^.^ v.-hen one s;- :k-- .o; .i" it ju-st 

proudly, -l bui;ked the line lor s -venieen | .^'^ ^^.^^^ .^jj ^lone 

yards." 

. , i;a.~l; Citv !' .s- A . •:.:^ 'IK .c new 

Life: "They .s.iy wages are i;oui4 .-• ''"^ ; ,.;i„.iKiales lor novernoi is lalong llat 



reduced all along the line." 

"Thai's 100 bail. Pretty .soon oiir plumb- 
ens' h-'lpers won't be making any more 
than a regular army officer " 



Ihf 



with liie people. They tirnily .settled on 
J F. Jacobson as lliejr man, and tliey 
will have no other. Jacobson has »»een 
a frl.nd and advo. ate of the lornniou- 
•>'s' interests during all his public lifa. 
and lh>v rem.unber him. Tiie people 
mean haVnnniy tlits year. 



Nashville American: "H. 
rommtic school of poets." 

"What are th.y?" | ■ — _ . , ,. 

"Til.- kind ilKi think thv»y have no] y^y,^ Harbors Iron Trade .I.iurnal. 
troubles as lon« as they can hive just about the time someone gets j-eady 



gnK'eriea charged." 



It l.<? •-lalmed by those who profess to, , i„l.. ■.^>».» l'k«rkn<>w« 

he in tbo know, tbat tlie stom.ich Isi , '"'»•'* 'r!J lJ..«nM^Anneb.an 

overwork.-d and th.1t m..n eats too mueh ' Drunken, b. dragged »>'^^-^«V'^l; ' ^1. 7'h^ 
to he In flrst-elass ngbtlng form, like : Blotchy. di.sfigured with hoi rik hair, 
thn fuzzy wiizzy of Kipling fame. Lo. al j I g.her, wretcheder object. I ^^;;« ; 
bonlfaees have deel.bd that they ! Ne'er m the streets 01 th- eit> v\,isb».iii. 



l.y t-il;; 



IV-' 



lull 



t . 1 
. .1 



Why do I slop at that eieature to 
staru.' 

Gaunt and inhuman, with red, swollen 
eyes, 
Paten.'s of \}\anA mixed witli pati-hes 
of blue. 



Washington Heral.l: 
clapping your hands, 
ask<'d the cook. 

"1 was trying. ma. Ian. 
Yorick Handout, "to giv 
eawie.> an encore." 



"Why are yon 
ne :?oo<l man?" 



. swer.'d 



to sit down in that Kepubliean cuber- 
iialorial ehair. someone eiwe slips up 
behind and pulls it from under. Tho 
silence that follows is intense and i3 
l)roken only by ' ' ' ' ' "' "Jf ^ha 

i dropped aspirani 

Kedwooii Revielle- .lustiee is what 
the working classes wmi in this couu- 
trv. and not charity 



Bohemian: Old Ladv (who hu.l given 
V^TwuTi'l'^ niekoD-Now. what will you . ^, ^ .. ^^^ ^,i„,,,,.., ,,,^,^,^, ^he 

HuiiKv Hobo-Waal ve s-e. mum, ->f average man does not have to take 

I b "''an a.Ko, there' ain't enom;h left very n.uiy e-uitortion lessons l..i.r . ^ 

to hire a shofur. .^o 1 gue.ss I'U g^H a can pat himself on the ba- k 



luymcul a..;,!;'. 1. A 

'><■] III employ- 

' bttt were 



"tbi ho 
.irt- 
lere 

icHcrv- 
Thcrc 

\t least 



;;ab,^ Ijinl.li 
, . . ' ni ;.i .\- Ml !■ ' 

: :•! -.evc!-' 

.igi'ttt slioiiM d and 

111 sliouid i»c di-»cha:'»; '1 . 
;>uiii-^:inic:-' •'■ •' •''• ■• •"• • > : t! 



JUSTICE TO CORPORATIONS. 

1 he l!" ill !-< indebted to one >l the N'orthwestern 
ulroad.- I a ;.aniphlct copy of a brilliant and entertain- 
ing aril. le l»y Henry I.ec Higginson, published in the .\t- 
lanttc mnitlily ;»nd entitled "/tistice to the C frporations." 
!:• -'lis article wc are informed '!ia' ''' • >rporations 
'ttght great matcri.1l benefits ry eov.ntry 

sed tit "> 

not developed the systen. 
far behind in material proK'tc-a. \ 



are ealled upon to do the part of Or. 
Munvon and h-dp tlolr l)rother.=». They 
th-refore will set a well established 
pri "e mark after o^ch .^separite artble 
of digestive en.ioyment. thinking thusly 
To t^i.t the r-inition ■•ign before the np- 

petttc ove<» of th-* he.i\ v din-r. Tt Is - , . -,,..11 i.. „ 

entlr.lv fr-on a spirit of brotherlv lovf*. rainied by vice with detestable d>es, 
that tlie b.inlfaees hnv.. de.tded to mark Nothing ab«,ui her that any eould prize, 
each little menu thustv Why do 1 gaze at thai thing as 1 do. 

• • • 
Af the L.»nox- W G WilPam^ and Foul-mouthed, foul-odored, and reeking 

wife. Ribbing; <;eorg- W, Hand. rs. MIn- j with sin ^, „...,.,. k- r-.ir 

r.eapolls: O A Te-ekjord. f'hi. ago; Louis Sneaking along liKe a cowaidl,\ / >'r. 

Pavlan Rt. Paul: c R Adams. St. Raul: Sodd-n wiiii Iniuor irom marr.ov to .skin, 

o L. P.onw.'ll. MInn-apolls; H. A. g-m- Only in form to huninanity km 

berg. M!nne;.,H.IIs Th-mis 15. Scofl. Id. I What can it be ihat atiracls men to 

Kn.> F K. Keller. Chleago. C S F-nvlei. her? 

.Mintiean.tlls. J..hn M. Mnrtiii. Vlig.nl.i; , , . ^ .,..^,oi«r 

r> J I'.rkins Minneapolis; A J 1<. llv. Something I eaught from liei features by 

Virginia; W R. Ib-nnui. S». r.ul; chance, 

O.-.rge t>rr. Mlnn.ajvdis. H. H Kran.-.- Someiiiing that suddenly shone and 

neek. Minneapoils; F. Thotnps.m. N-w then fled— ... , ^^, 

York: Charle.^ Olson. Aurora. R. R. I Was il a tmji of the head or a glance..— 

JameH. Madi.-on; M. O. K-Ily^ St. Paul; Plerce.l to my heart like the point of a 

lance. 
Taking on.j b.ick lo the days thai ar-J 

dead. 



schooner. I km handle that meself. 

Phila.lelt>hla Press, Towne; Luschman 
i.s tioulVi. d .1 «ivai deal by his wiles 
ins<iiunia. 

Hri>vvne-I didn'i know that before. 

Towne— Yes. she usually has a severe 
attack of it ever>' night when he comes 
in laie and then the trouble begins 

London Opinion: Reay-Thai e.tse 
hasn't come on yet. Lsn'i the laws de- 
lay maddeiiim;? -, , ., 

Oissie «al.s. ni-mindedly) — Perf. .niy 
irightfui: I've be.n six months K.aiiing 
tiiai young b.irrisler lo pro|>ose! 

Arkansas O.inoorat : Mr. Shyl>oy-lT's 
yery elie.-rful within, but very disni.il 
wiiiiout, 

Mi-^s Keichein— Without what? 

Mr. Shyboy— Why-er-er-withoai you. ol 
com<i-. dearest girl. 



Monlicello Times; \ : \\ • ars asre, 
aeeording t<t the Minn.apoiis .lournal, 
Kd Younsf was a dishonest politieian, 
whieh It proved by !us votes as a Ro- 
publiean bigislator in tlie state .senate. 
Now the Journal is Ixiosting him for 
Rovernor. Kd Y-iung by his volo once 
.■ost th.- Stat" s.-.-io tisi'.if.'.l tii.ni- 



san.J d.dltir.-^. ': 
him a c.-nl. 

Benildjl Pioneer- Horn- 

reftlS.'S tot; • 
•I'lesn't kn..vs 



\-9 



n 

10 



I'airnioi 

I the lower li.nise ol ■ m :^ I •■ -..-.. .1 ,-, ■■.\.- 

pr. ssed by .01 an.b'nt aph.irism. mud- 
dle. 1 th.' fountain «hat gav.- him drink." 
A few morn lug ago lie pray.-d f.'rventljT 
for the army of the un.>mi.l"V.'.I 



.luid 



\\ 



THE RULE OF CANNON. 

■ nican-s si> getieral .•!> ii 

• Iiere 



energy, creating a ncv. .tiid mighty uncc iJ:ai i-. of great 
'• ;otage to civili'/.ation. 

\.l true, every word of it. '. • ■ »s 1 irdly neces- 
I sary to write an article to prove it, since y denies 

'i.irdly try to make a pica tor justice 
■ : '• ' :• ■ ♦'■ v :- "T d by 



i It 



It. tnc . >! i> orattoit 
riiiy serious injust: 
Ihe trouble ^ 



cncourasiHic 



fil- 
ls V Kcp' 
to .-Ypc.ik riglil '.'..: ;n -..■>i:^:,"- 
the aulocratii, dcsji »f:c hkiiu; 
<U'.'idc^ wliit Ic4i-...i' 11 '.iii 

!l ' 



Spcal. 


■ ■- i ->c,-> '. . 


lav 


'■ ■" 


P ■ 




V < > 1 1 - 




R> 




tuike.; i 


1 1 . 1 n 1 1 J. Ill 


matter 


,• ^-,.-i' t!l 


-comi' 





'•,\Ct. SVCI 

-, Iiair.nc ;'i 



i! he 



ariM' 

by r 

cnltv ■>-..> 

the p'Mu- t^ood, :i! 



:;;ot:«in.>. 



la tuc courage 

.\ ..it !se thinks of 

I Spc.ikcr Cannon 

•d and what sh.nll 

-iuc: .lU'.'ii >l --c* kM al 

' V '■ (\ .r. and th.tl his 

•tu their being 



'. )t \\!-»vonstn 

v-t, and there is 

t!i his speech, a 

■. it hap 

oh give 

1 >;;; .ii^; Speaker 

TV nv.n- 

1 by 

and 

d I tic diftl- 

• i-t!ug for 

the uses 

t .> little 



• moat of th"- ad for jits- 

tK'c to t: -though t! ot true of Mr. 

Higginson- rc.iiiv n.ca:! that we siioiwa let them ahmc 



I J l-'ied.^rl'k. Wau.s;oi; .\. T. G.iidon, 

IS been left Mount iron, W «', M< Cray. Minn.-apolis; 

, I »l, ,» »b.„ J*i»i-s F. Row. Hihbin«. W. C. Bell. 

c ate u.'.'i that they]>;..^ York; R Rmdolph. Chieijfo; Fr-d 

have made possible undertakings so huge that nvlividual | ^ Uneoin.^»ian^.^. f;,;-; '^'-[-.^K- 

enterprise could never have ace unplished them, and that i Miehlgamme. fcv'-r Kv »-s.»n an.l w:te. 
. u .1 jlAl-k-n. W. H Mantor. Brain. rd; T. K. 

they he concei .ital and i^..„nar<!. St Piui. r» P Thonas. st. 

pa il. F. A. Hall Mimieap'dis. 

• • • 

At 'h- St. Louis: -E H. Ros-. i ;. . .„ . 
F B R'Ksson. Virulnla: Ttiomis Sullivan. 
St. Paul; A O. H Md, Minneapolis; S F. 
l>«nny Chleago; W. M. iv-rr. Minn.-apo- 
lis; l>' C. Peacovk. Illl>l>lng; J. F. K.-n- 
nedv. St. Paul. F'-rry Naught'. n. St. Paul: 
A K Pfreund. Hltiblng. Ciiarl-s Spring- 
If»r Mar-iu'tt.': H. Picher. Mar-tueti. ; H. 
Ne'nnan and wife, Minneapolis; A. Cardie. 
St Paul S. C. An.l.-rson. St. R'gis. M' nt ; 
a' j Sh.a. Rvel.ih: W. B. Nelson, Min- 
neapolis; H. J Kimball. St. Paul. W. C. 
St Paul. Harve\ Cohen. Mln- 



t » do busin-- 
rectors wi-' 



1 1; 



l!',!i ;e.M!is as tiieir di- 
hinkable. The 



Who w<juld believe that a creature bo 
vile 
Thus cf>uld remind me of one who was 
dear. 
Pur.- and white-hearted and guiltless :>( 

guile. 
One who was dead, but whose beautiful 
smile 
B«amed on me then, and who.sc imag.' 
was luar? 

Y'es. it was soniethlng to wontlpr al>out, 
Som. thing lo force me to slop and to 
suite. 
Something to cause me to aiK'stlon and 

doul»t; 
Yet it was true, and my h.'art was drawn 
out, 
Eveii to her In her \yretchedness tlnrtj. 



neinolls ('an Tln-l, Hibbing; C. A. Rem- Mon.-y 1 gave her; she stared in anjaz.j; 
'ngt'.n "Hlbliing. O. K.lly. Rhin.-Iand.'r; l S<.on. I suppose. It was syuander.^d lor 
G.-.rg.' L. Br'\il<!i. Kly. H. K. Miirtin. ( gin. a . .. ,, 

• 'hisholm; W ii. Shaw, ciiislolm; C H. i Well. 1 should pay for wiy wondering 
r- I A T?.i».< Miiv.iti.'t le: ' Eaz.'. 

her foulness there came lO 

York 



...v.w.=. ... W-bst r. HiM.ing; J A. R.>ss. Mar.|U.ti.'; ; gaz.'. 

Strongest i ;t m their favor ; -jo m W.»st l>.'tr>l': Thorn is Bra-ly Ht»>- When trom her foulness there ci 

,. , . t • 1 !»in« V H.' Rose. S'. Paul; F. A. Klass, me praise, 

porations .ic^ •'luplisn work that :nai\iau.iis ^"■-'■•^•dnjtri.'ii'c ch trie.* R.»berts Mar.iueiie; C. ■\'isi..ns ..r purity out of her sm 

not d>. and they accomplish it by virtue of their «reat I J,^^;a;;;-th. '^Unk^n^ J,^A. Hr.aj.^vir- -eowari> WH^^^rin^inT^ w 

strength and almost nnhmtted p>wer Hrftng set up irm 'River: A. P. ku.sch. Cr..okston. • ; 

, . j • • • Pohiled I'anigraplis. 



:ul' <• 
■t th. 



t.i 'liat p-' 

but pr.i! 

rso\'. 

over to 

niembci 

ing in t 

Inive a icw uiajoriiy i:; 'hidci - .-<• 

and usages that under the cloak 

enabled to perpetuate their 

lioiiso for their own purposes " 

What are those ptirpos.s? 
find any progressive legislatio; 
Does il not, on the -itlicr haiu! 
c.iiiirols the house -and tl; 
inalcd by Cannon — uses its puwc: u* defeat everything, 
from tarilT revision d^>wn, that the people arc demanding? 

"It IS the consensus of opinii>n," contiivic'l Mr. Xel- 
«on, "that practically all of the power v lody has 

1, v^cd in the speakership. The speak- ■ 'ic 

house 

Whit becomes of representative government under 
such conditions as this' What becomes of the people's 
•wislies when the man that holds this power battles for 
interests lio-^tile to the people? What kind of men are 
these congressmen who cower tamely under such a gross 



' :i-ini ..a-. -■.. aiig 
.1 few itiMiority 

>i)struclton, we 

:i. i;cd in tlie f.>rms 

' m.Tiority t!;cy are 

■i the 

;hc waiting pttblic 

cding from them? 

liat tho clijpic that 

bsolutely dom- 



thcse strange nev/ giants :un:anity 

: ) let them go unregulatctl. The ver: ;at gives 

ihet;- '■ ■• .ibitity to accomplish great l.i.i.;^ i.ccomes a 
men ■. !::n; in liberty if it is not supervised in the in- 

tere- i>le. 

!iie plea f ■ lividualism cannot 

lie made in bclvai: o; tiis.- >,^:!.e':.ti: ''■/ taking up the 

work where individual effort rc;i .. . uie hnr.t of its 
p.nver, ihey have practically destr.>yed indivi.biali^n:, re- 
placing it with 'f >emi-s«>ciali.-.m. If -ower 
IS permitted to work unhinderc<l. tyra; le inckUablc 
result, becaitsc this power is in •'• ■ ' i' a few men' 
who are using it, so far as the; . i ir tlieir own 
sellish ends 

If tho people, throiu Tnment, strictly regttlatc 

the use of this now powct. n can be made a benevolent 

;iiul useful public servant. If it is nnrcjil.ircd, it cannot 

tail t'> be, as it has already been pro-. ':ard and re- 

■ tlie public 

t- jipor.i'.MUs .should h.Tve ji;«i::e, bttt n^ more than 

in-fii .' They mu^t b' iv i.?,. :'n,- ...••..•■•; ,• 'li.j pciple, 

• pcrmittc • people. 

That :s what the people intend, a: lan that. 

There is n.) in.iustice inv-dved in puiiwid ih;,-. new p.:iwcr 

ur.der control, ami vn-r t!\''!-',ice i- .--..i....: :.- n'! "ing 

tt ti-t go uncontr'>Ile<l 

There nm- i-tice to the : ntions, but first 

there nv;- ' • . the people. 



\' -he Sj aiding: H. I>. Bat tie. Mmne 
ap.>iu; J. F. Gintjer. R..eh-ster. N. Y 
R.)!iert L. B'>wen. Minn -aih.r.s; C 



K. 



H'»edel, Butte: A. J. H alfr C'>pperfleld. 
Co1j» a, K. Davis. Piilladelpbla; <. U. 
= • . ' I), trolt, Frederi -k Whit.'. Mitme- 
.;is S A. Anderson, St. Paul: P. Wal- 
;.T .Minneap-ills: J"hn MeCarihy. Mm- 
I ip.d!'« S. R. Klrby. Hibbing; .bdni L. 
-Jiult, Chie.i^o; F. p. Ly.m .%l.nneip..I:s; 
J. Kelly, Minn'ai..>li»; ^ J- V"> ''^'•, *-!V* 
..'mTo .\rr..l.l .Slimitz. Br..okiyn; J. N\ • 
^ ' W. U. L>we, Mume- 

<'hleago; H. L. 



Flight, Chic.i« >; 
apol's W. S. S'lllivan 
j..hns.>n. ishpemitig; C. L Huniap clil- 
ea«.. T C. Rohui.^jn. Chicago; I. D. 
l-owV.'s a-.; Paul. J. K. N'>yaud. Chlca- 
Ko W W. OnUUn. St. Paul. (J. Go..d- 
el.' St. Paul. J. H. Long. Yo:;ng.«rown. 
oh'o A hi. Biirn. by, N"-.v \.irk; \N c. 
Uovd.'Mllwauk . J •: ' Hmoney. PUis- 
bjr'e. 

V :.ie McKa.v: C. M. Towne. C.^ss 
l^ke Kthel Chase, M.iineap.tUs; Kdna 
lliimU TuxV-ania. Mex , Kmmi Wilson, 
l; tii; .\ima Wl.-e. Hibhing; Al H'-rck- 
h.'i'n.'r Chlo:,«o. Miss Mir.ni- Stevens. 
Pri.'toi^; John K rr. Hel.-na. J.hn Lvicey. 
St Paul- A. Pullman. Minneapolis: L. 
F (;r:ssvjld. Mnn-i^tp-hs; G M. B. ck. 
St P.iul; Chaile.* r'alm.»r. HU.bing; \\. 
M Havnes and wife. Two Har!>..rs: H. 
crawf'^-l. St. .-lo.M. J. R. Sten-ms St. 

Cloud; J. J. Mav-'h ""'' ,^^"^»'- "'*:l''"5' 
William Bavnton, M-mntain Iron: "V H. 
Teltev T.iwer; J. GiU'ert. Mlnong: 1 U. 
knight. Proctor; l>ay F. Stacy. Mlnne- 
r K J.-»hns>sn. Kveleth: J. L. 

Kotze, Eve- 



Chicago N'Ws; WiiC mail has d.n? 
woman can umlo. 

Help th.' actor along by giving htm lh<? 
glad hand. , ,. , 

Il is easier to cultivate a girl s imagin- 
ation than her voice. 

Lots of men woul.i be good hu.sbandj 
if they ha.l belter wives. 

He's a brav.' man who tries to stop a 
wourin'.s runaway tongue. 

I..ack of cr.*dit pr.'\ents som-^ people 
fr.»m living beyond their means. 

Xo ni.in is half as .xman as his wifn 
tri' s to make p.-opb- la'lieve he is. 

A nian who owes another a grudge is 
Btiri' to be Joliniiy on the sn-it on pay 

Many a man gets ahead by in.lucing 
oth'-r iii.;-n to put their shoulder to hi.s 

^^ You' ran Karn a little eaeh day-unless 
you happen to be one of those wise 
per.sons who know It all. 

Th.- mail who :i« gleets to put his be.=?i 
foot f.»rward wli-n h.' lias a chance may 
fer-l Ilk.' kicking hims.lf later. 

It's easy t.. emvfnee th-- world that 
vou'bave sense after you have suee.-eded 
In accumulatini; a large pil-- of dollais. 

AcconlinK to siatistlcs. on.- woman out 
Of a million cm open a telegram with as 
little emotion as she displays m opening 
a can of corn. 

II' nr.diibiilon wi-re to •ipr-iad iiK'> a 
,r'yer.«el nv^ntk- ovr the entire country 
and ri ally prohibit niaylio the first robin 
would iio\ be si?tn so soon. 



"A IMHipluH-y." 

It was a plea.sanl day in .lune. 

.And gnat wa.-- th.- e'.nv.'nti.n; 
Tlie sun was riding high at noon. 

And 111" land was all .Uienlion. 

Alabama:" eall-'d the eler^t. 

.\nd th.' olYici- erowd w«iU .la:' 
Wli.'ii a v.". S. .M.irshai show'-.i Ins 1: a.l 
(Hit in llie seetliiim mass and .^ai.l 

"Count twenty-two for Ti"' 

The Cannon ni.'n turn pal.' .. ^ . - - . 

.\nd the Husli-s men gasped l.>r br^ ath- 
Th" nvn f'O' Fairbanks hung U> p ».st.s 

.\s L'olorl' ss as death. 
"Arkansas"' tin- el.rk exclaim I, 

.Viid tiie nail nhook fxri- an.l ait 
Wli'-n a sprv pos'mast.-r. whit.- of liur. 
H.))<ped to the main deek of his ehair, 

An.l eri.d. "Eiglit.-en for Taft!" 

The Fairbanks ni.n "xud-d gr .ois. 

.And the Cannon men sli- d t.'.irs — 
And il'e Hughes m-'n ulL-r-d n'>ne but 
ni'ja us 

That on<'.! had utterefl elfers 
•'California"' l)<..)m<Nl Ih.' el.Tk. 

And till whole cmcntlon laugh.^d 
When a r«y>-nii.^ coUector rose, 
.An.i siirilly whisll.'.l thr.»ugh bis no.se. 
•Count twenty more for T.ift"' 



The Hughes men looked a 
men. 
And the Fairbanks men. from pi ' 

And pri.'vins, I'jined th-' oth.»rs wli-n 

They pulbd their T'ddy He.-irs, 
.\iid they all rushed up on "'i 

hish 

As men who hn,i made r.i.l; 
\n.l wh.n (h. din -x'-k^ the tuniul- d d. 
.And the dust li-ol s'ltb d soni." insi I •, 
Th'- eandld.tt.- was Te.ldy 

-St. Louis p..st-I»lS!:it<h 



R.'.I Lak.' Falls i',:i7.'<- wise 

farmer kimws It is better t.» tiav.* a Ut- 
tU' lan.l. all paid for and well etiltt- 
vai.'.l. than a gr" O i-lg f.irni !e.' i-l in 
d.-bt mi) n>.t half wrke.J 



\\ .:!;.: n: .' Th« niAn w a 

t. n-.b.llar tag mi his vot,-- Is .igain cxin- 
ini^ out of his two years' hlbern:»ti.>n 
Willi his n<»strils dilat.-d in an C'-Mnpt 
to S'-ent the eampalgn t>arrel 



|{elle«'lions f>f a llaelielor. 

N vv Y'.»rk Press: Th-' most succ.»ssful 
I'lVe .(lYair i'< wh.n it's tniat^ination 

We .-ill Ilk.- -it 

wasn't their 

Th.' only c;i i;.'-.- ,i nun .lis ■ ai.iUe 
money in sp.'oulati.m 1$ to go jti;.Un3t 
his judgment 

If a .iirl W" -.-ou PU' lub- 

bers for hei. : ^ •':- ••.V.'.'it 

ar.'ii't dr.>i5.s.'J for I' 

The rea.son i "v •■' .. ; ,. n- 

jovmeiit out -1 is she 

(.,: ,v. -■ ir's h 1 . .. ^ ^ • ■■! wife. 





Wm-Miy of 


tl»»» r*oMfiii 






Hibbing Trihun 




•y 


e. 


commissi. »ner 


Vi!ok au'.iiOMZ' d 


the 




pur ili.K- -if 


■'SJnrv groin d 


for 


nnon 


til. 

St. i.,0'J,!a C" 


i: . r.'i->^'- 


■ . • v 


r-f 


Thw means 


^•. Louis <?•' 





f )i-m 



have a co-artliouso w.irthy of th>- ra ii-ist 
countv in th.- state, set in surroundhigs 
suitable for such a public building, 
X:!iety-niiie :> r ""ni of '',.. .v.nd.^ of 

vli >unty 1 plea !i the 

aeti.ii! of th !. ^'id i leW 

of iJK; newspap'i '->■■ ;. i a-ig.^ are 

delivered of div.>r.i -i :.»ak!n^s ovir 

th.' .^xt ravage n.;e "; .ii: i • . ry- 

l>j.ly will be iiappy 



.•%re of SoiiM^ Vm'. 

Til • Conhd.ntial Bank-r: Minma; s«o.'k 
should be l>..ushl in the dark of th- ni.NJn 

from a total stranger. If i>»ssible. pay j f urnate.s"i'n this district are b-ing bl.rwij 
him ill lea.i moie-y " - - 



lliisiiM-.'^ IMeking Ip. 

Birmingham News: One by on** the 
irnates in this district are l»-ing blo-wij 

. ,. Mining sto. k is us-^- | j^ j,jj. .^ re.suniption of op-ntions, and 

fuV'f.Vr .sev.ral Miings. Th.' long and nar- jj„. outlo'jk be.omes st.'adily brighter. 

row eerlifieat.'s ar- good for Laying upon ^ 

pan'ry sh.-lv s. The short, lat .,nes c.in ; 



apoiis. 



W 'lien 1 n^nn realiites that the fact "In* things arc as 
they a ititfactory proof ih.r tre right, he 

is in a position to lean: •: - 



The Princeton Union, run by :' • i , mi G.»v- 

crn.)r Johnson defeated tour ycar.> ., There arc 

many who belie\ Govern.>r J.>hn's lecttire proposi- 

tion will ptove t.» he a huge tiaso — that it is merely a 
pretentious undertaking." Surely this is tl^c litr.it fir 
sour, jealous, small-minded churhshnc&s. 



Hurd. Mlnn.uap..Iis; '•5'-»rg;\ '"':"',!?•'•, *•'':■■ 
l.th: Oabriel Snol-'. Kv.M-tli; c harles I 
Nls.>n. Aurora; Lizzi- W.-st. Ely: Ir.^1 
Chase Knite Riv.r: Mrs. L. M. Wasn't* 
F'y M J o'N-1. Philad.lphii: W. Bag- 
lev,' BembU: : Mrs J. A Dalpch. Grand 
Rapids: A. .M. <;)rd.-»n. Mlnne.ipolls. 

RIc'o and Frrors. 

Rorh.'xter Hera 1.1: W:il!nm .lame.s. th.> 
^-ain.ius psy ohologi.st of Harvanl. said: 
•'Th- .^dde.st, the most momentous as:#)cl- 
ation.s oftentlm.s art.i.-h themselves to 
ilie most trifling ihing.s 

'•TbuM at a .llnner that I once at- 
tended the host.>.«is said lo a sour-face' 
man -ni h.:>r left: K..n^ 

" May I help v.>u to some of the bouoa 
riee. Mr. Smithr 

• "Rie." N't, tliank you; no rice for 
me,' Smith an.swered. vehmently. 'It Is 
' . I ss.. elated with the worst mlsfake of my 
1 life.' •• 



b.' u'^ed in the bottom of draw-r.-. I la; i 
han<ls..mely engrav-d eertuU ales, on! 
han.l-made paper, -an b.;r.»l!ed up and. 
us.'.l for killing Ihes. ^ ou sn.»uld. or 
. our-i.- buv your slock careiully =in 1 | 
^•hooso' the size whieh will cm^ in hand-' 
i.'.st Low-grad" mining sLx-k snoiiIJ be 



.AMl.SFMKXTS. 



!>ougbt Just b"fore house cleaninR. Il 
.an'then be laid under the carpets during 
Late in the fall it can b" 
for iH^dding th":; 



the suinni. r 

taken up and used 

liors.-. 



Iowa 
Nebraska . . 
ICansas — 
Washington 

lUah 

Oregon 

Ohio 

Wyoming . 
Minn<-sota . 



Tlie Pullninn AVbisk. 

iT.ii'ston P.jst: The Pullman eompany. 
having abolished the .sale of liuuor in its IHinois . 
ear* ought to institute one more reform j Muhlg.in 
IITC^^ the infernal whisk broom, j ^'-'o^-^f 

Wuti-lies the Wind. | U' ''''\n«in 

A pfditician always ', ^^ i-^eonsin 

when ho 



Hal vest on News: 
wants what the people want whei 
finds out th.-y are soins to hav e it. 

\Vlioi«-l>a. I>«nion Hum: 

Demon Rum. h-'s a-runnln' fast. 

Who-i-da. Demon Rum._ 
He'.» llk'^ to stop, but he d.»esn t dast, 

''Vhoa da. Demon Rum. 
Whoa-da. Demon, while I g. ts my pall, 
Whoa-da. IXinon, have yo any mixed 

Whoa-da. Demon, till I up an' salts 
your tail — „ , 

Whoa-da. Demon Rum! 



Illiterates in Hie Vnited Stag's. 

A'H.ri.-an Journ,i,l of K.iu.-.iUon ; The 
f.iU'iwing list sh .ws th-- numljet .tf niit- 
.rat.-s in .^ach l.<t<M of popuLuion. aetor.l- 
ns to the last TJnit^fi States cen.sus: 

23 Connect ieui o") 

2:> Pennsylvania ''.l 

29 M'Jiitana 'il ' 

31 N.w Hampshire... •^21 

3! Mi.ssouri 64 ; 

3'. Rhod.' Island K4 j 

41 .Maryland Ill I 

:» West Virginia ....114, 

a Delawaru 12)1 

4.' Nevada tS-i 

.^2 T'-xas 14.'> 

Al Kentucky l''*^' 

4<\ .Arkansa.s 2«>l 

•',.» Tennesse,; ^iT | 

•57 Florida 21.C 

4'> Virginia 22f' i 

r,') N'ortii Carolina ...287 

5" Arizona. iWO j 

;".'. 'Jeorgia 3)". | 

T>' ilississiprl 32' I ; 

rc> N.'W Mexico Z^2 

:>■*■ .Alabama S4'T 

.-,9 S.iuth Carolina ...3ii9 



LYCEUM 



TO.\i4aiT A\D 



TUe .Mu<*k-l.eon« riityerN In 

^^THE CASE OF RE- 
BELLIOUS SUSAN'' 

By HKMIV AHTUt R JO^KS. 
MiitluecM W c«ln«».sdu>- "nd Saturdity. 
I «iual prlccM. 



M.\RCH 16 — FR.\XK IJAMKI-S. 



Tuesday & Wednendii > , Murch 17-lS 
>l ATI \ KK. \\ 1 .11 V K.«in A V. 

'^MAN of the HOUR'' 

SE.%TS TOMOKIIOW. 



California ... 
Si. nth Dakota 

Maine 

New York 

Oklahoma ... 
North Dakota 

Verm.>nt 

Ma.ssachusetts 
N'W Jersey 



Louisiana 



I 



—New York Sun. 1 Ux" administration. 



\I1 the .states before Maryland in the 
foregoing lis' have compulsory attend- j 
ane.' laws, but thev are not. as a rule, 
.-•nforced rigidly. Thre.^ of tho.se that 
rome later in rhe list have s.ich laws, but 
thev are practically dead letters through, 



METROPOLITAN 

THK IIOl SK OF MIIITII. 
Tonlirht and Ail Thl« Week. 

Dreamland Burlesquers 

with DAVK MARION lu Hie 
Latent SmcttMm, 

. "NEWPORT" 

NRXT WEKK — Hl«h Scbool (itrlm. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 











t 







'^ 



■ ,^ — — *— . 



- 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 




OF m^ mMms 



STATE WILL 
MAKEMONEY 

Out of New Method of 

Clearing Itasca State 

ParK. 



Dodge of Minneapolis. Up was a gradu- I ber of keepers of barrooms are prepar- 



ato of the Ontr.il hiRh school and for a 
ilmt' alUMuitHl tho law school of tlu- Unl- 
v*rMlfy of Minnesota. Two yt^ars ago he 
cni.-nHl ni'wspiipt-r work and wa« con- 
nt<ni'd with papers In Minneapolis and St. 

I'aul. 

Six month.s asm h" became tlty editor 
.>r th.' Daily Mi.«soulan. He was taken 
sli'k with ptomain.' poisoning la.st Wfk, 
an,} Col. and Mra. Ixidj?!- left Mlnnt:ip.)li.s 
Saturday for their sons bfdside. He di. d 
b.>rori> they reuchfd MissoMla. B. sid.>s 
hl.'^ parents, Mr. Dodge leaves a sister. 
Miss Dorothy Dodge. 

CLOOUEtTOHAVE 
UP-TO-DATE CLUB 



Profit Derived From Dead 

and Down Timber 

Removed. 



Bemidji. Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— R. C. Arnold, coni- 
nii.ssioner of Itasca state park, reports 
that the work of gelling out the dead 
and down timber in the park by con- 
traci, as it is now being dune, is 
proving a benelit to the state. When 
one considers the manner in which this 
work ha.s been carried on herelufore, 
and tlio estimales placed on the lands 
that are now being cleared by the 
state, it appears that the state has 
niis.sel con.«idt.-rable in the previous 
deal.s. , ,. 

St'CU'>n SfJ is being cleared of its 
dead and down timber this winter. This 
tract was previously estimated at 50.- 
OOO.OOO feet by a state scaler, and the 
report turned in on sections 14 and ::4 
Wfis that it was hardly worth while to 
bother with the tracts. 

Mr. Arnold looked the situation over 
and advi.setl the timber board to have 
the timber cut by contract, which has 
been done. 

Mr. Arnold reports that there la now 
banked and scaled from these con- 
tiact-s s()0.0«JO feet, and that it has been 
aold to the Bemidji Lumber company 
at $11 per thousand. After paying the 
c<3st of the loggini?, the stale will net 
15.25 i)er thousand from the timber, or 
a total of $4,200. One half of this 
amount will go into tiie stale treasury 
and til' jtht-r half into the slate sch'Wl 
fund. 

Mr. Arnold estimates that there are 
about 200.0W feet of dead and down 
timber on .section 26. about 1<K),'MX) feet 
on section 22. and ab^jut 80.000 on sec- 
tion 16. which can be cleared up next 
winter, and which will return to the 
state a good sum for the trouble. 

Itasca statt.- park is a valuable piece 
of property, and will return the sta,te 
many times the sum that has been ex- 
pended in its purchase and improve- 
ment. 



ing to go out of business. They say 
they are driven to tlie step. They 
attribute the increa.^o in the fee to the 
efforts of a so-called •trust"' among 
the liquor men. and they are after re- 
venge. An organization has been ef- 
fected, and announcement is made 
that its members will see to It that 
those salooni.sls who remain In busi- 
ness will live up to the law strictly. 
Up to recently Marquette saloons were 
seldom closed from one week's end to 
the other. Then the lid was clai>ped 
down, and it is becoming evident now 
that it Is down to stay. 




DEATH LOOKS SLSPKiOlS. 

Relative of Ed Dunlop Propo.ses to 
Coiidiu't Iiivesti;i:atioii. 

Ten^T.'-ik', Minn., Much 0.— (.Special 
to The Herald.)— There appears to be 
a mystery surrounding the death of 
Edward Dunlop, at Big Falls. al)out 
two weeks ago, tho relatives of the 
dead man l>elng of the opinion there 
has bet'Ti foul play It was reported 
here that Mr. Dunlop was foun^l dead 
alon gthe railroad track near Big Falls, 
but later It developed that he was 
found lead In one of the Big Falls ^ 
resorts. It is said that Uunlop and an- I 
other man had been drinking heavily | 
and that Dunlop's companion hid a 
lage sum of money. It i.^ also reported 
that toward evening Dunlop fell as'ecp 
in the saloon and later was carried 
to a room, where he remained all of 
one night and a day and in the even- 
ing was found dead in bed. Some .say 
that lii.s companion has not been .seen 
since> Dunlop was hurriedly burled 
at Big Falls. He Is .i brother-in-law 
of Peter Maule of this village and 
also h;i8 a sister in Michigan, who 
will demand an investigation. 



Local Companies Will Pro- 
Vide and Equip Suit- 
able Establishment. 

CloquK. Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
lo The Herald.)— The local companies 
have agreed to establish a club in this 
city, provide all necessary funds for 
a full equipment of athletic apparatus 
and other furnishings, and have It 
turned over to the public, under the 
management of a local board of direct- 
ors. The mstitution will bo governed 
on the y. M. C. A. plan, but everyone. 
whether old or young, employe of the 
comp-'inies or not. regardless of re- 
ligious belief, will K' eligible. The 
building recently occupied by the 
Northern Lumber company's store will 
be remodeled for the use of the or- 
ganization, and furnished with ath- 
letic and comfortable equipment, as 
soon as {>osslble. 

Phil Bevls, secretary of the Duluth 
Y. M. C. A., and E. W. Peck of St. 
Paul, the state secretary, have been In 
the city to consider the question with 
the repre.scnlatives of the companies. 
They slaved that as soon as the build- 
ing was Hnlshed they would send a 
man to lake charge of the club, and 
al.so a physical director. Work will 
be begun In a short time, and doubt- 
less Cloquet will have a clubhouse that 
will rival any of its kind in this vi- 
cinity. 

AKELEY LS INTERESTED 

Id PIjiv bv Home Talent for Catho- 
lie Church. 

Akeley. Minn.. March 10. — (Spe- 
cial lo The Herald.) — Much interest 
is being manifested in the home 
talent play which the citizens are 
to give for the benefit of the Cath- 
olic church. The cast is considered 
a strong one. being made up of the 
best of local talent. A very pleas- 
ing feature is the manner in which 
the local Protestants are co-operat- 
ing with the Catholics in the en- 
deavor to secure funds to beautify 
tho Catholic church The play will 
be given on Thursday in the opera 
house, and a large crowd Is assured. 
Fath'V O'Mara. the Akeley priest, is 
a popular young clergyman and ha.s 
done much for his church. The cast 
of -'The Iron Hand" is as follows: 
Harmon Van Horn. A. G. Strom; 
Oliver Montford. H Butler. old 
Ikey, E. A. La Flamme; Jack Min- 
ton. ' H. O. Butler; Hawkins. J. R. 
Johnson; Bella. Mrs. E. R. Dampler; 
Lizzie, Mrs. A. G. Strom; Mrs. Dib- 
ble. Mrs. M. O. Olson. 

County Attorney Dampl'^r and 
Mrs. Dampier with Mrs. Olson ftre 
cnnsldi'red as possessing as good 
talent as any in Hubbard county, 
and the enthusiasm shown by the 
local Catholics In.sures a largo 
hou.se. 



IF You NEED FURNITURE BUY NOW! 



ROINDHOISE IS DESTROYED. 



DIES OIT WEST. 

Former T^viii City Newspaper Man 
Suctuiiibs to Ptomaine Poisoning. 

Mlnn.apolls. Minn.. March 10 —(Special 
to Th- H-rald.>-\vniiain E. Do.l^e, Jr.. 
fonn»»rly a Twin Citv newspaper man. 
died Sunday in Mi.-isoula. Mont., from 
ptamaln.- poisoning. 

Mr. Dodge was a son of Col. W. E. 



THE AMERICAN IDEA 

No Distinction on Account of 
Dress at the 5t. Regis. 

NEW YORK'S HOME LIKE HOTEL 



Recenily. we ar- told, the managtr 
of a fastilonable London restaurant re- 
fused to allow an Earl and his Count- 
ess to eat in the dining-room because 
they were not attired In regulation 
evening dress. It Is a pleasure to be 
able to state that such snobbishness 
does not prevail in New York hotel 
restaurants. Even at the St. Regis, 
which sets the pace In matters of 
dress and etiijuette. the wearing of a 
business suit bars no one from ad- 
mission or service. The business man 
who comes to New York without an 
elaborate wardrobe ncd have no mis- 
givings. At the St. Regis he will get 
quite as good .service and be made to 
feel jusi as much at home in his busi- 
ness suit of an evening as though he 
wore the costume approved by society. 

The St. Regis is emphatically an 
American hotel, and is conducted in 
accordance with American ideas. Com- 
fort is the keynote and homelikeness 
Is the symphony in this inviting pal- 
ace of rest and refreshment. It is an 
Ideal stopping place for all who appre- 
ciate good living at a fair cost, a place 
where one always feels at home. We 
are wont lo say and think. "There's no 
place like home." but times have 
changed since the old song was writ- 
ten, and manv have discx)vered that It 
Is po.ssible to lind elsewhere a place 
like horn" in every good particular, 
but unhke home in the matter of ca.re^ 
and annoyances. Such a place is the 
St. Regis. New York. 

Whether you go to the metropolis 
for a dav or two on business, or for a 
week or month on pleasure bent, make 
the St. Regis your home. The restau- 
rant ciiarges are moderate and a good 
room may be had at $4 a day or one 
with bath at |5 ($6 for two persons), 
or a parlor, bedroom and bath for 112. 



Three Mineral Range Engines Bad- 
ly Damaged in Honghton Blaze. 

Houghton. Mich.. March 10.— (.Special 
to The Herald.)— Fire of an unknown 
origin broke out at 10 o'clock Saturday 
night in the Mineral Range round- 
house in the Houghton railroad yards. 
The building, as a result, is a total 
loss and the three engin^-s contained in 
it are badly damaged. The loss is es 
timated at r>.«)00. h<ilf for the building 
and half for the engines, which can be 
repaired. 

Night Foreman Fred Miller in charge 
of the roundhouse, said that he knew 
nothing of the Are till his hostler 
called his att>'ntion to it. The blaze 
seemed to start In the roof '>f the 
frame building and it had gained such 
headway before It was discovered t.iat 
Miller could do nothing but get his 
men out and notify Foreman Peterson. 
who lives nearl)y. 

HURT ( lI.\SINTi ( OYOTE. 

North Dakota Horseman is Thrown. 
Breaking His Leg. 

Bismarck. N. D.^ March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— Roy Hauser. a young 
man residing at Menoken. has been 
brought to tho city suffering with a 
badly fractured leg. He was taken to 
the office of a physician, where his 
injury was attend d to. It seems that 
young Hauser was on horseback, chas- 
ing a coyote. At breakneck speed thu 
horse stumbled into a small hole and 
threw its rider heavily to the ground. 
While the Injury Is quite painful. It is 
not thought that it will result seri- 
ously. 

DlSdllSED AS TRAMP, 

Rice Lake Chief Captnres Leader 
of Tongh (lang. 

Rice Lake. Wis.. March 10 — As- 
suming the di.sguise of a tramp. 
Chief of Police Mose Beaudry ef- 
fected the capture of the leader 
of a gang of hoodlum* and broke 
up 



ST. PAUL AU. READY 

Fop National Meeting of Butter- 
makers to Begin Wednesday. 

St. Paul. Minn.. March 10.- (Special to 
The Herald.*— The comnilttefs on the re- 
ception and tntertalnment of the conven- 
tion of the National Creamery Butter- 
makers' association, which will begin hero 
tomorrow, have conipb-ted arrangements, 
and nolhlns will be spared to ensure the 
success ot the gathering. Members of 
the committee on reception, headed hy 
the First R.'gimenl band, will meet in- 
coming trains tomorrow moiaing an-i 
escort the delegates to their hotels. 

At 9:30 a. m. 100 members of the Coni- 
njerolal club will as.sfnible at the Ryan 
hoU-l, and acting as an esiori. will 
march with the convention delegates to 
the Auditorium. The procession will be 
ht^aded by a platoon of police, fo'.lowtd 
by R H. Stng chief marslial, and C. 
Tr. at Spear and A. J. Slobbart, his as- 
sislunts. Th^'n will come the First Re^i- 
nu'iit band and 100 members of the Coni- 
mtrclal club, followed l)y the convention 
delegates. On tlieir arrival at the Audi- 
torium the members of lh»* Comm- iclnl 
club will occupy boxes reserved for them. 
The route of the procession will be from 
the Ryan up Sixth street to St. Peter, to 
Fifth, to the Auditorium. 

.\t the session Wednesday morning 
Governor J.ihnson and a repre.sentativ.> 
of the mayor will deliver addresses ot 
welcome. 

COMMERCIAL TRAVELERS 

Of Crookston Council Have Elected 
Their Officers. 

Crookston. Minn.. March 10.-< Special to 
The Herald. )-The following officers have 
been elected and installed by Crookston 
council. No. S8. I'nited Commercial Trav- 
elers- Past counselor, G. E. Schuneman; 
senior counselor. W. IV Sheffield; junior 
counselor. Adam tietty; »\'-^*'}'^^>'-^J^'::^,^- 
un-r Robert F. L^lck; conductor. M>roii 
Tliornton; page, Oscar "'^'^""•S'm. sen- 
tinel. Bert L.-vln8; executive committee. 
J. P. Foot.-. G. E. Schuneman^ J. A. 
Getty. Clayton Final: physician. Dr.,C^ t. 
Dampier; delegates to attend grand lodge. 
C. A Hitchcock, a. E. Schunenmn and - 

^Th?next annual meeting of the grand 
lodge will be held at Calgary. Alberta. 

June 8 and 9. 

PLSHTNCWfHlS WAY. 

Roadbed Ready as Far as Onaniia, 
Mille Lacs County. 

Onaniie. Minn.. March 10.-(Special to 
The Herald. )-Ed Falby, the contractor, 
who had the rock cut this side of Plef*. 
has taken eight miles of work on the 
So<} extension this side of Snake nver. 
having finished the rock cut which had 
taken so long. The roadbed Is now ready 
for the ties as far jis Oaanihu 

UNCLE SAM[ SLOW PAY. 

War Veteran Walts Many Years 
for Small Amount Due. 

St. Paul. Minn.. March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— .Vfter waiting forty- 
three years E. D. Libbey. 10S2 Ashland 
avenue, formerly adjutajit general of 
.Vfinnesota. has received a check for $44.10 
which the United States government has 
owed him ever sh.ce the clo.se of tho 
Civil war. In January, 1S65. Mr. Libbey, 
then a sergt-ant in the United States 
army, was promoted to a llentenancy. 
but when he was mustered out later In 
the same year he received onlv the pay 
of a sergeant for the time he hid been 
a connnlssiond officer. The difference 
was paid to him only a few days ago. 



ANNUAL 



This sale is surprising all. We have more to offer you— bigger varieties 
—more impressive values. In more cases than one, you save half the cost of 

an article. Takes good merchandising to make such a thing possible, and 

we've merchandised right. There is no mvstery about the success of this ISIarch Sale. \Vith high-grade 
Furniture, such as Kelly's, going at prices 'truly ridiculous, it would be strange if people did not attend by 
the hundreds. And as knowledge of the fact broadens, the popularity of this Great March Sale is bound to 
increase. No one likes to miss an opportunity to purchase housefurnishings at half or thereabouts, it not 
in immediate need of the furniture, we will charge it and hold until wanted. Buy now! 

WE FURNISH YOUR HOME COMPLETE ON EASY PAYMENTS I 

Mail Orders g# (5 ^^^^ Orders 

Promptly Filled ^L Jm^ Promptly Filled 



^ 





MARCH SALE OF 

COUCHES AND PARLOR FURWIURE 



just received a carload of couches and parlor furniture, ordered specially 
for this March Sale. We mention but a few of the great values here. 



We have 



NOT ROBBED AT ALL. 

Only Drnnk and Forpot Where He 
Had Hid His Money. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. March 10.— N. M. 
Ve.sle ot the Twin Cltlea. who a.sserted 
that he had been robbed of a note for 
$100 and fM In cash and his coat and vest 
In the Columbia hotel, has discovered 
that he had been mistaken. While under 
the Influence of liquor he had atuffed 
the coal and vest, wliich contained the 
money in his niattre.>4s. When he got up 
in the morning he forgot all about it and 
•said he was robbt-d. The coat, veal and 
inon.*y were found In the mattress by a 
chambermaid. 



Couches, upholstered in velour. A variety of colors 
to select from. Biscuit tufting. Sanitary steel con- 
struction. Oil tempered springs. A couch that was 
made to sell for $12.00— March ^g ^fi 

sale price ^\Mm^\J 

Couch, upholstered in Boston leather, diamond tuft- 
ing. Soft, comfortable springs. Wire tied so they 
will not get loose. Sanitary construction. Frame is 
heavv and massive, (iolden finish. This couch 
was made to sell for $20.00. March Jl 2 50 
sale price ^ ^^^ 

Genuine Leather Couch. Frame of quarter-sawed 
oak, highly polished. Diamond tufting. Oil tem- 
pered springs. Sanitarv construction. A very com- 
fortable couch. Made'to sell for $30. J1 O AA 
March sale price 'P * ^« V V 



Handsome couch, upholstered in Verona Velour. 
Different colors to select from. We have them with 
and without tufting. Sanitary construction through- 
out. These couches must be seen to be appre- 
ciated. Made to sell for $18.00. March J 1 1 t£k 
sale price ^ m M, •%/ v 

Three-piece Parlor Suite. Upholstered in figured 
velour. Frames are finished mahogany. Suite con- 
sists of settee, large arm chair and one reception 
chair. This is a splendid suite. Made 4 1 'J C A 
to sell for $24.00— March sale price <P1^.%JV 

Three-piece Parlor Suite. Upholstered in genuine 
leather. Good spring Xvork. Frames are finished in 
mahogany. Suite consists of settee, large arm chair 
and reception chair. Suite was made $ | |C C A 
to sell at $30. March sale price V * U«%/ W 



THE STORE THAT SELLS IT FOR LESS! 



to The "Herald.!— Cieorge Hughes, one of 
the veteran pa.'isenger conductors on the 
ivntnsula division of the Norihwestern 
system, who has been running between 
Green Bav and Ishpemlng for a number 
of vears. ha^ been granted a six weeks 
vacation, which he will spend in Den- 
ver and oth'^r rH»lnts In the AN est. 



PENINSULA BRIEFS 



lONDi:«'TOR T.\KKa VACATION. 
Ishpemlng. Mich.. March 10. -(Special 



the ring by securing a convic- 
tion. For months he attempted to 
catch the leader, but his uniform 
scared them away Disguised, he 
"fell in" with the gang and led 
them away to the lockup easily. 



SALOONKEEPERS' TKLST 

.Alleged to Have Been Formed to 
Drive Out Small >Ien. 

Marquette. Mich. March 10. — (.Special 
to The Herald.)— An a.ssociation of 
saloon men working in the Interest of 
the enforcement of the liquor laws Is 
the novel spectacle In prospect here. 
The common council having boosted 
the license fee from $500 to $750. a num- 



Piles Quickly 

Cured at Home 

Instant Relief. Permanent Cure — 

Trial Package flailed Free to All 

in Plain Wrapper. 

Piles is a fearful disease, but easy 
to cure if you go at it right. 

An operation with the knife la dan- 
gerou.s. cruel, humiliating and un- 
necessar)'. 

There Is Just one other sure way to 
be cured— painless, safe and In the 
privacy of your own home — it is P>Ta- 
inld Pile Cure. 

We mail a trial package free to all 
who write. 

It will give you instant relief, show 
you the harmlejw. painless nature of 
this great remedy and start you well 
on the way toward a perfect cure. 

Then you can get a full-sized box 
from any druggist for 50 cents, and 
often one box cures. 
1 Insist on having what you call for. 

If the druggist trie-s to sell you 
something Just as good, it is because 
I he makes more money on the substi- 
tute. 

The cure begins at once and con- 
I tlnues rai)idly until It is complete and 
permanent. 

You car. go right ahead with your 
work and be ea^y and comfortable all 
the time. 

It Is well worth trying. 

Just send your name and address 
to Pyramid Drug Oo., 92 Pyramid 
Building. Marshall. Mich..' and receive 
free by return mall the trial package 
in a plain wrapper. 

Thousands have been cured In this 
easy painless and Inexpensive way. In 
the privacy of the home. 

No knife and its torture. 

No doctor and his bills. 

All druggists. 'x> cents. Write today 
for a free package. 



Maruuette-Kicked in the forehead by 
a horse, William Uishop. aged 2.'>. is lying 
at deatli's door at Kugadine. Western 
.Mackinac county. His skull was frac- 
tured, and a piece of bone penetrated 

the brain. ^ ,, , .v,. 

Hancock— Prof. J. S. Chamberlin of th.s 
city has received word from his sister 
at Detroit to the effect tliat her two 
srand-chihlren were burned to d'^ath in 
the schoolhouse fire at North Colhnwood. 
Ohio. . . ..^ 

Houghton-Nicholas Schuler. one of the 
oldest engineers on the D. S. S. A A... 
died .Saturday afternoon at his home in 
West HouBh'ton. He leaves a wife and 

family. ,, . „, 

C'aluinet-Jaob Cronenworth, Jr. or 
Mohawk and Maggie Therrien of Allouez 
wen- married S^iturday evening at the 
home of the brides father at Allouez. 
The ceremony was performed by Kev. 
H Magahav. pastor of the Moha/wk .M. 
E church. Only a few of the intimate 
friends of ihe young couple were pres- 

*"lJike Unden-Mr. and Mrs Edward 
Boyd have arrived here from McKlnley. 
Minn., where they have been visiting 
since last November. 

CiUumet— I'rlah Penberthy. a local 
steamship agent. Is making arrange- 
ments for a visit to the old country of 
a party of Cornishmen during May. It 
is expected that there will be between 
twenty and thirty In the party. 

Marquetle-Mr. and Mrs. James Wright 
Saturday evening celebrated the iwenty- 
nfth anniversary of their ^«^^^,'»8 a. 
their home at JSi West Park street. Tht-y 
w-ere married in Marquette a quarter of 
a century ago and have lived here ever 

"'Houghton-Rev. Walter R. Fruit 
piistor of the Grace M. E. church ot 
Houghton, has made arrangements for a 
8»rles of revival services to »>«, b^'^ at 
the church this month. He will be as- 
sisted by Kev. A. A. Maywood of Mar- 

Ishpemlng— Superintendent E. E. Scrib- 
ner of the Ishpemlng public schools ar- 
rived home Saturday from Washington. 
U. C. where he attended a meeting ot 
superintendents. 



of the paper, quit. This makes the third 
newspaper that has suspended publica- 
tion In this county within a year. Mr. 
Sander<5 expects to move to Western 
Montana. 

Ross— Carl Cedarholm has moved his 
family and blacksmith tools down from 
Vassar. Man., and has started a black- 
smith shop in the building formerly 
occupied by M. Egstad. 

East Grand Forks— As a result of a 
decision of the supreme court of Minne- 
sota, the McClure Lumber company must 
\,fi\ the Grand F'orks Lumber company a 
judgment for $117,000. This ameunt is a 
result of the failure of the company to 
fulfill a contract to diliv-r u specitied 
number of logs to the plaintiff. 

Tracy— Earl Ander.son, lat. ly employed 
on the Collins farm. In Murray county, 
was found in the snow five miles south- 
east of the cllv In a badly f roz* n con- 
dition Sunday, "and wos brought to this 
cit" In a critical state. 

St Paul— Duell N<lson. for twenty-five 
years a resident of North St. Paul, where 
He has long been known as the "viUage 
tailor,' was found dead in his bed Sun- 
day morning. He was 75 years (dd. He 
is survived by his wife and one daughter. 

Barnesville— Michael Farley, on»- of the 
oldest residents of this city, died at his 



home here of Bright's disease. He was 
at the time of his death an employe of 
the Great Northern railway and was on 
the retired list. 

Crookston— Frank Montague, chief clerk 
at the United States land office In this 
city recently received notice that his sal- 
ary had been increased to the extent of 
$100 per year, so that hereafter he will 
draw $1.30<J per year. - 





Greenbush— The Greenbush Journal has 
suspended publication after an existence 
of seven years. Editor Zanders wanted 
a change and not being able to dlspo«e 



How to Know 

if it is Eczema 

Rt^dness. 

Swelling. 

Inflammation. 

Watery blisters. 

Crusty formation. 

And all the time Itching, annoying 
,'i,nd. at times, almost unendurable itch- 
ing. 

This Is eczema, the most common and 
most difficult to cure of all skin dis- 
eases, because of its tendency to be- 
come chronic ana spread. 

You can stop the Itching at once, by 
using Dr A. W. Chases Ointment and 
just as certainly heal up the raw. flam- 
ing sores by use of this great healing 
ointment if "you are persistent in treat- 
ment. , ^, , 

Marvelous success In the cure of 
eczema is what has made Dr. A. "W . 
Chases Ointment standard the world 
over as the most soothing and healing 
of ointments. 50 cents a box. at all 
dealers or Dr. A. W. Chase Medicine 
Co Buffalo. N. Y. Every box of the gen- 
uine bears the portrait of A. W. Chase. 
M. D. 

!Hr(». JnmeH Robblnw, SIdaey, Towner 
Co.. North Dakota, ittatea: 

"I had a most distressing case of 
eczema and suffered dreadfully from the 
Itching. Nothing I used had any Influ- 
ence on it After the first few applica- 
tions of Dr. A. W. Chase's Ointment I 
obtained relief and four boxes complete- 
ly cured me. I consider the cure a re- 
markable one aa the case was very 
stubborn." 



:kiuioi. N. j^>.— George McHattie of Fox- 
holm, charged witli threatening to kill 
Lawrence Gregerson. a neighboring 
homesteader, said thai there is no truth 
whatever in the charge when he appear- 
ed before Judge Murray. He is a very 
peaceable and respectable looking man 
and does not impress one as being a 
man who would do harm to anyone. 

Bismarck, N. D.— The relatives of Dr. 
F. B Strauss in the city have been sur- 
prised to receive a letter from the doc- 
tor apprising them of his marriage in 
Chicago to Miss Marie E. Ball. The doc- 
tor is quite well known in this city, and 
at present taking a post graduate course 
in surgery in Chicago. 

Briltin, N. D.-J. J. Fulcher. the agent 
for the International Harvester company 
h<'re was no.ified Saturday by telegram 
of the sudden death of his father at 
Monroe Mich. He left for that place at 
an early hour Sunday morning. 

Oakes, N. D.— Something like JT.OOO has 
been raised by subscription towards the 
erection of an opera house at Oakes and 
the building will be started at once. 

Crosby. N. U.— As a result of a lire 
which destroyed the Hoislngton building 
about a half mile out of Kermii. which 
was being moved from Kermit to Noon- 
an by the owner, Mr. Rouse, a promi- 
nent bu-siness man of Kermit has been 
arrested on a charge of arson and is 
being held under $1,000 ball. 

Devils Lake. N. D— Company M of the 
North Dakota national guard was mus- 
tered in here Monday, fifty men signing 
the roll. The company has organized 
with the election of James Stenson as 
captain. Hink as first lieutenant and 
Tonv Holt as second lieutenant. 

Grand P'orks, N. D.— Aloyos PogUlsch, 
a Hungarian, who was arrested last Sat- 
urday afternoon on insanity Information 
and was placed In the padded cell at the 
county Jail has not partaken of a particle 
of nourishment since placed In jail. 



and fifty persons were in danger of be- 
ing roasted in a fire at the five-cent the- 
ater of Charles Bassinger on Mam street 
Sunday evening, the blaze being caused 
by the explosion of n picture machine. 

Chippewa Falls— In order to check the 
smallpox epid«'mic at Chetek. the board 
of health has ordered that everj' resi- 
dence and public building there must be 
disinfected. 

Dodgeville— The old DodgeviUe Canning 
& Manufacturing company has been di.<5- 
solvod and tiie properly taken over by 
the creditors. They have reorganized un- 
der the same name, and filed Inoorrtor- 
alion papers with the secretary of state. 
The capital slock is $:^.tJ<JO. 

Eau (Maire- Mrs. Henrietta Hardel or 
Fall Creek has been united in marriag* 
to E. W. Weir of Bloomer. Mrs. Handel 
is 01 years of age. while her husbani 
is 41. 

RilKni— The members of the tJlerman 
Evangelical church of this city havo 
extended a call to the Rev. Fred C. 
Kuether. pastor of the church in Anilgo 
and they are now awaiting the decision 
ol Mr. Kuether. 



"THE TINGLE 

OF ACHIEVEMENT" 



The Power to Do ThlnKrn in the \Vorl4 

Depend!^ oa Phynieal and Mental 

Stamina. How to Kec-p \%>ll 

and Stroag. 




Chippewa Falls^Iohn Patterson of 
Marlon Ohio, was arrested at Ladysmlth 
Just as he stepped off the train. The po- 
lice there had been informed that Pat- 
terson was wanted on the charge of 
forgery and that it was iwobable that 
the man would come to Ladysmlth to 
visit his uncle. .. ^. w 

Racine— One man waa badly burned 



This is a strenuous age. Strong 
nerves, a clear brain and healthy body 
are needed to win success. Ambitious 
men, engro.ssed in business or profes- 
sional life, headaches, nervousness, 

slonal life, frequently find themselves 
subject to headaches, nervousness, 
dyspepsia and insomnia, which greatly 
lessen the ability to accomplish the 
tasks they set out to perform. 

Beecham's Pills are a most valuable 
medicine for busy men. Their timely 
u.se will keep the organ.s In good trim. 
They tone the stomach, increase the 
vitality, purify the blood, regulate the 
bowels and give clearness to the brain. 
While Beecham's Pills contain no nar- 
cotic nor sedative, they are a boon to 
the man who finds himself unable to 
retain the clearness of his men- 
tal facilities. A pill or two taken 
a .short time before retiring will equal- 
ize the circulation, withdraw the blood 
from the brain and bring restful and 
refreshing sleep. 

The prices of Beecham's Pills are lOc. 
and 2oc. a box. All drugglsU aeU 
them. 






-; 



mi 



10 



THE DtJLUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



m 



< 




Simplicity 

There's just as much dif- 
ference in talking machines 
as there is in pianos. The 

Columbia 
Graphophone 

Is the only Instrument of its 
kind. It has reached its per- 
fection as a mu.slcal instrument 
largely because of its ideal 
simplicity. 

Best kind of evidence in the 
"BX" model, which costs you 
complete with six records and 
200 needles Just $28.60 — and on 
easy terms at the ca.'^h price If 
vou like. Other outfits from 
112 to J200. 



MUST REIMBURSE STATE 

FOR BANK FAILURES 




County Forced to Make 

Good the Money 

Lost 



Sold by Your Dealer 

-DM •¥- 

Columbia 
Phonogragh Co., 

,18 Third AvcnucWcsty 



Action Brought by the 

Attorney General Is 

Successful. 



St. Louis county must stand the loss 
of the state tax money amounting to 
about $17,000 on deposit In several of 
the local banks that suspended In the 
years 1894 and 1896. A decision of 
Judges Cant and Dlbell of the district 
court, filed with the clerk of the court 
today, directs that a writ of manda- 
mus shall Issue against County Treas- 
urer W. A. Holgate, commanding him 
to turn over fortwlth to State Treas- 
urer Dlnehart $17,167.74, which is the 
balance found to be due the state from 
deductions made from the regular 
quarterly settlement of tax moneys In 
Augu.st, 1899, to provide against the 
loss of state moneys in the bank fail- 
ures. 

The court has granted a twenty 
days* stay of judgment. The county 
will take an appeal to the supreme 
court. 

The case against St. Louis county, to 
collect the money, was brought at the 
Instance of Attorney General E. T. 
Young who dug the matter up out of 
thf old files after he succeeded At- 
torney Ge-neral Douglas in office. The 
collection of the $17,000 had been 
dropped several years before Mr. 



Young came Into his present office. 
Under the decision of the court the 
county must not only stand the sev- 
eral thousands of dollars loss of its 
own tax money, but must also stand 
the loss of the state funds which had 
been forwarded to the state treasurer 
on the tax settlements. 

At the time the banks failed they 
were county deposltorlea for divers 
amounts. At the time of the failures 
the county auditor and county trea- 
surer did not know how much the loss 
would really amount to. and they had 
reason to believe the county would 
eventually realize all the money de- 
posited from the bank assets and from 
the surety companies furnishing the 
bonds for the l>anks. Acting on this 
belief, for a period of two or three 
years the county auditor certified the 
tax money to the state treasurer, and 
the county treasurer paid the orders in 
full, without making any allowances 
for the amount of the state money lost 
In the banks. When, In 1899, the exact 
amount of the loss was determined 
and apportioned between the county 
and state, L. H. Whipple, who was 
then county treasurer, deducted from 
his tax settlement in 1899 the state's 
share of the loss, amounting to $17,- 
157.44. The state demanded payment 
In full, but the county refused to re- 
mit the balance, claiming that the 
state should stand its share of the loss 
through the banks. 

The Idea that the state should stand 
its portion of the loss was so generally 
held that no action was ever taken 
against the county to recover the 
money until Edward T. Young was 
elected attorney general. The case was 
tried about a year ago, Mr. Young 
and C. S. Jelley appearing for the 
slate and Assistant County Attorney 
W. J. Stevenson appearing for the 
county. 

In case the supreme court affirms the 
district court decision, the county 
board will have to take steps to meet 
the draft out of the general revenue 
fund, or make some provision for it In 
the next levy. 



Intrcfluctoiy 
Sale 




Si^n of Purity 
i& Heaithf ulness 

Most beers are wholesome, out 
it has been our aim to give the 
public the most wholesome. Our 
location on Lake Superior, whose 
waters are proven to be the best 
adapted to brewing of any in the 
country-, has given us an advantage 
over other breweries. Expense has 
not been considered in obtaining 
the best malt and hops, or 
in making our plant the 
most complete and mod- 
em in the world. 

Your home deserves 

Fitger s Beer— it costs no 

~ more than inferior beers. 

Order a case today. 



FlTGEPo 

BREWING 
COMPANY 

DULUTH 
MINN, 




HERALD'S WEST DILITH DEPT. 




J. J. Mo ran, 
405 t'entral Ave. 



or r t« r^Ki 

5405 Uaniaejr St 






PROGRAM 
OF BANQUET 

List of Speakers at West 

Duluth Commercial 

Club's Dinner. 

Many Prominent Speak- 
ers Will be Heard 
During Evening, 



The West Duluth Commercial oliib will 
hold its sixth annual ban<iuft tomorrow 
iiiKht at <:») o'clock in Wade's hall, 
lorm-r of Central avenue an<l H»imsey 
.street. It will be a dinner nnprooeilentod 
in tho history of the club, ami more than 
4tK) guests are expected to feust and en- 
joy an elal>or;i.te program of speeches 
and music. 

Kev. Hoderlck J. Mooney of the Holy 
Apostles' Episoopal church will pro- 
nounce tho opening Invocation. H. H. 
I'helps will preside as toastnjat^ter and 
iniruduee the jipeakers who will addr»-ss 
the baiuiu.tirs t.n the tollowiuK toasts: 
Haven. "Cay ol Duluth;"' 
O. Kherhurt, 



from their long exposure, and the ^>o- 
lloe and humane officer, are much in- 
censed over the case. 

The place where the team stood was 
only three blocks from the stable where 
the horses were kept. 

MORE SERIOUS CHARfiE. 

Six Boys Are Also Charged With 
Destroying Property. 

The six boys who took part In the 
keg party Halurday night were arrested 
again yesterday afternoon on a warrant 
sworn out by M. FUiatrault. charging 
them with having broken into the shack 
and destroyed $»5.oO worth of property 
belonging to him. 

The hoys appeared before Judge Flack 
of tho Justice court last night and were 
assessed for the damage they had done 
and the costs. „ ,. ^ , , 

Three of the boys have still to be tried 
on Saturday at the juvenile court on the 
cluirge of drunkenness. 

West Duluth Curlers Win. 

In the interelub games played last 
night between three rinks of the West- 
ern Curling club and tno Duluth Curllns 
club on the Western Curling club's iee. 
the rink skipped bv Br.>wer of Duluth de- 
fciUed MaelH)nald's rink bv a sore of 
n to 10 and Dunlop's rink of Duluth won 
from Kmll Zaufts rink by a score of 11 
to S Th«' only names Won by the \\ e.m 
Duluthlans was that skipped by Martm 
Melilahl. which he won from Hall of 
Duluth by the big marjiin of ff teen 
points, the score being 18 to 3. but this 
Kave the West Duluth men the victory. 

Friday night will be membership night 
and only members and their famlUos 
will enjoy the privilege of the skating, 
curling and music. 

W est Duluth Briefs. 

Rev. Roderick J. Mooney. rerior of thp 
Holy Apostles' Kplscopal church, will In- 



HOLIDAY FOR 
THE TWO RACES 

Jewish People Will Also 

Celebrate on March 

17. 

The Ii/ish people of the city will not 
be allowed to have a monopoly on St. 
Patrick's day this year. The Jewish 
residents of the city will also c-elebrate 
the day, as this year the Feast of 
Purim comes on March 17. 

The Feast of I'urini Is a commemor- 
ation of the deliverance of the Jews of 
Persia, about 450 U. C from a threat- 
ened massacre by Human, prime min- 
ister of Xerxes, king of Per«la. Esther, 
the Jewish wife of Xerxes, and Mor- 
decai. her foster father, were respon- 
Bible for the deliverance. The festival 
will be cek-brate<l by the Jewish peo- 
ple of Duluth in common with the peo- 
ple of their race in every city and town 
In the country. 

March 17 is, of course, the great Irish 
holiday, in memory of .»^t. Patrick, the 
patron saint of the Irish race. 



Mayor K. D 

Lieutenant Ciovernor A. _ 
"State of Minnesota;" W. 1. IMInee. 
"Matters Kinaneial;" .ludge William A. 
flint. •Juilieiary ;" Hon. C. H. MilW-r, 
••.North! astern Minnesota;" Hon. Joseph 
li. Cotton. ••.Manufacturers of Steel and 
Iron ai the Head oI tlio (Jreat l>akes;'" 
and ('()ngrt ssnuin J. Adam Uede, "l-iw 
Knlorcement." 

Flaatcns orehestni has t>een engaged 
to play during th»' evening and several 
niusuHl nunilwrs will add to the enter- 
tiunmenl ot ilie diners. There will be a 
piano 8<^<lo tiy Fred Ulcl and vocal solos 
by M. J. FUiatrault and Charles O. Ap- 
pithagen and ott.ers. 

The banquet will be served under the 
nianageineiit ol the ladles ot the Ifciptist 
church. a.ssisted by the ladies of all tlie 
Oilier West Duluth churches. 

At a tneeting of the banquet commlttei> 
in the ottice of i^. .\. IJarnes yesterday 
afternoon, to conn>!ete all the arrange- 
nunls, a r»eeption committee of IdO mem- 
bers was appointed to receive the guests 
Tlie baiKiuet cominiitce which has had 
charge of the arrauKements Is as follows: 

Jost ph Cochran, chairman: .\. H. Mer- 
riman. H. H. I'helps. 'I'homas Olafson. 
F. \V. Jolifz, F. K. Wntson. W. K. Kern. 
I.. A. Barnes, CJeorge M. Crulkshaiik and 
.M. M. Clark. 



SAY I 

MIniieamuT i H„mcatnkc. 5 centers. 

Hndl. V a? wholesale by N'ell J. Huek- 

l\.y We sell them. Ask for one of 

*'vv"hv" havJn'V*'" you asked to hear 
nlny^d the Victor Record of Kllecn 
^^'Ahore 'Melodies frU ' haTnieey Ol- 
eotts play? lo-inch No. •'•.m-flOo. 

THE SPENCER PHARMACY CO. 




^fce^ 



Closes Saturdayt 
March 14. 



^oAn J. Moe ScSonsCo 

(ibrmerhf Johnson ^Moe) 

21^ Ave W: A Superior St., Duluth 



The> West En^ 
BigDefi^rTmentStorej 



16c Huck Towels 

17x32 with white- | A 
borders, 9 to lo a. m. I IfC 

only 6 to a customer . . . ^^ ^^ 

$1.25 MusUn Curtains 



Ruffles, striped, plain 
and checked, hour 
sale only 



6Sc 




W.K 



Baby Coats to $5.00 

Just right for spring and fall — 
bear, caracul and db ^ AQ 
astrachan — hour ^ ^ a^O 

sale ^ 

KLITE ENAMEL WAIIE — Just 
one hour, 10 to 11 a m.. Austri- 
an Elite enamelware, full guar- 
anteed new com- lA rM 

plete stock '"^ "" 

Women'M fl.«M> "Marlow^' Low 
MhoeN — with elastic front. The 
biggest shoe bargain of the HTQ 
big sale— for one hour ^ 



Eight Great Hour Sales 

FOR WEDNESDAY. 

In addition to a general and tremendous price re- 
duction in all goods in the store (even the new spring 
goods) we are offering some twenty or more extra spe- 
cials that will make the time spent here Wednes^iay 
worth your while. Read each and every word and be on 
hand when the gong strikes the hour. 

Features to Remember 
Pre^ously Advertised 

You save 60c on every pair of men's and w^omen's 
Shoes you buy at this sale. 

You save Yi on fall and winter ladies' and chil- 
dren's Suits, Skirts, Coats, Furs— on some you save 2-3 
or more. 

The basement offers unusual inducements on all 
the new goods. 

New lines of Rugs and Lace Curtains are here— 
prices vigorously blue-penciled. 




Misses* Cravenettes 
to $8.50 



All in one lot, 
fall styles, right 
for spring, each. . . 
FANCY PLAID DRESS GOODS 
the regular 25c qual- \^h(y£* 



$3.98 



ity drees goods, yd 
JAPANESE CHINA 



-Complete 



stock all new goods IZ |||H|»p i 
— introductory sale. .73 |f 1 IVC || 





In appreciation of the generous response to ad- 
vertising and the hearty "God speed" given the new 
organization, J. J. Moe & Sons Co. will give 10 per 
cent on all sales (not profits only) made Friday, 
March 13, to the Norwegian-Danish M. E. Church 
Building Fund. j 




15c Madras 
Waisttng 

Short lengths, stripes ^|/ 
and figures, hour saleQ^/^Q 
special 

Gilt Edse Shoe l*oll|tb — known 
the world over as the best 25c 
polish— hour sale— (limit ISC 

8 to a customer) «.«r^ 



75c New Silks 39c 

Fancy and plaid for OA 
waists, hour sale per ^yQ 

yard 

NEW KID GLOVES — $1 25 
black and colored gloves — la<lles 
only — entire line and new Hk^o 
spring stock, hour sale., v^^ 

Arniour'i. Venetian Mine Toilet 
Soapn — three U;c cakes in iSC 
a box— hour sale '— " 








12c and 15c Fleeced Goods, 



for kimonos and house 
dresses, all shades, 
hour sale 



7K2C 




BliOOCHES 12c — They have 
been up to 38c — a complete and 
full line. Introductory t 2C 

sale special A*iv» 



$1.25 Black Taffeta 

30-inch black taffeta. 



73c 



Guaranteed — an intro 
ductory special, yd. 

CRAVENETTES to $15l-Rrun- 
proof cravenctte, good styles; 
and all in dark Khades ^ 



$4.98 




16c Cambric lie 



lie 



Diamond and Cameo, 
5 to 6 p. m. per 
yard 

Gastman** Talcum Powder — Pat- 
ent screw top bottles, 25c size— for 

one hour. only. 



9cts 





-^PISO'S CURE 



Throat Trouble 

and all affections of the 
chest yield promptly to 
I'iso's Cure. It is an ideal 
remedy for children, be- 
cause of its agreeable flavor 
and absolute freedom from 
opiates and dangerous or 
objectionable drugs. 

All drucKlJt«, 25 cents. 



COUGHS..oCOLT)S 



DRIVKS >MTH BKOKEN ARM. 

West Duluth Man Suffeis Painful 
At'cident ou His Farm. 

While preparing to move from his 
place about fifteen miles back of Wood- 
land I'ark to West Duluth Sunday night. 
Conners Winters fell from the loft of his 
barn through a hay chute to the floor, 
breaking his forearin and dlslocatlnn his 
shoulder. 

In spite of the pain, with the aid of 
his Son and a neighbor, he bound up his 
arm in temporary splints and drove all 
the way to West Lmluth, where he In- 
tends to make his homo for the rest of 
the winter. 

HORSE!? LEFTCmOVERED. 

Team Stood in CoTd \Vhile Owner 
Was Drinking. 

Because he left bis team to shiver all 
night long, at tho corner of Forty- 
flfth avenue west and Grand avenue, 
Genrgc Booker Is being sought by the 
police, and will be placed under arrest 
on the charge of cru«-lty to animals. 

Booker. It Is claimed by the police, 
left his team tied at the corner, while 
he was drinking In some West Duluth 
saloons. He became Intoxicated. It Is 
charged, and the team was allowed to 
stand all night long, uncovered and un- 
protected from the cold. While the 
night was not a bitterly cold one, the ttm- 
perature was nevertheless, low enough 
to cause the anlmala to suffer severely 



$500 



' Buys a double corner, one block from 
' Raleigh street on Klfty-nlnih ave- 

Iti'tiino— A lO-room house with water 
ail. I light; 50-foot lot. x.-,,,. 

•2 0«)O— Seven-room house on t'»rt>- 
first avenue, near National Iron 
Works. . . 

Manv other bargains In Irnproved 

and unimproved property, ^5ee 

L. A. BARNES, 

Woodward Bids, We«t nnluth. 



struct the confirmation class this even- 
ing at the rectory. . „ ,, 

Mr. ifnd Mrs. M. J. Murray's 3-year-old 
dauKhter Is quite HI as the result of 
having accidentally swallowed a 5-cent 
Dlece A physician was called to their 
ho.nV. 1-4 North Fitty-elghth avenue 
west, and the coin was removed with 
the aid of an emetic, but It will be 
some time before the child will fuHy re- 
cover fn.m the eeffects of the siccident. 

Miss Kate SulUvan left this af ernoon 
for Chicago, where she will visit with 

'''A'faid party was Klvon 1<YS "*^'i,* 111 
Gillevs hall by the Sons and Daughters 
of Norway, Fram lodge No. a and Ada 
lodge No. 14. Progressive pedro was 
played, tho ladies' favors being won b> 
Mrs Groswald, Mrs. E. Johnson and 
Mrx J C Wesenberg. the gentlemen s 
by George Salverson, O. S. Olson and 
farl Carlson. N.xt Saturday night the 
Sons and I>aughters of Norway will give 
a basket social at Ollley s hall. 

The St. Pi.trlck's day entertainment to 
ho given on the evening of Monday, 
March 16. at the Great Eastern ball, 
promises to be a great success Every 
effort is being made by those to take 
part in it to perfect themselves. Among 
other attractions of the evening E. J. 
Kennev will deliver an address and 
there "will be a song by a sextet of 

*'V\Xh''fe*?alrlng. Hurst. W. D. Jeweler 

There will be a spicial meeting of all 
the men of the Holy Aposles' Episcopal 
church, Thursday evenlni?, at the church, 
to hold a conference to make plans for 
the extension of the church. The meet- 
ing will be called at 8 o'clock. 

Fred Cookenbecker of Sixty-third ave- 
nue west and Nicollet street, last night 
entertained twenty of his friends on a 
slelghiide to New Duluth. 

Rev Madsen will address the congrc- 
eatlon of the Norwegian Lutheran 
church Fifty-seventh avenue wtst and 
Wadena street, tomorrow evening at the 
church on temperance. The meeting la 
under the dirfction of the Norwegian 
lodge. I. O. Q. T. 

Rev J A. Lumley, pastor of the Ply- 
mouth Congregational church, Fifty- 
fourth avenue west and Bristol street. 



AutSorim«4 Ac«nts 

St/^/ '^Elastic" abinets. 




lUTsal Mcrcastiic Report CsUaeli. 
Tha is an excellent time to consider 
the purchase of a cabinet for ftling 
mercantile credit report*— one to 
•nanged that ^ index guides auto- 
maticaDy act a* safeguards against 
errors in credit departments. 

t*i mt •/i«M' you houK 




will deliver a series of Sunday night ad- 
dresses on "Present I>ay Problems. ' 
Last Sunday night he lectured on the 
subject "Social Unrest," and next Pun- 
day night his subject will be "Indus- 
trialism or How to Pay the Grocery 
Bills " 

Rev. J. A. Lumley will address the 
Congregational church at Biwabik to- 
morrow night on the subject "Wc Can- 
not Esc'i^e." , „, , 

The Missionary Society of the West- 
mi lu-tir IMesbvierian church met this 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. William 
Lanplow, 621 North Fifty-sixth avenue 

The meeting of the Ladies' Guild of the 
Holy Ap<^'stles' Episcopal church, which 
was" to have been held tomorrow after- 
noon at the home of Mrs. Walter Evcred, 
Fiftv-slxth avenue west, has been post- 
poned until a week from Wednesday, 
when thev will meet at the same place 
and discuss the subject, "Abraham Lin- 

M. Jacoby left Sunday night for George- 
town. Colo., where he wDl look after his 
mining interests. 

L L Gilpin of Forly-flfth avenue wes^ 
and Rene street, left this afternoon for 
Kallspel, Mont. He expects to he away 
at least until next fall. 

Louis Ramstad of Fifty-fifth avenue 
west and Sixth street returned Sunday 
from a six weeks' trip to I-^orida ami 
Cuba. He spent a week in Havana and 
the surrounding country. 

Mrs. G. F Brown and family of Grand 
Rapids, Mich., have moved to West Du 
luth, and will make their future home a 
3(-6 South Fifty-ninth avenue west Mr 
Brown is now in the state of \\ ashington 
but Is expected soon In West Duluth. 

Found— Lady's scarf and pin. Owner can 
get same at room No. 11 Woodward build- 
ing by paving for this ad. . 

It. James <^urt. No. a4. C. O. F.. will 
meet this evening In Gllley s hall. Th- 
court at its last meeting, appointed a 
committee to confer with the other courts 
of the citv to arrange for a celebration 
of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 
foundation of the order. A .conference 
was recently held with comniittees from 
the other courts, but nothing definite 
has vet been dC'Cided upon The eve^nt wil. 
take place next May. It =. probable that 
a large class will be Initiated into the 
order and a number of state officers will 
be present on the occasion. 



has been decided to present it ag.iln on 
the 27th of this month. A meeting has 
been called for tonight to make arrange- 
ments for it. The procetds? of \h enti r- 
tainment will be used to send delegates 
to the boys' conference at Silver Bay. 

N. Y. 

• • • 

The cabinet of the boys' d- partment 
will meet Thursday at 5 o'clock and will 
arrange for the annual ban<iuet tf; be 
given in April. They will als<. m;(ke ar- 
rangements Ut a recepticm to F. A. 
Crosbv th<- intern.atlonal boys' secretary, 
who will vis-It iKiluth March '.iO to 22. 

MAN ENDS LIFE WITH 

A BIBLE AT HIS SIDE. 

St. Louis. March 10.— With a bullet 
wound in his forehead, and a cheap 
revolver and a Bible lying at his side, 
the dead body of a man, supposed to 
be Andre Mitchell, was found today in 
an empty freight car in the Waba.'^^h 
yards. Appare-iitly the man had com- 



mitted suicide and had been dead a 
couple of days. On the flyleaf of the 
Bible, and on a union miner's card in 
his ffocket was inscribed the name, 
"Andre Mitchell." A United Mine 
Workers' assessment book showed he 
had paid dues March 1 at Eldorado, 
Colo. 



ALMSHOl SE AT FRISCO 

DESTROYED BV FLAMES. 

San Francl.«co, March 10.— One of 
the buildings of the city and county 
almshou.^e was burned this morning. 
In it, when the fire nroKe out, were 
2(Ki persons, mostly patients recently 
removed from the city and county hos- 
pital. So far a,s knov^n all were re- 
I moved in safety, though five are re- 
I ported to have been injured. The alnis- 
house is located near the Lake Honda 
re.servoir of the Spring Valley Water 
company. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE BANK 

DULUTH. 

'^Capilal $500,000"^ 

Surplus and Profits (earned) $800,000 



ALL DEPARTMENTS OF BANKING. 



BOYS' DEPT. NOTES 



Never Fails to 

RESTORE GRAY or FADED 
HAIR to Its NATURAL 




COLOR and BEAUTY 

No matter how long it has been grray 
or /Avied. Promotes a luxuriant growth 
of healthy hair. Stops its fallmg out, 
and positively removes »•">- 
&rmU. Keeps hair soft and glotsy. Re- 

! fuse all substitutes. 2>i times as much 

! in $1.00 as 50c size. 

IS NOT A DYE. 

Phllo H»y Spec. Co., Newark. N. J. 

$1 and 50c Bottles, at W. A. AI>betts* 



The Interscholastic Baseball league Is 
drawing to a close. Two league games 
were played In the boys' department gym- 
nasium yesterday afternoon The J^ffer- 
sons defeated the Franklins by a « ore of 
-8 to 9. and the Adams' team ^t,'^_from 
the Endions by a score of , to « Jherc 
will be two more games and then Ih.- 
Series of three games to decide the cham- 
Mon'=hlp Friday afternoon at 4 30 the 
Jefferso^ns will meet the Washingtoas. and 
the game promises to be one of the best 
n the series. In the event of the ■V\'ash- 
ngtons winning, the \yai^hington8 and 
Jack"ons will tie. Should they lose, the 
Jacksons and Jeffersons will play a series 
o? three games to decide the champlon- 

'"ironLl^^t'V;^ the jacksons will play 
the Franklins. This will close the lea^c 
for this vear. The next big school event 
win be the baseball league and the mter- 
scholastlc field meet^ ^ 

Th(- boys' department minstrel show 
wL such a suce^s. and the reque.na that 
Ub« repeated w«re so numerous, that It 



PRINTING, RUUNG, BOOKBINDING! 

F. H. LOUNSBERRY & CO, 




IT M£:ans mone:y 



To any business concern that uses our up-to-date filing systetn. "Quick filing; 
quick finding." Come in and we'll explain it to you. 

CHAMBSILLrAIN'TAYLrOR CO. 

223 West Superior Street. 



SAPOLIO 

IS LIKE A GOOD TEMPER. "IT SHEDS A 
BRIGHTNESS EVERYWHERE." 



\" 



■.!* 



* « 



f- 



>!»; 
I:!l 







THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



11 



M 




mm 




ALL TEAMS 
IN THE RACE 



THE LINCOLN PARK ROLLER POLO 




Interest in Y. M. C. 
Basketball League 
Affairs is Keen. 



A. 



Better Games Have Been 

Played in Last 

Few Weeks. 



u 


FC. 


•A 


.7W 


5 


.500 


5 


.Hi 


«i 


.Ui 



w. 

Horak's | 

Noon " 

l»eighton'3 * 

Night * 

The race in tho Y. M. C. A. Uaakut- 
ball league grows intere.stlnjj as the sea- 
•on aiivancoa and It is now entering into 
a stretch, in which the real ability of the 
teama will be brougiit out and the cham- 
pionship iJeclded. The league season will 
end ab'xi- April 10 and tho games for the 
next ui 'iiih will hold mote oi intfreat 
for Ihu ;ilhlci03 and liielr supporters 
than an> riunifrf lor th»? year. 

The Norltu'rn Hardware company has 
donattHl a beautiful .iiivcr loving cup to 
go to the winner in the l.>aguf race and 
ft has aroused keen oonip'-tltion between 
the diftf^r.-nt teams. Everybody still haa 
a chance to win and ev<ry team i-^ mak- 
ing the best use of its opportunity. Th^* 
ganie.s have improved in quality lor the 
past month and now the Hves are play- 
ing a great article of bisketball. They 
put spirit into their work and tho spec- 
tators get a line run in every game. 

Every team is In the race. Ueighton 
has come up ta.st In the last few woek.s 
and Mapp's ntglit cla.ss hfis taken a cor- 
responding .slump Mapp's team la play- 
ing good basketball, but has been un- 
fortunate and there ig a i>osslbility that 
it will c!i!nb out of th^" hole before the 
end of th.- season. Tonight, Mapp's team 
.and Deigliton's 5:15 class team will meet. 
They are both struggling to keep out of 
last place and the game will be a good 
one. 

The noon cla.ss five and Horak's team 
had a wh.rlv.ind battle kMt Friday night, 
the le.uiers going down by a score of 
19 to 13. 

The scores recently hav» all b?*>n close, 
the play swift and hnished and from 
now to th'5 end of the .season baskfitball 
Interest will be at fever heat In associ- 
ation clrL'l"3. 



LEAVES TO 
SIGN MEN 

Artie 0*Dea on Trip to 

Twin Cities and 

Cliicago. 

Fargo Has Manager and 

Good Crowd of 

Players, 



Top Row — Axel Erickson. cover point: James Smisek, manager; Robert Nelson, goaL 
Bottom row — Al Olson, center; Al Swanson, right rush; Arnie Olson, left rush. 



Tho Lincoln park roller team has 
been winning regularly In the West 
end this year. While other t«*ams have 
.sprung up all around them, existed 
for a few weeks or months, and then 
died of inactivity, the Lincoln Parks 
have gone on winning game after 
game and improving right along. They 
think now that no team can bo gath- 
ered together In the city to defeat theon 



and they are prepared to defend the 
honors again.>«t all comers. 

Tlio Northern roller polo team, which 
snatchod the city honors from the 
Lincoln Parks last year, Is reorganiz- 
ing, and the Lincoln park players are 
anxious to arrange a serie.s of games. 
While the Northerns have turned their 
attention to hockey, and given up the 
roller polo game, the Lincoln Parks 



COLUMBIAS IN 
GREAT FORM 



Heavy 



Win Two Out of Tliree 
Games Under 
Handicap. 

with a dummy In the lineup and a 
handicap of only 83 against the Bankers' 
116, the Columblas last night won two out 
of three from the First National Bank 
team in the Duluth City Bowling If>aguo. 
The Columbias rolled in fine form, ro- 
Ing over the 'M) notch in every gamo. 
8laudt and Ferguson st irred for the 
Golumbias and McLean for the financial 
men. 

Siaudt .-arried away all th^ Ind.viiual 
honors. He rolled a high score of 254 
and a high average of :24. The Fitwells 
will play the Centrals tomorrow night. 
The scons of Uusl nli?hts play foUowj: 
Ooliinibia. 

Nobis. 7 1«* 

Hawley. J4 l»l 

dtaudt, 7 -*7 

Dummy la*) 

Ferguson 1''3 

Handle. ip 4< 



SEND BOAT 
TO CHICAGO 

Yacht Club Members Are 

in Favor of the 

Plan, 



L'he plan will be for regattas to 
be held every year, the four <'Iiibs par- 
ticipating, the affair being pulled off on 
the waters of one club one year and on 
those of another the next, until all the 
clubs have been thus favored. Another 
.>bjeit of the as.soclation will be to work 
logt-th'T to bring the Inland yachl races 
of the \Vi>st Into this district. Most of 
th»> big inland racfs have been held at 
Oshkosh. Wis., heretofore. 

An Industrious campaign for new mem- 
bers will be conducted from now on, and 
committees will be appointeil to look 
after the work. There will be several 
new Improvements and additions at the 
rlubhouse on Park Point this year, and 
the propt'rty will be made more pleasing 
to the eye. One feature planned is an 
observation parlor, enclosf^d In gla.s.x. on 
the breakwater In front of the club, for 
the acoomn»odatlon of those who desire to 
watch the races. 



Plans for the Summer 

Are Discussed at a 

Smoker. 



1S5 

i.->o 

38 



165 



Totals 'J^. 

Fiist Natioiml Hank. 

Ashley, 21 '."" 

Kin-itter, 30 101 



•iU viA 



McLean, J5 

I'eitlt. 21 . 

Letteau, 19 

Handicap 

Totals — 



...1S7 

...Ul 
,..U-> 



i3t; 

1.W 
2'W 
V,\ 
15.) 

u; 



.SS4 >W Wl 



The Duluth Yacht club held a smoker 
in Plaaten's hall last evening and ills- 
cussod plans for the coming summer. Tho 
matter of sending a boat to th" Chicago 
races was nuite thoroughly discussed, and 
It was found to be the uiianiniKUS .-'entl- 
Ifwlment of members that Duluth be repre- 
-l* ! sented .it this event. A boat will have to 
,[^., ' be built for the occasion. The races are 
38 ' t"or craft measuring 18 feet on the water 
line. II IS beli^-ved tli- club will lii-.J 
Itself In a rlnanclal condition this summer 
that will p<Tmit It to make the venture, 
and thus bring Duluth into mor-' prom- 
inent notic.' in sporting circles of tho 
country. 

The ma'.ter of the circuit of yacht <-lub, 
or periuancjit regatta assoolatiim. d>- 
scrib"d in The H<-rald recently, wi.s tak^n 
<ip. Th'- pi II'. undoubtedly will go through. 
Duluth, Minnotor.ka, T'alhoun and Wtilte 
Bear will ')•• In tho association, it does 
not look much as If S'li^-rior would be a 
member. It Is more than likely that the 



170 
l.>r> 

VM 
177 
i:r7 
IW 



[5P0PT1HG 



FLl>riLLA SAILS. 
Ltma, March 10.— After an ^Ight day 
visit the .Vmtrlcan torpedo boat itotilla ! ;;2-footer3 on the other sldn of the J>ay 
sailed yesterday afternoon for Panama i - ■ 
The llttl ■ hoats got under way about 



bers of th 
ms to have 



i- I win bo purchased by m«':nV 
:i Duluth ciub. for Interest s»'e 
o'clock i'rhi wiVh "an exchange of salutes fallen off In Superior. The association 
steamed spe..dily out of the harbor and will be for ra.ing y-ichts of the 32-fo>t 
turne,! iv.rMi tor their l.;V» :<nv. rm. hype now owned by ir..-mber3 of 'he local 



'^^-.JL 



If! 



JAi 



f^m 



a 



M 






The ante-season trou- 
hles of a club-owner in 
the Northern league are 
more burdensome this 
voar than will Xye those 
oi the 8ea*;«m Itself. Tho 
Duluth and Winnipeg 
people have been work- 
ing since early Septt-m- 
ber framing up a league. They succeed- 
ed m getting Brandon and targo Into 
line and then Superior looked like a sure 
thing. With Superior, it was necessary 
to get another town, so Eau Llalre hap- 
p.med around, hung up its hat and an- 
rounced that it had come to stay. 

The fans hurralied, the sporting wr t- 
ers spread congratulatory ink and tlie 
schedule committee K'Jt busy. «i't they 
reckoned without Ted Sullivan and the 
street railway comany. The ditt.rences 
bctweMi the veteran manager anri the 
traction company have chased the v. m. 
hack to fhicago, and Superior baseball, 
which was able to sit up and take a lit- 
tle feed for a few we. ks. again has one 
foot tn the grave and Is gasping feebly. 

Kuehnow, Pulford, Lamb, et. al. are 
.scurrying. If s tough to own a »ran.-hl.se 
ir. a town, which is a sure live baseball 
town, when there's nobody el.se to frame 
into a league. Winnipeg and l>i biib 
will furnish a little belter than their 
sliar.' of their attendance-. 1? argo and 
Hrandon should l>reak evon at least, but 
none If the managers care to go i^Sii'nst 
the four club league game again it they 
ean p.Ksslbly tight shy of It 



have been playing: o^,j(oJlers all the 
year and they are undoubtedly better 
now than when the ■- Northerns met 
them last. ' 

The Lincoln Parks will play the 
Broadway team of Superior tomorrow 
night, and next week wtH be ready to 
negotiate with the Northerns for a 
series of games for the championship 
of the city. '■i"j 



Northwest, whatever else, and have an 
even break with Houghton, the repre- 
sentative of the CopiK-r Country league, 
which played here. Either before or 
after they make the trip to New York, 
tho Hancock seven will be asked to play 
the Northerns and decide once and for 
all Just which team has the right to 
claim championship honore In the West. 

• • * 

Frank Sumnw-r.''' friends believe that 
he will mako good with South Bend In 
the Central league this yeaf. The boy 
is; speedv In tho Intteld and out and, with 
H little more coaching, will make a real 
star. 

The announcement that South Bend 
has signed Summers as an outfielder 
brings up one of the queerest plays ever 
seen at Athletic park. On a clean hit to 
center field, a man was thrown out at 
hrst base last sutniner and Summers was 
the boy, who turned the trick. 

Summers had been playing inHeld for 
Duluth and he was too fast. His speed 
threw him over the ball, and his errors 
were growing so numerous that he was 
put in the outlleld, where he would hav<> 
more room to work off his steam. He 
covered more ground than any center 
held«-r Duluth ever had. 

One day, Miller, the young Houghton 
pitcher, was up to bat. Miller made a 
hit about onco a week and It was his 
hitting day. He caught one fairly and 
sent It out Into left center between short 
and second. It was a pretty hit and 
should easily have gone safe. At least 
.Miller thought so. He ambled down the 
Hrst base line at a sort of a jog and not 
until he was nearing the base did he 
see the ball speeding on a dead line for 
Tracey's outstretched mlt. He th^c^^ 
the lever over a few notches, but It wa-s 
too late. Miller w;vs thrown out. 

Summers' throw was a dandy. It sped 
all the way about six feet above the 
ground, with all th" speed he used at 
short, and Miller never loafed again on a 
hit to center field. Neither did anybody 
else, when Summers was in that garden. 



Artie O'Dea, manager of the Brandon 
team of the Northern league, left yes- 
terday on a hunt for players and by 
the time he returns to Duluth, he ex- 
pects to have his men all signed up 
and be ready to escort his Duluth con- 
tingent to Burlington, Iowa, where his 
men will report about April 16. 

O'Dea has lost Summers and Thorson, 
but he still has Mulcrone and McGraw 
from the local lots, and they will help 
fill out the squad. 

O'Dea has high hopes of securing 
Pitcher Henry Schurch, who was with 
league last year. Schurch is one of the 
steadiest pitchers ever to perform In 
the No»»thern league, and he will be a 
fine star for Arties pitching staff. He 
has secured Catcher McMorey, with 
Calumet last year, and hopes that his 
catching department will be well taken 
care of by Mulcrone and McMorey. Mc- 
Morey is a fine catcher, but rather weak 
with the stick. 

Artie Is after Sam Meniece's release 
from Columbus. The American associa- 
tion team has a string on the big Du- 
luth man, but doesn't care to use him, 
and Artie believes he will be success- 
ful. He has picked several youngsters 
off the St. Paul and Minneapolis prai- 
ries and will also go to Chicago to line 
up some men, who are thouglit to be 
available. 

* • • 

At the meeting of the league at Far- 
go Sunday, W. J. Price of the Fargo 
club, said he had succeeded in landing 
a manager and a good crowd of players 
at Chicago. He didn't divulge the name 
of his leader, but Fargo isn't going In 
on a weak basis, and the magnates there 
can be depended to trot out something, 
which will be a figure in the race. 

* • * ' 

There are several possibilities for the 



management of the Superior team, which 
is not yet a dead one. If the Supeiior 
people take hold and secure the franchise 
on their own responsibility, they are 
talking of putting Butch" Kennellev in 
charge. "Butch'^ has signed a Duluth 
contract, but Kuehnow would probably 
release him, if the Superior people wanted 
him to manage the team, and "Butch 
would be glad to take the reins. 

Roy Patterson, the Chicago White Sox 
pitcher, who was this year released to 
Minneapolis in the American association, 
is another possibility. Patterson isn't 
very anxious to perform with the Millers, 
and is looking around for a managerial 
berth. Superior looks like a good propo- 
sition and the people there have begun 
negotiations with Patterson. The pitcher 
performed for Duluth in the old days of 
Frank Wade's West Duluth teams, ar.d 
the fans of the Northern league would be 
glad to see him come back as manager. 

• • * 

Eddie Herr Is busy signing up men for 
his Winnipeg team. Fred Giencke. the 
little pitcher, has jotted his name on a 
contract, and Fred Luderus, the big first 
baseman, who deserted to the Milwaukee 
lots last season, has returned to the fold. 
Herr has also signed a twin batterj- from 
Missouri. They are billed as "Omeh— The 
Vance Brothers— Oliver," and are said to 
liave an act which takes down the money 
everv time. They look alike, and some 
managers have a habit of ringing in the 
catcher, who is a sticker, for the pitcher 
who couldn't hit a push-ball. Herr wdl 
bear watching when he gets that pair. 

• « « 

Al Kuehnow's office Is still flooded with 
heart-rending letters from young l)ali 
players who are anxious to break lnt<J 
professional company. Some of them are 
rich in unconscious humor, and still 
others, while they may come from good 
ball plavers, are marvelous specimens or 
chirography and twisting of the Erij^lish 
language. Following Is a fair sample: 

"Dear sir an manager— I hear that you 
are looking for ball players for this cc.m- 
'ng summer I am a ball player and i 
would like to work for you this commg 
season I am a good all around player the 
proper place for me is at short stop Im 
a good stedy fellow and my batting av 
last year was 2S0 that is Just Sunday ball 
I am a right hand thrower and left nan.i 
batter and let me know what you art- 
paving for ball players I would be glad 
to "work for your people If you can us 
me." 



BUY THE 



REX 



BRAND 



Duluth Brewings 
Malting Co. 



MUTUAL TRANSIT 

COMPANY FINED $5,000. 

Buffalo. N. Y.. March 10.— Judgo 
Hazel, in the United States court here, 
yesterday, gave his decision In the 
case of the Mutual Transit company, 
which was oonvicted at Elmira in 
January last on the charge of giving 
rebates to the Camden Iron works upon 
shipments of pipe from Emaus, Pa., to 
Winnipeg, Man. 

Judge Hazel said as this was a pri- 
mary offense of the corporation, the 
Tnotlon for a new trial should be de- 
nied and a fine of $5^000 should be im- 
posed. A stay of execution for sixty 
days was granted. 



HILLMAN WILL 
MEET HASKINS 



It would bo 
"'laire. if the 



LTa 



im 



jtaTvtt roap 



VIA/HINCTON . 0.e. 



^-^.W-v . V-iS 



straight Whiskey Means 

that the whlskev's flavor, mellowness and bouquet have not been artificially 
attained, but have been crentcd bv Nature's melhoil— iho good oldbocesk 
Keulucliy way— by aging in tbe wood alone. Such a whiskey is 

Sunny Brook 

THE PURL FOOD 

Whiskey 

It Is all that the distiller's art knows about the producing and %giag of a per- 
fect, whiskey. Every boitie is ailed under s'lrTv.^iun of U S. Internal Re- 
veni'e Officers and s>»aled with the Qovemnent "flreeo Stamp." u posltivs 
a^siiraii.e of fu.l proof — full measure and fully matured ace. For Sale by 
all First-Class Oealer.i. . _ 

SUNNY BROOK DISTILLERY CO., Jefferson County, Ky. 

ASK YOUR DEALER 
FOR IT. 



Indoor Athletic Season 

to Close In New 

York. 

New York. March 10.— The Indoor ath- 
letic season will practically close to- 
night with the annual carnival of the 
NVw York A. C. at Madison Square 
g<arden. The games will form a fitting 
finale to the most successful history of 

.• ,«,,,>. r.,, V..,,, I indoor athletics. The meeting will bring 
kind ot tougn on tiau , ^ \ 

Norlhem league should | together the greatest gathering of coi- 

lejfe amateurs that ever competed in a 
set of games outside of the intercolleg- 
iate championship— Yale, Princeton, Har- 
vard, Pennsylvania. Columbia, Dart- 
mouth, Cornell. Amherst. Michigan. 
Fordham and minor collegiate institu- 
tions. 

The list of competitors will Include 
champions at nearly every branch of 
field and track sports. 

The meeting of Guy Hasklns and Harry 
Hlllnian promises to furnish the most 
sensational contest of the season, and 
new figures are expected for the 600 
yards. These men are the fastest in the 
country for this distance, and today the 
track will undergo a special survey so 
that In the event of a new record being 
made there will be no question as to the 
actual distance c.overed by the two 
c nfl. c Ic s 

Another event that Is attractlnif con- 
siderable attention is the sixty-yard 
dash, in which Forrest Smlthson will 
attempt to establish a new record. 



drop back to four clubs and '''a^c «juc 
the \Vi=»consin c-.ty. Kau riaire has a 
anchise. Us players were returned from 
u rosse eveVyih.ng Is framed up tor 

should 



b^ 



tr 

L^atrosse, ev 

the t-ani. and if the town , , ,^ 

turn.'d loose now. It couldn't break into 

any kind of a bush circuit. In figuring 

.m another team for the e"^* "*'•,,»'« 

!uign.ite.s must hgure. not only on Insur- 

tiig a slx-cljh -iicuit. but on giving tau 

Claire si .square deal. 

Al hope of Siipt^rior Is not »o;Jt. Ted 
Sullivan has taken his turkey and sllent- 
fi it'"d away to the wind-swept shores 
if Vke Michigan, but there are other 
hLaibal inen with some money and the 
n^rS o take a chance on Superior. 
There is n., reason on «»arth why the 
town .shouldn't support a baseball team 
RR^eball should go in Superior and if 
fome^y will try It, the Northern 
K ague magnates will once more dare to 
breathe. 

o • • 
The Hancock hockey team, winners of 
the championship of the Copper Coun- 
try league, which carries with it Michi- 
Kan honors, has turned the tables on the 
Northern team of Duluth, which counted 
the .Michigan seven out of the reckoning 
when claiming the amateur champion- 
ship of the United States 

Tho Hancock team has practlcall> 
made arrangements for a trip to New 
Vi>rk city, where a series of three games 
will be plaved with the Crescent A. C. 
seven winners of tlie championship of 
the .\mateur Hockey association of New- 
York and conquerors of the Toronto 
I'niverslty team, amateur champions of 
Canadn. In a letter to the manager of 
the Hancock team, the management of 
the St. Nicholas rink of New York of- 
fers to take the Copper country seven 
for a series of three games to decide the 
championship of North America tn ama- 
teur hockev. En route, the Hancock 
bovs propose to play the Cleveland team 
In "the Ohio city. 

Should the Hancock team win a major- 
ity of the games In New York city, it 
will doubtless set up a claim to the 
title for which the series is to l>e played. 
But the Northerns will demand recosnl- 
tion also. They ar« champions of tb* 



SHIPS NOT INFERIOR. 

Metoalf Says .\inerican Naval Ves- 
sels Compare Well WUh Others. 

Washington. March ^.—Before the 
senate committee on naval affairs. In 
connection with tho Investigation now 
in progress, a letter yaa read today 
from Secretary Metcalt, in which he 

said: 

"Our ships are not Irifftiflor, type for 
type, in their own period of construc- 
tion, to vessels of other- navies. On 
the contrary I concur jn opinions ex- 
pressed abroad that our- »Wps are su- 
perior." 

The secretary stated la the letter 
that tho Delaware and Nirth Dakota 
are to be equipped with, the two stage 
hoists, and said that there was no 
longer ground for conta^tion as to 
the location of the armor belt. 



THE CORNERSTONE THAT ENDURES 



EVERY young man and young -woman wants to be 
■uccessful and accomplish something worth while. 

THE HABIT of saving, practiced in early life, is a safe 
and secure cornerstone of success. 

A Savings Account with the First National Bank of 
Duluth will ^ve you inspiration and an incentive to make 
regular deposits. 

First National Banl( of Duluth 

Capital and Surplus — One Million Five Hundred IViotisand Dollars. 
Undivided Profits— Two Hundred Thousand Dollars. 



NOTICE TO MEN 

Men, Go Where You Art 
Sure of getting a Cure. 

The best pl«oe In the North- 
west where you c»n get cured 
the quickeiit and chpapext Is 
at the great Hetilelberg Medi- 
cal Institute, St. Paul. Hon- 
est, faithful »«rvlce, new, ad- 
vanced treatment, expert 
ticill. rapid cures, reasonable 
charges. 

We will cure you Secretly 

and Cheaply— a visit will 

_ . The best .Speci 

convince you. Northwest fur Men 

Vears'of experience in treating Kervous, Blood a 
L'hronio Diseases, gvies us many adrantatres ore 
other doctors. We cm* Nerrous Uebiitt)'. Ulscharsw 
from painful swellings, pus sores. Blood Poison. Ka^ 
ture. Hydrocele, Varioo.'-e Aelns, Kidner, Bladder anil 
Prostatlo Troubles, Piles, t'ltitula and Keotal Affection^ 
RheuraatUm. Bad Uabits, Catarrh, Eczema, .ScrofoJa 
and other stubborn chronic maladieit of Men. Writi 
describing your C4u<« if you cannot call. Over lM;Mi 
men have applied to us for treatment. 

Consultation, Examination and Advice FREE I 

Heidelberg Medical Institute 

Cor. Fifth and Robert St. ST. PAUL, MIMI. 

(100,000 Capital, incorporated under tlM litaM 
Lrfiwa ot Minnesota. 



3 




OLD SORES CURED 



AliliEN'S CnLCIBBIMK SAX.TK. 

Ctirst Chronic Ulcer*, Bone Clc«r«, V»rlc> w 
L'Icers, ScrofulouB Ulcers, MeroarUI Ulcer«i 
Fever Sores, Oanerene, Blood Polsonlnah 
WhIteSirelllngr.lXiIk Leg.PoUoned Wounda, 

All Sores of long standing. Posltlrely nerer falto. 
Draws out all pjlBon. Sareg expense and sufferlnC. 
Curas permanent For aale by druggists Hail Mcr- 
We. J. P. AUJUi HJWlCUfK CO.. Ss. FaOb. T" 



PILES CURED AT HOME! 



in 2 to 5 Oayt. No Pain. HnUe or Loss of TtaM. 



WHOLESALE 

Jobbers and 
Manufacturers 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA, 

Rcliabl* and Up-to-Date Concarns Who Do a Strictly 
Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Krieger Co. 



BAKERS, AND ICE CREAM 

MANUFACTURERS. 

Crescent Bakery. 



BLAST FURNACE. 

Zenith Furnace Co, .. 



BREWERS. 

Duluth Brewing & Malting Co. 
Fitger Brewing Co. 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 
Bridgeman-Russell Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 



GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Twohy Co. 

Stone-Ordean-WelU Co. 

Wright-Clarkson Mercantile Co. 

HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Cow 
Marehall-Wella Hdw. Co. 



tfyouaresuffertneform Itching. Bleeding. Blind or 
trudin^Pilei,sudwill saul > Jur a.^^^e^s. *'=„»''1J »;!',>;<5{ 
how to cure youRclf at home. FIRST APPI.ICATIOM 
STOPSITCli AND BURN 1 Send us no money. huttello«i«« 
Of the treatment. Write at once HY-ZON K£M&OY CO* 
ijji Tower Ave SUPERIOR. W 13. 



HATS AND FURS. 

Blake & Waite Co. 



LIQUORS. 

Frerker Bros. & Co. 



CEMENT AND PLASTER, 

D. G. Cutler Co. 



CIGAR MANUFACTURERS. 

Duluth Cigar Co. 

Ron Fernandez Ciga^ Cok 

Tom Reed Cigar Co. 



CONFECTIONERY. 

Duluth Candy Co. 

National Candy Cow 
(Duluth Factory.) 



CORNICE MANUFACTURERS. 

Deetr & Co. 
Duluth Corrugating St Roofing Co. 



CROCKERY. 

Duluth Crockery Co. 



DRUGS. 
L. W. LciUihead Drug Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
F. A. Patrick & Co. 



LUMBER. SASH & DOOR MAN- 
UFACTURERS. 

Scott-Graff Lumber Co. 



MATCH MANUFACTURERS. 
Union Match Co. 



MEATS. 
Elliott & Co. 



MSN'S FURNISHINGS AND 
MAN'F'RS. CLOTHING. 

Christensen-Mendenhall- 
Graham Co. 



PAPER. 

Duluth Paper & Stationery Co. 

Bemji Bag & Paper Co. 

Zenith Paper Co. 



PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 

Crane & Ordway Co. 



FOUNDERS and MACHINISTS. 

Clyde Iron Works. 
National Iron Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitx Company. 



PRODUCE AND COMMISSION. 

Fitzsimmons-Palmer Co. 
Haugsrud & Markkanen. 
Knudsen Fruit Company. 
Thomae Thompson Co. 



SADDLERY. LEATHER AND 
FINDINGS. 

Schulze Brothers Co. 



SHOE MANUFACTURERS. 
Northern Shoe Co. 



For space under this heading apply to F. H. Green, Secretary Jobbers 
and Manufacturers' Association. Duluth. Minn. 



SUMMONS— , «. T • 

State of Minnnsoia, County of St. LotUa. 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial DU- 

trict. 
A. J. Upham, 

Kainiifr, 

vs. ^^r 

Joseph B. Grindall, .\JF> T. Cross- 
ley, Athellng A. JTrossley. un- 
known heirs of lAiza G. Cross- 
ley, deceased, aj^o a" other por- 
sons, unknown, claiming any 
right title, estate. Interest or 
lien fn the real estate described 
in the complaint herein. 

Defendants. 
Tho State of Minnesota to the abo 

named defendants: 

you ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and 
required to answer the coniplaint of the 
plaintiff In the above entitled action, 
which complaint lias been tiled with the 
Clerk of said Court, and to serve a copy 
of your an.swer to the said complaint on 
the subscrlbens, at tlieir offices in the 
Torrey Building in the City of Duluth, 
In said County and State, within twenty 
(20) days after the service of this Sum- 
mons upon you. exclusive of the day ot 
.such service; and it you fail to answer 
the said complaint within the time afore- 
.said the plaintiff in this action wll apply 
to the Court for tho relief demanded 
ilu-rein, together with the costs and dl»- 
bursements of this action. 
Feby. 11th, 1S08. 

S. T. Ac \VM. HARRISON. 
Attorn-ys for Plainiift. 

WS-6U Torroy Bldi?., 

Duluth. Mlo^ 



NOTICE OF LIS PENDEN.S- 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dla- 

trlct. 
A. J Upham, 

Plaintiff, 

vs. 
Joseph B. Grindall. Azro T. Cross- 
ley, Atheling A. Crosslcy. un- 
known heirs of Eliza G. Cross- 
ley, deceased, also all other per- 
sons, unknown, claiming any 
right, title, estate, interest or 
lien in the real estate described 
in the complaint herein. 

Defendants. 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That an 
action has been begun in the District 
Court of St. Louis County. Minnesota, by 
the above-named plaintiff against tbe 
above-named defendants, the object of 
which is: 

First— To require the defendants, and 
each of them to set forth the nature of 
his or her c'.aim to the real property 
hereinafter described, and to have th« 
adverse claims of the defendanis, and 
each of them, determined. 

Second— To obtain a decree of said Court 
determining and adjudging: That the de- 
fendants, nor either of them, have any 
estate or interest in. or Men upon, the 
.said lands and premises, or any part 
thereof and that the title of the plaintUI 
thereto is good and valid. 

Third— That the defendants, and each of 
ihem, be forever barred and enjoined 
"rom asserting any claim whatever in 
;ind to said lands and premises or any lien 
.iXK)n the same adverse to tne plalntifC. 
KDd for such other and further relief as 
to the Court may seem just and equltat>l«, 
and for plaintiCE's costs and disburs*- 
ments. 

The complaint In this action Is now OB 
file In the office of the Clerk of the Dis- 
trict Court of St. Louis County, Minn*- 
sota. 

The property described in said complaint 
and herein referred to Is situate m St. 
Louis County. Minnesota, and described 
as follows, to-wlt: Lot twenty-five (26). 
Block one hundred and eleven (lllj. Wast 
Duluth, Fifth Division. 
Feby. Uth. 1S08. 

S. T. & \VM. HARRISON. 
Attorneys for PlamtifC, 

608-611 Torrey Bldg., 

Duluth. Minn. 
Duluth Evening Herald— Feb. 18-25, Maroh 
3-10-17-24, 1908. 




CLOTHING 



112 WEST SUFEUeX sncEC. 



m 



i 

i 



^ 



■^ 
» 




li 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERA^-Di TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



l! 



9ooDrops 



nrvj 



ALCOHOL 3 PER CENT. 

AN^gclable PrcparaHonforAs- 
slmllaiiiii^ iheFocdandRe^ula 
ting ll(e Sioraachs andBowelsof 



iNFAKf Sv^ClUlDREN 



is 



59^ 



.ut V 



■ 

Promofes DigpsHonJChf erfii- 
ncss and Rest.Contalns neittw 
Opfiuni.Morphine iwrMiiieraL 
Not Narcotic. 



Jltapeo/OMIkSSIlIElFtrOBER, 



CASrORIA 

For Infanta and Children. 

The Kind You Have 
Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature 
of 



JLcSoM*- 
jtibtSttd* 

mrmSetd- 



Aperfcct Remedy for Consfija- 
Jion , Sour Storaach.Dlarrhoca 
Worms,Convulsions.Fewrish 
ncssandLossorSEEEP. 

Fac Simile Signature of 
NEW YORK. 




FIR PRICES 
INCREASED 

An Advance In Almost 

All Lines of Raw 

Furs. 



At b months oW 

j5 Doses -33 Cents 



guaranteed under tlw rowla 



Exact Copy of Wrapper 



Thirty Years 

CASrORIA 



TMB OCNTAUN SOMrftNT. HKW "OH* OIT». 




CHINA MUST 
BACOOWN 

Z. Fuginia of Tokio Says 

Japan Will insist on 

Treaty Rights. 

Claims Present Dispute 

is Fully Covered by 

Treaty. 



That war between Jni'nn and China 
within a very fhort tUne will result, un- 
less China rtjctdcs from the nttitmle it 
Itbe tiiktn uron the seizure of Japanese 
vcKMis wUhln the space defined a«5 neu- 
tral territory at the conclusion of the 
Jariinese-Chlnebe war. Is the opinion of 

f. FuginiJi of Tokio. who is at the 
paldinjj today. 

Mr. Fuginia, who was one of tnc 
Jftpanefic lonmilssioners at the James- 
town exposition, is connected t>y family 
•with ihe uij'lonmtic sirvice, and is well 
advised upoi. the latest menace to the 
peace of the Orient. He basea lus 
©pinion upon reliable knowledge of Ja- 
i»anes».' stntimiiit toward the siizure ot 
the mikado's ship by the Chinese inen- 
of-war. . , , 

He savH, moreover, that Japan If pre- 
pared f»'r war. Mr. Fugiiiia says that 
Japan will stand pat upon the dt niands 
made upon China, and unUs*» that coun- 
try complies with the demands, he »>e- 
Ueves that war will follow. He believes 
that China has violated diplomatic pro- 
eedurc* to such an extent that only the 
most exact compliance with Japan's de- 
mand can avert .1 recourse to arms. 

Mr. Fuginia says that the treaty 
reached at the conclusion of the late 
Japanese-Chinese war specifically cov- 
ered the <Jue^tion that Is at the present 
{Ime thicaitJ ing to phinf;e the two ooun- 
rles into war. He claims that !t w.ts 
a violation of this treaty, a direct defl 
to Japan, upon the part of China, that 
has led up to such a warlike attitude 



upon the part of the Japanese. He 
says that China must recede In its at- 
titude or be prepared to fight. 

As to the war talk in Japan concern- 
ing fancied diplomatic differences with 
America, Mr. Fuglnia declares there Is 
nothing in the situation to cau.se the 
hast i lann. He says that the Jingo 
party of the empire— not a representative 
jmrty -has been the means or creating 
all the war talk that emanated from 
Japan. ,, , 

Mr. FiiRinla says among the poUtl- 
cian.s and diplomats of Japan, that |s 
among the conservative class, there is 
no thought of war with the United 
States. , , 

As to Immigration. Mr. Fuglnia says 
that Japan Is opposed 10 the wholesale 
exodu.** of h»-r subjfi ts to this coun- 
try. The country is expanding com- 
mercially and industrially, an«l wished 
to employ the laboring class at home. 
Japan is enforcing measures to restrict 
and pr» vent Immigration. 

Mr. Fuginia depncutes the reports 
that have crept Into the papers con- 
eerniiiK tho Influence exert* d by the 
Koreans to stir up dissatisfaction 
among the natives of India. Hestates 
tli:.t Japan has only the most cordial 
fteling toward Kngfand. He says tliat 
Korea is governed by Japan, and that 
no attempt has been made by that 
small country to Incite dissatisfaction 
among the natives of England's great 
Eastern posscssitm. 

Japan has a jingo party. a« cording to 
Mr. Fuglnia that Is at outs with the 
poli<y of the Mikado. Th«v are ra<ll- 
cala and are dis.«atistled with the pres- 
ent order of things. They would liKo 
to see the country embroiled In ji war. 
as they see small opportunity to protlt 
under the present order of govern- 

'col.' Thomas Wilkinson of New York. 
Is accomrnnying Mr. Fnginla. They are 
enpaged in liuslness which his to do 
with an exhibit at the approaching 
Alaskan exposition at .Seattle. .Mr. 
Wilkinson reiterates his st.itement. 
made to The Herald some time ago. that 
Johnson Is the presidential timber, that 
the East Is looking to. Mr. Wilkinson 
believes that the Minnesota governor is 
the onlv Democrat who can defeat the 
candidate nominated by tho Republican 
party. 

Given I'p to Die. 

P. .«?plegel, 1204 N'. Virginia St., 
EvansvlUe. Ind.. wrlte.s: "For over 
five vears I was troubled with kidney 
and bladder affections which cnusod 
me much pain and worry. 1 lost llesh 
and was all run down, and a year ago 
had to abandon work entirely. I had 
three of the best physicians who did 
me no good and I was practioally 
given up to die. Foley's Kidney Cure 
was reci'mmended and the first bottle 
gave me groat relief, and after taking 
the second bottle I was entirely 
cured." Why not let It help you? 
Sold by all druggists. 



Remarkably Large Num- 
ber of Wolves Killed 
in Duluth District 



The price ot raw furs has recovered 
Bomewhait from the slump that came 
immediately after the recent financial 
flurry, and the Northern Minnesota 
trappers, who held theJr product in the 
hope of obtaining a higher figure are 
now able to profit by their patience. 
Fifteen or twenty kinds of furs have 
gone up from 10 to 25 or 30 per cent, 
and, according to recent price lists, it 
looks as if the present figure would be 
maintained during the remaJnder of 
the trapping season. 

Prime skunk skans, which early last 
month brought the trapper Jl.20, now 
sell for $1.75, Muskrat pelts now bring 
40 cents, where they were 31 cents 
early in February, and mink also com- 
mand a better price. Lynx skins that 
were selling for 18 to JIO, are now 1 
worth $11 and $12. and fox skins are 
worth about 25 per cent more now than 
a month ago. Badger skins are now 
selling for $2 Instead of $1.50. as was 
the case a few weeks ago. Fisher is 
a little lower now than it was then, 
and beaver is soor.ewhat higher. Bear. 
wolf. etc.. are selling about the samo 
as in February. 

Furs will be in prime condition only 
four or live weeks more. With the ap- 
proach of spring and wanner weather, 
they iK'ffln to lose their rich, glossy ap- 
pearance, and command a smaller 
price. The season thus far is said to 
have been a fairly profitable one for 
Minnesota ti-appers. Conditions in the 
woods have t>een satisfactory for the 
worlt, and there has not been enough 
fconw to interfer with operations to 
any extent. The total output of furs 
for the season from the Northern Min- 
nesota district will be considerable. 
C>perations are being conducted in tho 
whole region north of Duluth, and 
along the north sliore of L«ake Su- 
perior. 

Probably the number of wolf hides 
sent out from the Duluth district will 
be larger this season than ever before 
in the history of the state. Even in 
the early days it is said wolves were 
not so numerous as they have been 
this winter, and with all the settlers 
after the animals, in addition (o the 
Indians and regular trappers, the num- 
ber killed has been remarkably large. 
The bounties paid out by the state and 
county nets a tidy sum to residents of 
this county. 



The Business Man 



li 



(s^n 



t-ilr l^^ FiiTfiot 

Hanun's Beer It 



(*«;^NLY when the breat, 
Ing point Is reached 
does the busy busi. 
ness man realize the 
disastrous effects result- 
'ing from mental con- 
centration and over- 
work. 

Digesto Malt Ex- 
tract used regularly 
icvery day repairs the 
continued waste of the 
body. It tones the 
system making it pro- 
ductive of the greatest 
amount of work but 
without loss of vitality, 

AT ALL 
DRUG STORES 

*' Leads them Air* 



19£ 




Let Your People Decide 

Serve one dish of home-baked beans and one dish of Van Camp's. Then let your folks 
decide which kind they'll have next And be glad of their choice. For you don't 
want to bother with home cooking-do you?-if your people like our methods best. 



Here is an ideal kitchen, fitted with every facility. In charge of 
a chef whose main purpose in life is to create one perfect dish. 

At stake on that dish is our reputation, established for 47 years. 
And a sale of tens of millions of cans every year depends on how 
people like it. 

May we not claim, without offense, that we can prepare that one 
dish better than you? 

One reason is that we bake in live steam. 

So we don't crisp part of the beans, as you do. We don't burst 
the skins. Ours are all baked alike— baked until they are mealy. 
Yet they are nutty because they are whole. 

That is the first point your people will notice. They will never 
again want beans mushy and broken when they learn the nutty flavor 
beans have when they're whole. 



Then we bake the beans, the tomato sauce and the pork all 
together, and get our delicious blend. 

You will never be content to add the sauce as a dressing when 
you learn how much better it tastes if baked into the beans. 

Then we heat our ovens to 245 degrees, and bake the beans 
ninety minutes. Most of the beans in your baking dish never get 
half that heat. 

That's why your beans are heavy and hard to digest That'a 
why they ferment and form gas. 

It requires a fierce heat to break doWn the fibre of beans. To 
separate the particles so the digestive juices can get to them. Youf 
oven cannot apply it. 

Beans, to be digestible, must be factory cooked. 

It is good to know that the beans which you like best are alsa 
the best beans for you. 



\^n Giinp 




BAKED 

^imH TOMATO 

SAUCS 



MALT EXTRACX 

MAOr ONLY BY 

THEO. RAMM BREWING CO.. ST. PAUL 



ARMY ON A 
WAR^BASIS 

Officers Believe Standard 

Will be Raised by 

New Law. 

Places America on Equal 

Footing With European 

Countries. 



Army officials see in the passage 
by the house of congress of the army 
pay bill, increasing the pay of the 
soldiers 40 per cent, and giving the 
officers a graduated Increase, vaiylng 
according to rank, a move to place the 
United Slates army on equal footing 
with any of the armies of Europe. 

L.ieut. O. H. Dockery, in charge of 
the locai United .States recruiting 
t.fflce, and an officer with wide experi- 
ence, gives it at his opinion that tho 
army pay bill is the first move to placa 
the United Slates army upon a higher 
plane of efficiency. 

The passage of the increased pay 
bill is for the object of bringing former 
soldiers back into the service. At the 
present time the cavalry, the Philip- 
pine service and several other branches 
of the army are closed to all appli- 
cants except those who have seen for- 
mer ser\icc. The idea is to maintain 
Ihe army ttn a plane of efficiency equal 
to those of tho foreign powers. 

Lieut. Dockery points out that it re- 
quires at least a year of training to 
make any thing approaching a soldier 
out of a raw recruit. Men going into 
action after only one year's experience 
in thf army would be In the same class 
as the militiamen, who are required to 
learn by actual experience the details 
that go to make up an efficient and ex- 
perienced soldier. 

The mistakes made by the army In 
the Spanish war have not been lost 
sight of by the military authorities at 
Washington. More of the men died in 
camp than were killed by the bullets 
of the enemy. This was because the 
volunteers and raw recruits did not 
know the first principles of camp life 
or sanitary precautions. 

It is believed that the increase of 
the pay will bring back into the serv- 
ice many men who have seen actual 
fighting.' At any event they have been 
thoroughly drilled in camp and garri- 
son life. This is the kind of soldier 
iho army authorities are trying to get. 
In other words, the lieads of the 
army are endeavoring to put the army 
of the United Stale.s in a war footing. 
They are providing an incentive for 
the American soldier to make a profes- 
.«^jon out of the army. They are offer- 
ing inducements for his remaining in 
the army, instead of quitting it at the 
end of liis first enlistment term. 

Th's la the policy of .Secretary Taft. 
according to the belief of Liuet. Dock- 
ery They are placing the army upon 
a war fooling, not with the idea that 
there Is going to be any trouble, but 
with the idea of preventing mistakes 
that have proved costly in the past. 

At the present time the i-ecruiting to 
tlxa anny i» »o heavy that the IncreaM 



PORKaxoBEANS 

You will never be satisfied with other brands after you know Van Camp's. That 
nutty flavor, that perfect blend,that tang and that zest would be missed. Once learn 
how ffood beans can be, and you will be one of the millions who insist on Van Camp's. 



But the difference in beans isn't all in the cooking. There is also 
wide choice in materials. 

The beans, for instance, are sold as low as 30 cents per bushel. 
Yet we pay $2.10 for ours. 

The reason is that we buy only the choicest Michigan beans. 
Ours are picked out by hand to give us only the whitest, the plump- 
est, the very cream of the crop. 

We could buy tomato juice for 75 cents per barrel. Yet we pay 
$3.45 for just the tomatoes used in a barrel of ours. 

The difference is this: Cheap sauce Is made from tomatoes 
picked green, and ripened in shipment. Or of scraps from a can- 
ning factory. It lacks flavor and richness and zest. 

Ours is made only from whole tomatoes, ripened on the vines. 
They are picked when the juice fairiy sparkles. Our sauce has a 
savor which Nature alone can give. 

When you once know what our piquant tang means, you will 
never buy brands which lack it. 



It pays to get the best in beans, for the best are cheap enough. 

Suppose you can save a trifle per can, because the maker has 
used a cheap class of materials. You will not find them appetizing. 
You'll not serve them often. 

How much better it is to serve beans that your people like. 
Then let them largely take the place of meat. 

For beans and meat have about the same food value. One 
easily takes the place of the other. 

And think of the trouble saved. Van Camp's are always ready. 
Each can in the pantry means a savory meal all cooked. If yott 
want them hot, put the sealed can in hot water. 

When you are tired, here's a meal without labor. When you ar« 
hurried, here's a meal without waiting. And a meal that all people 
like. 

Consider what you will save in time, money and trouble, when 
your people learn about Van Camp's. 



Prices: 10, IS and 20c per can. 



Van Camp Packing Company, 



Established 
1861 



Indianapolis, Indiana* 



of the soldier's pay would not tend to 
very materially increase the numerical 
strength of tho army. It is quality 
that the war officials are endeavoring 
to obtain. They desire to make the 
personnel of the army as i>ermanent 
as possible. They are endeavoring to 
Interest the soldier in his work. 



MANY LAND ENTRIES. 
Bismarck. N. D.. March 10.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The homestead entries 
at the local l''nited States land office 
reached the 40,000 mark Saturday aft- 
ernoon. 



One of ihe 



of the happy homes of to-day is a vast 
fund of information as to the best methods 
of promoting health and happiness and 
right living and knowledge of the world's 
best products. 

Products of actual excellence and 
reasonable claims truthfully presented 
and which have at tamed to world-wide 
acceptance through the approval of the 
V.'ell-Inforinod of the World; not of indi- 
viduals only, but of the many who have 
the happy faculty of selecting and obtain- 
ing the best the worlil affords. 

One of the products of that class, of 
known component parts, an Ethical 
remedy, approved by physicians and com- 
mended by the Well-informed of the 
World as a valuable and wholesome family 
laxative is the well-known Syrtip of Figs 
and Elixir of Senna. To get ita beneficial 
effects always buy the genuine, manu- 
factured by the California Fig Syrup Co., 
only, and for aale by all leading druggists. 



ROB TROUT 
STREAMS 

North Shore Settlers Com- 
plain Duluthians Are 
Fishing Through Ice. 

Some of the Best Pools 

Are Being Cleaned 

Out. 



open for several weeks and it goes 
very much against the grain of tlie 
fair-minded sportsmen to have law- 
breakers clean out the best pools be- 
fore the season is legally opened. 
They claim that the practice is not 
only unlawful but that it is unsports- 
manlike fur the reason that the fish 
are hungry and are caught without 
any opportunity of making a fight for 
their lives. 



defection of M. Beerneart and his fol- 
lowers will mean the further modlfl- 
cation or possibly the defeat of the 
treaty. 



FORTUNE OF MILLIONS 



THE MINISTER OF STATE 

KICKS ON CONGO TREATY. 

Brus.sels, March 9. — Minister or 
State Beerneart, who was at first 
disposed to favor the treaty providing 
for the annexation of the Congo Inde- 
pendent State to Belgium, has now 
decided to oppose it because of the 
clauses granting recognition to private 
concessions and providing for a grant 
of $10,000,000 to King Leopold. The 



Will Not Tempt Worcester Man 
From Y. M. C. A. Work. 

Worcester, Mass., March 9 —John T. 
Dower, secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
here, ha.s been notified that he is heir 
to a fortune of flO.(tO(t.(>00 left him by 
an uncle, Thoma.« Wallace, who died 
in Melbourne, Australia, a short time 
ago. Mr. Dower says that he wUl 
not go to Australia for the money, al- 
though he has employed coun.sel there 
to look after his Interests. Whether he 
gets the money or not, he says, he will 
retain his position as secretary of the 
local branch of the asKoclation. 



Several complaints have reached 
the city from people residing in the 
vicinity of the north shore streams 
that the creeks and rivers are being 
depleted of their trout by the un- 
sportsmanlike practice of certain Du- 
luth men who are claimed to be cut- 
ting holes in the ice and catching the 
fish out of the pools. 

According to the reports there is 
.scarcely a stream between Lester 
Park and Knife river that has escaped 
the depredations of certain parties 
who have violated the fish and game 
laws by catching trout out of season. 
The law expressly forbids the taking 
of trout through the ice and provides 
a severe penalty in case of a convic- 
tion for the practice. 

The settlers along the north shore 
are much incensed about the r.iatter 
as well as a large number of the local 
sportsmen. „ , . ^ 

The season for trout fishing does not 



V^YnWmTi^ And many other painful and serious 
hISI^Iv ailments from which most mothers 
*%lLJJU.l\i suffer can be avoided by the use of 
TiT^Wl A r«rr "Mother's Friend." This ^rcat remedy 
KKl^ilNI is a godsend to women, carrying: 
mMw^MJLmVJ m, ^j^em through their most critical or- 
deal with safety and no pain. No woman who uses 
I ''^Mother's Friend" need fear the suffering and danger inci- 
dent to birth for it robs the ordeal of its horror and m- 
sures safety to life of mother and child, and leaves her 

in a condition more favorable to speedy recovery . Th e child is also 
healthy, strong and good natured. 1|i| A^Tl ||'|l'C 
Our book, -Motherhood," is worth IWI II £ JQUj]^ |3 

its weight in gold to every woman, 

and will be sent free in plain envelope fTOIFniTTI 
by addressing application to |1 |C|r.|l||i 

Bradticid Regulator Cc Attania. Ga. m, mm^mm^mmm 




s 

I 

! 

* 

I 

< 

I 
I 
I 
I 

I 
■ 1 — — — 

i 
i 

t 

- — - 

I r 



-* I — - - 
I — 

_4: 

4 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: •PUESDAY, MARCH 



1908. 




Special Sale of 
Trojan Enamel Ware 

This ware is triple coated inside and out — enamel is guar- 
anteed acid proof and tree from poisonous substances. A very 
handsome lis^ht gray color— smoothly coated— long lasting and 
durahlc. This is a chance to secure high-grade Knamel \\ arc 
at tlie prices vou usually pay for "seconds." We want to close 
this ware out'entirelv. to make room for the F. & B. brand. 

'r< g special , Re« Si»C( lal 

Price Price. | Price. PrUc. 

2-!it. Rice Boilers.... 88c 48c 2-qt. Sauce Pan 23c 14c 

3-<U Rice Boilers $1.10 68c 3 ^ sauce Pan 27c l»c 

Laisre size Wash Basin 2 Sc 18c \ ^j,^,,,.^ „„_ ,a_ 02c 

2-.,f. Wlnd-sor Dipper 25c 16c ^-^t. Sauce Pan 29c -^c 

4-qt Pre.Herve Kettle 29c 21c | «5-qt. Sauce Pan 4oc 3-c 

6-Mt Pre.serve Kettle 41c aao 2-qt. Milk Pan 15c 10c 

K-qt Preserve Kettle 4Sc 42c 3-qt. Milk Pun 22c lao 

14-qt Preserve Kettle S2c 58c ; n-qt. Milk Pan 30c l8c 

7-nt Tea K.-ttle.... 89c 69o ; 2-qt. Coffee Pots 59c 38c 

«-qt. Tea Kettle $1.10 79o.3-qt. Coffee Pots 69c 48c 

14-qt Dish Pan 78c 48c,l»/4-qt. Tea Pots 59c 32c 

17-qt DLsh Pan 98c 58c 1 2-qt. Tea Pots 69c 39c 

This Is only a partial list of our btgr stock. Como early, select 
enough to stock your kitchen with the finest Cooking Ware there is. 



EVIDENCE 
DEMANDED 

Employment Agent Asks 

That Definite Charges 

be Made. 

Denies Any Crooked Deal- 
ing Towards the 
Laboring Men. 




J^CgNtW 



■^»^' « 



Bristal Bowl and Pitcher 



Al)soIutfly clean and sanitary, 

plain shaped bofly in white 

ware; a very popular seller 

at 85c and so 

priced In other 

stores. Our 

pcice here 

only 



pular seller 

58g 



Bristal Covered Toilet Pails 

plain 



With ball and cover, 
whit'> and one 
that sells In other 
stores for 80c. 
Our price on thi.s 
is only 



58c 




Fine Dinner Set 



$21 



U8 



A complite sol of 4S pii>ces. consists of 6 5-inch plate.s, 6 7-lnch 
plate.-< 6 fruits, 6 individual butter plates. 6 teacup.s and saucers. 2 
platters, open vigetable di.sh, covered vegetable dish, butter dish, sugar 
Ih)\v1 cream pitcher, gravy boat and pickle dish. . , ,, 

The whole set complete for only $4.48 — a set that Is well worth 
$6 .'lO The stt i.s very daintily d»'corated on a good quality of .semi- 
porcelain body ware and is guarant.-ed not to craze. In a great many 
store^^ you pay $7 or $S for no better dlshe.s than these, but our im- 
ni^-nse buying power enables us to sell these at the low price o£ only 
$4.48. 




REPETITION OF TERRIBEE 

COLLIN WOOD DISASTER 

(Continued from Pago 1.) 



chimney, where It ran up through the 
attic. 

Before the Are department could get 
a stream on the building, the flames 
had gutted the attic, dropped to the 
floor below, attacked the east wing 
and was roaring up the big central 
tower. The bell fell inside of tlfteen 
minutes. The building Is a total loss. 

Eiglit hundred pui>ils were enrolled 
In the school. The big building had 
llfty-four rooms, including two large 
play rooms and two engine rooms 
was recently rebuilt and was 
mally opened last April. 



culty restrained from disobeying the 
strict Injunctions of the police against 
showering the young monarch with 
tlowers. 

An Imposing array of civil guards 
and police lined the streets through 
which his majesty was conducted. 



It 

for- 



ALFONSO AT BARCELONA 

(Continued from page 1.) 



No ('a.sc on K«'Oorcl. 

There Is no ca.se on record of a 
cough or ct)ld resulting In pneumonia 
or consumption after Foley's Honi-y 
and Tar has been taken, as It will stop 
your cough and break up your cold 
quickly, llefu.se any but the genuine 
Foley's Honey and Tar In a yellow- 
package. ContaiJis no opiates and Is 
safe and sure. Sold by all druggists. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

"J. T. Moody denounces employment 
agents thieves before the council." The 
above statement appears In the morning 
l>aper. Things have come to a fine 
."Stage when a minister of the gospel will 
go before a council meeting and make 
a statement like this about good law 
abiding citizens. I have been in the 
employment business for thf last twelve 
years, and 1 know that I am as honest 
and as good a citizen as Mr. Moody. 
Ijoes any one think for a moment that 
men build up a businos.s of any kind by 
little, petty thieving such as was con- 
laimd in tho slatem»"nt of Mr. Walsh 
and Mr. Moody? It fs loo foolish to 
liilnk of. I know, and I am sure, tl»at 
I have as many mfrlends among the la- 
boring men as either Mr. Moody or 
Mr. V\'aUh. or both of Ihpm together, 
and for any one to say that we are rob- 
bing them is the height of folly. Tli'.re 
is hardly a day goes by that my part- 
ner or 1 do not help some laboring man 
out, someiim.s by buying him a meal, 
a bed. paying his fare to a job or even 
ndvaneing his office fee and fare. 

I would liki; to liave Mr. Moody sav 
who the.<je crooited employment agents 
are. He endeavors to make l»is state- 
ment broad enough s«j we could not get 
bark at him In a criminal action, but. 
for the sake of honest citizens, lie should 
come out and show his evidence. It may 
l)t! that there are unscrupulous foremen 
,ind contractors who will di-scharge good 
men when they have worked only a few 
days, but I doubt U. It take.s time to 
Kf-t m-n out to a camp, and when you 
get tium there it always lakes on«. or 
two days before men get located and can 
do th'-ir work to any advantage, and 
if men are discharged inside of two or 
three days. It Is perhaps because they 
show their utter inability to do tiie 
work for which they have been hired. It 
is not eviry man that hive.s out for ?30 
per month and b<->ard that can make that 
much for his enipiviy<'r. 

There Is also a matter of revenge to 
tak.' into account. One year ago men 
were scarce, and foremen and contrao- 
tor.4 had to knuckle down to the laboring 
men. This winter, labor has L>een plenty 
and if men show an Inclination to be 
lazy they get fired. Our office is open 
for in.sprclion any time. We have no 
poli<-.' record as criminals. We never had 
any trouble with laboring m<n. and I 
am not a thief. I will not deny but that 
mistakes are sometimes made, and men 
are sent out when there Is no job for 
them but It happens very seldom, and 
then is perhaps, on account of some un- 
avoidalile circumstance. In that case we 
gen'^rally try to straighten it out the 
be.st wo can for all concerned, either by 
furnishing the men with another job 
or reimbursing tliem with money to eover 
their lo.ss when the fault is apparently 
our own. and generally when w.' know It 
Is not our fault, as a business proposl- 

If ' these gentlemen have any evidence 
of crooked dealing at our office I wish 
th^y would present It to the proper 
authorities in a proper manner, and. u 
they have not, I <losire them to refrain 
in the future from making public state- 
ments which have a tendt>ncv to in- 
criminat.^ our ofTice as well as others, 
and thus materially Injure our busine.ss 
and reputation without any foundation 
therefor. Thinking The Herald for this 
privilege of stating our side of^V»e-?*=*«' 
I am, Yor.ra truly E. O 

Duluth, March 10. 



HOODLUMS 
THROWEGGS 

Vigorously Pelt Sleigh- 
Ride Parties With 
Aged Hen- Fruit. 

Take Stand at Favorite 

Corner and Bombard 

the Rigs. 



THE MERRY 
WIDOW 

and her bow. 
made her lirst 
L>uluth appear- 
ance at our 
Millinery De- 
partment. Come 
and see this 
Hat. 



Always Send Yonr Mall Ordcrt to 

117-119 West Superior Street, IXuluth, Minn., 
For Quick and Satisfactory Service. 



THE KAYSBR 

GLOVBS 

are here — the 
best of Silk 
aiov«B — long 
or short — all 
wanted colors 
— buy yours 
now. 



li: 



OlvUND. 



Hoodlums making their headquarters at 
Twenty-elghlii avenue west and Third 
street have been making things miserable 
for the sleigliridc parties which have 
pa-ssed that way lately. 

Their chief delight seems to be the 
hurling of passe eggs at the merrymaker^ 
in the sleighs, and they have succeeded 
In giving users of the thoroughfare In 
their locality a lot of annoyance, so much, 
in fact, that compialnt has been made to 
the policeman on the beat and he has his 
eye on the miscreants. 

The recent fall of the beautiful snow 
gave sic'.uhride parties a new lease on 
life, and many of them go to West Duluth 
and to New Duluth from diff<?renl parts 
of the city every evening. The hoodlums 
take a stand at their favorite cornel-, 
armed with a cheap line of eggs, and 
when the sleighriders pass they are bom- 
barded with the eggs. ' • 

bome members of the sleighride crews 
have stopped their rigsand given chase 
to the youngsters, but the latter know 
well their battUground, and in each iti- 
stance have succeeded In eluding the 
srasp of the indignant persons. 

The other evening a rrtMUber ol Ixiys and 
girls from the Bryant -^chool made up a 
sleighride party, and what the hood- 
lums handed them In Ihf way ol a recep- 
tion at Twenty-eighth avenue west and 
Third street is said to have been some- 
thing to renu^iber. TT^p ^Bryant scliool- 
ites were fairly smothen-d with the fra- 
grant hen fruit. The thcWent well Digit 
put an end to the ouUng. 

MANY AHEND FUNERAL 

Of John Lindahl at the First Swed- 
ish Baptist Church. 

Funeral services for John Lindahl. a 
prominent resident of the West end. who 
died last week, were held yesterday morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock In the First Swedish 

Baptist church. , .w , „,„i, 

Kev A. Kdstam, pa.stor of the church, 
was in charge of the services. Re\-. ( art 
Lindahl of Willmar. Mmn., a brother of 
the deceased, was pnsent and gave a 
brief talk. Olaf G. Olson gave several 

^^he chur^rh was filled to overflowing and 
manv persons accompanied the remains 
to rnion cm.-tery. The Pallbearers wen. 
Oscar Lingwail. Louis Berg<iul8t, Andrew 
Bergqulst, John F. Fredln. A. Thoren and 
Frank Frlsledt. 

(iETS A BIGSIRPUISE. 

Woman Returns Home to Find Rela- 
tives in Possession. 

When Mrs. William Chapman of 321 
Twenty -eighth avenu« west returned 
from church Sunday evening, she re- 
ceived one of the biggest surprises of her 

life. 

Her father and brother unexpectedly 
came to the city that evening and Jour- 
neyed to the Chapman residence. There 






The Woman of the Hour ! 



jULUTH women are very much alive to the import- 
ance of being well dressed — they are keen to note 
the little style touches which place our new Rain- 
coats somewhat in advance of the ordinary styles. 
The cut (Slows one of our models, a striped silk. It's 
rubberized to .shed water and does its work well. The 
same model is also liere wiUi tlie Butterfly sleeve. 

Other numbers in other stripes— in plaids— in shadow 
stripes and in invisible plaids—some are rubberized — others 
are "cravenetted" by the Priestleys' of England! 

All are waterproof! Are tastily trimmed with touches 
of braid— of self strappings — and buttons. Prices range 
$16.50 to $35.00 for coats to be proud of in sun or 
rain, at home or abroad! 

Umbrellas for the Travellers ! 

One maker of umbrellas makes umbrellas as good as 
the best of other makes— but more than that— the ribs are 
warranted not to break— the umbrellas can't turn 'Svrong 
side out"— and the handle is detached, or attached securely, 
in a second ! 

You can put the umbrella In your sultqase or your 

trunk. Prtces range $2.50 to $12 for detachable liandlo 

styles. 



'SaSSi 




THREATS TO BLO W BANK 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



aceomp^nled by Gen. Linares and the 
members of nis pers.mal suite, in bril- 
liant uniforms, he was warmly greet- 
ed. 

King Visits Cliunh. 

Smiling his acknowledgnn'nts to the 
plaudits of the people, the king en- 
tered tiie royal carriage In waiting, 
and. e.scNjrted by a .squadron of cav- 
alry, he was driven rapidly to the 
church of La Merced, where a te deum 
^vas celebrated. After the service, the 
king repaired to the residence of the 
captain general, which adjoins the 
church. This afternoon at 4 o'clock 
he will hold a reception at the home of 
Oen. Linares, at which the officers of 
the Austrian stjuadron, now in the 
harbor, will be present. 

BarceUma was gayly decorated In 
honor of the royal visit. The tiers of 
balconies along the route traversed by 
tiis majesty were hung with bunting 
and flags and thronged with wi>men 
w.-ariiip the black mantillas, for which 
the beauties of .Spain are famous. 
There were flowers in pi-ofu:^ion and 
tht! scene was festive and beautiful. 
^The king bowed to the right and to 
the left, in resih)nse t.i the greetings 
of his people, and wime of the black- 
eyed .Spanish women were with dlffl- | of the contents. 



man he would talk If over with him 
and tlie stranger a<i'epted. all the time 
keer>ing tht! bottle In his hand and 
within sight. 

Noticing that the man seemed thin 
and piiu'hed. Drake asked him If he 
wasn't hungry. 

"1 have been studying oyor this mat- 
ter for several day.^i and liave not eaten 
a thing for forty-eight hours," iinswered 
the man with the bottle. 

InvitiMl to Breakfast. 

"Well, lofs go and have hipakfasi and 
talk this over." proposed Drake, 

".\11 right, but don't try any monkey 
busine.ss or you are a dt-ad man. ' replied 
the anarchist. 

President Hamilton of the bank en- 
tered tiic nt'xt room during the convcr- 
.sation and liearit enough of it to enable 
him to know what was going on. 

As l>rake and the strang'T l^'ft the 
room together Hamilton tolfphon»>d the 
police station for plain clothes men and 
followed the two men to a nearby res- 
taurant. 

Drake and the man were on opposite 
sides of tlie tal)le when three dete«"tlve». 
accompanied by Hamilton, entered the 
room. 

Slipping up behind th*" stranger the d<»- 
lectives pinioned his arms and relieved 
him of the bottle before he knew what 
was up. 

He was then taken to the police sta- 
tion. Th»>rf he refused to talk. The 
bottle was sent to a chemist for analysis 



DULUTH CONCERNS AWAKE. 

Their Representatives Are Looking 
After Business Up North. 

International Falls. Minn.. March 10- 
. Special to The Herald. )-Almost dally 
th.>re are offered more evidences of the 
fa.'.t that the Duluth Jobbing Interests 
claiming this as th.dr legitimate 



are claiming una .is '^",'..\. " . .V.:, 
territory, "rhe latest a<ldltlon to the 
ranks of the travelers who are looking 
for trade for houses at the Head of the 
Lake, is W. D. Dean, who spent a day 
here r^^eently. In the interost of the 
Zenith Paper company. Mr. De.in Is an 
old-time printer, so he was right at 
home when calling on the printing 
trade Mr. Dean carried away a good 
Impression of tho town and experts to 
see It develop Into one of the best busi- 
ness points in his territory, which In- 
cludes the northeastern part 
state. 



Majectic Theater 

2021 \VeH« Superior Street. 

Special Tonight and All the We»k. 

TilO>l4S & l.V.V. — I'un Makers onil 

Dnnelng. Thre*' part* Movlni? IMeturew 

■nd tw*t Illiislruted SongM. __,.^.„„ 

.\nMISSION. 5 .\>D l« CEXTS. 



Foresters, will Initiate a large class of 
candidate at the next meeting. ihe 
lodge has made large gains in member- 
ship this winter, a large class having 
been admitted last month. 

Leonard A'eter.son of Spokane, Wash., 
is renewing acquaintances and greeting 
Ills friends In the West end. where he 
lived for many years. He came to at- 
tend the funeral of his brother-in-law, 
John l^indahl. which was held yesterday. 
Sunday evening, he gave a short talk 
during the services at the First Swedish 
Baptist church. 

It's worth while to see our hats; none 
better- bring your old hat— we'll make It 
new. Pearson's, 1814 Pietlmont avenue 
wost 

The Young Ladies' Aid society of the 
First Swedish Baptist church will meet 
Fridav evening wiiti Mr. and Mrs. Oscar 
Lingwail of :!»o2 West Second street. 

The Ladles' Aid society of Zion Nor- 
wegian church will be entertained 
Wedne.iday afterno<jn by Mrs. O. Trons- 
dahl of 203» West Fourth street. 

For weak lungs, use the Norwegian 
Cod Liver Oil. sold at the Lion Drug 
Store. 

Mrs. George Ernstrom has returned 
from St. Luke's ho.spital, where she un- 
derwent an operation for appendicitis. 
She is getting along nicely. 

1907 imported cod nver oil. A. E. Swed- 
bcrg. 3 E. Sup. St. and 2015 W. Sup. St. 

Hello! What Kind? Bring Red Cross 

-\- Cough Drops every time. 5c per box. 

STRANGE PARALYSIS. 

New York Woman Falls Unconscious 
to the Sidewalk. 

New York, March 10. — Miss Mary 
Asche Is in a hospital here suffering 
from a species of paralysis which Is 
proving interesting to physicians. The 
dlsea.se Is known professionally as 
parapergla. Miss Asche was walking 

along the street when she fell uncon- 
scious on the sidewalk. She was taken 
to a hospital in an ambulance, where 
the paralysis developed. The physician*, 
say that the disease was doubtless 
caused by dancing. Miss A.sche hav- 
ing Indulged a great deal in that 
pastime. The con.stant straining of 
certain muscles l.s .said to be respons- 
ible for her condition. 



TO AVOID 
TROUBLE 

State Officials Took An 

Active Part in Cass 

LaKe Election. 

Right of Every Citizen 

Protected by Action 

of Governor. 



authority to issue such an order under 
Che city ordlna-ices. Regardless of the 
opinion of the city attorney. Mayor 
Becker says he will see that the Inspec- 
tor's orders will be enforced and that 
portioh.s of about twenty city .schools 
will be closed temporarily while the 
propf^r fire escape.s are being inducted. 
A cla.sh between the mayor and school 
authorities is expected. 



PITTSBURG FIREMEX HURT. 
Pittsburg, March 10.— Eight firemen 
wtre injured and the business section 
of Wilkinsburg, an adjoining su- 
burb, was dmaged to the extent of 
$12.5,000 by fire today. Assistance was 
sent from this city. 



of the 



pajl CUMB IR • T« 14 MYft. 

PA^OOlNTMt.Nr K 



CAM of Itci^inv, Blind, 
Pile* 1b6 to ua*7i or BOBtv 



varantecd to cur* aay 

)le«dine or Protra4iail 

reniDd*4. {oc 




TO START POULTRY FARM. 

Milwaukee Men Going: Into the Busi 
ness Near Menominee. 

Menominee. Mich., Mareh 10.— Appre- 
ciating the peculiar advantag-es of Me- 
nominee as a place for raising poultry, 
two Milwaukee mi-n after looking over 
the .Menomln'-e poultry farms carefully, 
closed :i deiil wltli A. W. lilom of the 
Menomln»'». Ab.slraet & Land associa- 
tion for eighty acres of land which will 
l)e divided into about ten five and ten- 
at re plats, ami disposed to a number 
)>f Milwaukee poultry. m<n wlio will be- 
fr\x\ next spring the establishment of 
model poultry farms. Tiie work of 
clearing the land antl getting It In 
shape for tlie work will be started at 
once, and the buildings and housings 
for the poultry will b«' started as soon 
as the land has been cleared. It Is estl- 
niatfd that l>«'fore ihe doso of th»> year 
that several thousand chickens will be 
located upon the plat. 



MILE IN^MID-AIR. 

Mule is (liven an Unusual Experi- 
ence in Knoxville. Tenn. 

Knoxvllle, Tenn.. March 10.— Ten 
thousand people stood on Gay and 
Clinch streets, and on top of neigh- 
boring buildings or sat In windows and 
watched an ordinary type of the hard- 
working American mule hoLsted to the 
top of the new ten-story steel con- 
struction building of the Knoxvllle 
Banking & Trust company. 

A large band, fitting arotmd the 
mule's body, was attached secure, and 
five of th«' workmen took their posi- 
tions ab.>ve her. Then the engine 
whistle screamed and In thirty sec- 
onds she was swinging in midair, and 
never did a mule seem more Inter- 
ested and possessed of more curiosity. 

The crowd yelled and laughed. The 
ascent was stopped near the top to en- 
able the photographer .«tatloned on the 
top of a neighboring building to get a 
photograph. The mule held her queer 
position and did not seem to Buffet 
dizzine-fls. and seemed very much at 
ease when the great derrick swung her 
onto a platform on the tenth floor. 



they found that no on^ was at horn?. 
However, they effected an entrance and 
proceeded to await .Mrs. Chapman s 
coming. ^ , , ., 

One enscon.sed himself in be<l and the 
other hid behind a screen. Thev sur- 
prised Mrs. Chapman all right. She 
nearly fainted when her father popped 
from behind a scre«m when she entered. 
It was some time before she recovered 
from the shock. 

BEMA I'LIIB'MdS DEBATE. 

Jud^e Upholds Side Favoring Di- 
rect Popular Election of Senators. 

Members of the Bena club held an 
Interesting debate In Dr. Oredson's office 
last evening on the question. "Resolved, 
That United States Senators Should Be 
Elected by a Direct Vote of the People," 
and It resulted in victory for the affirm- 
ative side. 

Every member present took part in the 
arguments and some Interesting talks 
were put forth on both sides. Ihe clubs 
critic. Rev. J. L. McBrlde, acted as 

At th'^lr regular meeting next Monday 
evening the Benaltes will hear a lecture 
by Rev. Mr. McBrlde on "Capital and 
Labor." 

Woman Hit hy Car. 

Mrs Christine Kron of 2108 West Third 
street was struck by a westbound street 
car at Twenty-first av. nue wtst and 

Third street yc.<iierday aftern.m j ^he 

wa«. brul«<'d. but not seriously Injureo. 

Mrs. Kron is somewluu deat anu sne 
did not hear the warning gong of the 
approaching car In time to get entirely 
out of the way. The motorman 
ceeded In slowing the car pretty 
before It struck her. 



FARGO U. C. T . ELECT 

Officers for Year and Initiate Sev- 
eral Candidates. 

Fargo. N. D.. March 10.— (Special to 

The Herald.)— Fargro council. No. 60, 
United Commercial Traveler.s, have elec- 
ted and installed the following officers, 
after initiating a clas.s of candidates: 
Sr. C, D E. Dinan; Jr. C. G. Richard- 
.=on; P. Sr. C. I>an S. Stewart; secretary- 
treasurer. "Thomas E. Dunn; cond.. Ed 
T. Edwards; pagp. B. A. Wilbur; 
sentinel, E. M. Edward.s; ex. com.. O. W. 
Wilkinson and J. E. Dixo-i; delegates to 
grand council at Calgary. June 8 and 9. 
i;»OS, Robert Mackay. Dan S. Stewart and 
D. K. Dinan; alternates. S. W. Miller. B. 
F. A.<!hleman and J. M. Yoder; council 
surgeon. Dr. A. W. Skelsey. 




mad( 



sue- 
well 



TAFT CLl B FORMED 

BY FARGO REPUBLICANS. 

Fargo, N. D., March 10.— At a large 
meeting of Republicans at the county 
headquarters a Taft club was organized 
by the supporters of the secretary of war 
for the presidency. 

Unless the present plans of the or- 
ganization are miscarried. Fargoans will 
be given an opportunity to hear the ad- 
ministration candidate. Mr. Taft is billed 
for speeches In tho Twin Cities in the 
near future, and an endeavor will be 
made to bring him to this city for an 
address. 

Tho following officers were elected: 
President, W. E. Hunt; vice president. 
E. A. Ball; secretary and treasurer. J. 
P. Edwards. 



D. E. H., March 10. 1908. 

The first Derby made in America wa§ a 

C & K 

Hats for Men 

NAPP-FELT 

distinction is 
the outcome 
of methods 
peculiar to the 
C & K shop, 
where the finest 
hats have been 
(or fifty years. 
Many processes in hat- 
making usually entrust- 
ed to a machine are, in 
Knapp-Felts, accom- 
plished by the trained 
and skillful hand of a 
C & K workman. 

Aside from the satisfac- 
tion of wearing a liat -wliich 
is the expression of an artis- 
tic ideal rather than a ma- 
chine-made product, Knapp- 
Felt hats offer many advan- 
tages. The shapes are ex- 
clusive C. & K. designs of 
sufficient variety to afford a 
wide range of choice; the 



.St. Paul. March 10.— (Special to The 
Herald)— Precautionary measures were 
taken by the state ofUclals to prevent 
trouble at Cass L^ke today at the mu- 
nicipal election. Reports that the law- 
less element of the town had been in 
a troublesome mood for some time and 
had threatened to take matters into 
their own hands at the election were 
made to Governor Johnson. He noti- 
fied Sherift: R. E. Dulury of Cass coun- 
ty to do his best to prevent disorder, 
and at his request Attorney General 
Young detailed S. Lrouis Weeks, special 
attorney general, to be present to see 
that the citizens were protected m 
their rights. 

The governor's information was that 
the proprietors of some disorderly sa- 
loons and gambling resorts had threat- 
ened to see that the election went their 
way, and advised others not to Inter- 
fere' with them. 

Letter to the Sheriff. 
In his letter to SherlfC Dulury, the 
governor says: 

"It has come to my notice that at 

the coming election, to be held at the 

village of Cass Lake, March 10, 190X, 

there will be an organized effort made 

to dei)nve the honest, law-abiding cit- 
izens of that community of their just 

suffrage rights to participate in the 

election and on the showing already 

made to me of this proposed nullifica- 
tion of our election laws, I have di- 
rected the attorney general of the state 

to send one of his associates to be 

present during the election of Cass 

Lake, to see that every right of that 

community is protected in every right 

which was guaranteed to him as an 

elector under the c(mstitution and laws 

of the state of Minnesota. 
"I also direct you to use every means 

within your power as a public official 

to se« that the peace and order and 

dignity of the state are maintained 

ui>on that occasion, and do everything 

within your power to see that every 

voter is protected In the rights which 

are his as a citizen of the state, and J ,^ 

that you co-operate with- the assistant stcadtaSt CrOliap U} C IS 

attorney general to this end." 
It was reported that those 



West End Shortpails. 

.Mi.xs Charlotte Weterland of St. Paul 
is visiting her father, T. Wetterland of 
IToa West Second street, tor a tew days. 
The last of the week she will go to 
Kargo to renualn several weeks for the 
purpose of Instructing th'^ milliners of 
the Klickeriall state in the latest styles. 

A daughter was born yesterday to Mr. 
and Mrs. Harold Wohlstrom of 2!>J6 \\ est 
rnird street. 

Miss Marie Anderson has returned 
fiom Bayrtehl. Wis., where she has been 
visiting relatives lor several weeks. 

Mrs. W. K. Close and children of Bay- 
tieiu. Wis., are visiting M.X». t^lose s par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Anderson of 
2\\* West B'cond street. 

The concert scheduled for Friday even- 
ing at GrUce M. E. ch^n^;h will be given 
tomorrow evening instead. A number 
of counter attractions Indiiced those in 
( hargo to hake a change In the date. 

The Kpworth league sewing Jwciety 
of the First Norwegian-l>anl8h M. fcj. 
church met last evening with Mrs. H. 
O. Muns*-n of 125 North Twentieth ave- 
nue west. ■ /. I 

Take no chances, have your prescrlp- 
t'ons fillo.l ,it the . Licm T>ruK Store. 

The n-gular meeting of the Epworth 
league of the First Not^egian-Danlsh 
M. E church will be he^l this evening 
at the church. ^ ,^^ 

Court Central, No. M, ^ly^nltea Order of 



KCZBMA PATIEXT LOST HOPE. 

Out Ordinary Oil of WlntrrKreeu Quick- 
ly Cured ThiM \\ onian. 

After treating for Eczema with six 
different doctors, Mrs. J. A. Wheeler, 
of Wellington. Ohio, was completely 
cured by pure vegetable oil of winter- 
green. This oil alone could not cure, 
but she used this oil as compounded 
with glycerine, etc., in D. D. D. Pre- 
scription. 

"1 feel It my duty to say what a 
wonderful cure D. D. D. has been for 
me." writes Mrs. Wneeler. "I was 
cured a year ago last fall, but did not 
dare write because I v*'as not sure the 
cure would be permanent. I had doc- 
tored with six doctors and they all 
said It was seldom. If ever, a ca-se like 
mine was cured. I think I used onl> 
four bottles of D. D. D. and I am per- 
manently cured. If I ever needed D. 
D. D. again, I would be willing to pay 
15.00 a bottle." 

This remedy and also D. D. D. Soap 
are sold by us and recommended be- 
cause we know their merits. We cer- 
tainly would not recommend them to 
our mighbors and patrons if we did 
not positively know of the wonderful 
results that D. D. D. brings in all kinds 
of eczematous diseases. Lyceum Phar- 
macy, Duluth. Minn. Call at our store 
for a free pamphlet on the care and 
nutrition of the sWn. 



behind 

the pian proposed to colonize a large 
number of lumbermen and othei-s, 
which make up the floating popula- 
tion of that part of the state; in order 
to carry out their purpose. 

TWO DIED UNATTENDED. 

Eaii Claire Men Pass to Great Be- 
yond W hile Alone. 

Eau Claire. Wis.. March 10.— Two men, 
both quite well advanced In years, were 
found dead .Sunday, both having passed 
away suddenly alone and unattended. 

.Tohn Orr. aged 69. veteran of the Civ-il 
war was foun.l dead In his bed at the 
Jovce house, corner of Grand avenue and 
South River, by Mr. Nelson. the 
proprietor. , ,. » ,„„ 

Peter Benson, aged «. residing at 192 
Ferry street, and janitor at the Fourth 
ward school was found dead at 6:30 
o'clock In the basement of the t^chool- 
house. 

MAYOR BECKER WILL ACT. 

To Enforce Order Abolishing Third 
Floors in Schools. 



Milwaukee. Wis.. March 10.— Up to 10:30 
this forenoon nothing had been done by 
Mayor Becker in the way of enforcing 
the order of Building Inspector Koch 
directing that the third floors of a num- 
ebr of the city schools be vacated pend- 
ing the Installation of fire escapes. Mayor 
Becker says he expects to take some 
action this afternoon. 

The order to close the third floor was 
served on President A. S. Lindemann of 
the school board Monday forenoon and 
on the principals of the schools affected. 
The principals sent the order to the 
superintendent of schools. 

President Lindemann referred the or- 
der to CItv Attorney Kelley. who con- 
tends that the building inspector has no| 



deep, rich and permanent; 
the nice proportion of stiff- 
ening^ in brim and crown 
makes the "balance" perfect 
— consequently they feel 
lighter and are more pleas- 
ant to handle and wear; the 
close texture and wear-re- 
sisting quality of Knapp- 
Felt cannot be successfully 
imitated. 

Knapp-Felt De Luxe, the 
best hats made, are Six 
Dollars. Knapp-Felts, the 
next best, are Four Dollars, 
everywhere. The Columbia 
$3 Hats are 
also made in 
our factory. 
The Columbia 
Clothing C o. 
are our 
sole 
agents 
in Du- 
luth. 




The Crofut & Knapp Co^ 

840 Broadway, New York. 



1 



i 



4 



r 



N 



imgyB^g 



14 



4 

THE DULUTH EVENING ,I|ERALD: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 



WHEAT HAS 
SOFT TONE 

The American MarRets 

Have a WeaR Day 

of It. 



American, old. 
March Ss l^d; 



6a 4^d: 
May. 6s 



futures, 
3%td. 



firm; 



Flax is Quiet. But Firm 

During tlie Session 

Here. 



Duluth Board of Trade. March 10.- 
Wbeat was hoavlly sold today and all of 
the American markets closed very soft. 
In Duluth, both active opilons showed 
a loss of mora than two points from yes- 
terday. 

The .jffect of the bearish government 
report, issued Just before the close yes- 
terday, was felt In today's markets and 
-was relU-citd In the cables, which were 
weak. Argentina offerings continue very 
liberal, which was another cause for 
weakness. 

Bradbtreet's reported a decrease of 
a,aati,UvA) bus., in the world's visible sup- 
ply of wheat. In the United States and 
Canada, there w^s a decrease of 2,O3e,O00 
bus. 

Liverpool c'.osed \i*\ lower, Berlin %c 
lower, Antwerp %c lower and Hudfpcsi 
%c higher. TIk- liruiness In Budapest >a 
due to unsoasonablo weather there. 

The May option clost-d ^Vse lower In 
Duluth, 2',8-V4C lower In Chicago. l%-74e 
lower In Mlnn.ai>i)lis. l%-%c lower in 
New York and ll»c lower in Winnipeg. 
The July opt ion cl«'B..d 2>ie lower in Du- 
luth, l',4-'»8 lower in Ciiieago, l>s-'/ie lower 
In Minneapolis and Tb*^ lower in New York 
aiid Winnipeg. . ^, ^ 

Mav corn closed %c higher in Chieaso 
and Vid to Id higher in Liverpool. May 
oats closed '4c higher in Chicagi). 
Brooniliall cabUd from Liverpool: 
"There was an liisy toni; lo 111*- sp»cu- 
lative wheat market at X\w opening, as a 
result of till- bearish showing' of tiie 
Am» rlcan government report, larger ar- 
rivals here and the ehf.ap r La Plata 
offerings, and values were T^d lower. The 
nearby month was partieularly under 
pressure and lost a further V^d during the 
morning, with no i-h<jw of str'Ugth. Tha 
distant months showed some signs of 
strength from the early decline, and 
aborts covered in a small way. prhea 
gaining '^d to '/.d. At mid-day. however, 
the market wa.s generally ea.'^y as a resuit 
Of poor support. At this time the market 
was l'»d lower than .Monday. 

"Corn was linn at the start and %d to 
«4d higher and further gained »4d during 
the nioriiiiig. Support resulted from the 
firmness in America yesterday, a bullish 
government showing and an improved 
demanj for .xpot." 

Car r. eeipt.s at Duluth were 56 against 
263 last ye;ir. and at Minneapolis 2(H 
against 2<J3 last year, making a total for 
the Northwest of IKO against ulC last 
year. Chicago received 41 against 15 last 
year. Winnipeg received ISl against 243 
last year. 

Primary receipts of wheat were 445.(iOO 
busliels; last year. .i67.0(iO bushels, .^liio- 
ments. '2S4.00O bushels; last year. 173.000 
bushels. 

Primary receipts of corn were 543.000 
busiiels; last vear. JTiS.CW bushels. Ship- 
ments, 2V»3.0«n) bushels; la.st year. 4ti4.000 

bushels. 

Wheat was rather quiet during the ses- 
■lon In Duluth. May wheat opened %c 
lower at *1.".V'8, declln«d to $l.ll.-Va. rallleil 
to $1.05T«. declined to il.i)i,%. rea<-ted 



THE MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

\Mieat Takes Fall of Nearly 2 Cents 
to the Low Point. 

Minneapolis. Minn.. March 10.— Wheat 
had a fall today of nearly 2c to the low 
point, .May going down to $1.06^1. Tlie 
government report was construed here 
as bullish or sustaining on corn and 
oats but rather bearish on wheat. On 
the 'other hand the Northwest spring 
wheat supply situation was firmer than 
ever, for a while Minneapolis with 1'04 
cars received against 230 a year ago, 
made a showing somewhat less bullish 
than the recent comparisons, the local 
elevator stocks decreased L'OO.OOO bus to» 
the three days, while in Duluth only 6b 
cars were received against 2o3. The 
early resistance gave way later on 
heavy Heilliig out of both May ami 
July. Both options sagged heavily and 
both lost for the day by IV^Cfjl'V'. May 
opened at $1.00^; high, $1.07^»; low, J1.04U; 
close, $1.05%. July closed $1.03%. 

The cash market was less active and 
lVti2c over was quoted for No. 1 north- 
ern. 

Considerable selling at the Inside 
price. No. 2 northern brought $102 un- 
der May. Close: No. 1 northern. $l.i»t;%. 
spot or to arrive; No. 2 northern. $1.(>4%, 
spot or to arrive; No. 3 wheat. $1.0(V(il.ti3; 
No. 3 yellow corn. bl\fii5i>%: No. 3 while, 
oats. 5<te; No. 2 rye, 77\'ii7H?4C. 

Barley was dull and neglected and In 
.some cases 2c lower. On the lower range 
the mailing grades sold but low grades 
still dragged. Clo.se. BH'USSc. 

Flax held to the Duluih May price but 
the demand was only fair. Close. $1.15V4- 
Millers quote bran in bulk, $21.00(ij'21.60. 
Although wheat went to a prl»e basis 
warranting reduction in flour millers pi,'r- 
sistently held prices up except that 
clears "were quoted 5c lower. If wheat 
remains at the present level, however, a 
decline In Hour se* ms Inevitable and at 
the close today outside quotations were 
lower and millers were tlnally quoting 
patents 10c off. Shipments, 44.'jyl Iwirrels. 
First patents, $a.25i'}i5.50; second patents, 
$.i.25'fj6.40; first clears, $4.40^(|>4.50; second 
clears, $3.45''a3.55. 



DECLINES 
INJTOCKS 

MarRetHas Reactionary 

Tendency and Prices 

Had a Drop. 

Selling for Profit-TaRing 

the Cause of the 

Slump. 



New York, March lO.-The opening 
movement of prices of stocks today 
showed some hesitation, but was mainly 
upwards. Changes were small through- 
out and gains reached a large fraction 
only In Great Northern preferred. 
Southern Railway, Erie second pre- 
ferred and Republic Steel preferred, and 
a point In United Railways and Invest- 



merclal bills 
55»4c ; Mex 
bonds, ste 



"dollars, 
irallroad 



New Yor! 
ket opened 
an advanc 
IKiol cables 
to a net los 
the opening 




bar silver, 
47c; government 
bonds. Irregular. 



otton 3Iarket. 

rch 10.— The cotton mar- 
at unchanged prices to 
points on better Llver- 
xpected. but eased oft 
5 points shortly after 
a result of scattered real- 
izing and local bear pressure In the ab- 
sence of support. A little later the mar- 
ket rallied on covering and continued 
steadiness «^r^d with prices during the 
middle of JBdB morning about net un- 
changed. BuSess was quiet. 

Spot, closed liulet 5 points lower; mid- 
dling uplands ni.ao; middling gulf. 11-75. 
No sales. Futeres closed barely steady. 
Closing bids: laiarch, 10.57; April, 10.60; 
May, 10.6ti; Jatie. 10.57; July, 10.42; Au- 
gust, 10.;^; Ootober, 3.90; December, 9.92. 

St Paul Livestock. 

St. Paul. March 10.— Cattle: Receipts, 
11,400; market, active, strong and un- 
changed. Hogs- Receipts, 6,S00; market, 
lO-giSc lower; range. |4.35fi:4.50: bulk of 
sales. $4.4<^Kr<4.46. Sheep: Receipts. 4,000; 
market, strong; and unchanged. 

"WlUBiLL 



Duluth I'ur In.siM'etloii. 

Wheat— No. 1 northern, »; No. 2 north- 
ern, 13; No. 3 spring, 4; No. 1 durum. 16; 
No. 2 durum. 12; No. 3 durum, 1; total 
of durum, 2», mixed. 1; total of ail wheat, 
4>j, last year, 263. 

Flax— No. 1, 23; total of llax, 23, 
year, 34. 
ft i.'orn, 1; oats, 22; rye, 2; barley, 2. 

Total of all cars, 106. 



laat 



BIGELOW 



>f 



.\incrioaii 


Wheat 


Market 




Du- 


Minne- 


Clil- 


New 


luth. 


apolis. 


cago. 


York. 


May- 








Open $].0534B $1.0G»^ 


95% -96 $.103 


High l.Wi 


1.07-S. 


9>iH 


!.«;% 


Low i.Oi% 


1 .0.-.>4 


93 


l.ol'i 


Close l.OSTg 


1.05% 


93%-% 


l.OlVi-% 


C!<».se, 0th. 1.06 


1.07-'/i 


9oT» 


1.0.i% 


July— 








Opbn 1.06% 


1.04% 


90H-vi 


97% 


High l.OO'u 


l.OOVi 


91 V4 


t8-»i, 


Low 1.04 


!.<«%-% K9\4 


16% 


Close 1.04B 


1 .03% 


8914 


96v»A 


Close. 9th. l.OCM. 


i.or,i^-V4 90^-% 


97% 


In Winnipeg, M 


ay wheat 


closed at $1.11% 


and July Wheat 


at ?1.14Vi 






Chicasu Oats, Corn 


and Pork. 




Oats. 


Corn. 


i'orK. 




May. 


May. 


May. 


Open 




.... 


$12.15 


High 


. 54 


«.'■.% 


12.15-10 


Low 


. 63V4 


64% 


12.07 


Close 


. 53% 


65- Vi 


12.07 


'IYt'a.sury liiilaiit'os. 




Washington. M 


aicli 10.- 


-Today 


s treas- 


ury statement: 


Availablt 


' cash 


ba lance. 


$266,235,472; g«dd 


coin and 


bullion 


$23,349,- 


527; gold certificates, $36,405,570. 





$1.06. 
that 



to 
lumped off to II 03"/8 and do.sed at 



price, a loss 



of 2',se from yesterday. 



July wheat opened late at %l.W^ bid and 
declined by the close to $1.04, a los.^ of 
2Vic from yesterday. 

T>uruiu wheat dosed IV^c lower and cash 
spring wheat was selling on a basis of 2c 
over Ma.y for No. 1 northern. 

Flax was cjuiet but the tone was firm. 
May flax op<'ned unch.inged at $l.ir)'.i. 
advanced to $1.15% and clo.sed at $l.ir>Vi.. 
a gain of Uc over yesterday. July tlax 
opened '/4C lower al $1.16>4. advanced to 
J1.17 and closed at $1.17. a gain of v^c 
over yesterday. 

Coarse grains were unchanged. 

Following were the closing prices: 

Wheat— No. 1 hard, on track. $l.u7"/<i 



New York («ruin. 

New York. March 10. -Close: Wheat, 
May, $1.01^(i<%; July. 97%. Corn, July. 
llh^ic; May, 73%c. 

THE COPPER STOCKS. 

The following ait the closing quota- 
tions of copper stocks at Boston today, 
reported by Paine, Webber & Co., Room 
A, Torrey building: 

[ Bid. I Asked. 



ment. General Electric declined 1% and 
New York Central %. While the move- 
ment was narrow the dealings were 
quite active and widely distributed. 

The realizing of the professionals and 
the distribution of buying orders at new 
points Induced alternate upward and 
downward movements -within a narrow 
range. A decline after the opening was 
checked when Union Pacific and Reading 
were bought heavily and lifted a point 
above their low price. Considerable 
strength was also shown by other less 
active stocks. Pressed Steel Car vrofvT- 
red rising 4^, Virginia-Carolina Chem- 
ical preferred 3. Denver & Rio Grande 
preferred and Consolidated Gas 2. Nor- 
folk & Western 1% and New York Cen- 
tral, Southern Railway. American smelt- 
ing and American Car preferred 1. The 
market weakened before 11 o clock ana 
the level of prices fell a traction below- 
last night. Pennsylvania and lowa Cen- 
tral preferred fell a point. Trading be- 
came dull at the decline. 

Profit taking sales were renewed with 
some activity and declines extended to 
some of the active stocks. Including Un- 
ion Pacific, St. Paul. Northern Pacific. 
.Missouri Pacific, B. & O. and Interna- 
tional Paper preferred fell 1. There were 
fractional rallies before noon. 

'''A''rilly''set In after 12 o'clock 
Increased In force gradual y "''<» tl»r 
majority of stocks had the decline. 
Canadian Pacific rose 1%. „v..^h 

A reaction occurred agam, whlcn, 
however, did not hurt prices much, and 
the ground was later recovered. Cnl- 
cago Great Western debentures yleld- 

^ The market closed rather Irregiilar 
very dull. The advocates of reaction 
courage from the difficulties of advancln;? 
prices and sold the market again, prices 
receding to the previous 'ow Polnt or 
below. Baltimore & Ohio fell 1%. Atchi- 
son and Westlnghouse Ll.ctric 1»^ Ortat 
Northern preferred. Amalgamated Cop- 
mr and American Ice 1. Cnlted States 
Wipe preferred rose 2 and M.u:kay com- 
panics 2%. The decline was checked in 
the late dealings. 

Quotations furnished by Gay & Stur- 
gli, brokers. 32S West Superior street. 



Says That Bryan 
Not Get the Nom- 
ination. 



THOUGHT DRUNK 
WAS BURGLAR 



When the proprietor of a saloon on 
lower Lake avenue appeared to open 
the place, about 6 o'clock this morning, 
he found the front door standing open 
and the lock broken. Visions of a 
ransa<;ke<i interior, a missing cash 
register and a depletion »of the stock of 
booze rose before his eyes, and he 
plunged boldly in to know the worst. 
He stopped inside the door to survey 
the expected wreck, but there w-as no 
wreck. The cash register was in its 
accustomed place behind the bar, the 
bottles on the back were Intact, but the 
cause of the broken door was revealed 
In the huddled hgure of a man In a 
comer of the place. 

The "dead orm" was aroused and an 
officer called. A ride in the patrol 
wagon, and a few hours in jail sobered 
the supposed burglar up, but It brought 
no recollections. Thomas Callahan, he 
said his name was, but farther he 
knew nothing. He didn't know where 
he wJis arrested, where he had been or 
anything that happened to him. When 
told he was found in a saloon, he 
swore he didn't know how he got there. 
Nothing was missed from the place, 
and as It was evident Callahan hadn't 
broken in with any ovei-mastering de- 
sire to clean out the place, he was 
booked up as a drunk and drew $1 
and costs or three days. 



DVJLVTH COPPER. CVR.B MARKET. 

WALrTE^R. W. CARR 



202-204 M^VNHATTAN BUILDING. 



Private Wires. 
City 'Phoues. 1805. 



References: 

CITY NATIONAL BANK. 
Duluth. Minn. 



Private Long Distance 
♦Phones, 165"-1805. 



TTTESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 





Bid.| 


Ask. 


American-Sa^inavr. .. . 


2.75 


3.00 


.^rlz-Comnicrelal . . . « . 


17.. 50 


18.00 


Bla4-k Moiintu'n 


4.06 


4.12 


Butto Coalition 


20.001 


20.12 


Butte & liondon 


.70 


.72 


Butte & Superior 


1.12 


1.18 


Cal. & Ariz 


100.50 101.00 


Cal. & Montana 


.20 


.25 


Cal. & Sonera 


6.87 


7.00 


Cnrman Cons 


1.25 


l.JSO 


Cliff •• 


.65 


.70 


Comanche ,• • 


.3 v. 


.04 


Copper Queen 


1.50 


1.65 


Daly-A\est 


8.00 


8.25 


Davis-Daly 


4.12 


4.37 


Dcnn-.'Vrizona 


8.37 


3.50 


East Butte.. 


4.87 


5.12 



Bid. I Ask. 



Globe Cons 

Greene-Cananea . . . . 

Hancotk Cons 

Kc\vf^naw 

Niplssiiig 

National 

North Butte 

North Butto Ex 

Old Dominion 

Sup. & Pittsburg. . 
Superior & Boston. 

Sliannon 

Shattuilv- Arizona. . 
Tonopah Common. 

Trinity. 

Warren 

Wolverine- Arizona . 



«.75 
8.12 
5.75 
4.75 
6.87 
.52 

50.00 
1.18; 

36.00; 

12.12! 
1.87t 

10.73 

15.25 
5.501 

14.001 
3.87 
1.65| 



6.87 

8.25 

6.00 

5.00 

7.00 

.54 

50.23 

1.25 

36.50 

12.25 

2.00 

11.00 

15.50 

5.66 

14.25 

4.12 

1.87 



Bonds 
which 



and 
took 



William E. Blgelow, better known to 
his Nebraska friends as "Wild Bill Blge- 
low," Is at the Spalding today. Except 
for the Stetson hat, and a bow-legged 
walk, that comes from years In the 
saddle, yjou wouldn't suspect that Mr. 
Blgelow was the "Wild Bill" of former 
days. 

From a rider of the Nebraska plains, 
Mr. liigelow hum graduated into an in- 
surance man. Just at the present time, 
Mr. Blgelow is more Interested in poli- 
tics than Insurance. He can't help that 
—he comes Ironj the state that nurtured 
W. J. Bryan. 

Years ago Mr. Bigelow was at home 
in a pair of ohaps and a big gun. To- 
day he is more at ease In a business 
suit. He has forgotten the rustler fighis 
of the old days, but says that there Is a 
grand old flghi going to be pulled off in 
the coming Duiiocralic convention. 

Mr Bigelow doe.^nl believe that W. J. 
Bryan will receive the Democratic nom- 
ination for president. He Is from the 
same state as the Commoner, yet says 
someone else will be chosen at the last 
moment to lead the party. This Is 
feeling in Nebraska, he says, and is 
coming to be the general belief over 
country. 

The Western people are mighty Inde- 
pendent, according to the former cow 
puncher .He says that they refuse longer 
to be dictated to. and they are about 
ready to bolt the too-often-tried candi- 
date. They like a change once in a 
while and are willing and eager to back 
some new ii.an with their votes. 

Johnson Is a favorite, Mr. Blgelow 
says, with Judge Gray a close runner up. 

TO 1*RK\ il.VT THK f;Rir 

LAXATIVE BRO.MO QUININE removM tha 
cause. To get ttie Keauine, call tor lull name aad 
look ior tiguature ot E. W. GRUVE. ssc- 



MYSTERIOUS 
DISAPPEARANCE 



The neighbors 
been operating 
street, between 
nues west, are 



of Bert Tann, who has 

a bakery on Fourth 

First and Second ave- 

wonderlng at his mys- 



Stocks— 



Stocks— 



To arrive: No. 1 northern, $1.05T». tJn 
track: No. 1 nortli<rn. $1. ()«')"«; May. Jl.OS'n; 
July 11.04. luiriiin on track. No. 1, St;u,e. 
No i: S4^4c; May durum, WiUc; July du- 
rum Wac. Flax to arrive. $1 15; flax on 
track. ?l.l&; May. $l.i:.Vi; July 
to arrive, uOc; oats on 
76-M)e; barley, 60-SOc. 
Cars in.specieil: Wheat, 23; 

M. 

Reeolpts: Wheat. 32,G63; oats. 13.612 
ley. r..sSG; rye, l.V.I; flax, 13,400. 
tthipm.nts: Wheal. 1.000; 



Jl.K; 
track. &)c; 



oats 
rye. 



last year. 



bar- 



oats. 3i,rd». 



Cuwli Sales 'fiiesilay. 

northern wheat, 1 car... 

northern, I ear 

northern wheat. 1 ear ... 

spring wheat, 1 ear 

spring. 1 ear 

Durum wluat, 1 car No. 2 

Uuruni, 1 ear No. 2 

Oats. 3,500 bu. No. 3 white 

rlve .,.••.••*... 

Klax, 1 ear 

Flax, 10.j>0& bus 



No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 



.51.07V.J 
. l.Of?% 
. 1.04^ 
. .W^ 
. l.Ot) 
.. .S« 



to ar- 



l.lo*, 
1.15V4 



THE CHICAliO MAUKKT. 

Trading; 



inj; 



Hi avy in Wheat at Opeii- 
Witli IMites Weak. 

Chicago, \lar<li lt>. - Trading was 
heavy at the opening of the wheat 
market today and prices were weak. 
The governiiMiit report of yesterday 
on the amount of farmers' reserves and 
lower pri< ts at Liverpool were the cliief 
depressing intliu-nees. t'ommlsslon 

houses and pit traders were heavy sell- 
ers. May wheat opened 'iC lower to 

e higher at '.'.''•^e to 90V,c and sold at 

c. Miniuapolis, imlutli and t'iiicago 
reported receipt.s of »»1 cars agaln.st 1!K> 
cars last week and 531 cars one year 
ago. 

The market rallied somewhat because 
of the strengtii of corn, but later be- 
came weak .M.iv dropping to SS^hc. The 
close was weak with .May -'sf'J^Vie lower 
at i<5V'ia;<-\e. 

The corn market 
covering actively 
day's government 



opened 'it''" Vie to ^i<it^ 



was strong, shorts 
because of yester- 
report. May corn 
igher at iM'/fjc 
to W^hC and sold up to ti5c. Local re- 
ceipts were -♦iO cars with U of contract 
grade. 

Prices ruled strong all dav. The 
loint fur May was i\i>^ii-. The close 



.\inerican-Suglnaw 

Atiaiiiic 

-Vrcadian 

.\dventurt3 

Allouez 

Arnold 

.'Vhmeek 

Arizona Commercial ... 

HingiKun 

Black .Vliiuntaln 

Butte & Superior 

Butte * London 

Boston t'ons 

Copper Uange 

Calumet & Arizona 

Calumet iS: Hecla 

Cumberland-Kly 

Copper Queen 

Centennial 

l>avi.s-l»aly 

l)enn- Arizona 

Daly Wtsi 

Kast Butte 

I'^'anklin 

tJranby 

(•reeiie Catianea 

UIoIh; Cons 

Hancock 

Helvetia 

Isle lioyale 

LaSalle 

Keweenaw 

Mass. Clas 

iMiclilgan 

Mass 

Mercur 

Alotiawk 

Niplsslng 

North Butte 

Neva<la Consolidated ... 

Nevada I'tah 

<.)ld Poinlnlon 

(Jjiceola 

Old t'olony 

JMioenIx 

I'arrott 

Pneumatic Service ... 
i'neumatlc Service, pfo 

Quincy 

liaven 

Ithode Island 

Santa Fe 

Shattuck 

Superior Copper 

Shannon 

Superior & Pittsburg ... 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

rnited Copper 

I'nlon Land 

rtah Cons 

U. S. Mining 

IT. S. Mining, pfd 

Victoria ■ 

Warren ■ 

Winona ■ 

W«dv«-rlne 

Wolverine & Arizona.. 

Wyandot 

Amalgamated 

Anacontla 

Butte & Hallaklava.... 
Calumet & Sonora.. .. 



rm 



high iKT 
was lit 

September oats werf 
but the remainder of 
dull. The tone of the 



with May *4C higher at tio 

In good demand, 

the market was 

_ market was llrm. 

May opened >4C higher at 53V and sold 
up to 53V. Loeal receipts were 397 cars. 
The prt>vlslons n'.arket was quiet and 
easy. Li\e hogs were 5c to 10c lower. 
May pork was a shatle higher at $12.15 
antl sold down to $l-'.aT»s.. Lard wms JVge 



3 

10 
4 

1V4 
-•tiVi 
45c 
60 
17% 

6>fc 

4 

IVi 
67c 

lOOH 

-»% 

"Tl\it" 
4Vti 
3«i 
8 
5 
8 
85 
»Vs 
6% 

'M\k 
14 

5 
53 

» 

3(k- 

48% 

60 
10 
3% 
3<i 
81 

■bOc" 

4% 

11 

82 
1% 
3«4 
ITa 

16 

16% 

04 
14 
4»i 

':wi4' 

29»4 
3S 
3V4 

r.% 

122 
IH 

65 

r.2 

32% 
6^« 
6T« 



3'4 
10% 



65 

18 

4'4 

1 3 

69c 

16 

61 »4 
101 
6UU 
7% 
1^ 

23% 
4^ 
3% 
8'A 
6V« 
8% 

90 

8\; 

6% 

6 

3% 
21 
14% 



16 



Atchison 

Amalgamated Copper . 

Smelting 

Baltimore & Ohio 

Brooklyn R. T 

Coloradt) Fuel & Irotj.. 
Canadian I'acllU, ex-dlv 
Chesapeake & Ohio 

Hrie • 

Illinois Central ••••••••• 

Louisville & Nashville. 

Anaconda 

Mis.vourl Pacific 

New York Central 

Pfoples (las 

Penn.«ylvanla Railway 

Reading 

St. Paul 

Southern Pacific 

Sugar 

U. S. Steel 

do preferred 

Union I'aclflc 

M. K. & T • 

American Locomotive .. 

Northern Paclflr 

Gr«-at Northern 

American Car Foundry 

ex. dividend 

National Lead 



|Hlchll»wiClo*e 



70*4 

52 

G3% 

811+ 

42^ 

177, 

145% 
28% 
13% 

125 
96 
33 
3J% 

87!^ 
116% 
102»» 



the 
be- 
the 



terlous disappearance. 

Since Saturday night there has been 
no sign of life about the store. This 
morning some of the neighbors feared 
that something was wrong, and they 
gained entrance to the building, fear- 
ing that the family might have been 
suffocated with gas. There was no sign 
of anything wrong, however, and 
nothing had been disturbed in the 
bakery. 

Mr. Tann, so far as Is known, was 
not in debt, and no reason can be as- 
cribed for the disappearance of himself 
and his family. He has a wife and one 
child. 



72 


70»4 


63>4 


6H4 


64% 


63% 


82% 


81>« 


43-^. 


42*4 


18% 


17^>. 


14f.*« 


145 


•2H-U 


28% 


14 


n>k 


125 


125 


96 


9<1 


33% 


32^(1 


33»4 


32'8 


99% 


9S% 


87»i 


87*fe 


117 


IPi 



•••••••• 



103% 

1117 

72% 

119% 

32\ 

96% 

120% 

20% 

37% 

12i: 

122%| 

I. 

29% 
49%| 



101%] 

115% 

71%! 

118%; 

32% 

95%| 

118% I 

30% 

36% 

lat^l 

130%! 

I 

■29%i 
48^1 



115- 
71% 

118% 
32% 
95% 

119>. 
20% 

3i:% 

124% 

12' 

"29% 
49 



53% 
10 
8 
36c 

49% 

60% 
lOVi 

3% 
36% 
83 
OOc 
1.00 
17 

4% 
12 
84 

1% 
3% 
n 

16% 
17 
11 

12% 
»i 
14% 
5% 

1=«4 

29% 
38% 

3% 

4% 

6 
125 

1% 
85 



Sto<«k <»ossln. 
Lozan & Brvan. New York, to Paine, 
Webber & Co.: The market displayed a 
reactionary tendency today, which was 
onlv nalural. In view of the sharp re- 
roverv The selling was mostly profit- 
taking, there being no news of an un- 
favorabl.- character. It Is gen. rally con- 
<eded that a general improvement has 
taken place, but It would .«eem that the 
lime Is hardlv at hand for areat aetlvlt> 
and much higher prices. There Is llttl- 
disposition to liquidate securities, even 
these prices, and In the absence of un- 



at 

foreseen adverse 
the market to hold 
the present h'vel. 



factors we 
within a few- 



look for 
points of 



GETS WATCH IN 
HUGGING MATCH 



Theodore Helin was convicted of 
petit larceny in municipal court this 
morning and went up on the hill for 
sixty days. He was charged with 
stealing a watch and cliain from one 
Andrew Simonson, and, though Helin 
swore he never saw the watch, the 
evidence was dead against him. 

Simonson's implicit trust in the af- 
fectionate nature of the Finnish race 
cost him his watch and chain, 
men were pretty well loaded and 
embracing each other fondly, 
witnesses testified that they saw 
onson's watch pass into Helin's 
session, while Helin 
hugging the maudlin 
breast. 

Helin figured that his word was as 
good as the witncsse's. He swore he 
didn't know Simonson from an Egyp- 
tian mummy and had never seen the 
watch in question. His testimony was 
one complete denial of all that had 
gone before, but It couldn't stand up, 
and he was found guilty. 



NEW LINE OF 
ORE CARRIERS 



A persistent rumor says that there 
is to be competition among the lake 
freighters this coming season. The 
competition, if rumor is true, will be in 
the shape of a new line of boats, 
backed by Chicago capital. They will 
be general freighters, and will go 
after the indtpendent ore trade. 

The heavy ore trade of last fall. It 
is said, when boats were in such de- 
mand, was t'ne cause of the enlistment 
of capital in the new venture. The 
outlook for a dull, early season in ore 
traffic may delay the placing of 
new line of boats in commission, 
in any eveivt, it Is said, that they 
iK- in opri-ralion before the close 
lake season. 



ZENITH 1464. , ^ , ,», M.nn'"'^''^" ""' 

Reference: City National Bank. Duluth. Minn. 

MARTIN ROSENDAHL, 

Copper Stock Broker, 

414 WEST SUPF.RIOR STREET. !02 »L\NHATT.%N BriLDINO. 

My own wires to Copper C ountry. Also connections to Eastern markets. 

TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1908. 

Conner sliare market Is In an elegant condition, heavy sales of 
stocks being made all along the line, ^^e look for niiuh «'»e»'<;'LJ": f,^ 
on tlie KtHKl ones. The curbs are acting fine. Balluklaxa l^. prolMbly 
Uie strongest curb stock on the boanl. and olTcriiigs oi thousand.s of 
shares would not louer the price one-cigrhth. The strcuttlh in this 
M<Kk is causetl by the ver> heavy orders on Hie in all brokcrago 
oinces If there ever was a ffoml stork for big money liallakla^a 19 
uVe one. On the 1st of April the 700-ftK,t level will l»e rtM.jhed and 
en bcKlns the opening up of the rich vein, that make the North 
Ee aiid Moston & Montana famous. Watch Rutte-Ilallaklava It 
is qiiotcd in Roston and New Y«.rk, and is fast becoming one of the 
favorite copper stocks in the United Mates. ,,,„„fc. 

Givene-Canauea and Superior & Pittsburg arc slead.y. RIack 
Mountain Is very strouf,^.. Copper *?"»"*'" ;^"'* " . V'^J^' V';" I!*" Z*;^^^^^ 
Butte & SuiK-rior slM)uld have another rL<e; $1.2o is clicap for it. 
Carman was more active today and should advance. 

Mv wmnections with Boston are of the v« ry best. Miller A. to., 
our c-onespondenl. is regarded as one of U.e bist firms '" i''^ countrj-. 

Piper, Johnson & Case, with xvhoni we connect in New \ork, is 
one of the best firms in the United Slates. 

We aNo have our own wire to the Copper Country ami can jrlye 
you the very best of service on all stocks. Our market on U»e curbs 
cannot be beat. 



M. w. K/E:e: (Sl CO., inc. 



BOTH 'PHOXKS, 2O03. 



410 WKST SUPERIOR STREET. 



CAPITAI^, $50,000 

BANKERS AND BitOKKRS. 

Brunolie!* at Hlbblne, SupeHor. We^f Uuluth and Chlcagro. 
Private Wire, to New York. BoMon. Clipper « ouiitry and Range. 



the 
but 
will 
of the 



Both 
were 
Two 
Slm- 
pos- 

was strenuously 
Simonson to his 



at $7.l»JVj aiul ^ 
::Vie lower at 



lower 

were 

$6.7714. 

Close: Wheat- May 
89>^4c; September, S*j>4t 
to («>V'; July. tL'>«i'; 
Oats-May old, 5y;^^^•; 
old 4^'Stf: July. i-'\i 



old at $7.M 
$(>.Su and 



Kib.s 
sold at 




37%c- 

fi2.4; 



I'urk-.May, SlU'TVj; 
Vg. I.ard-.May. ^T.SO 



93%'}<D33(,e; July. 

Co!'n- May. 'ioc 

Septiinlx'r. iil*4>'. 

May. 5lS4e; July 

Sfpti'iiitier, SpiOf 



July. >S.O_'V2fiJ<..0r); September. $8.JL"2, Kihs 



Julv, $i::.45 to 
to $7.H(V„7.S2',2: 

—May $t>.75; July, ?:.e5. Kyt- fa.«h, SJii 
Be isurley— <'awh. TSIiWc. Timothy- 
March $4.75. Clover .March, $-.M. Ca.-ih 
wheit'-.N'o J red. i'.'.iTi'<«ys»je; No. 3 r.-d, 
aLriflia.e- No 1; hard %i 'aSl.tMi, : No. 3 
hard 1<:V'J| II ;<•■.': No. 3 spring, S)6c(fi$l.oa 
Corn-No. 3, tio'V<t >)-«■■ 

Liver|x»ol (iraln. 

Liverpool, Mareii 10— Whc.it: .^pof. firm; 
No 2 red Western wliUer. 7s M. future's, 
steady: March 73 Vid: May. 7s =V4d: July 
7b ZVid. Corn: Spot, steady; prime 
Ainerican. new, da IM: vrlme 



CopiK'r Ciosslp. 

Havdin, Stom- & Co.. Boston, to Wal- 
itM \V Carr: tJur market opened steady 
and generally higher with business larg- 
er than for several days*. Activity was 
in Hutte Coalition. North Butte and 
Cireeiie-Canauea. which were fractional y 
hlKher, and all orferings were quickly 
tikfu The rest of tht- li.>«t was dull and 
wlta<.ut feature, althouKh it had a strong 
underti..K.. The strong New^ork mar- 
ket has had a sympalhc-tlc effect on ou'- 
market and gave it a -strong 
but the metal .situation 
slowly that traders are 



Chicago liivestock. 

Chicago. March lO.-Cattle— Receipts 

alwut t.-VK), market steady; beev;*, ?4.25% 
6:«- cows and h<-ifers. J2.<J<K.i6.1';>; texans. 
MtHKtHSS- ealvis. $i>.o(Kf(r;.7'>; westerners, 
S4'0(Wrt)«>; stockers and feeders. J3.(K)''<i«.yo. 
Hogs-Receipts alnu.t li-'.«»; niarket 
steady; light, $4.4<va».to: nuxeo ?4 4(V'j,4 .5. 
heavv W.46'»iM.7.S: rou<h. $4.4:>''34.t>»: :pl»rs, 
K 75i'rf4.40: hulk of sal.-s. J4.tiO''<r».7(>. Sheep- 
Receipts about U.*W. Market strong; na- 
tive f:i rh';'n«;.00; western. J:{.7d(!i«.0O; year- 
lings. ir...'.tKV(6.:»: iambs, Ja.OO^j^.lO; west- 
ern, $5.75(i[f7.15. 

New York >loney. 

New York. March lO.-^lose: Money on 
call f>asy. li^rji:* per cent: ruling rate. 
•>• closing bid. \: offered at 2. Time 
loan<» dull and soft; 60 days. SHflS^i tx-r 
cent- 90 days. 3\<ii* per cent; six month-:. 
4'o4«4 per cent. Prime mercantile paper. 
oh^'iM per cent. Sterling exchange, 
steady with actual business In banker.'^' 
bills at $l.<i6.L'ri'fi4.S«».30 for demand and 
at W.S3.45'!f>4.S3.W for 6ft-dav bills: com- 



VANDALS TAKE 
LIGHT GLOBES 



Vandals have worked havoc at Ath- 
letic park, where the hockey rink of the 
Northern hockey team was located this 
winter. A visit to the park by the boys 
yesterday disclosed a state of affairs 
which caused them to rise up and vow 
vengeance on Hie West end small boy. 

The big outer gate of 
was fastened 
open, as w'as 
of the park 
dressing 
tlrtly, and 
interior 



imdertone 
is iniprovins so 
selling 



little. 



Midway Horse 



mixed 
mixed 



Market. 

.Mtnnesoia Transter, St. I'aul, Minn.. 
.\Iarcli lO.-Barrett & Zimmerman report: 
Trade quite aetive in all classes, the de- 
mand centering on general purpose 
horses and farm mares. Receipts were 
liberal in all classes. A larKc number 
of buyers werv- on the market and a 
numl)er of sales were consummated, but 
a number of the buyers expnssed their 
Intention of hlHng their ordexs at tomor- 
rows sale. A. C. Geer, Graceville, Minn. 
John Montgomery, Wakonda, 9 
rived with mixed consignments. 

L)rart(r.<<. extra 

l)ntfter.s, choice 

Farm mares and horses, extra 
Farm mares and horses, choice. 
Farm mares, common to good .. 
l>ellvery, choice 
Drivers and 



1)., ar- 

. 12.V8175 
. H6ftil70 
. 110<trH5 

. Co'iriio 

. 12a4z;li» 

saddlers , liMtlW 

Mules, according to size 125®>200 



MEN 

8PRIN6 

SUITS 

$10 to $28 

Blacks, Blues and 
Fancy Mixtures 

I WEEK 

Payments 



FRED 



EDWARDS 



Dll.lTH. 



O 



Iddinc' 
mt Ave. W. A 
Superior St. 



»t'i*KR10R. 
Uuom 210 
Truux Rlk. 
1024 Tower Are. 



the park, which 
with a pjiulock, was forced 
the team gate on the side 
The lock and hasp on the 
room door were removed en- 
j the boys made a raid on the 
of the roont, in which was 
stored th<' clubs possessions. Seventeen 
fifty candle-power incandescent lignts, 
valued at 90 cents each, were removed^ 
the wiring was broken -and some of it 
carried away, brooms and other articles 
taken and everything not taken was 

smashed. , , , 4»._ 

The wiring over the surface of tne 
rink was broken down, the goal nets 
smashed and the fence broken Efforts 
to break Into the ticket office, in 
which the shovels and other Ice-cleanlng 
imnleinents were located, failed, and the 
v-indals gave up their efforts there. The 
lights were the most valuable articles 
taken, as the expense of replacing them 
is not inconsiderable. 

NEGRO'S HOME 
VfASINDULDTH 



William Henderson was the name of 
the negro found dead on his home- 
stead near Tower, Minn., last week, 
and the fornter home of the man wa-s 
In W'est Duluth. This fact was brought 
to light today by an examination of the 
records In the office of B. N. Johnson 
& .Son." land attorneys. 

Henderson was located on the land 
bv the Johnsons last year, and he is 
well remembered by them. He lived 
m West Duluth for some time prior to 
going into the woods, and has a num- 
ber of friends in the city. It is thought 
that he was unmarried. He is said to 
have been murdered. There was noth- 
ing on his body to identify him when 
found by a cruiser. 

A severe cold that may develop into 
pneumonia over night, can be cured 
quickly by taking Foley's Honey and 
Tar. It will cure the most obstinate 
racking cough and strengthen your 
lungs. The genuine is in a yellow 
package Sold by all druggists. 



LAND CIRCULAR 
IS IMPORTANT 



Instructions of considerable Impor- 
tance were received at the local land 
office today from the department of 
the interior at Washington, In regard 
to publication and posting of notice in 
scrip, warrant, certificate, soldiers' ad- 
ditional and lieu locations and selec- 
tions. According to these Instructions, 
in cases of applications to locate all 
scrip, warrants, etc., or to make lieu 
-selections of public lands of the United 
States, the location or selection must 
be accompanied, in additi<m to the evi- 
dence required by existing rules and 
regulations, an affidavit of the locator, 
telector or some credible per.son pos- 
sessed of the requisite pvr-sonal knowl- 
edge of the premises, showing that th^' 
land located or selected is not In any 
manner occupied adversely to the lo- 
cator or selector. 

Heretofore all that was neces.sary in 
cases of this kind was the filing of 
scrip, warrants, etc., in the land office. 
No trouble at all was connected with 
the proceedings, which scarcely gave 
room for any contest of any kind. I»( 
addition to the affidavit clause, the 
new ruling provides that the locator 
or selector, within twenty days from 
tho filing of his location or .selection, 
shall begin publication of notice 
thereof, at his own expense, in a 
newspaper lo be designated by the 
register of the general circulation in 
the vicinity of the land, and to be the 
nearest Uiereto. Such publication 
must cover a period of thirty days, 
during which time a similar notice of 
the location or selection must be 
po.sled in the local land office and upon 
the lands Included in the location or 
selection,, and upon each and every 
noncontiguous tract thereof. 

A very large amount of scrip, war- 
rant, certificate, soldiers' additional 
and lieu location and .selection business 
is done through the Duluth office, and, 
therefore, much interest.s attaches to 
the new- 'instru(;tions locally. 



ia^ i SituiiiriSs, 

M CoBffvesH St., Boal*B. 

Members ot 
Boston Stock Exeliange. 

Direct and Bzrlukiive 

Prlvvte Wire* to 

BOSTON, NEW YORK, CHICAGO, 

CALUMET and HOUGHTON. MICH. 

Duluth Of flee I »*8 W. Superior St. 

Old 'Flione, 18R7. 

R. G. HUBBELL, .Mannger. 



N. E. LUGOFF 

STOCKS AND BONDS 

All OrderH I'roniptly and Conflden 

tinlly Kxecuted. 

305 I.ONSDAI.E BIII.DING. 

Old Thone, 1025. Koiilth »l»hone, 977 



DTIDMELL 



COPPER STOwKS. 

All TRANSA4riONS CONFIDENTIAL. 

t04 FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

BLII.DING. DULUTH. 

Zenith. 1088 PBOXES Duluth. 1089. 



Both Phones, 149>. 



Svoin "B," Phoenix Bllu 



i J. H. ROBBERS* 

i Copper Stocks and Bonds 

i Curb Slocks a Specialty. LMed SccorKlet. 



Arrested for Forgery. 

fhnrged with pa.'s.'-lng .1 forged check 
for $.V> on a W.si Supr-rior street jeweler. 



INYESTHIENTS 

Choice commercial paper at cur- 
rent rates, 7 to 8 per cent. 

Limited amount Preferred stock.B 
In our leading mercantile houses, 
6 to 7 per cent. 

Guaranteed mortgage certlli- 
cates, 4 to 5 per cent. 

BASK STOCKS. 

Oovernment, municipal and in- 
dustrial bonds at market. 

A. R. MAOFARLANE & CO. 

208 Alwortli BuildiuK. 



Fa9iii@,W@U@rSSo 

■ANKERS AND BROKERS. 



Members New York and 
Boston Stock Exchanges 



DULUTH OFFICE— 

Room A, Torrey Buildinj, 

lis ^Vcnt Sapcrior Street. 



COMMISSIONS 

Eat up your prof- 
Its unles.s you are 
very, very careful. 

OUR RATES 

save vou about 
half. Ask for a 
rate card. 
H., 3-10-'08. 



/xnac^ 




K. McLENNANy 

COPPER STOCKS. 

"300-307 Provldenee Building. 

DULl TH, .MI\N. 

Old 'I'hone 1 1«». '/.enlth Thone 680. 

Diiliilh < urb Stocks a Specialty. 





Jacob Kane ot Spokane was arrested this 
afternoon by the police. 

The check wa.s signed by L,. A. Camp- 
bell & Sons, contractors in Spokane. 
The jeweler became suspicious and tele- 
graphed to Spokane. Kane's arrest fol- 
lowed. 

CHIEF ISSUES ORDERS. 

Saloon Men Notified to Close Their 
Doors at 11 o'CIock. 

The saloonkeepers of the city are get- 
ting the tip to;1ay. Following out Mayor 
Haven's instructions, Cblef Troyer is- 
sued his orders to the officers of the 
department today, and every saloon- 
keeper is being served with personal 
notice to close his doors at 11 o'clock 
tomorrow night and every night there- 
after. . , . , 

The chief's order is as unmistakable 
as that of the mayor. It ordc-r-s every 
officer of the department to strictly 
enforce the provisions of the mayor s 
order <ind the 11 o'cloek "lid," whkh 
was expected since Mayor Haven took 
' office will become a certainty tomor- 
row night. 



MiNiNG 6T0CK8. 

O. A. N AFE 

BROKGR. 

701 PalUdlo Bnildlnj. Dvlnth. Mini. 
Duiatta 'Phoae 8ML 

t3^ Another S2^,o33 dold Shipment from the 
Ocuvc Mine. Octave i-. ad.Mdcnd jiaver. 



RAYMOND HITCHCOCK'S . 

TRIAL HAS COM.MENCED. 

New York, March 10.— Raymond Hllch- 
cock the comedian, was put on trial in 
the criminal branch of the supreme court 
before Justice lilanehard on an Indict- 
ment growing out of charges preferred by 
a 15-vear-oid girl. 

Hitchcock arrived at the court room 
earlv accompanied by his wife, who is 
known on the stage as Flora Za belle, and 
his counsel. Mrs. Hitchcock was not per- 
mitted to enter the court room, however, 
but was escorted to the anteroom In which 
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw spent m.uch of her 
time during the trial of her husband for 
the murder of Stanford White. 



Had Right to Vote. 

C. Claus, the young man who.se vot» 
in the Second ward aldermanic fight. Is 
claimed by J. L. Cromwell to have l>een 
Illegal, was on the witness stand this 
afternoon, and testltled that he had ea- 
ta.bll.shed a residence at *K>4 East Tenth 
street, since i^ec. 2, and that he was an 
American citizen. 



OCEAN RTEAM.SHIP.S. 

New York— Arrived: Steamers Oscar 
II from Copenhagen; Stattendam frona 
Rotterdam. 

Bremen — Arrived: Steamer Rheln -. 
from New York. 



Proposals for Contract 



Rids will be received up to 10 o'clock 
Wednesdav March 11th, l!Jf>8, foi the dia- 
ging and rt'hlling of te.si pits for the pro- 
posed Court Housf, as per pians and 
speclflca lions on file at the offic«- of th« 
(jourt House Commission at No. S21 Pro- 
vidence iiuilumg. 

GEO. H. CLAYPOOL, 

Secretary. 



United Ptutos Engineer OfTlce Du- 
luth, Minn., Mareh 6, IJ*.*.— Sealed pro- 
posals for dredging and hire of dredg- 
ing plant at Superior entry. Wis., will 
be received liere until noon Monday, 
April C, 1908, and then publicly opened. 
Information on application. 

GRAHAM D. FITCH, 
Major, Engineers. 



United States Engineer's Office. Du- 
luth. Minn., March 10, 1908. 

Sealed proposals for furnishing steel 
plate at Superior, Wis., will be re- 
ceived here until noon April 9. 1908, and 
then publicly opened. Information on 
application. Graham D. Fitch, &^Jor, 
Engineers. 



\ 

DEFECTIVE PAGE 





L 



14 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, MARCH 10, 1808. 



WHEAT HAS 
SOPT^TONE 

The American Markets 

Have a Weak Day 

of It. 



American, old. 
March 5s l\d: 



5s 4V4d: 
May. 5s 



futures. 
3a*d. 



firm; 



THE MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 

\Vlieat Takes Fall of Xeail} 2 Cents 
to the Lou Foiiit. 

Mliiui- 



il.olis. Minn.. Miirih lo.- 



Flax is Quiet, But Firm 

During the Session 

Here. 



DuUUh '■ 
Wheat \\ 
the Am. 
In l'"i . 
a loi^s 

l«rU;»;. , 
was »-n 
W«ak 

BiatlfcUvvv 

2,3ati.M/() bus . 

ply i>f wlna 

Camulii. Ll" 
bus. 

Livvrj" ■ 
low< r, Aiuw 
%c iilKU. r. 



M .r 





. nt 


.l.^-o 


yis- 


(■!>■ -..^ 


.itid 




■ rv. 




. ry 




icr 


.sJblfi 


sup- 


Slul< ,s 


it Mil 


ot ■:.'< 


:;•;,'»►) 



MiiiiiiMju-'us. »>iiini., -•i.iivii i>-. — W heat 
had a fall today of marly :i<: to the low 
point. May goiuK down to $1.06»^. Tlifc 
giiverniiu-nt rtport was oonstrut-d here 
as bullish or sustainlmf on corn and 
' oats but rather beari.sh on wheat. On 
the other hand the Northwest hpritiK 
wheat sup|)ly situation wa» tlrmer than 
iver. for a while .Minneapolis with :;l'4 
t-AVa r< ct'lved UKalnxt l.'3'i a y»-;ir ;«Ko. 
ni.idi' a showinK soniewhat less btilllsh 
than tlie n cent coiuiiarUons, the lo«'ul 
el. vatitr .stocks decreas.-.l ■2(\>a'(a> bus r.»» 
thf llii.e «lav.s. while in L»uluth only 5*> 
ears w<re received vtK'AiiiRt 253. Th« 
earlv resistance gave WitV lat«r on 
hi :iv.\ .^.IliiiK tiut of both May an.t 
Jiilv." I'.oth options* sjiKTKed heavily and 
bolli lost lor th«> ilay by I'l^f/ I-'hc May 
oI..-ne.l at «l.<»'.>/j.; bleb. $1. «'"'»; low. $1.01'*; 
ib.s.. .«Hi.")'h. July c1os<mI Jl.*!.*?**. 

•111.- I ash market was l.-ss active and 
l'i{'«i-c over was cjuoled for No. 1 north- 
ern. 

t'finslderable selliuK at the Inside 
price. No. - northern brouRht $1.02 un- 
der May. flose: No. 1 northern, $l.i>''.^a. 
spot or to .■irrlv*. .\<. -' northern. $l.<^'Ss, 
spot or to arriv.-; No. a wheat, $l.(''V(»l.iC: 
.\o. 3 yellow corn. 5T=*4'<if>!»*4; No. 3 while, 
oats. b«>-; No. :; rye, 7T\'>r7H34e. 

Harley was dull and neKb-cted and In 
siHne <a.«e.'» Jc low.-r. <.>n ihe lower rr»n»e 
tiie instltinK tjra<bs .•'old but low grades 
sitlll druBJfed. Closi'. C.'.'ilS'iC. 

Flax hei<l to tlie IMiUiili May price but 
Ihe <l.'rnand was only fair. Close. Sllii'*. 
AiUI'-rs (juole bran in bulk. $21.<>UKi/-Jl.iHX 
Althous;li wli.ut Went to a pric basin 
warrantnu? leductlon In Hour mblers p -r- 
sist.titly li«-ld i>rices up exiepl Ibal 
clears "were quot.-d »c lower. If wh-at 
ninains ut the present lev<i. however, a 
.Ji;o!ine in Hour se. n»s lnc\ ttabl.> and at 
ti>e cb>s« to'Piy outsJile .juoiations were 
lower and iniUers wer«' lliuilly quoting 
patent.^-- l»c oJf. Shiptnents, 44,in>l Uirrebs. 
Kirst patent..^, $r».::i.'«»6..V); second patfiits. 
J.>.:v»/f..4a; tlr.si clears, |4.4«.*'«|4.r>».»; second 
clears, $:i.4:/'j:{.K. 



DECLINES 
IN^OCKS 

Market Has Reactionary 

Tendency and Prices 

Had a Drop. 

Selling for Profit-Taking 

the Cause of the 

Slump. 



nierclal blll.'i, $4.83>fe'g>4.S3'4; bar silver, 
55V4C; Mexl«im dollars. 47c: government 
bonds, steaiy; railroad bonds, irregular. 

Tlu" C"*t"n >larket. 

New York, .March 10 —The cotton mar- 
ket open.'d i;i,;idv at unch.iuijtd prices to 
an advance i)f 2 pv>inle on better Liver- 
pool cables than .xpected. but eased oft 
10 a net loss of 3 to o points shortly after 
tht; opening ng a result of scattered real- 
izing and local bear pressure in the ab- 
sence of support. A little later the mar- 
ket rallied on covering and continued 
steadine.*i8 %broHd witli prices daring the 
middle of the morning aVioui net un- 
changed. Business was quiet. 

Spot, close.l cuiet 5 XKiints lower; mld- 
illlng uplands 11. W; middling gulf. 11. /5. 
No .vales. Futures closed barely steady. 
Closing bids: March, 1057; April, lO.tiO: 
May, lOM; June, 10.57: July. 10.42; Au- 
gust, lo.'J&i October, '.t.'M; December. 9.92. 

St I»jiul LlvoKtock. 

.St. Paul. March lO.— Cattle: Receipts. 
3,4<iO; market, active, strong and un- 
ch:inged. Hogs: Ueceipts, rt.SOO; market. 



' 1' 



■■^ne iower and l;:iu<p-->i 
Jiroin.ss in Hotlapest m 



il.l! 



itlier there 

(d 21.»e lower 



In 



vac 



Chicago, l%-'^c 

Ji^-'bc lower in 

wer in Winulpeg. 

J'sv- lower ill I)u- 

,it ago. K'.-'ji' lowi r 

h>Wel III .\' w ^■o|•Il 



•■*iC liigher In ciiifimo 
bi r in tJverpuol. .May 



dut' to utisi aMiu.'tbl' 
Tlie Ma%- ..i-i ion 
Dl'luth. 
lower J: 
New Yi 
The Jul 

lut li, I'i- « .■,>».. .1, 
In Min:ieapoli.-5 and 
and Winnipeg. 

^lay c.Uii closed 
and >s<l l< I lit hi 
oais «lo.sed '4<- biyher in Cliicago. 
t;roi'riiu.ill e.ibl. il inun Liverpool: 
"Therv was an .-isy tone lo lii. 
lative wheat niark«t at th. openii • 
result <.f till- b.-arish sh..win:-{ ■" i^'" 
Anurtcan goverr'in.nt report, iarj;<r ar- 
rlval.H her. and the cle ap r L;: I'hiia 
o(teiin»:s, auii values were "».l low.r Tb" 
nearliv month was partieiibu iv iin«l< r 
pressiire -iml lust a I'urtni r 'vl iluring t(i«- 
mornitii<. wiili no shi.w ol stn iigUi. 'I'bo 1 
distant inundis showed some signs of 
Btreiiglii tr.iiu the early d.'< line, .ui<l 
shorts covered in a small way. pri-.y 
gaining '«d to ».id. At mi. 1-day. b.)W.v. r. 
the i:ia!l>i t was gen.nilly easy as ;i r. .mhI 
of pool Mippoii. .\{ this Tlnte the niarkm 
was I'bd lower than .Monday, 

••Corn w.is llrm at the siitit and »„d lo 
%d lilgh.r, !»nd further «:'•»<■'< '4<1 during 
the moriiiiii; Siippori r.sul!..| Imm tli- 
nrnin..ss in .Xiueiie.i y.;u.!''^ 1 bullisb 
gov. rnnnnt showing ami iproved 

demand for .-^pot." 

Car n t.ipis at Iniluth w.r.- h6 ag:iin.<t 
263 last vi.'ir, and a I .Mian.apolls -04 
a.iiainsl 'Ji;:! last yi-ar. making a total lor 
the Norlhw.si ol" 'yAi against .'.It', laai 
year, (.'iiieago ri-e.iv.d 41 against in last 
year. Wiiinit-eK' fcived IM .-igainst L'4't 
lu-st yea I 
I'rinia: . 
busluls, last y.ai. ,'i(;7.tM«> busli. 1.-, 
inents. 'JM.ikki husheU; last year, 
busliels. 
I'rimai 
busliels; la.--! y.il, '..le'.'"." iiii-h< i- 
menis, •j*»'!,<'ao bushels; last y.ar. 
busii. Is. 

Wheat was rather quiet dmmg Ibe .s.-s- 
Blon In Imluth. May wheal open..l V 
lower at »1.'>.V8, deellm.l to $l.n..>3. rallb d 
to ?I <"feo. d.'cltmd to $1 <>.V^4. reacted to 
Jl.iJtj. slum:i. d oil" 10 $1 <»;!■» and «losed a.1 
thai prii., a loss of :"si- 'lonr y. .ster.lay. 
Julv wheal op.n.-d bile at $l.ii«i' 
d.iimed by tlie clo^^.' to II. '4. a 
aVae troiu yesl.nlay. 

Imrum wheat elosed I'vC biwer ;. 
Bluing wheat was sellitiu oil a b.i 
over .>la> lor No. I north. m. 

Flax was qui. I but th.' ion. vs. 
May tlax op.i\eil im. h.i!iK<i! at 
advanc. d to Jl.bVS. and cl..s.d a; 
a gain 01 '4C over yest. I'day, July 

OpeU.-d >4C low.- • ti Il.l . :>.U:,n,- 

|1.17 and .lo-, 
ov I yesterday. 

Coar.se grams W<re uneiriUKi'd. 

Foltowim^ were the c1imIi;« pric's: 

Wh'ai No, 1 bar.l, on ira.k, Sl.iiT'V 
To arr ve. No. I luutherii, Sl.Oi'H. <_»n 
track; No. i tiortlii tu. ."Jl HiV'k; Mav. jl.OH'k: 
July $l.a4. iHuiim on tia.'U, No. 1. Mi^ic; 
No 2. MV-. -Mi'v durum, »t;'4c; July du- 
rum m;-,c. I'*lii.< to arriv.". |1 17.. flax on 
track. i<l.ir>; May. SI.l.'.'v: July. $11^; oats 
tu arrivt, r>t»c; oat.-^ on iraek. Sue: rye, 
7»j yic; baiby. tU'-Mv. 

Car.v in>pecie»l. SVhe.it. ... la-*! .^ ear, 

Si 

U .TJ.OkV?: oats. |.1,t:i2; bar- 

le>. .. ~.., ■•'■ '■'■•"« 1"'.*«>". 

Shlpm-ti; ' ". "•>l«. 31. ''lO. 



Diiliilli Cur Iiis|M-i*tloii. 

Wheat— No. 1 northei-n. l>; No. 2 north- 
ern. i;i; No. 3 spjing. 4; No. 1 durum. H>: 
No. 2 durum, 12; No. 3 durum, 1; total 
of durum, 2!>, mixed, 1; total of all wheat. 
o»., last year. 26:». 

Flax -.\o. 1. 23; total of llax, '23, last 
vi'ar, ;i4. 
• Corn, 1; oats, 22; rye. 2; barb .s ^ 

I'otal of all cars, I**. 



.May 
« >p.n 
lli«h 
Low 
Close 
Close, 

Jlll.V 

( »pt'n 

High 

Low 

("lose 

Close. 

In Winn 
and July 



.ViiM'Hraii WlioHl 

l>ii- Minm - 
luth. ajM-dLs. 



.Market. 

«"lii- 
. ago. 



New- 
York. 



$1 .tXi^^U $1 .<V.«5 



9th. 



9tb 



1 .(»> 
1 .037i 
l.<«Ta 

l.Oti 

i.(ir.*» 

LOr.'a 
l.tM 

p.g. .May 



1 .07»H 

1 .Ot'Vi 

1.%% 

1.07-'» 



fi-s: 



1«5^» 



1 .04\ l«OVi-'* 

i.or.'a 9P4 
i.o:{\-i4 sy«i 
i.t>;p4 .s9>i 
l.a-.',.>4 9.1' aS, 
wheat .loseil 



Wheat ill $1.11' 
l'iiU>HK<> *'»•" 



% $.lf« 
1 .«',% 
l.i.l'i 

■•■}4 l.lll»2-'^i 

l.O..-''. 
97T« 

!i7\ 
at $].ll%4 



<'orii 

I la'.s. 



hikI INtrk. 



open 
lliwh 
Low 

CI" . 



Corn. 
May. 



Fork, 
May. 

si2.ir> 
12.15-it; 

12. I*; 

12.07 



it:{.<n)o 

..l.tiOO 

.-'iiii)- 
ti>I.WJ 



bid atiil 
liiS.-i of 



ll.l.-.'i. 

*i.i:.Vj. 

flax 

.1 lo 



Tn'XNiiry Ibilaiiro. 

Wa:-hiii«ton. Mai'eli III. TinLii's treas- 
ury .-Il.l lenient : Availabl.- cash bal.moe, 
K«"rfJ,2;C>.472; g.dd coin and bullion, $23,:U9,- 
fcT; gold certlfloates. $3«.4<»3..'>7y. 

\ou Ycirk fiiruin. 

N'ew York. March 10. flos. ; Wh.-at, 
.\iay, SUnWu-t. J''-^ '■'''- <'orn. July. 
71'/5!c; May. 73=^4e 

THE lOPPEK STOCKS. 

The ftdlowlng ait tViu closing quota- 
lloiLs of c.>pper stocks at Ib.ston tod.-ty, 
r.poried by I'uine, Webb.r die Co.. Uoom 
A. Torrey buildiuiii;: 



New York. March lO.-Thc opening 
movement of prices of stoeks today 
showed some hesitation, but w:is mainly 
upwards. Chanifes were small thr.uigh- 
t.ut and gains reached a large fraction 
only in Cireat Northern preferred. 
Southern Railway. Krl« second pre- 
ferred and Republic Steel preferred, and ] 
a point in L'niieu Railways and Invest- 
ment, General Electric declined 1'4 and 
New Y«U-k Central -4- While the move- 
m«*nt was narrow the dealings were 
quite active and wiUly distributed 

Th«» realizing of th.- proiessionaU an.i 
the distribution of buying order.s at new- 
points induced alternate upward and 
downward movements within a narrow 
ninge. A decline afbr tiie op.-nuiK was 
chi eked when Union Pacific and Reading 
•were bought heavily and lltn-d a point 
above their low price. Consid'-rable 
strength was ali«j shown by other less 
active stocks. I'riss. d Ste.l Car pn l< r- 
red rising 4»4. Virginia-Ciin.lina Chem- 
K-jil preferred 3, Deuvr & Rio Orande 
preferred and «'onsoUdaled Gas 2. Nor- 
folk & Western 1^4 and New V-Tk ten- 
tral. Southern Railway. American smelt- 
ing and A:uerican Car preferr. d 1. 1 la- 
niark.t weakened before 11 o clock aitd 
the level of prices fell a tnictlon b.low- 
last night. I'l iinsylvuiiia and lowa C-n- 
iral preferred fell a po'nt. Trading be- 
came dull at the decline. 

I'rofit taking sales w» re renewed wlin 
some activity and declines exteii.led t.. 
some of the active stocks. IncludinK i n- 
ion Pacific. St. Paul. North, rn P.aclflc. 
.Missouri Pacific. 11, & o, and interna- 
tional Paper pref.rred f. U 1. 'i n.-re were 
fractional rallies before noon. B..nds 

'' A^'riily'sct In after 12 o'clo. k which 
Inereased In fore- gradually "''*",, V.'^ 
majority of storks had the decline. 
«'anadian I'a'ific rose 1-^. ...v.i^n 

A rea.tlon occurr. d again, w*'''^". 
however, did not hurt prices mu. h. and 
the ground was later 
cigo Great West, rn 

"^Vhe market closed rather Irregidar and 
very dull. The advocnt.s .if reaction took 
c.Mjrage from the difficulties of adv.inc;n„' 
prlce>. and sold ihe market agat;i. prices 
receding to the previous '''W l»oini or 
below. Raltimore & UlUo fell l*s. ■^;^'"' 
son and Westinghouse El- ctric 1>4. Great 
Northern pr.f erred 

?.r and Atix rican 
Mpe prefer! ..1 



lO'.tl.ic Iow-.tT range. |4.3r.'ri4.50: bulk of 
sales. |4.4«i-r/4.4f.. Sheep: Receipts. 4.000: 
market, strong and unchanged. 

"WiUBiLL 
BIGELOW" 



Says That Bryan Will 
Not Get the Nom- 
ination. 



recovered. Cni- 
debenlures yield- 



Atmilgamated <'op- 

Ic.' 1. I'nited Stales 

rose 2 and M.ickay com- 

paiL.s 23-4. Th.- di-cUne was checked "» 

dealings. 



p.- 
111. I 
the late 



Quotations furnished by Gay & S'fur- 
gls, brokers. 32!4 West Superior street^ 



Stocks- 




William E. Blgelow, b.tter known lo 
his Nebraska friends as 'Wild Bill Blge- 
low," is at the Spalding today. Except 
for the Stetson hat, and a bow-legged 
walk, that comes from years In the 
saddle, you wouldn't suspect that Mr. 
Blgelow was the •Wild Bill ' of former 
days. 

From a rider ol Hie Nebia&ka plains, 
Air. Bigiluvv lui-^i graduated into an in- 
smance man. Just ut the present time. 
Air. Bigelow is more Interested in poli- 
ties than Insurance. lie can t help lliai 
-he comes from the elate liial nurtured 
W. J. Bryan. 

\ears ago .Mr. Bigebiw was at home 
In a pair t.l chaps ami a lug gun. To- 
day he Is HKire at ease in a business 
suit, lie ha.-, lorgoii.-n the rustler tigbis 
of thf old days. Uui says that there is a 
grand old figlu >;oini; to be pulled off m 
the coming I »c4nocrauc convention. 

Mr Bii; 'low d->e."-n"l believe that W. J. 
Bryan will re. elve the Democratic nom- 
ination tor presi.lent. He is from the 
same state as the Commoner, yet says 
sonu-.me else will be <-b.isen at the last 
moinetit to lead the parly. This is the 
iVeling in Nviiiaska. he says, and is be- 
coming to be the general belief over the 
country. 

Th.- Western people are mighty Inde- 
piiident, acuding to the former cow 
puncher .He says that they retus.- longer 
to be dictated to, and tiiey are about 
ready to bolt the too-often-trlcd candi- 
date. They like a change once in a 
while and are willing and eager to back 
st'in.- new n.an with their vtHes. 

Johns.m Ik a favorite, Mr. Blgelow 
says, with Judge Gray a elose runner up. 

TU I»HK.\ '\\T TIIK <;Rir 

LAXATIVE BKO.MO gUlNlNE removM tha 
cause. To Krt tlie Kcautno, cail tor lull name aad 
look ior tiKuature ut E. W. GKuVE. asc 



THOUGHT DRUNK 
WAS BURGUR 



When the proprietor of a saloon on 
lower Lake avenue appeared lo open 
the place, about 6 o'clock this morning, 
he found the front door standing open 
and the lock broken. Visions of a 
ransacked interior, a missing cash 
register and a depletion of the slock of 
booze rose before his eyes, and he 
plunged boldly in to know the worst. 
He slo.p.ped inside the door to survey 
the expected wreck, but there was no 
wreck. The cash register was in its 
accustomed place behind the bar, the 
ijoiiles on the back were Intact, but the 
cause of the bioken door was revealed 
in the huddled hgure of a man in a 
conier of the place. 

The "'dead one" was aroused and an 
olMcer called. A ride in the patrol 
wagon, and a few hours in jail sobered 
the supposed burglar up. but it br.iught 
no recollections. Thomas Callahan, ho 
said his name was. but farther he 
knew nothing. He didn't know where 
he was .trrested, where he had been or 
anything that hapiK-ncd to him. When 
told h.- was found in a sa!.>on, he 
swore he didn't know how he got there. 
.Vuthing was missed from the place, 
and as it was evident Callahan hadn't 
broken in with any overmastering de- 
sire lo clean out the place, he was 
hooked up us a drunk and drew $1 
and oo.«ts or three days. 

MYSTERIOUS 
DISAPPEARANCE 



DVI^VTH COPPER. CVR.» MARKET. 

WAI^TER, W. CARR 



202-204 MAXHATTAN BUILDING 



Private Wires. 
City Thoues. 1805. 



Refcreiu-os: 

CITY NATIONAL BAXK. 
Dulutti. Miiiu. 



Private Ix)iis I^*** 
'Phones, 16.'>« 



tanre 
1805. 



TX'ESDAY, M.%ItCU 10, 1»08. 



Amerlran-Sasrlnaw . , 

Arlz-roMsincrelrtl . 
liluck Mountain. . 
Hiitfe Coalition. . . 
Butte & L<!n<lon. 
Buite & SupiTlor. 

Cal. & .\rl/ 

Cal. &- Mont;tna. . 
Cal. & Soiioru . . . 
Cnrniaii Cons. . . . 

Cliff 

Coinanehe 

C«n>p«»r t^ueen. . . , 

l>nly-West 

Pa\is-l>aly 

Denn-Arl/.ona. . . . 
Ease Butte. ..... 



I Bld.l A»k. 



.... 2.751 


3.00 


. .. . K.-'VO 


18.00 


4.00 


4.12 


. . . 20.(M> 


20.12 


70 


.72 


... . 1.12 


1.18 


. . .100.50 101.00 


.20 


.25 


6.S7 


7.00 




1.25 


1..-.0 




.65 


.70 


• • .• * 


.3':; 


.04 




L.-iO 


1.05 


.... 8.00 


8.25 


•1.12 


4.37 




8,37 


3..">0 




4.K7 


5.12 



Globe Cons 

Greene-Cananea ... 

Hancock Cons 

K<'M t^naw 

Niplsslng 

National 

North Butte 

North Butto l.x. . . 

Old l»oiiiin!on 

Sup. & PiJtslmr}:. 
Su|M-n«»r «r Bt»ston. 

Shuntion 

Shattnik- Arlwina. . 
Tonopah Common . 
Trinity 

Warrt-n 

Wolverin*'- Arl-/ona . 



12.12 


12.-25 


1.87 


2.00 


10.75 


1 1 .00 


1 15.25 


is-.-so 


5.,V) 


5.«5 


' 1 1.00 


l4.2.-> 


1 3.87 


4.12 


1.U5 


1.87 



.Slocks- 



i ash 

1 ii'ii-Ui< 1 1 
1 not t lull), t ear 
-_' iiorih.rn win .it. 
;? sprmK wh.'^- 1 
a .Kprmg. 1 < I 

l>urum wn.at. 1 

IJurum. 1 t-ar 

ti.it.^ .'t>ili im 
rn.' 

Flax, 1 .ai 

Flax, b•,.^o 



No, 
No 
No. 
No. 

No. 



sal«-«* rue«.»la.% 

Whe.lt, I - 1: 



ar 



N. 



white to ac 



i .ei-'-K I 
1 ."4-« 

1 ,tit» 
..t(»Io 



TIlKdIK A(;o MAUKKI'. 

Trading llravy in W lirat at Ojumi- 
iii^, \\ itii rritt's \\ eak. 

« u. .»io, .Mareb 10.- Tra.ling w.is 
heav> at th. oiM-iiing of th.- wli<at 1 
mark, t totl.iv md pri.-.-s w.-r.- w.-ak. 
The «:ovc r.port of yest. rday j 

on the ail. : farmer.'*' reserv.s and 

lower pri< • ,- at l.iv.r|»»ol were the . bief 
d.pr.ssiuK tiitlnen..-!*. I'ommission 

hoii.<»s and flit Traibrs w<'r»' heavy s.-U- 
er.s. .\l:iv wb.at op.u'.i '*c l..w-<r lo 
«•.• high.-r at iT.'Sie t.> 'Ji'.'ic and sold at 
<);..■. .Mitili. apolls, iMllntU and Cill.'.lg.) 
reported r. ..ipis of :**! » ar.< :i>,MltiM b*"' 
oars last \\ ■ U .md 5;?1 ■>'■ .V'.ir 

ago. 

The luurket 1. tilled som.wb.U be. ause 
of 111.- str.ngt.i of ...rn. but lai. r be- 
came w.-ak .\l IV dropping to 1«\»-. The 
«-l.>se was weak v.iih .M.iy 2's'|'-'i'' lower 
at !':'^*''f!»-l-"'4< ■ 

Tin . oin inuk .•<tr.»ng. shorts 

cov.-iing .utivels ......us.- .>f yester- 
days >;overnm.tit report. May corn 
op'-n.-.l ',M'"'.ie to U'U-'h'' higher at til's.- 
to I't (,.- ind sold U!> to ''>.'»e. Lo.al re- 
e«-ipts w. le I'l;" < ars With 2 of . ontra.t 
grad. 

I'ri. . strong all I li' 

htgli poiiii I'-i .^li'V was 65^41. The rlont,- 
was- lirm with .May •'4C higher at tio 

.s. ;.[ ..its wer.' In good detnand. 

but tli' Il uiaind. r of lln' n>.iik«-t w:is 
dull. Tb.- ton.' ..t like m.'irkei >va8 rniii. 
Mav op.-m-il '4' hit;ln r at '>.■.",.>- ati.l sol.l 
up "to ,'<;;»«■• I- leal lei-.ipis w .-re ;W7 <-ars. 

The pr.>vi*i|oiis Kiarh.t w.is .lui. t and 
eas>-. I.i\.- tio,!is were .»<- t.> loe b>wer. 
May pork wa.^ n shtub higher at $l2.ir> 
an.l sold ilown t.> $lJ.t'7'v. l.ai.l was .'U^' 
lower at $7.1'-'" an.l void at ?7>:t... Kibs 

• M at 

.d.iy. :v-„'.'ii.j 4> , July. 
>M>'.ie. (*. irii-Ma.v, Ch- 

Si pt.-Ulb.r. I'il',"'- 

May. fd»4e; July 

, , , ;-. pti inb. r, :!7-,i'i| 

5ilJ,i'7i..; Julv. $i:,4'» to 

»7..Vi to JT.!«e''/7.S2>a: 

U. iiibev. $S.22'2. Hibs 



.\merlean-Saglnaw . 

Atlantic 

-Nr.'.idian 

.Vil veil! HI ■ 
.MloU.i'. 

Am. lid 

.Muiie.k 

Arlsotuv ♦ 'ommei »'i.i 1 

Hingiiam 

Hlai k .Mountain .... 
Butt.' »v .-^up. rl.ir — 

Bull.- »V- l.on.b.n 

ttostmi Cons 

C'opp.r Itaiige 

*'aluniel A: .Arizona. 
Cuhiniet iV- ll.ei . 
Cumt>.rliiu<l-Kl> 

Copper Qui ell .. 

C.ntejinlal 

liavls-Kaly 

I tenn-.\iizona 
DaU W.St . 

Fus'l Buile 

Franklin .. 

tSranby 

(•reeti.' Caiiau'-a 
ai.»be C- 
l|.'»neoi-k 
Helvetia 
Isle Ko.'. 1 . 

UaS.ill. 

Kewi-t-naw 

.Mass. t. ' 

Mi.-iiiga!. 

.Mass .. 

Meri-ur 

Moliaw K 

Nlplssing 

.\«.rth Butle 

Neva. I a Consolnlal.-d 

Nev.i.la Itah 

Old |)omlnb»n 

t>«eeola 

tMd Colony ... 

I'll. I. -nix .. 

I'arrott 

I'neum.ttiv Kervle. 
I'mumalie .<er\ - - 
(..(uitu-y — 

liav.-ti — 
llliode Isiai.'i 
Santa \\ .. 

Shattu.-k 

,*«iiperl.>r Copp. r 
Sbnnn.in , 

.Superior »\: I'ittsbnii: 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

rniti-d t'l-ti ' 

I'nion l.aiiii 

|-j;il, C..iu^ 

r. ». Mining 

I' s, .M*"*'"-' 

vi4'torla 

NVarr.ti 

\Vin.>na 

W.dv.riiH 

U'.'h .rill. 

NVyand.'l 

.\nialu:iniated. 

.•Niia.'on.la 

Buite »V- Ballaklavsi 

Cahimet Ar Son.ua 



Bid. 1 


Asked. 


[i 


■iU 


1" 


IC',2 


I 


4U 




M 


_'.-■• 




•fctt 




t** 


55 


!."'. 


is 


c ' ^ 


■■'l 


1 


1'4 


l»4 


1 ;!-!« 


<;?.• 


«».! 


H'a 


ir. 



1.1 1''.! 



tll«« 

101 

t»uu_ 
i\ 

23Vis 
4»* 



Atchison 

.\m:ilK» mated Copper . 

.*^melting 

Italtimore & Ohio 

Hroiiklyn R. T..... 

c,d..rH.I.> Fu. l & Iron.. 
Canailian I'ai Ult. ex-div 

Chesapeake & Uhlo 

Krie , 

lllin.ds Centi-al • • • ■ • 
Lonlsyllle & Nashvllb- 

.\ II. »i oil. la 

.Mis-^oiui Paclfle 

New York Central 

I'eopb' s <Ja» 

INnn.-^ylvant.i Itaiiwav 

Heading ,..»..•... 

St. Paul • 

Soutln-rn PacKlc 

Sugar • 

v. S. Steil 

<lo preferre.l 

Fnion I'.icUlc 

M. K. & T • 

Am.'riean l.oeom.»tlve .. 

Northern l*a< Itic 

ijr.-iit Northern 

American C;;r F.oindry. 

ex. divld.n.l 
National Lead 



51-'*: 

42»,; 

14S i 

■2N*«i 
12\ 
V2.'. 
% 

till ' 

U'l-'^Hl 

iir.--»; 

ir.»-»i ii>4 
I .-12*4 1 ":\' 

I 9i'.v«l {JfiH' 
12ii»*l lls%, 

1 2'>Si Sf^Hl 

37' 4J »e«l 

! 121! ! \2A\ 

I 122^,! 130'*: 



ln-41 
fe2»,; 

4;i"h 

IS'^t 

H I 
125 I 

Xl'* 

117 
10.".' « 
iU7 , 



4S>%»( 



21" h! 



•*. 

tSl's 
Ml, 

12*4 

177* 

2KV. 

134 
12.^. 
iNl 
33 
32' H 

S7% 

11 •',14 

liiJ^ 

11.'.- 

71^ 

11S«2 

323^ 

ii»>. 

i:4T, 

12 

'^i 
49 



The neighbors of B.-rt Tann, who has 
been operating a bakery on F'ourth 
street, between First and Second ave- 
nues west, are wondering at his mys- 
terious disapii.-arance. 

Sinee ijutur.iay night there has been 
no sign of lite about the store. This 
morning some of the neighbors fear.-d 
that som. thing was wrong, and they 
gained eiurame lo the building, fear- 
ing that tb.- tamily inigbi have bei n 
suffocated with «as. Th.-re was no sign 
of anything wrong. however, and 
nothing had been disturbed in the 
bak.ry. 

Mr. Tann, so far as Is known, was 
not in d.-bt, and no reason can be as- 
crlbe.i for the disappearan.-.- of hims.-Jf 
and his family. He has a wife and one 
child. 



KliNITU 1404. 

Keferenee: 



BUl.UTll 1871. 
City Xational Bank, Duluth. Minn. 



ti"!! 

5»* 



IS'.. 



0-8 

•■' . 



St, 



ptM. 



\- .'Xriaouu. 



10 


10',» 


3?4 


»J» 


3ti 


3.rt» 


M 


S3 





lioc 


oOc 1 


1.00 


V''. ^ 


17 




!'-4 


u 


12 


1)2 


^^ 


IS 


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17 


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11 


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il'i 


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;.«4 




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■■-.'■, 


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•21«'4 


21^4 


3S 


3!i«4 


3U 


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r. 


67. 


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7'» 



St«M*k <«o«»>l|t. 

l,osun & Brvan. .N. w V.rk. to Paine. 
AVebber Ar Co.: Tin- market .li'^play. d a 
re.-ictloniirv tend'-ncy today, wlm h was 
..nlv natural. In \ 1. w of the sbarn le- 
.-ov.rv The tielling wii« m.»stly prodt- 
tukinjr, th. r.- being no news ..i an un- 
favorabb- <hiirfie-.er. 11 is get;, tally con- 
,ed.-d that il g.tieral impr'v.-n.ent has 
taken pl.ice. but II w.miM se.-m that lb. 
time Is baldly at han.l f.^r ur -at f » v»V 
and much high.r prl.es, Th.-r.< ts liril - 
dlsivisiilon to li.pjldnte se.-nrttb-s. ev.-n 
at th.-so pri.-es. and In the .ibsonc. 
fore.seen adv.-rs.- fa.-t.us w.' 
lb.- market t., h-d.l wl<lii!i a f. w p..»nts ..f 
the present level, 

CliUntgo l,i^i*stoi-k. 

rnicago. .Mm n 10. -Catile 
;'.b.>nt t.7.i)i>, tiuirket 
«,;*»; i-ows an.l In 
J4 (»K.(4,>o: calv.s, 
Sl.niMifi Oil; stt»-" ■ ' 
li.>g» Ke.-.ip. 
stea.ly, light. ii-> 
b.-avv, J«.4«>''»4.7.t: 
jr 76»i"4,4o: bulk ••! 



GETS WATCH IN 
HUGGiNG MATCH 



Theodore Helin w-as convicted of 
petit larceny in municipal court this 
morning and went up on the hill for 
sixty days. He was charged with 
sle.iHng a watch and chain from one 
Andrew Simon.son. and, though Helin 
swore he never saw the wati'h, the 
evidence was dead agftlnst him. 

Slinonson's imidiclt trust in tlie af- 
fectionate nature of the Finnish race 
cost him his watcii and i-hain. Both 
men were pretty well load.-d and were 
embracing each other fondly. Two 
witnesses testified that they saw .Sim- 
<inson's walch pass into Helin's pos- 
sessi.m, while Helin was strenuously 
hugKing the maudlin Slmonson to his 
breast. 

H.'Iin figured that his word was as 
good as liic -.vitni-s-se's. He swore he 
didn't know Sinvm.son from an Egyp- 
tian mummy and h.nd never se.-n Xhc 
watch in question. His testimony was 
one compute denial of all that had 
gone before, but It couldn't stand up, 
and he was found guilty. 



NEW LINE OF 
ORE CARRIERS 



A persistent rtmior says that there 
is to be competition among the lake 
freighters this coming season. The 
c«impetition, if rumor Is true, will be in 
the shape of a new line of boats, 
backed i>y Chicago capital. They will 
be genoral ft-eighters, and will go 
after the indiiiend.-nt ore trade. 

The heavy oie trade of last fall, it 
is .'•aid, wh« It boats were in such ile- 
mand, was the cause of the enlistment 
of capital in the new venture. Tin- 
outlook for a dull, early season in ore 
irafflc may delay the placing ot the 
nt A line of boats in commission, but 
in any event, it is said, that ihey will 
Ih- in ojKrHlion before the close of the 
lake season. 



MARTIN ROSENDAHL, 

Copper Stocli Broker, 

414 WKST SLT»I:RI0K STKFITT. 102 SLXNIIATIAX BriLIH.VG. 

My own wires to C«.pp< r Countr y. Also c« mnc«^kms^oJja»>tcw Jimrj^^ 

Tl'l-:Sl>Ay. MAIUII 10, 1»08. 

Copper share market is in an eleg;aut eou«lition. •>«»*> •'»•«** "' 
.stoeks laiiu; ma«le all uU.ng the line. W.- I<.<:k for niueii hig:«««'r l"''*'*^ 
on the }'«KKl oms. The curbs arc avting Hue. BallaUlaxa is pii.lMbI> 
the strongest . iirb st.ak on the lM)ai-«l. and olYei i»g> ol tliou>iMUl> oi 
share.s xy.iuld not lower the price one-Hghth. ;^;»« .-"• "f* '.. u . ' !.J; 
Btmk Is tausiHl by the xer> luavy orders on lile in all hroker.ig^^ 
olTkvs. If there ever was a gxHal sto.-k !««• big moiu'V ifciHaUlaxa 
the «»ne. On the 1st of April the 7<»0-I.M.t level will Im- leaehed 
then begins the opening up of the livli yvUx^ "»*.."'»« iV.l !*.',« 
Butte ami Moston At Montana faimms. Wa.eli Buite-Ballaklaxa. 
Is quoteil in Boson and New ^ orU, and is fa>i Ikv'«u»*'« •'•»' «•' 
favorite eoppt-r slot ks in tin- I iiited Mati-s. 

(ireene-t aiianea ami Superior & rm-lnu-g aie -...a;!.v. 
Mountain Is very stnm;,. t o|>|h- t.>m'*'n was a Ii.'a\y trailei 
Butte & Sui»erior should ha\e another ii>e; M.2.> Is cheap 
Cariitan was more active Kulay ami should a<l\anee. 

My eonueeli<»ns with Boston are ot llu» 
our eo'inespoudent. is rt-gardtd as one ol tlw 

IMper. .lohnson A: Case, with whom we 
one of the best linns in the I iiit4-d States. 

We alM> ha\e our «»wn wire lo the t o|ip.'r t ouiiir> and ran u«xe 
y«»u the very best of M-r\ire <m all slocks. Oin- iiiark.-t on the eurJ>a 
cannot be beat. 



is 
iiid 

nil 
It 

the 



r>Ku'k 

loilay. 

ha- it. 



v« r> be^l. >liller & * o., 
best liniis in the eoiinlry. 
<-4Miiiet-t in \<-\\ ><•!■!*. fi 




M. W. LrE:E: Wl CO., Inc. 



DOTli 



•riioMiS, au»3. 410 wi>t sh'kkiou 

CAPITAL. $50,900 



i»'i'Ill::i<:T. 



£IANK£:rs and bicokers. 

Branehri* at lllliklanr. Sup«TU»r. W «•«< I>ulu<li nna ClijeaBO. 
Private Wlro. to New York. lloBlon. Coimmt < oui.try aud Hm tige. 




>f un- 
looU t.ir 



St. id.v; beev 



Ueceipts 
s. H.2R\ 

lt.-r>», $2.K>'y5.-2:.; texans. 

$.*..«H»'<p'..7'.; western.-rs. 

■ Md f.-eders. $3.0l/'« I.W. 

It 22.t»'«(»; niark.-T 
i US; miX.Mi. ?4,40'ti4.7r.-. 
roii«h. $t,l.'.'<i4.«>»; ;p!ffs 
.«nb-s, ?4.tiO'>( 1.70. 8heej>-- 
Ke.V*pt< about ll.o"0. Mark.-t -»trong. na- 
tive j:t i!r.*i«;,»Vi: we-^'tern, $:!.7:.':f''5.<V: year- 
lings. J.'>.r.a"«»; - $3.uy'.r7.10; west- 
ern. S7i.7r>'<r7.ir> 

New York Mom-.x . 

New York. March 10.— Close; Money on 
call. easy. I'«4'»i2 per cent; ruling rat»*. 



VANDALS TAKE 
LIGHT GLOBES 



Vandals have worked havoc at Ath- 
letic park, where the hockey rink of the 
Northern ho<-key team was located this 
winter. A visii lo the park by the b.iys 
yesterday 



closing bid, ».; offend 



lit 2 Time j the 
loans dull and soft. 00 days. 3«5'««3»4 t>- r | <-arr.ed 
cent, W days. 3\'ai p.-r cent: six month-. 
4'<i4*4 per cent Prime mercantile paper. 
r.»-.,r« per cent iSterlina; ex.-hantf.-. 
steady with actual busn.e.«s in b.ink. r-' 
bill- at M.s*?.27.'?j».*'..30 f'lr demand and 
at $4.>>3.4r.'f74.S3.r.O for 60-dav bills; com- 



uiKclosed a stale of affairs 
whu-h .-ause.l them to ris.- up and vow 
vengeance on the West end s.iiia 1 boy. 

The big outer gal.- ot tb.- park, which 
w t« fastened with a padioek, was lorced 
.ip.n, as W.IS til- team gate .m the side 
of the park. The b-civ and hasp on tb-- 
dr.-sslng r.ioin door were rem.ived en- 
tir.lv and the boys made a raid on the 
interior of th.- roonf, in which wa.-i 
stored th.- cbibs T>o.ssessions, Seventeen 
fifty candle-power incandescent light.s, 
valued til W cents each, were removed, 
wiring was broken -and some of it 
away brooms and oih< r articles 
"everytlilng not taken was 



at 
-i. 



were 2'a'' low.i 
$6,77»a. 

Close: Will Jit 
8y«4c; .'^epteiiil.er. 
to '"."'(.e. July. ' 

Oats .May obi. 
ol.l. 5l'«e; July. 
37='p' I'.irk- .May 
|12.47'a. l.ar.I .May 
July. $S.o2'-''fS (Vi; s. 
— Ma\. *ti.7r»: July, f- 
BSc. Barley Cash. 
Mar.-n. J 1. 75. Cl«>v. . 
wh<ai .\o. 2 rctl. ! 
M<Ot»T»»« ; So. 2 bar. 
hard. :t:;.-'ir»1,o:': .Nl 
Corn -No. ;{, tv»'v.«t>2. 



e.i, 
7.i''r 



H>- 



<.:t< 



•-Ini 



;-!■ 



•b. 

: No. 

-^t-iM*, ; 



Cash, Sl'ii 

Tiinothy- 

$2i'. Cash 

S j.-d. 

.N'o, 3 

-, '?• its. 



l,iver|M>oi (ii'ain. 

Liverpool, Mar»-ii 10, \Vh..i 
No 2 red Western winter, 
.March Ts M; M ly. 



steady . 

78 2V4d. Corn: .spot, 

iUnerican, new, te 



Stilt, firm: 
7s 4d: futures. 
T.s \i\: July, 
steady; prime mix.. I 
i^d; prime inixeU 



Co|>|M«r Ci»»sslp. 

li.iy»bn, Stoiu & <'o,. Boston, to Wal- 
ter W Carr: t>ur market opened steady 
and K.-ii.-rallv higher with business larg- 
er than for s.-veral days. Activity was 
111 Butte Coalition. .N 'rth 
t.i-eeii. -t'anaiiea. Which wero 
hlgb'-r. and all 
tiUeii. The r.-s; 
witiiout teaiur. 

UlLlerti'll.', 

k.'t h.is had 



Butte and 
fractionally 
offerings were qui. kly 
of th,. lisi was dull atvl 
although it had a strong 
riu- strona .New Y.irk nuir- 
;i svmpaihetic ett.-.-t .m our 
market and gave it a string un.leri.me 
but the tn.-iai situation is . J"Pr.>vmK so 
slowly thai irad.rs .ire selling llltb-. 



Mtnn., 
on 
de 



Midway lloi>e :>larket, 

.Mmnesoia "Vr.insfi-r. St. Paul. 
Vlaici 10, -Barrett & Zimiiu-rman repeivt: 
rra.l«> tiutte a.-tlve In all classes, tin 
man.l centering on general puri.o.s. 
hor.-. s and farm tnares. Ueceipts Were 
liberal m all classes. A l.ir«.- numb, r 
ot buv. rs w.r>- on the market an.l a 
numii.'V ot sales were coJisunimat.'d. but 
a number of the bu.\ers . xpr. ssed then 
Intent bin ot tilling their ord.rs at tmii >r- 
r.iw's sale. A. C. c;eer. tJraccville, Mmn.. 
J.»bn .M.mtiromery. Uak.ui.la, d. !»., ar- 
riv. d with niix.d consignments. 

nraft. rs. .-xtra 

Hraft.-r.'», chid.e 

Farm mares and horsex. extra .. 
Farm mar.-s and h.irses. choice... 
F.-»rni niar>-s. common to good — 

IVIlvery, choice 

Drivers and sa.ldlei-s < 

Mules, according to size 



«;7.'!i24' 
12.=.'{tl7fi 
I4.'>''n7«t 
llo'dlt.-) 
♦'.D'Tlbi 
127.'»l'l!i<) 

ur.'fi'jio 

12tf'O'.U0 




.taken and 

smashed. , , , ,».- 

The wiring over the surface of the 
rink was broken down, the goal nets 
sma.sht»<l and the fence broken^ Efforts 
to break into the tb ket offjc.-. in 
which the shovels and other ice-c»eanlng 
impl»-nients were located, failed, and the 
van.lals gave up th<ir efforts titere. The 
lights w. re the most valuable articles 
taken, as the expense of replacing them 
is nut Inconsiderable. 

NEGRO'S HOME 
WAS IN DULUTH 



William Henders.in was the name of 
the negro found dead on his honie- 
■^tead near Tower. Minn,, last week, 
and the former home of the man wa.'= 
in W.-st DuUith. This fait was brought 
to light t idav ly an examination of the 
records In the office <.f B. .V. Johnson 
A: .^nn. lan.l attirneys. 

Heti.lers.m was located .m the land 
bv the Johns.. ns la.«t year, and he Is 
w'ell remembetod by them. He lived 
in West Duluth for s.im- time prior to 
going into the woods, and has a 
her of frlen.l.-^ in the city 
that he was unmarri.-.l 
have been mur.lered. 
ing on his body 



LAND CIRCULAR 
iS IMPORTANT 



Instructions of considerable Impor- 
tance were leceived at Ihe local land 
ofiice today from the department of 
the interior at Washington, in regard 
to publication and posting of noilce in 
scrip, wariant, eertiticate, soldi. us' ad- 
ditional and li. u locations and selec- 
tions. According to these in.structions, 
in cJises .»f applit-ations to lo<ate all 
scrip, warrants, etc., or to iiiak.* lieu 
.sek-cti.ms .if public lands of the I'nit.-d 
.Slates. th< location or selecibm must 
be accompanied, in addition to the i-vi- 
.lence re.jiiir. d ly existing rules and 
regulatl.ins, an aflidavit of the l.icator, 
(elector or some .-redible pers.in jms- 
sessed of the re<iuislte p-rsonal knowl- 
edge of the premi.ses. showing that th- 
lan<l locate. 1 or seU-eted is not in any 
manner occupied adversely to tile lo- 
lator or sflctor. 

Hei-.lof.ire all that was necespary in 
cases of this kind was the ftlins of 
.scrip, warrants, etc.. in the land othce. 
N«i trouble at all was connected with 
the proceedings, which scarcely gave 
ro<im for any (onlest of any kind, Ij. 
addition to the aflidavit clause, th-- 
Oew ruling provides that the locator 
or selector, wiihin tw.-nty days from 
the filing of his location or .selection, 
shall begin publication of notl(!e 
thereof, at his own <-xpense, in a 
newspaper lo be design.ited by the 
register <»f the general circulation in 
the vicinity of ih.- lan-l. and to bo the 
nearest Uu-reto. .Such publication 
must cover a period of thirty days, 
dui-lng wliii-h time a .similar notice of 
the location or selection must be 
po.^ited in the local land otfice and upon 
the lands included in the location or 
selection,, nnd Ufion each and every 
n.incontiguous tract thereof. 

\ ye:y large amount of scrip, war- 
rant c.rtificate, soldiers' additional 
and Ueu locati<in and selection busim-ss 
Is done througli the Duluth office, and, 
therefore, much interests attaches to 
the ni^w lns'.ru(iiif-ns locally. 



M COBSKSM St., BOBtMB. 

Members of 
Boston Stock Exetiange. 

Direct and Bxelu&,lve 

Prlvnt*- Wires to 

BOgTOlV, XKW YOUK. t Hit AGO, 

CALI-MI:T and HOI liH TON. MICII. 

Duluth Office t »4S W. Superior St. 

Old 'Phone, lh^7. 

R. G. Ill UBli:i.L, .Maaaser. 



,. JBTOiKiELL 

COPPER STOCKS 

kU. TRJl'«A4riO?IS CO.NF1DESIT141. 

•04 FIH!i>T N.VTIONAI. n.%NK 

Htil.DINU. Dtl.lTH. 

Zenitb. lUNU PHONIES Duluth, 1I>2S. 



Bolk Plionf «. t4S>. Room "B." Pharnlx Blk. 



J. H. ROBBERS, 

Copper Stocks and Bonds 

Curb Storks a Sp*cl»S»>-. IWm Seroritlcs. 




Choice commercial paper at cur- 
rent rates, 7 to 8 per cent. 

Limited amount Preferr.'d stock.s 
In our leading mercantile houses, 
6 to 7 per cent. 

Guaranteed mortgage certifl- 
cates, 4 to 5 per cent 

BAXK SlYX^KS. 

Government, nfanb-ipal and in- 
dustrial bonds at market. 

t. R. MAnFftRLA^tE & CO. 

203 .\hvorth Building. 



■ANKKRS AND BUOKISRSi. 



Members New York rad 
ItostOB Slock Exchanges 



DULUTH OFFICE— 

Room A, Torrev Building. 

Sl« Wc«t fiaperlor Ktrert. 



Arrested for Forgery. 



I'hnrged with 
for S-Vi on a \V. 



passing a forged check 
S.;i"-rior street J.-wekr, 



«X»M MISSIONS 

Eat up your prof- 
Its unles!< you are 
very, very careful. 

01 R H.%Ti:s 

save yon about 
half. .-Xsk for a 
rate card. 
H.. 3-10-'08. 



/^^^"^ 




iium- 
1! is thought 
He is said to 
Tliere was noth- 
to identify him when 



found by a cruiser. 



•V severe c>il<l that may develop into 
pneumonia ov.r night, can be cured 
uuickly by taking Foley's Honey and 
Tar It will cure the most obstinate 
racking cough and strengthen your 
lungs The genuine is In a yellow- 
package Sold by all druggists. 




Jacob Kane ol Spokane was arrested this 
.'lit. rnoiin b.v the police. 

The check was signed by L.. A. < 'amp- 
bell & Sons, contractors In Spokane. 
Th.' j. weier l-et-anie suspicious and teb-- 
grajilied to Sp<jkane. Kane's arrest fol- 
lowed. 

CHIEF ISSUES ORDERS. 

Saloon Men Xotified to (lose Their 
Doors at II o'Cloek. 

The snloonk. ei..-rs of the .ity are get- 
ting the tip to lay. Following out .Mayor 
Haven's instructions. Chief Troyer i.s- 
.sued his orders lo the officers of the 
departnient today, and every saloon- 
keeper is being served with personal 
notice to close his doors at 11 o clock 
toin<irro\y night and every night there- 

i'fi*-'". , ... 

The chiefs order Is as unniistak;ible 
as thai of the mayor. It order.- .-very 
.ifticer of l.be department to slrieily 
"aforce "he provi.'-ions of the mayor's 
order 0110 the 11 o< lock "Ibl." wbi -h 
was expected since .Mayor }iaven t.»ok 
office will become a certainty tomor- 
row night. 



K. IScLENNAN, 

COPPER STOCKS. 

"S0<;-.107 l'ro\Uieii«-e niiildlng. 

i>i I.I rii. Miw. 

C»I<1 'I'hnnr I MMt. Y.ruUU 'PlKiiie 6MI. 
Duluth <urb Stocks a Spc-olHlly. 



MifiilKG STOCKS. 

O. A. N AFE 

BROKlCn. 

;01 PalUdio Buildl-ig. Dulath. Mini. 
9mMH 'PhMc 82-IL 
iW Another <2^.oJi <e id ^l.ii.nlcnt ir.jin the 
(J. irfVf Mine. l)c;a-.x- i- a d.\idcnd i.av.-r. 



Had \{\^\\t to Vote. 

C t'laus. tb.- .young r.iaa who.=e vot« 
in the S.cuid ward alderinanb- fight, Js 
claimed by J. 1... «"roniw.-!l to hav.- l>eea 
Illegal, wa.s on th.- witiie.ss stan.l this 
afternoon, and testified that he had es- 
t.'i.!)l;.shed a r-sld.nce :it ^m East Tenth 
street, since l>..-c. -', and tbal b- 'V'- an 
American (itiz.ii. 



< « • 1-: A X .'^T E A M.'^l m '.S. 

X" w' York -Arri\e.i: Steamers Oscar 
U fr.im f'orjenhag.fi; .Siattendam from 
H.ittf rdani. 

Hrem.ii -ArHved: Steamer Rheln 
from New York. 



Proposals for Contract 



l!ids V.ili b' leeejyed up 'o l<, o'< lock 
\V<dn<'.''day 3ilai( h llth, n-^i^, for tli^ du- 
«in'.f and nhlllng of t< .-l pits l<ir the pro- 



RAYMOND HIT('H( Oi'K'S . 

TRIAL HAS COMMEMEI). 

.V. w York, March 10.— Raymond Hilch- 
coclc the coiiie.liun. was put on trial In 
lb' criminal branch of the supreme court 
before Jii.'^tic'. ISlanehard on an indict- 
nicnt growing out of charges preferred by 
a 15-year-. lid jrirl. 

Hitchcock arrived at the court room 
. arlv accmpani' d by his wif.-, who is 
known on the stage as Flora Zabelle, and 
Ills counisel. Mrs. Hitchcock was not per- 
mitted to enter the court room, howeyer. 
but was escorted to the anteroom in which 
Evelyn N'r-sbit Thaw spent much of her 
time"du!lng th« trial of her husband for 
the murder of Stanford White, 



pits l<ir the pro 
pos.Kl Court ll'ouse, as per piuns hhH 
sp. .ificaiions .»n file ai the oflTie.- .«t 
Court House C.iinniissioii at No. :;•_'] 
videc.<.".- IJuildinsj. 

tiKu. Jl <. I.AYI'IJUL., 
Sect. 



iba 
Prj- 



arv 



I'nited .'^t;ii-s IJnuiiie. r cjffiee Jju- 
!iitb, Minn.. Mareb 'J. 1!».:S. Sealed j.r.*- 
pr.sal.s for dredging and hire <»f dredg- 
ing plant at .Superior entry. Wis., will 
be r.-e<-iy< d h.-re until nnosi MornJuy, 
April C. IJriH, an<l then publbjly opened. 
Information on .ipplbation. 

(WtAHAM 1 1. PITCH. 
Major, EuKitieers. 



I'nited .States Engineer's Olfice. Dtt- 

Inth, Minn.. Manb K», l»f«. 

Se.iled proijos.'ils for furnishing .steel 
pl.ite at Superior, Wis., will b. re- 
• eived here until noon --Vprll 9, 1*>S, and 
then publicly opened. Informatl.m oa 
.ippllcation. Graham D. Fitch, ^^jo^, 
Engineers. 



DEFECTIVE PAGE 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 




■WH 



IBP 



1^ 




^ 



A ♦ 



$5500 

Flno modern home on East Fifth 
Btreet. Beautiful location: bulltl- 
ing recently completed. Has been 
occupied by owner. Contains nine 
rooms and all up-to-date improve- 
ments, Including best hot water 
heating plant. If you look thl.s 
property over you will want to be 
the owner of it. 

Mendenhall & Hoopes 

209 I'irst National liank BIdg. 



STREST CA.RS. 

NOTICE TO THli: i^UBLlC. 
This toinpany operates a siiuoi railway 
line in the city oi Dulutli btlw^»u Tliu<l 
avenue east and th<.; end at Uices Foint. 
and anolht-T street railway line m the city 
Of Superior between Twenty-flrst aireet 
and the end of Connor's Point. Tuese 

Jlnes are separated by the waters ol Sst. 
^ouls i»ay, and are operated aa two dis- 
tinct and separate lint«. 

Tiie fare tor a continuous ride In cue 
direction between any two points on 
either one of those lines is oc. 

The public is hereby notilud that Ihi.s 
company does not, by undertaking to 
cany any passenger, or by acceptiutj faro 
for sucli curriaso. ashuino any re.sponsi- 
bllity beyond that of carryiiiK sucii pas- 
senger safely between pomts on the above 
nu-ntioued lines. 

Tills company is not responsible for 
clo.-^-^ connections, nor safe transportation, 
between the above mentioned iiiies by any 
ferrylKjat or other means oi transporta- 
tion. While the employes of tlUs com- 
pany have been instructed to keep them- 
eeives po.Kted and «ive upon request ail 
the information they can as to the prob- 
ability of connections being made with 
Other transportation Unea, ine company 
has no bettor means ol foreseeing unex- 
pected interruption.^ In the service ol such 
lines. n(»r of teiliUK how long such inter- 
ruption.^ will continue, than the public 
has ami. therefore, cannot be responsible 
for 'notice of such interruptions. 

DUIATTH STHIOET i<AlL\VAY CO. 
Ry TIi:KI'.EUr WAUHKN, Gen. Mgr. 
Deei'inh.r \<\ 19<)6. 



RAILROAD TlMEJ^UiLES^ 

THE DIILVTH A IRON RANGK RAIL- 
ROAD <0.>II'A!VY. 
"THE IRON RANGE." 

Leave! 

•3:15 P«n 



*B:o^ am 
•3:3s pm 



DULUTH. Arrive 

All station... be.ween Oulutli 



and Two Harbori 

All stations between Duluth 

and Two Harbors. 

t Two Harbors. Tower,") 

Ely, Aurora, Hiwabik, ! 

McKinley. Sparta, Kv«- [ 

leth and Virginia. J 



*io:3o am 

* 6:is pm 

•n:00noon 

• 6:4s pm 



t Makes no stops between Endion and Two 

Harbors. 

•Daily except Sunday. 



t7-4S »ni 



News Tribune Vermilion 

Special ({Sunday only) 

Knife River. Two Harbors. 

Tower, Ely, .Aurora, Biwa- 

bik, McKinley, Sparta and 

Eveleth. 



|ia;So pm 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



L«?avt' I 

* 4:00 p.iil' Aihland and East 

* IrOa-inl Akbtand und Kast 

* f-.jv p.ailMinti. and Dakota Express 

* 8il5«-inl-..Njrtti Coast Limit ed -.. 

Lfave 



1 «tOO am 
• 1:55 p. m| 
•lUIOp.Illl 



Duluth Short Line. 
ST. rAOL 

buhhxapolis 



•Daily. fDatlT E«cept Sunday. 

I .ton Oev»t toil 314 Wnt -:>u|>oTlor Street 



Arrive 
*II:lSa.a 

* 6iMp.ni 

* 7:5Sa.iB 
•_*:25 9jm 

.\rrivo 

* 6:30 t.m 

* 2:os p.m 

* 7soop.m 
' 'hones'lM 



Eo rth-WestIriT HneI 



Lc**r Superior ^ ao pir 

Jktiiye bau Cljiirj ic st-pui 

Atrtve Maduon ^41*01 

Arrive Mliwauli«j ; 45 ftin 

Arrive JanesrUl* 4 fu Ain 

«D*ll|r. bbxcept SunJiy. 



Lv iuiuUi U. 4u am a) ijpa 

I.TSuptrlor sc3*'n jjopa 

I Ar St. Paul 4 f" P'" ' 4" P" 

I Ar Mplt jojiim 9 10 pa 

Pullman ilea^rit anvl chair 

can >» C lilcano, I'arlor aaJ 

calcArkt. I'M'iii t Itiea. OfHca 

—101 W. Superior St.. IJuluth 



DULUTH, •OUTH SHOHEAjftTUINTIO 

{^o. \i.|N o.Xf \ iNorT-fNoil. 

A. M.IP. M. 



a 7:aofb 6.2<)|L.v 
a 7:45|b 0:35 
P. M.jA. M. 
a 7;45ib 5:40 Ar. 
a 8.a6ib 0:30 



a G:15fb 3:60 

ft 7:45 b 4:30 

bll>:15 



, . Duluth . 
Superior 

Houghton 
Calumet 



.Ar 



.Lv 



lehpemlnK . 

Marquette . 

8 S. Marie. 

b 8:<X)i Montreal .. 



A. M. 

t 10:30 
blo:15 
P. M. 
blU:20 
b i*:30 
P. M 



b S:16 



Boston 



A. M. 



blli :151a 7:66 
bll:30a 6:45 
b &:3U 
blO:lo 
biu:00 



A. M iP. M.I 

8:60 b 7:10 Lv.. Montreal 



lA. M.,P. M 

ft 8 Mib 7:10ILv.. Montreal ..Arlb 7;30ial0.1j 
P M. A. M. P. M.i'a. M. 

ft 6:0 0[b 7:18|A r..New Yor k. .Lvlb 7:00|a 8:4i 
b DttTTyT a Dally exc.pt fciunday. Dining; 



car on Trains Nos. 7 ana 8. 



DULUTH, MISSABE ft NORTHERN RY 



STATIONS 



PM A.M.I , 

8:60 7 40lLv.... Duluth . . . .Ar[l0..30 

4:06 

4:20 

7:35 



♦'io 

6:33 

• • • 

• • • 

5J6 



A.M. P.M 

.„,„ . 3:3( 

7:a6|Lv..67tli Ave. W..LvJlO:16 
8 15iLv. . Proctor ... .Lv|l'):00 

U;36lAr. .Coltiraine 

10:44HAr. M't'.n Iron. 

10:37] Ar.. .Virginia 

10:i9|Ar .... Eveietli . 

lO;5t;|Ar Sparta .. 

ll:20(Ar.... Blw:ibik . 

10:5«tAr .. Hibbing 



.Lv| 6:60 
. .Lv 



Lv 
..Lv 
..Lv 
..Lv 
..Lv 



6:65 

7:32 



7:10 



3:1 

8:0U 

12:00 

12:20 



Daily except Sunday. 

Miirning train from Duluth makes di- 
rect . onnection at D. M. & N. Ry. liepot. 
Virginia, with D. R. L. & W. Ry. for 
points north of VIrgflnla. 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD; TUESDAY, MARCH 10. 1908. 



18 



Lofts! LottsI Loftst 

FOR RENT — Some very desirable space on Michigan street, 
suitable for wholesale, or manufacturing; has all conveniences, 
including electric elevators and trackage. Rents reasonable. 

CH AS. P. CRAIG & CO., 

220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Special Bargains 

$5500 
$1900 
R. P. Dowse & Oo., 

General InMiar';nce and I.ioaa«. 
106-7-8 I'ruvldeuoe Bulldlav. 



175 foot northeast cor- 
ner First St. and Thir- 
teenth avenue east 

Terina. 

100 for-t southeast cor- 
n»-r Third St. and Thir- 
ty-.lghth avenue west.. 
TerniN. 



WE ARE SELLING REAL ESTATE. 

BUY HOMES 



For 5-room cottagre In 
good condition; central; 



Improved 

HO .\erea -40 arres 
liuK kouMe, barn 
liouMe, blarkamitb 

spring well, bctwee 
CMirds wood, one mil 
eight miles from 
paid J3.000 for thl 
ments, nothlnff c 
like farming 




SI 250 

hillside. 

€9 11 fin ^°^ large lot an(l 6-room 
v£UUU cottage, very choice— corn- 
bin itlon home and future business 
location; central; hillside. Both on 
easy terms. 

AA|»PA For a choice West Fourth 
#CQvU street home, near Lincoln 
Park, upper side of street. 
# J AAA to 930,000 for homes In all 
«4UUU parts of the city. 

HOltiES AND LOTS for Sale 
Everywbere. 

L. A. Larson Go. 

ai4-15 Providence Bids. 

Both 'i'hones. 192o. 



ADDltlONAL WANTS 

Irom page 16. 



liil' 
V* 



WANTS 

BRING 
^QUICKC, 



SITUATIONS WANTED— 
FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED — WOMAN 
wanu light washing to take home. Call 
new 'phone, I&i8-Y. 



SITUATION WANTED — WORK BY 
the day by young lady. New 'phone 
21M-D. 



SITUATION WANTED — POSITION TO 

nurse children by experienced Nor- 
wegian lady wl\o does not speak Eng- 
lish. R 48, Herald. 



SITUATIONS WANTED— MALE. 

SITUATION \\ANTED^A;s''"KrREMAN 
or janitor or any kind of inside worlc. 
Address X 24. Herald. 




CUT THIS OUT AND 
READ CARtFULLY. 

Tii.i m-'W Soo lino now l)uilding 
from Moose Lake is going to opon 
up a largo tract of eii.sily clo.irod 
landrt, suitable for truck gardoning. 
j.ouUry rriLsing and dairying in the 
soutlieastorn part of Carlton Oounty. 
Invest a little of your i<avlngs In a 
forty-aero tract, and it will double 
in value wltliin tho next two or three 
voars. Reaaouablo prices and easy 
lorms. , , , ^ 

Tome in and let me tell you about 

A. W. KUEHNOW, 

30S-4 TOKIIKY BriLDINO. 



A.M 

7:10|Lv. 

10:57!Ar., 

»;lt;;Ar. 

10.'25,.\r. 

iMS'iAr. 



SUNDAY ONLY, P.M. 

Duluth Ar. 14:36 

.... liJoioralne Lv 

Eveietli Lv 

Virginia Lv 

Hibbing Lv 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 



Leave 



i c.coa.m ) 
• 3::-5p.mV 
•11:1^ B.m) 



ST. PAUL AlfD 
.Minn£AP0Ll3 



Arnve 
tlO-.lSp.m 
53 p.m 
30 a. m 



(tlO 

.-|:l.„._ 

I* 6:51 p.m 
)• 7:I5a.m 



•'iuSt.in I Crooliston.Cirand Forks. 
*t:55p!mi Montana and Coast 

i ^•A'- B m..»wM KWcr. HiuliinK. Virginia. .fI2:I5n.oi 

1 J.*, p.m ^.^ Wilroar aod J .,„.,- ' _ 

1 t:CO«.m| Sloox City ploasp'» 

*" •Daily. iDaily Except SunJaf 

Twin City sMperi te»dy mt op.m Olfic» -Hi.iMir.g Hotel 



.•tEEI.MU NKW YOHK t ITY. 

In vi.siting Now York I will show 
you tho entire city and .Save Vou SO per 
cent at least, and show ymi iiioro in 
ono dav than you ooultl se«^ otlu-rwiso 
In onr and :i half days. Will meet you 
at dopot and find hotel accommoda- 
tions. No uniformed men as e.soorts. 
Writo a wo.'k in ailvance for engage- 
ment and terms. 

EUWARi) BITLEH. N. Y. C. TuuriHt, 
47 \\. !\'lneleeath St.. ^'ew York. 

Fotiiii rlv with I'anton & Wliitc Co.. 
l>ulutli. .Minn. 



Bargains in Beautiful 
Lalceside Lots I 

Buy now. They will never be 
offered again as cheap as they 
are this spring. 



E. W. MARKELL 

306 I/oiistUili) nuiltling. 



Must Be Sold 

on Terms to 

Suit Customer. 

lO-room house, centrally located, hot 
water heat, hardwood floors, storm 
windows and screens, cement wallts, 
open plumbing, two water clo»et». 
porcelain bath tub. 

Cooley & Underhill. 

200-210 Kxrlinnfce nulltlliijj. 



NeTV Building. Ne^ Bqulpnient. 
RATIOS — 93.00 AND 93.50. 

HOTEL McKAY 



Ct. 



First Street and Fifth Avanu* 
West. Duluth. 



21st Ave. East 

New. modern 7-ROOM HOI HE. Lot 

B()xl40. Best looatlon. Twenty-first 
avenue east, abnve Superior street. 
Oash required $45yO; balance to suit. 
Rented aftLr May 1st for $56 per 
month. Just wliat you are looking 
for. 



The Miller 

222-224 \%'. Superior ■«. 

Amorioan and European Plan 

Fifty Homelike Rooma. 

JOHN' ^^ . MILLRR, Prop. 



HOTEL I^CNOX 

Most thoroughly equipped In th« 
Northwest. Sanitation perfect. 
European, tl.OO and up. American, 

12.00 and u ^. ^ ^^ 



BUR6 d; HAWKiMS, 

Main Fluor Fallatllu. 
IKSlRANCl!:. L.OA3(9. 



CQAfin Iniproved, well located 
^9UUU corner (,60x140). netting 'i 
per cent on entire Investment: $3.tiO0 
will liandle it— easy terms for bal- 
ance. 

flP4rAA Double corner (100x140); 
WC9UU good locatton-Kast Fifth 

.stroot 

Fine corner lot on East 
Superior street. 

«1 AAA Improved business 
I UUU nor (50x140). netting 9 per 
cent on entire investment; reason- 
able terms. 

Eleven and one-half acres on Her- 
mantown road, under cultivation- 
street cars will run to land. 

A. H. W. ECKSTEIN. 

SOI Burrows BIdg. Zenith 'Phone SS8. 



Si 000 



cor- 



Get Busy 

Buys four lots 50x140 feet 
eaoh, between Second ave- 
nue west and Third avenue east. 
Don't let this bargain get away 
from you. One-third cash, balance 
at (5 per cent. Buy and double your 
money In one year. 



S600 



J.D.HOWARB&QO., 

Real Estate. Loans. Insurance. 
210 West Superior St 



SITUATIONS WANTED — BY TWO 

young men attending business college, 
cleaning up offices, etc., evenings. L 24. 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY NO 1 

coachman, permanent position. Apply 
15 Lake avenue north. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY A STEADY 
and sober young man. position aa 
night clerk In some large hotel In 
city; good references. New "phone, 
1941. 



SITUATION WANTED - MIDDLE- 
aged man of good sense and experi- 
ence wishes position as servant. Ad- 
dress H. H. Upton, 319 Mesaba avenue. 




FOR SALE! 

New six-room house with bath, good 
pjcatlon. In East end. Lot 25x140 feet. 

Price-$3,000 

EASY TERMS. 

We Have Money to l..oan on 
Real Katate. 

PULFORD, HOW & CO., 

300 Kxohanire Rulldlng, 
DIM TH. .YIIIV.X. 



SITUATION WANTED — COACHMAN 
with flrst-class references desires posi- 
tion. 321 Devonshire street. 

DYE WORKS. 

ZENITH CITY DTE WORKS— LARG- 
est and most reliable. All work done 
In Duluth. Work called for and de- 
livered. Phones: Old, 1154-R; New. 188«. 
232 East Superior street. 



SITUATION WAiNTEEX-YOUNQ GIRL 
wishes position in doctor's office; wages 
no object. Address X. 23. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — WORK BY 
the day washing and cleaning. 515 Me- 
saba avenue. 

SITUATION WAJ^TBI>-TOUNQ LADY 
bookkeeper desires a position. Thor- 
oughly experienced. Address X. 19. 
Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— BY COMPE- 
tent young lady dressmaker In reliable 
private family; Al references; willing 
to assist with housework when sewing 
is light. W 160, Herald. 



to eftect. The summer travel In this di- 
rection is Increasing year by year." 



WITHIN THIRTY DAYS. 



SITUATION WANTED-POSITION BY 
young lady in office as assistant; can 
operate typewriter; object, experience. 
Z. 61. Herald. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 

FOR SALE — FIVE-R(X)M COTTAGE: 
water, sewer and gas; modern improve- 
ments throughout. 1016 East Sixth 
£ treat. 



DUIATTH DYE WORKS-FRENCH DRY 
cleaning; fancy dyeing. Old 'phone. 
1202-R; New, 1101-A. 330 East Superior 
street. Suits pressed by the month. 



^TOVE^REPAIRINa 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10 fl<X) different stoves and ranges. C. 
F. Wiggorts &. Son. 217 East Superior 
street. Both telephones 



ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION 

— OF— 
EMPIRE REALTY COMPAPNY. 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRES- 
ENTS, That Uie undersigned do hereby 
assotMate themselves together for tlie 
purpos<j> of forming a corpoi-alion. pur- 
i>uant to the provisions of Cliapter oS of 
the Revised Law.* of Minnesota 1905. and 
the acts amendatory thereof and supple- 
mental there(u. and do hereby sign and 
adopt the foTlowlng certificate of incor- 
poration: 

ARTICLE I. 

The name of this corporation shall be 
"Enipiro Realty Comnauy." The gen- 
eral nature of Its business shall be buy- 
ing, selling,. lua^init '«KMi4ttg in and irii- 
proving lands and toneinonts, construci- 
ing, leasing and operating docks, ware- 
houses and elevators, and carrying on 
any kind of lumbering, agricultural, 
mercantile or transportation business, 
and such other like enterprises as are in- 
cidental to the above specific purposes of 
this corporation. 

The principal place of business of -this 
corporation shall be at the City of Du- 
luth, Minnesota. 

ARTICLE IL 

The time of commencement of this cor- 
poration shall be April 1st, 1908, and the 



FOR SALE— RBSIDEiNCE OF SEVEN 
room; city water; electric light, etc. 
Must be seen to t>e appreciated. For 
appointments, address V. 49. Herald. 

FOR SALE-TEN-ROOM hSuSB. BUILT 
five years at West end. one block from 
car line; 'all hardwood tlooi-s-. on very 
easy monthly payments. Property can 
be had for $1,200 to $1,500 less than it Is 
worth today. Must be sold immediately. 
$500 to $1,000 will handle. For sale ex- 
clusively at 205 Palladlo building. 



Bridge Aeross Rainy River is Rap- 
idly Nearing Completion. 

It is now expected that the bridge 
across the Rainy river at Ranler. con- 
necting the Dulu'fh, Rainy Lake & Win- 
nipeg with the Canadian Northern, will 
be completed within the next thirty days. 
The contractor says that at the outsiffe 
everything should be finished by April 
12. and It is thought likely the con- 
tract will be finished before that time. 

All the necessary steel and other build- 
ing material are now on the ground, 
and unless unforseen circiunstances ar- 
rive to prevent, the structure will be 
completed by the time specified. Just 
when the regular train service over the 
bridge and to Winnipeg will be started 
Is not known exactly, but it doubtless 
will be early in the spring. 

GETS GOOD JOB. 

W. 0. Lerch Appointed Assistant to 
President of Mexican Central. 

W. G. Lerch, formerly a railroad man 
In Duluth, and very well known here, 
has been appointed assistant to the 
president of the Mexican Central rail- 
road at a salary of $7,500 a year. 

NEW GRAIN DOORS. 

Mankato, Minn., March 10.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Omaha Railroad com- 
pany will equip its freight cars with a 
patent grain door, a device patented by 
Kd Ario and Joe Pheeney. the latter a 
conductor on the Elmore branch, and 
well known in this city. The new door 
is a great improvement over the old 
grain door. This is true from the fact 
that the new door Invented by Mr. Ario 
permits of the throwing back the en- 
closed door without first unloading the 
car as was required with the old-fashion- 
ed door. Messrs Ario and Pheeney hope 
to install the grain door on freight cars 
on other roads. 



FOR SALE — FINE TEN-ROOM HOME, 
modern, central, large lot, fine con- 
dition beautiful inside and out. Ad- 
dross X 29, Herald. 



FOR SALE — NEW 13-ROOM HOUSE. 

rented to three families; total rents 

$50 stone foundation; bath, $4,200. C. 

L. Rakowsky & Co., 201 Exchange 

Bank building. 
» 



FOR SALE— FIVE ROOM COTTAGE, 
water and sewer; electric light and 
barn. Albert Swenson. 1230 East 
Fourth street. Zenith 'phone, 2062-Y. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 

WRITTEN IN BEST COMPANIES— 
Cooley & Underhill, 207 Exchange bldg. 



z, \ 9-Room House 



in the best part of the East 
end. Lot 50x140, 

$10,000 

HARRISON & JAMAR, 

Providence Bldg. 



Apr 
tht 



f3,I50— Very good 7-room East end 
iiotno, all hardwood floors, modern 
plumbing, gas, electricity, furnace, 
grate, stone foundation and cement 
floor in basement. 

Many atrletly modern East end 
homes from «4,:t00 to $I5,<M)0. 
$ 1, 2.%©— 4- room ootta».;o, large barn. 
3 luts. use of whole biork, Jersey 
cow. 100 chickens. 

ZENITH R EALTY CO., 491 Prov. Bldf. 



SLM.VIONS IN APPl.,ICATION FOR 
KKGISTRATION OF UAND 

State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis.— ss. 
Ul.strlct Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

In the matter of the application of 
William MacRltchle to register the title 
to the following described real estate 
situated in St. Louis County, Minnesota, 
namely: 

Lot Sixteen (16) In block Flfty- 
nme <59), Endion Division of 
L>uluth In St. lx)uls County, 
Minnesota, according to the 
plat thereof on tile and of rec- 
ord In the office of the Register 
l>eeds In and for said county. 

Applicant, 
vs. 
«**ty of Duluth, and all other 
persons or parties unknown, 
claiming any right, title, es- 
tate, lien or interest in the real 
estate described in the applica- 
tion herein. Defendants. 
Tho State of Minnesota to the above 
named defendants: 

You are hereiby summoned and requir- 
ed to answer the application of the ap- 
plicant In the above entitled proceeding 
and to file your answer to the said ap- 
plication In the office of the Clerk of 
said court. In said county, within twenty 
U'O) days after the service of this sum- 
mons upon you, exclusive of the day of 
such service, and, if you fall to answer 
the said application within the time 
aforesaid, the applicant In this proceed- 
mfc, will apply to the court for the re- 
lief demanded therein. 

Witness. J. P. Johnson, clerk of aald 
c«^urt. and the seal thereof, at Duluth. 
in paid oounty, this 9ih day of March, 
A. I). 19l>»>. 

(Stal of District Court, St. Louis County, 
Minn.). 

J. P. JOHNSON, Clerk. 
By V. A. DASH. Deputy. 
BALDWIN. BALDWIN & DANCER, 

.■\ttomeys for .Applicant. 
Duluth ?:vening H<rald. March lO, 17, 24. 

TEMPLE ROLLER RINK 

Second avenue east and Superior street. 
Open every afternoon and evening ex- 
cept Sundays. Matinees Tuesday and 
Saturday. La Brosse's band. Children'^ 
day every Saturday, from 10 to 12. 



period of duration thereof shall be thirty 
(30) years. 

ARTICLE III. 

The names and places of residence of 
the incorporators of said company ara 
Frank Crassweller, Arthur H. Crasa- 
weller and Elmer F. Blu, all residing at 
Duluth. Minne.sota. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The government of this corporation and 
the management of Its affairs shall be 
vested in a board of three directors, each 
of whom shall bfe stockholders, who 
shall be elected annually a^t the annual 
meeting of said corporation; a President, 
a Vice President, a Secretary and a 
Torasurer, who shall be elecfed annually 
by the Board of Directors at the first 
meeting of sMild Board held after the 
annual meeting of said corporation. The 
offices of President and Treasurer and 
of Vice President and Secretary may bo 
held by the same . Jerson. 

The annual meeting of said corporatiozi 
sliall be held on the Tuesday after this 
first Monday In January of each year. 

The names and a44rwse8 of those corn- 
Board of Directors until the 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 

CLAIRVOYANTS-IF YOU HAVE AL- 
ready made mistakas, thrown away 
money and lost confidence throujjh 
dealing with much advartLsed and self- 
styled Palmists and CI lirvoyants and 
their cheap clap-trap methods, start 
from the beginning, and consult this 
famous Egyptian lady. She will tell you 
everything pertaining to your future 
life and happiness; reading daily. Mad- 
ame LfUettrIa, 11 First av»inue east, Du- 
luth. 



No Excursion Rates. 

Passenger officials of the Great North- 
ern, Northern Pacific and Soo lines met 
in St. Paul yesterday and decided not to 
offer any excursion rates to Minnesota 
resorts this year. This does not apply 
to Interstate business. 

Orlno Laxative Fruit Syrup is a new 
remedy, an improvement on the laxa- 
tives of former years, as It does not 
gripe or nauseate and Is pleasant to 
take. It is guaranteed. Sold by all 
druggists. 



UNITED AMERICAN FIRE IN- 
SURANCE COMPANY. 

Principal Office: 409 Germania Buildinc, 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (Organised m 
18»8.) John Shepeck, president; F. A. 
Krekla, secretary. Atttorney to accept 
service in Minnesota: Insurance Commis- 
sioner. 

CASH CAPITAL., $100,000. 
lNCOM£ IN liW7. 
Premiums other than perpet- __ 

uals $1M.411.«1 

Rents and Interest 7.717.42 

Total income $ 112,128.43 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ 25.2!».*7 

Commissions and brokerage.. 28,S«8.JW 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 8,761.83 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 4.467.66 

All other disbursements 6,53».ll 

Total disbursements $ 72,S«7.4t 

Excess of income over dis- 
bursements $ 38,191.00 

ASSETS DEC. 31, 1907. 

Mortgage loans $ 181,700.00 

Cash in office and In bank .. 20,O48.0» 
Accrued interest and rents.. 1,790.01 
Premiums in course of col- 
lection 12,758.43 

All other admitted assets 2,721.85 

Total admitted assets ..$ 219,011.38 

Assets not admitted, $1,095.68 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ 8,231.35 

Reinsurance reserve 80.180.16 

CommlssioTl and brokerage.. 458.88 

All other liabilities 6,835.90 

Capital stock paid up 100,000.00 

Total liabilities Including 

capital $ 189,706.28 

Net surplus $ 29,306.10 

RISICS AND PREMIUMS, 
1!>07 BUSINESS. 
Fire risks written during the 

year $8,841,930.20 

Pivjiriioms ♦reoiived thereon 136,25>8.74 

Net amount in force at end 

of the year $ll.::i8.352.5V 

BUSLNI-;SS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907. 
Fire risks 

Risks written $669,596.66 

Premiums received 10,197.01 

Losses paid 4,4»j.ll 

Losses incurred 4,986.11 

Slate of Minnesota, Department of In- 
surance. 

I Hereby Certify, That the annual 
statement of the United American Fire 
Insurance Company, for the yeai- ending 
Dec. :hi, 1907. of which the above is an 
abstract, has l>een received and filed in 
this Department and duly approved by 
me. 

JOHN A. HARTIGAN, 
Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald. Maroh 10. 17, M. 
1SW8. 



LOST AND FOUND. 

LOST - ON SUPERIOR STREET. BE- 
tween Lake and Fifth avenues wegt, 
Friday a burnt-leather purse. Owner 
Is anxious to recover it. Finder please 
return to Herald office. 



Lo.ST — SABLE COLLIE, ALL WHITE 
collar. Answers to the name of Max. 
Advise 129 Fourteenth avenue east, or 
'phone 837. 



LOST— LADY'S BELT PIN, CAMEO 
head and two saphire stones. Return to 
Herald for reward. 



LOST-BROWN SHAWL, BETWEEN 
First avenue west and Fifth street and 
Fourth avenue west and Mesaba ave- 
nue. Please return to 102 West Fifth 
street. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

\rARTA''"^RINDERENGi MASSEUSE^ 
graduated from Dr. Arvedson's Inst., 
Sweden. aW Burrows Bldg. Zen. 1736-X. 



NATIONAL UNION FIRE INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY. 

Principal office, 401 Wood street. 
Pittsburg. Pa. (Organized in 1901.) E. 
E. Cole, President; B. D. Cole. Secre- 
tary. Attorney to accept service in 
Minnesota, Insurance Commissioner. 

Cash capital $ 750,000.00 

INCOME IN 1907. 

''ptTu'aiT' .!'.'.'."':...'.'.".'!... r.'::$ 1.53S.94G.72 

Rents and Interest 100,482.06 

Total income $ 1,639,428.78 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ 650,123.49 

Dividends and interest 30,000.00 

Commissions and brokerage 319,s:a.4l 
.Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 132,433.61 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 65,124.95 

Loss on sale or maturity of 

ledger assets 675. tiO 

All other disbursements — 107,400.32 

Total disbursements $ 1,295,663. (J8 

Excess of income over dis- 



bursements $ 3<5,775.70 

ASSETS DEC, 31. 1907. 

Mortgage loans $ 309.297.00 

Collateral loans 30,«0.00 

Bonds and stocks owned — 1,687,635.00 
Cash in office and in bank.. 146,073.72 
Accrued interest and rents.. 18,009.04 
Preniiun\s in course of col- 
lection / 310.159.51 

All other admitted assets... 5,127.71 

Deduct ledger liabKIties.... 33,190.48 



Total admitted assets. 



.1 2,473.111.62 



Assets not admitted.. $90,215.11 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1907. 
Unpaid los.se.s and claims... $ 109,248.74 

Reinsurance reserve 1,272.922.94 

Capital stock paid up 760,000.00 



Total liabilities, 
ing capital 



Includ- 

$ 2,182,171.70 



Net surplus 
RISKS AND 



.$ 340,939.82 
1907 BUSl- 



PREMIUMS, 
NESS. 
Fire ri-sks written during 

the year $184,678,272.00 

Premiums received thereon 2,466,300.17 



Net amount In force at end 



of the year 



. .$190,916,668.00 



BUSINESS IN MINNE.SOTA IN 1907. 

Fire risk.s Tornado. Aggregate. 

Risks written $3,341,237.00 $:'S3,025.00 $3,624,262.00 

P^:miums received ::..::.:.: 62,323.40 1,^M 64.185.98 

Losses paid 18,622.24 2S7.09 18.919.33 

Losses incurred 24,307.77 297.09 24,604.80 

State of Minnesota, Department of Insurance. „ ^ ^, ,. , ,^ . „. 

I hereby certify That the annual statement of the National Union Fire In- 
surance Company, for the year ending Dec. 31, 1907, of which the above Is an 
abstract, has been received and filed in this Department and duly approved 
by me, JOHN A. HARTIGAN. 

Insurance Commissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald— March 10-17-24, 1908. 



A E HANSON, MASSEUR, 400 NEW 
Jersey building. Old 'phone, 1826-K. 

OPTICIANS. 

C C STAACKE, 305 NEW JERSEY 
building. li)6 West Superior street. 



OPTICIANS — WENNERLUND &. NEL- 
8on. la-Jo West Superior street. 



po.-^ing th< 
first 



St election, are as follows, to-wit 

Frank Crassweller, Arthur H. Crass- 
weller and Elmer F.' Blu, all of Duluth, 
Minnesota; and until the first annual 
nieotiag and until their successors >' are 
elected and have qualified. Frank Crass- 
weller, shall act as Pre.sldent and Treas- 
urer, and Arthur H Crassweller shall tcct 
as Vice President and Secretary thereof. 
ARTICLE V. 

The amount of thfe capital stock of 
said corporation shall be Fifty Thousand 
Dollars ($SO,0<X».00), which shall be di- 
vided into Five Hundred (.jOO) shares of 
the par value of One Hundred Dollars 
($1(X>.U0) each and such capital stock shall 
be paid in ai; called for by the Board of 
Directors of .■jaid corporation. 
ARTICLE VI. 

The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which said corporation 
shall be at any time subject, shall be 
Twenty-Five Thousand ($25,»»).00> Dol- 
lars. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. We have 
hereunto set our Irands and seals thU 
iilh day of March, A. D. 1908. 

FRANK CRASSWELLER. (Seal), 

ARTHUR H. irRASSWELLER. (SeaL) 

ELMER F. BLU. (Seal). 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered In Pres- 
ence of: 

RUBY TURRELL. 

AGNES McMAHON. 



RAOLROAD NEW 




State of Minnesota, County of St. L3uls. 
— ss. 

On this 5th day of March, A. D. 1908, 
before me, a Notary Public, within and 
for said County, personally appe.\red 
Frank Crassweller. Arthur H. Crass- 
weller and Elmer F. Blu, to me known 
to be the persons described in and who 
executed the foregoing instrument, and 
acknowledged that they executed the 
same as their free act and deed. 

RUBY TURRELL, 
Notary Public. 
St. Louis County. Minnesota. 
Mv Commission Expires September 14th, 

1912. 
(Notarial Seal, St. Lot^Is Co.. Minn.) 

State of Minnesota, Department of 
State. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed for record in this of- 
fice on the 7th day of March. A. D. 
19<>8, at 9 o'clock A. "M., and was duly 
recorded in Book P 3 of Incorporations 
on page 490 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 
Secretary of State. 



SHAWNEE FIRE INSURANCE 
COMPANY. 

Principal office. 701 Jackson St.. Tope- 
ka. Kan.. (Organized in 1895.) Jacob Mul- 
vane, president; H. S. Morgan, secre- 
tary. Attorney to accept service in Min- 
nesota: Insurance commissioner. 
CASH CAPITAL, $200,000. 
IN(X)ME IN 1907. 
Premiums other than per- 

petuala I 1,321,208.42 

Rents and interest 61.956. 33 

From all other sources 5,904.09 



Total Income $ 1.3S9.068.84 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 19OT. 

Amount paid for losses $ 452.482.95 

Dividends and Interest 30.000.00 

Commissions and brokerage.. 412,949.87 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 56.974.37 

Taxes, fees and rents, and 

other real estate expenses .. 29.992.80 

All other disbursements — 52,164.70 



Total disbursements 



.$ 1.034.564.09 



OFFICE OF REGiSTKR OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within In- 
strument was filed In this office for 
record Mar. 9. 1908.' at 10:30 A. M., and 
was duly recorded >'>if Book 9 of Mlso. 
page 6. 

it C. PALMER, 
Beglster of Deeds. 
By THOS. CLARK, 
**■"■ Deputy. 

Duluth Evening Herald, Mar. -9-10, 1901 



LOW RATES 
EXPECTED 

R. B. Jones Says Roads 
II Grant Them 
This Summer. 



R. B. Jones of Madison, Wis., traveling 
passenger agent ot the Pennsylvania line, 
who is in the city today, expresses the 
belief that special summer rates from 
the East will be granted to Minnesota 
points this year, despite the fact that 
Several railroads have raised objection in 
regard to the matter, because of the 
low-fare legislation in so many states, 
resulting, it is claimed, in decreased pas- 
senger earnings. * 

"I am not In a posltio nto state of- 
Hclally^that reduced rates will be offer- 
ed." said Mr. Jones this morning. "As 
a matter ot fact, my knowledge of what 
has been done in this connection has 
Ijeen gleaned entirely from the newspa- 
pers, and 1 have had no talk with of- 
ficials higher up in regard to the sum- 
mer business, but my own observation 
and experience, and the fact that from 
the stand of certain railroads It Is evi- 
dent that they will put in reduced rates 
whether rival lines want them or not. 
leads me to believe that the summer 
rates will be general with all roads In 
the territory affected. No matter how 
low regular passenger fares are brought 
by adverse legislation, there always are 
some lines that insist on stimulating 
business by making even lower rates at 
certain seasons, figuring on an increased 
travel to more than make up in profits 
the difference between the regular and 
the special rates. 

"Minnesota has numerous popular sum- 
mer resorts, and Duluth Is particularly 
attractive to the tourits in summer, so 
this city will certainly reap a consider- 
able benefit if reduced rates are put la- 



Excess of income over dls- 

l)iu-sements $ 

ASSETS DEC. 31, 1907 
Value of real estate owned ..$ 



K4,504.i3 



45,000.00 
BUSINESS IN 



Mortgage loans 

Collateral loans 

Bonds and stocks owned 

Cash in office and in bank .. 
Accrued interest and rents .. 
Premiums in course of collec- 
tion 

Deduct special deposits less 
^,514.96 liability thereon $ 



805.585.00 
39,000. «jO 

278.750.00 
87.271.25 
14,974.98 

170,773.90 



.485.04 



Total admitted assets $ 1.443,870.09 

Assets not admitted, $8,357.92 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31, 1907. 

Unpaid los.ses and claims ....$ 90.042.00 

Reinsurance reserve 950,728.18 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, div- 
idends and interest due 1,872.70 

Reinsurance premiums 4,172.94 

Capital stock paid up 2o0,000.00 



Total liabilities 
capital 



Including 



.$ 1,246.816.42 



Net surplus • 197.053.67 

RISKS AiND PR1i>MIU;MS. 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 
Fire risks written during the 

year $99,619,424.00 

Premiums received thereon .. 1.773,256.38 



Ne.t amount in force at end 
of the year 



.$129,888,133.00 



MINNESOTA IN 1907. f 

Fire Risks. Tornado. Aggregate. 

Risks written $813,716.00 $2«J,300.(W $834,016.00 

Premiums received H'^i'}^ ^^If. ^•I?^S 

Losses paid 5,217.17 1.48 5,218.65 

Ijosses Incurred 5,224.67 1,48 5,226.15 

State of Minnesota. Department of Insurance. 

I Hereby Certify, That the annual statement of the Shawnee Fire Insurance 
company, for the y^r ending December 31st, 1907, of which the above Is an ab- 
stract, has been received and filed In tiiis department and duly approved by ma. 

JOHN A. HARTIGAN, 
Insurance Coxumissioner. 
Duluth Evening Herald, March 10, 17. 24, 1908. 



E. D. FIELD COMPANY, 

Agents, 

203 Exdunge BMf,. D stalk. Mlnii. 



FIREMEN'S INSURANCE COM- 
PANY. 

Principal Office, 784-786 Broad street, 
Newark, N. J. (Organized in 18o5.) Daniel 
H. Dunham, President; H. H. Hasslnger, 
Secretary. Attorney to accept service in 
Minnesota, Insurance Commissioner. 
CASH CAPITAL. $1,000,000. 
INCOME IN 1907. 
Premiums other than per- . ,^ ^, „ 

petuals ■••••! 1.596.40o.52 

Rents and Interest 213,96 ..99 

From all other sources 73.25 

Total Income I 1,810,446.06 

DISBURSEMENTS IN 1907. 

Amount paid for losses $ ^42,3?4.73 

Dividends and Interest 150,000. CO 

Commissions and brokerage... 399,427.50 
Salaries and fees of officers, 

agents and employes 69,916.32 

Taxes, fees, rents and other 

real estate expenses 67,102.57 

BUSINESS IN MINNESOTA IN 1907 

Fire Risks. 

Risks written '^•^Ji'I^S? 

Premiums received ,I'?S ,5 

Losses paid Jf'^-il 

Losses incurred i6,<«o.4» 



All other disbursements. 
Total disbursements ... 



67,300.42 



.$ 1,396.141.54 



Excess of income over dis- 
bursements $ 414.304.52 

ASSETS DEC. 31, 1907. 

Value of real estate owned — $ 108,473.66 

Mortgage loans 2,'231,3l0.90 

Bonds and stocks owned 2.030.415. (X) 

Cash in office and in bank 78,028.01 

Accrued interest and rents... 30.749.88 
Premiums in course of collec- 
tion 216,765.68 

All other admitted assets 6,246.67 

Total admitted assets t 4,701,068.80 

LIABILITIES DEC. 31. 1907. 

Unpaid losses and claims $ 119,339.88 

Reinsurance reserve 1,430,997.58 

Salaries, expenses, taxes, divi- 
dends and interest due 490.89 

All other liabilities 1,869.00 

Capital stock paid up I l.OOO.OUO.uO 

Total liabilities. Including 
capital $ 2.552,617. fi 

Net surplus $ 2,148.371.45 

RISKS AND PREMIUMS, 1907 BUSI- 
NESS. 

Fire risks written during the 
year $142,836. S20.0» 

Premiums received thereon — 1,990,766.73 



Net amount in force at end 
of the year S257.355,6».00 



Tornado. 

$288,475.00 

1,106.07 

18.01 

18.01 



Aggregate. 

$5,360.»J0.00 
63.V9S.28 
16.144.13 
18,783.44 



State of Minnesota, -Department of Insurance. ^ ^ , _ _ 

I hereby certify that the annual statement of the Firemen's Insurance Company 
for the year ending December 31st. 1907, ofwhich the above is an abstract, has heen 
received and filed In this department and duly *PP">^jJ^ a ^HARTIGAN 

Insurance Commisstoi 
Duluth Evening Herald— March S-W-17. 'Ot. 



. I < "V J 




I 



^SMfasi9999m 



\ 



DULUTH EVBNINO HERALD. "°''°" """^ '""' 





k H® IT Wlhia% Y®u WavD^ iii ^Itn© "iil®clli 



i®wadla¥ 




^®adl %H@ WamU 




T®iniiiilhi% 




324 J 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — Xo 
Advortist nicnt Less 'I'han 15 Cents. 

shoppin'g^ 
by telephone. 



Old 

'Phone 

MEAT MAllKETS— 

B. J. Tobc.i 22 

Mork Bros 1590 

LALNDKIES — 

Yale Inland ry 479 

Lutes Ivauiuliy 447 

Troy Laundry ^7 

Home Laundry 1044- M 

DKVCiGISTS— 

Eddie Jcronimus 1243 

Boyce 1^ 

BAKKKIES— 
The Bun Ton 1.29-L 

PLI-.MHIXG AND HEATINti — 

MKJvJrrin & Co Ma 

Archlt McDouguU l<-3 



New 
Phone. 

22 

1S9 

ITD 
447 

257 
lUTJ 

10T2 
163 

1128 

9S3 
916 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less '1'1»»"J^^5^^!5^'^ 

HELP WANTED— MALE^ 

VVANTKB-FOR THE UNITED STATES 
murine corps, men between the ages oi 
21 and 35. An opportunity to fee the 
worid. For lull inlorinatlon apply In 
person or by letter to No. 6 SoulU 
l-ilih avenue weat, Duluth, Minn. 



WANTED - FIRST - CLASS MILL- 
wriKhls for repair work, at once. Au- 
driss Shevllu-Alathieu Lumber com- 
pany. Spooner, Minn. ________ 



One Cent a Word Eacii Insertion — No 
Advertisenienl Less Tlian 15 CentJ*. 

'"TiELP'WANTED— FEMALE. 



MRS. KOMBRS- 
flee, 17 Second 
'phones. 



BlMployment of 

avenue east. Both 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 
INSURANCE AND 

John A. Stephenson. Wolvin bulldinK. 
E D I'leld Co., 203 Exchange buildinK. 
L* A. Larsen Co., 215 I'rovidencc buildinK. 
Pulford. How & Co.. 309 Exchunge_Bldg, 



WANTED - TWENTY-FIVE EXPERI- 
enced drill runners, $3.76 per day; 
twenty-ttve helpers. $;:.75 per day; 
teen muckers, »2.00 por day. 
thirty days work, »2.l;«) per day 
Bolton & Co., Garrison, Mont. 



tif- 
After 
C. M, 



WANTED— YOUNO MAuN TO WORK IN 

Office evenings. References. Address, 
C. 200. Herald. 

W^ITH 
In Bmall 
Herald. 



RELIABLE HELP ALWAYS TO BE 
had at .Mrs. Callahan's Employment of- 
fice, 15 Lake avenue no rth. 

WANTED- EVERY WOMAN TO TRY 

Dr. Le Grans Female Regulator, guar- 
anteed. Kugler, Your Druggist. lOS 
West Superior street. 



WANTED - EXPERIENCED BAi^ES- 
lady and apprentices. Misb Mtinlng. 
No. 3 West Superior street. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Lesj< nian 15 Cents. 

Oi 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less ITian 16 Cents. 



FOR RENT— ROOMS. 

Ralston Hotel, new management; 
heated rooms with or without 
122-24 East First street. 



Bteam- 
board. 




WANTED - A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Mrs. Fred Kugler. 1«1 
Dingwall street. 



WANTED - CARPENTER 

siuull cash capital to locate 
town near the city. H 20, 



& 



UPHOLSTERING 

ED OTT. 121 W. FIRST St 



REPAIRING. 

Both 'phones. 



WANTED - COMPETENT B O OK - 
keeper; young man preferred. Address 
C. 210, Herald. 



Men to learn barber trade; special op- 
portunity; big wages pnld•^ Cat. free. 
Moler Bar. Col.. 27 Nic. Av 



itfinneapolis 



Your 



IT PAYS rO HAVE CAMERON REUP- 
holster yi'ur furniture. Both phones. 
123 First avenue west. 



"We 
& 



r<p.iir find reflnish 
1 v t r.von. Old. 73S-1.. 



furniture. Larsen 
Zenltji. 1578- A^ 



MONEY TO J^OAN^ 

DO YOU NEED MONEY? 

Money loaned in Duluth or Superior to 
■alarUd i>eoplp without security. Also 
on pianos, furniture, horses, wagons 
Business absolutely confidonilal. Lull 
get our rates and terms. Monthly 
weekly payments as desired. No good ap- 
plicant refused. .,^ 
WESTERN LOAN CO.. 
5::i Manhattan Building. 
New 'phone. 9»). Old 'phone. i59-R 



etc. 

and 

or 



WANTED-EVERY MAN AND WOMAN 
to try Nervo Tablets, the great nerve 
regenerator, $1 per box. Kugler 
Druggist^ 108 West Superior street 

AGENTS WANTEEL^^^^^^ 

v^r;;:^^^?ij5rxrrEi?Psr7n5>r a n l> wo^*- 

en for large portrait house. Call be- 
tween 8 and 10 a. m.. 118 Thlid avenue 
west, basement. 



WANTED - STENOGRAPHER WITH 
some experience in bookkeeping. Ad- 
dress Insurance, Herald. 




PERSONAL. 

puSeTsafeand sure ! 

Dt Korcr'B Tansy lennyroytl 
and Cotton Root i'ilit. A tost oj 
lorty years in France, ha^ Pi?i*.? 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM; ALL 
conveniences; suitable for two. 905 East 
Second street. 



FOR RENT-LARGE FRONT ROOM, 
facing the lake, wuh all conveniences. 
211; Second avenue west. 



FOR 
and sitting 
street. 



KENT-FURNISHED BEDROOM 
222 East Second 



room. 



them it pofitivtl'j cure^ 
SION OTTKE MENbEi 



WANTED - WOMAN FOR GENERAL 
housework: wages JIG per week; eighi 
people to cook for. Jessie Burns, Aitkin. 
Minn. Northwestern 'phone. No. 100. 



t.TjVt'KES 
pecial 
price reduced to Ji.oc per box. 
Mailed 111 plain wrappir. loipor'ej.,^";*'^' "on» 
Paris. France, by w. A .^nBETf. Druwi3t 
Dulutb, Minn., aai West Superior ::trMt 



WANTED-A GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1101 East Fourth street^ 

FOR 

East 



WANTED-COMPETENT GIRL 

feneral housework. Apply lti02 
"Irst street. 



WANTOiD - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework; one who can go home nights. 
Call mornings. T12V4 East Fourth street. 



WE REI'AIR AND RECOVER ALL 
kinds ol lurniture. Larsen & Iverson, 
cari.«enter ana cabinet snop, 123 t .rsi 
Ave. W. Zeuilti« iaib-A, Old, j3b-L. 

DANCING 
Phone 1248. 



FOR RENT - TWO FURNISHED 

rooms for light housekeeping. Lvery 
convenience, $15 per month. No. 5 
South Fifth avenue east. 



FOR RENT - NICELY FURNISHED 
rt^om and board. Ill Second avenue 
east. Zenith phone, 1 25t>-Y. 

12.50 PER 

renovated 

hotel. Cargill 



FOR RENT-ROOMS FROM 
week and - up. Newly 
throughout. Metropole 
Ai Kenny, proprietors. 



PERSONAL - COFFINS 
academy. 18 La&e Ave. N. 



WANTED-NURSE 
Third street. 



GIRL. 414 EAST 



OLD GOLD BOUGHT. 



E E Esterly. manufacturing Jeweler, 
Spalding hotel, 428 West Superior 
street. New 'phono, 



IWHI-X. 



WANTED — THREE 

waitresses for out of 
hijrhan's emrloymenl 
avenue north. 



FIRST - CLASS 

town. Mrs. Cal- 

otlice, 15 Lake 



Personal— Mrs. Smith, 
pooy, etc., over l^uy 



Masseuse, 
B. Phone, 



PERSONAL-DR. BURNETT, 
list, top floor, Burro wfa buildmg. 



chiro- 
162t)-Y. 

DEN- 



FURNISHED 
(6 per month. 



WANTED— Y'OUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with light housework. Will accept one 
attending school or normal. 127 Tenth 
aveiiuj cast. 



MONEY T*© LOAN. 

DON'T BE DECEIVED 
by reckless advertising. We are the 
originators of the easy payment plan. 

75 CENTS PER WEEK 
pays both interest and principal on a 

$20,(10 l:>an. 

Call and let ua prove U. 
BALAKV AN D Cll.VT rb)L LOANS. 

DULUTH KINANr'i: CO.. 

801 Palladlo Bldg. 



PRIVATE HOSPITAL. 

URsT^'^LXN^O^fr^i^^ M ID- 

wife; female complaints. 413 .Se-venlh 
Ave. east. Old 'phone. 151t4; Zenith. l.:2o. 



inslali- 
Low- 



MONBY IXIANED ON HOUSEHOLD 
Jurniture. piano-i. horses and otki*-" Pfj": 
■onal nroperty the same day appiiea 
for. Loans can be paid in easy 
ments All busln-sa confidential 
est rates in the city. 

MINNES-)rA LOAN CO.. 

:,;05 Palladlo. 

Zenith, 8M. Old 'phono. 63o-M. 



FOR SALE— HORSES. 

HORSES FOR SALE. 
HORSES FOR SALE. ^, . , „ 
HORSES FOR SALE. 
HORSES FOR SALE. 
HORSES FOR SALE. „. , „ 
HORSES FOR SALE. 
HORSES FOR SALE. 
FOR SALE - LOGGlNtJ AND DRAKl 
hi)rse9; we have for .sale at our barn 
opposite the postoffke, the ttnest 
bunch of big logging and draft horst-s 
ever brought to Duluth. ^Tney mubl 
be sold und you can buy them at your 
own price. Part time given, if de- 
sired. Barrett & Zimmerman. Duluth, 
Minn. 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework, 1409 East Superior stree L 

WANTED-COMPETENT NURSE. 21li 
Tenth avenue east. 



PERSONAU-I. GILLEN. FASHION- 

able dressmaker. 1714 Jefferson street. 

i'liones, li»9it-R old. 2262, new. 

during con- 

Mpls, Mi no. 



Private hospital beXere and 
flnement, 1930 Clinton Ave.. 



PERSONAL - DERMATOLOGY AND 
scalp treatment at redueed rates dur- 
ing Lent, at Mrs. Smith's, over Day s. 



FOR KENT - SINGLE 
bedroom, use of bath, 
325 East First street. 

^^ RENT - FURNISHED ROCiIVlS 
single or en Buite; n*wly furnished, 
strictly modern; hot and cold runn n^ 
water in every room; |3 per week and 
UP Special rates by month. Ho 
Christopher, First Ave. W. and First 



:c! 

St. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion — No 
Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

FOR^S/O^E^^^nilSCELLANEOUSl 

FIXTURES FOR SALE. 

Becau.«e of remodelling store, we offer 
the following snaps in fixtures: 
AT HALF PRICE— About two dozen 

strong overhead nickle-plated ledge fix- 

AT $2.00 EACH— A number of $8.00 cloak 
and suit racks of oak. 

AT $25.00— A glass storm shed, with oak 
door, suitable for store or house. 

AT $?.00 EACH— About forty brass gas 
chandeliers, worth $10.00 each. 

AT $e'.00 EACH— Two brass wina^.w divid- 
ing rails, with green plush curtains; 
cost $25.00 each. 

AT $15.00— Seven square pedestals m oak, 
from 2 feet to 4 feet high, good as new; 
cost $i0.00. ^ „ 

AT $25.00— A $75.00 double-deck umbrtlU 
case, light oak. Lower part, 42 inches 
deep, 48 inches high. 47 inches wide; 
holds 104 umbrellas and has oonvix 
glass top. Upper part, 18 inches deep. 
47 inches wide, 36 inches high, with s Id- 
ing glass doors, for parasols or um- 
brellas; good as new. 

AT $12 0(.»— Three coat tables, polished gold- 
en oak tops, 54 inches by 12 feet long, six 
turned legs; cost double today. 

AT $2.50— An umbrella case, step style. 
holds 144 umbrellas. 

AT $7.50 EACH— Two large not'on b ns 
light oak finish, 24 inches high 
long, with four rows of open 
drawers; made to set on top of 
or to fit in showcase. 

AT 25c EACH-Four roll paper bolder 

GRAY-TALLANT CO. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 

MAioNIcT 
PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 79. A. F. * 
A. M.— Regular meetings firtt 
and third Monday evening! 
of each month at 7:30 o'clo^. 
Next meeting. March IB. 1908. 
Work— Second degree. EMward 
K. Coe, W. M.; H. Ne«bitt, 
secretary. 





FOR RENT-ONE FURNISHED ROOM, 
with ilgiu housekeeping privileges. 
East Fourth street. 



S feet 

s Iding 

counter 



IONIC LODGE, NO. 186, A. F. & A. M.— 

Regular meetings second and 
fourth Monday evenings of 
each month at 7:30 ocloclc. 
Next meeting March 22. 19.». 
Work— First degree. Carl F. 
Wiberg. W. M.. Hugh R. Bur- 
go, seeretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER, NO. 20, R. A. 
M -Staled convocations sec- 
ond and fourth Wednesday 
evenings of each month, at 
<::.S0 o'clock. Next convoca- 
tion March 11. Work- Royal 
Arch degree. Wilst>n. H. P.; 
Alfred Lc Riohleux, recorder. 




515 



EC»R RDNT-TWU STEAM 
lurnished rooms, complete 
keeping, inquire iib West 



HEA'^ED 
for house- 
Fourth St. 



FOR SALE-IRON AND WOODWORK- 
ing machinery and supplies, puUeye, 
shafting hangers, boxes, etc., new and 
second-hand. Northern Machmtry coiu- 
j)any, Minneapolis. 



DULUTH COUNCIL NO. 6, R. S. M. 

Regular meet:ngs first and 
third Fridav evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting March 2i.\ 1908 Work- 
lioval and Select Masters. 
.N'ewton H. Wilson, T I. M.l 
A,lfred l.^Rlchieux. recorder. 




DULUTH COMMANI>ERY. NO. 18. K. T. 
-Stated conclave first Tuesday 
of each month. Next conclava 
March 30. Drill. Wi l!am A. 
Abbett. eminent commandefj 
Alfred Le Richleux, recorder. 



ROOM, 

woman. 



PERSONAL-HAVE CAMERON REUP- 
holster your furiiiiure with leainer. 
tapestry, etc. Hair mattresses to order. 
Beth j.hones. 123 First avenue west. 



WANTED - TEACHERfi. STUDENTS, 
workers wanting to travel and earn 
money during vaeation Investigate our 
twenty-five lines of work Call 614 
Palladlo. 



WANTED - GIRl 
housewe>rk; one 
nights. Inquire 
avenue east. 



FOR GENERAL 

who can go home 
Flat No. im Elgiith 



WANTED - LAUNDRY GIRL WIK; 
thoroughly understands running shut 
machine, collar shaper and n-ckband 
ln)ner: good wages. Inquire bookktepei, 
Troy laundry. 



PEHSONAI^DRESgMAKING B\ Ex- 
perienced seamstress. Reasonablc- 
'prices. 503 West First street. 



I'ERSON.VL- WANTED 
go out nursing; terms 
22, Herald. 



PLACES 
reasonable. 



TO 
X. 



FOR RENT - ONE SINGLE 

furnisned, suitable for man or 
Housekeeping privileges allowed, wo 
East Fourth street. 



TTTH RK>JT— FIVE RO<.>M HOUSE; 

*aiso twcV?oom cottage, ttfi West Third 

street. 



FOR SALE 
Call New 
1231- K. 



- IRON 

'phone 



FOLDING 

1G2. Old 



BED. 

'phone 



FOR 

ture. 



SALE - HOUSEHOLD 
901 East Fifth street. 



FURNI- 



FOR SALE —OAK 
bookcase and wrumg 
Fourth. 



COMBINATION 
desk. 2315 East 



FOR RENT - TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 2lo2 
West 

1990. 



Superior street. Zenith phone. 



FOR SALE-COUNTRY EGGS. 
us your grocery order. W e 
pay day. Thatcher, 312 



PHONE 

trust till 

West Fourth St. 




SCOTTISH RITE. 
Regular meetings every Thur»- 
lay evening of each week at 
7 30 Next meeting. March 12, 
lit08. Work— Twenty-second de- 
gree and balloting. J. EL 
Cooley, secretary. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMOND.S. 
wuielies. furs, rifles, etc.. and all goods 
of value. $1 to $1,000. Keystone Ixmn 
& Mercantile Co., 116 West Superior 



St. 



MONEY SUPPLIED TO SALAUItiD 
people und others, upon their own notes 
without security, easy payments. Of- 
fices in sixty-three cities. Tolnian s. W9 
Palladio building. . 



Furniture .ind salaried lonns hy Union 
Loan company. 210 P;tlladlo building. 



FOR SALE - HORSE AND HARNESS 
and cutter. $80. Inquire corner Hit>- 
third avenue west and Ramsey street. 
Mrs. Hayden. _____ 

FOR~S^VLe! cheap - ONE GRAY 
horse, weight 1,4^»0; 4 years cud. Black 
horse weight 1,460; 4 years old; also 
delivery wagon. 26 East First street. 



WANTED — GOOD OIRL FOR GEN- 
erai housework. 1828 East Superior 
street. 



WANTED — 

chambermaid. 



AN EXPERIENCED 
Inquire St. Louis hotel. 



FOR SALE-FOUR YOUNG DELIVERY 
horses. 1,300 and 1,400 pounds each; 
work single or double. S. M. Kaner, 
12ia East Seventh street. 



FOR SALE-A GRAY MARE, 
old. Weight. 1,500 pounds. 
Mlehigan street. Cheap if 
once. 



7 Y^EARS 
311 West 
taken at 



MUSIC. 

MUSIC AAilJ MUslC.^L MEKCHANDISK Of 

"ifveiy Jescriptloa tJ'- 

son pbonugrapas. band 

land ofj^ifStrk .osiru 

lucuts, pianos St or^aat, 

lugvttldWttMGAAKD. 

J and 9 Vit»t .\vo. V\ est. 




cheaply on all 



clieap 
NoveU 



ty Co. 



talking 
130 W. Mich. 



FOR SALE-HORSES 
Third street. Herbert 



AT 
Inch. 



826 EAST 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GENEILVL 
housework; good wages. 1721 Eitst First 
street. 



PERSONAL - LAD1E&, AfcK ^YOUR 
druggist for Chlchestere Pills the Dia- 
mond brand. For -J^ years known as 
best safest, always reliable. iiu> or 
your druggist, take no other. 
Chichesters Lnamond Brand P.ils are 
sold by druggist* everywhere. 



REiNT-ONE Fl^RNISHED ROOM; 
suitable for one or 



FOR 

all conveniences; 

410 First avenue west. 



two. 



PERSONAL - MAtfgUERADE COS- 
tumes. Fanny Rot wold, 115 First ave- 
nue east. 



PERSONA l^THE EPIRELLA CORSET 
pitrlors are new hnated at 114 vV .bup. 
St.. over Folz'8. Old phone 



172.;- B. 



Dr Mitchell, electro-magnetic 
"Treats all disease*. «J5 W. 



specialist. 
First St. 



FOR RENT-MODERN FURNISHED 
room, in desirable location. Rent rea- 
sonable Address 12 West First street, 

flat "G." . 

ROOMS. CALL 22« 



FOR RENT-FOUR 
West Third. 



FOR RENT - TWO 
rooms .central. 222 East 



FURNISHED 
Third street. 



FOR SALE-MALE AND FEMALE 
canary birds. 107 East Superior street. 



i=OR RENT - THREE NICELY FUR; 
nished rooms for light housekeeping. 82. 
Eighth avenue west^ 

FOR RENT -FURNISH ED ROOMS. NO. 
1 Munger row. West Duluth. 



GREATEST PIANO AND PLAYER 

bargains are here this week. 

Novelty drawing room piano. $86. 

Large size Kingsbury piano. $198. 

Good medium size square. $37.50. 

One of the best l.irge size stjuares. $4o. 

Star piano and Appollo player. $1^8. 

Good oak piano and player $346. 

Fine mahogany piano and pianola, JAH). 

The above prices are the greatest ever 

offered. CaJl at once. , at 

KORBY PIANO CO. , 201 E. Superio r St. 

OFFICE FURNI- 

S. Ray & Co., 4013 

Both 'phones. 



ZENITH CHAPTER. NO. H. 
Order of Eastern Star. Regu- 
lar meetings second and fourth 
Fridav evening^j of each 
month at 7;30 o'clock Next 
meoinir March 1.". i;OS. Work- 
Balloting and Initiation Carrie Freimuth, 
•W M. ; Ella S. Ge.-irhart. secretary. 




EUCl 



FOR SALE-SAFES 
ture, fences, etc. J. 
West Superior street 



FOR BALBi-1125 TAKES A 
right piano. Big snap. 
West First street. Room 



FINE UP- 

Call at Z12 
6. 




LOLK3E. NO. 198. A. F. & A. 
M— Regular meeting first and 
third Wedn(.«day evenings of 
.^ach month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting March 



18. Sec- 
ond degree. E. G. Walindef, 

tart 



W. M : A. Dunle^avy secret 



WANTED-YOUNG GIRL TO ASSIST 
with care of two babies and light h'use- 
work; country girl preferred 
Wednesday. Macmillun, 6220 
I)erior street. Lester Park. 



East 



Cail 
Su- 



for. 
ave- 



WANTED - GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 119 Sixth avenue west. 



WANTED - 
housework. 



GIRL FOR GENERAL 
132 Twelfth avenue east. 



FOR SVLE-TEN Al HEAVY SLEIGH 
teams Red Cliff Lumber company. 
Thirty-ninth avenue wes t. 

Sho7hi'g~I^rne horses "jy ^P';^)"!*?;,^'^? 
trial. I. Randall. 2C9 \V. First St. 



WANTED-NORWEOIAN MAN WITH 
good home at Evclelh wants a house- 
keei/er- no objection to children. Ad- 
dress letters to Box 1»8. Eveleth, Minn. 



me u 



PHONOGRAPHS AND MUSICAL IN- 

•trument.«. Send your orders for popu- 
lar simgp and records to 21enlth 
Co.. No. 6 East Superior street 
Mirin 



Music 
Duluth. 



PIANO TUNING. 

T^ONE, 



C. A. llUEdORY, ZENllH 



606. 



WANTED-COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
gineral housework. 517 East Third 
street. 



Private home for Jadi«« before and dur- 
ing confinement; expert care, every- 
tliing contidential, 
Ida Pearson, M. D. 
nue, St. Paul. 

QUICK ~ASD GOOD PRINTlNa CALL 
old phomj, 1S04. Trade News Pub. Co. 



infants cared 
284 Harrison 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

FOR RENT-rrEW^"FOinrROlWrFl^ r, 
modern conveniences; also newly pa- 
pered three room flat, 508 West Third 
street, apply J E. Roos^ 



Office furniture, bar fixtures, refinished. 
"French Pc>lish" or "Mission Finish, 
furniture rebuilt. Zen. 1887. Weeterlund, 
cabinetmaker. 



PERSONAL-OLD MIRRORS RESIL- 
vered. St. Germain Bros., 121 1st. ave. w. 



PERSONAL-CENTRAL BATH 
lors. i4 WcEt Superior street^ 



PAR- 



VCiU RENT — FINEST EIGHT-ROOM 
^Z^otc^^aZ- -odern fl«t in .'ruluU., 
East Piid. T. W. Wahl & Co.. Lons- 
dale building. 



FOR RENT-FOUR ROOM FLAT, 
per month. C. H. Graves & Co. 



$!'« 



FOR SALE-COD LIVER OIL. 
berg, 8 East Superior street 
West Superior street. 



SWED- 
and :.015 



FOR SALE-WOOD SAW 
and second-hand gasoime 
luth Gas Engine works, 
south of aerial bridge. 



RIG. NEW 
engine:-. Du- 
thiee blockd 



CHAPTER. NO 59. R A. M.- 
Meets at W'est Duluth second 
and fourth Tuesdays of each 

month iit ':30..P- "\i, ^Tf! 
meeting, March 10. Regular 
business. J. H. OppermaJi.. H. 
p A Dunleavy. secretary. 



O. F.— 
evenins 
16 l.^ki 



LODGE, NO. 28, I O, 
Meets every Friday 
at Odd Fellows' hall 
avenue ni.rth. N.xt meeting- 
March 13. First degrea. 

John Andrews. nobU grand, W. H Konk- 

ler, recording secretary; A. 

clal secretary. 



H 



H 
Paul, 



flnan- 



FOR RENT-TWO 
room flats; electric 
compiete. 1030 West 



MODERN FOUR 
light and gas range 
First street. 



TIMBER LANDS. 



WANTED ATW ONCE-GOOD GIRL FOR 

gentral housewi-rk; very ^ood wafc;es 
to competent party._ 
Mrs. C. A. Pond, 



New 'phone, OU^, 
5806 Oneida street. 



WAN^rEr>-GIRL TO ASSIST WITH 
housework. 510 East ITilrd street^ 



WATCHES^EPMRED^___ 

1 WILL REPAIR WATCHES THAT 
others have failed to fix. Send by regis- 
tered mall to S. J. Nygren. Jeweler, 
West Duluth, Minn. 



. GRUESEN. 

Duluth. New 



in K i^M 
plione. 



4. 

1393. 



OVER BIG 



Guaranteed Main 

cleaned. ^1. Garon, 



Spring, 
Bros.. 213 



$1: 
West 



watch 
IsiSL, 



BOARD OFFERED. 

J^TrST^TlASS TABLE BOARD AND 
roefm; Steam heat. 313 West Third St 



BOARD AND ROOM IN 
ily; no children; very 
Y 48. Herald. 



PRIVATE FAM- 
central. Address 



HOARD OFFERED - FURNISH El» 
BOARD ^^^\^^.^^^ 2ig ^-est Third St. 



rooms 



BOARD AND ROOM-CHOICE TABLE 
board beautifully furnished rooms 
and all modern conveniences; reason- 
able terms. 919 East First street. 



WANTED-GIRL TO WASH DISHES 
Midland Hotel. 210 West Second street. 



WANTED - GIRL 
housework; small 
Third street. 



FOR 
family. 



GENERAL 

1112 East 



I BUY STANDING TIMBER, 
cut-over lands. George Rupley, 
ceum building. 



ALSO 
404 Ly- 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOM MODERN 
centraU; all hardwood floors ; 
Wahl & Co.. 208 



FOR SALE-ENDION DIVISION ^LOT; 
will take pay in excavation work. ti. 
C. Fulton. Zenith 'phone, 52. 

FOR KALE-SECOND-HAND LAUNCH; 
will rebuild to suit purchaser: ^a feet 
long. Duluth Boat Co. 

H^"~^i:i^l-~lT^~l^AL ^'ASCJLINE 
range at a bargain. Cost $—.50, gooa 
fil new. 617Mt West First street, up- 
stairs. 




K. O. T. M. 

D.iluth Tent. No. 
every Wednesday 



very 



tlat; 

verv neat. T. w 

Loiisdale building. 



FOR SALE-lOO ACRES IN TOWNSHIP 
67-21. M. Gibson's cruise. Mackey J. 
Thompson, 514 Pioneer Press building, 
St. Paul. Minn. _ 



BELL US YOUR LANDS AND TIM- 
ber. Hopkins Realty company, 500 Tor 
rey building. 



ASHES AND GARBAGE^ 

Removed-Gust Holmgren. 42S South 
east. Old 'phone, t94-K. 



2l8t 



avenue 



REPAIRING Ahm JINWORK^ 

SHEET IRt»N. COPPER WORK. ROOF- 
Ing guttering, spout Ini;. doio- lo order. 
C. J. Gauss. Zenith 'phone. 2'292. 



Call up Popkln. 1S57-X. at 18th 6th Ave. W 



FOR RENT— STORES. 

ITOR'ltENT^^tONT HALF OF S'TORl 
No. 3 West Superior street. 



HOARD AND ROOM OFFERED-TWO 
gentlemen: private family. 318 Third 
avenue west. ^_^ 

BOARdTaND ROOM. 16 50 PER WKeTc; 
modern conveniences. The Dakotah. 
W. Second St. New phone. 1446. 

OR BOARD - TREMONT 
12 Lake avenue north. 



117 



ROOMS 
hotel. 



WANTED-A NICE GIRL WHO IS 
working and takes her meals out. to 
stay nights with a lady for company. 
Inquire 19 Seventh avenue west^ 

WANTED— A COMPETENT GIRL PlTR 
general housework. 1732 East Flrst^St. 

W'ANT ED-GOOD GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework: good wages. 21" Second ave- 
nue east. 



BUY TIMBER iK COOK OR LAKE 

counties. Also furnish abstracts of title. 
Alex. McBean. 406 Burrows building. 



I 



PAINTING & PAPER HANGING 



PAINTING AND PAPER 
done at reasonable price* 
1106 East Sixth street. 



I 

HANGING 
I. Oness, 
Zenith, 1067-D. 



FOR PAINTING. PAPERING, CALCI- 
mining. liardwood finishing, etc. Ari- 
drew Ringsred, 322 East Slxtn street. 
(i|d, 513- M. 



M. A. COX, 330 EAST 



MILLINERY. 

FOURTH 



ST, 



SHELDON-MATHER 
First National Bank 



TIMBER CO. 
bldg. Phone. 



. f.V.1 
1501. 



MRS. BRANDT, 114 WEST FOURTH ST 



FOR SALE - SILVER COMB WHITE 
and brown leghorns, in fine condition, 
can rent complete place. Millbrook 
Poultry farm, Duluth. 

FOR SALE -~LK1HT SPRING OVER- 
c-ac. gray extra good quality and wel 
made; size 36. three-quarters length; $10 
cash takes it. W.. Herald. 



1, meet* 
evening at 
Maccabee hall. 2H West Fir«t 
street. Vi.siting members al- 
wavs welcome. Office in hall, 
hours, 10 R. m. to 1 p. m dally. 
A J Anderson, commander. 



FOr'saLE-I will .sell 100 SHARES 
of White Iron Lake stock cheap. lii- 
at 1705. Piedmont avenue west. 



quire 

Ti'PE WRITERS 
for sale. $25 up. 
perlor fclreet. 



FOR RENT - ALSO 
Edmont, 410 West Su- 



MODERN SAMARITANS. 

ALPHA COUNCIL. NO. 1. 
n.eets at Elks' h.ill every 
T'l'irsdav evening at • 
> e! c^K ' B.-neflcent degree. 
fll:st and third Thursday, 
.Samaritan deg^ree second and 

^ribe" First National bank 
Wallace P. Welbanks, 
aritans invited. 




scribe. 



financial 
building} 
All Sam« 



^^v 




WANTED-NURSE GIRL, COME 
lline: call 2601 East Fifth street. 



DAY- 



GIRL FOR 
2020 Jefferson 



GENERAL 
street. 



Room 



and Board-301 East Third street. 



PICTURE FRAMINO^^^^^ 

^^^^^KER^sT^ie^SECOND AVENUE W. 
GUS^TAV HEN NECK E. 211 E. SUP. ST. 



FARM LANDS.__^ 

FOR SALE- EIGHTY ACRES. VERY 
good soil, with some improvements, 
eight miles from Grant;-burK, Wis.; new 
railroad being built within lour mll-s. 



TENTS AND AWNINGS. 

POIRIKR &^CO.. b« East Superior St. 



WANTED - 
housf-work. 

WANTl:i>^>riLLrNERY MAKERS AT 
Freimulh's. 



Anyone wishing timber 
claims, write J. T. Joyce 



and homestead 
Athawa, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



WANTED TO BUY 

BUY-l IVE 



WANTED TO _ . 
room cottage In Easi end 
anu state terms. Address 



OR SIX- 

glve location 
V 39, Heiald. 



MOVING AND STORAGE. 



PEOPLE 8 MOVING & 



207V» 



West Superior 



STORAGE CO., 
street. Both 



phones, flOl. 



DULUTH VAN & STORAGE 
pany, 21C West Superior street. 



COM- 



FOR SALE - STOCK 
City & Lake- Superior 
Line) at $3.'i per share 
V. 48, Herald. 



IN THE TWIN 

railroad (Arrow 

; par value, $100. 



WANTED-SALESLADY 
department. Frelmuth's. 



FOR ART 



WANTED - GIRL. 
light housekeeping, 
street. 



ABOUT 17. 
922 East 



FOR 

Fifth 



W\NTED - EVERY W<1MAN. MAN 

and child that has rough skin or chaos 
to us» Kugl<"r"s Karnation K<>ld Kream 
the great skin food. 25c. Kugler 
Druggist. 108 West Superior 



CLOTHES CLEANED&^RESSED 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN. ZENITH 
Valet. 213 W. First St. Both phones. 

JOHN MUELLEr7 202 WEST^FIRST ST. 

PANTORn-NL~lirFIRST AVENUE W. 



BT'STNESS CHANCES-FOR SALE- 
Buffel and cafe, loca'icn best in Minne- 
apolis good trade, and a bargain to 
right pariv; cause for seiiing. retirinj,' 
from business. ALso 44-rnom hotel 1:: 
good location and doing big busliifss. 
J.ihn Mack, Liberty hotel, Minneapolis, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE - LIVERY. DOING GOOD 
business: good rcfison for sellinp. A\*- 
dress C Herald. 



WANTED TO BUY - NATIONAL CASH 
r'^ilsier- tota' adder; must be in good 
condi'llon. Give descnplic.n and spot 
cash pr'ce. .A-ddress A. E. 
Evenlntj HJiald. 



Duluth 



ancier. 



A O U. W. . 

Fidelity lodge. No. 106 meet* 
•a Maccabee hall. 224 We»t 
First street, every Thursday 
al 8 p. ni. Visiting membert 
welcome. W. J. Stephens, M. 
\V.; W. W. Fensterrruichef, 
recorder; O. J. 
East Fifth street. 



Murvold. fltt* 




W \NTr;D TO BUY - NATIONAL CASH 
^Ve.i^Jst'eV; small size; total adder, for 
barber ^hr.p; will pay spot cash. Ad- 
dress Y. 49, Herald. 



Your 
street. 



ARCHITECTS^ 
FRANK L. YOUNG & CO.. 201 Pal. Bldg. 



STENOGRAPHERS. 

STENXM^RArHSK^LTESS^ i 

keeping and .stenography at any hour. ! 
2815 West Third street. 



WANTED TO BUT-5C-FOOT LOT, BE- 

^teen Lake and Sixteenth av-nues eas.. 

mention best cash price fi«St 'etUr, 

owners only. Address A. Heitmann, 

general delivery ,^ity.^ 

WANTErTTOBUY-HOUSE AND LOT 
for cash. I 80,_Hetam. 

7.- * xJT^irr> to' buy — A LARGE OR 

^\man^mct of lind for investment. I G9, 

Herald. 



1908. B, 
Hoopes, 



COURT ' COMMERCE, NO. 
3:«3 Independent OrdeT of 
r\.resters, meets first and 
third Friday evenings at » 
o'clock, at Rowleys hall, Na 
West First s^eeV J^^J^ 
,n,.eting^ March_ ^ 



112 
rcKi 
M. B 
R. S. 



lar 
ickminster. 



^^^^ 




M. W. A. 

IMPERIAL CAAiP, 
meets at Macctibee 
West First street, 
fourth Tuesdays 
month. George 



NO 2206, 

ball, 214 

second and 

of each 

Lindberg, V. 



GRACE BARNETT. 



^RSTNXT:BLt3G ! SATIN SKIN SPECIALTIES. 




C p. Earl, clerk. Box 411. 



Na 



NORTH STAR LODGE, 
as. Knights of Pythias, meet* 
every Tuesday night. Joha 
J Lumm, C. C; James A. 
K. R. S. 



Wharton, 



CLAN 



Appl 
8 tree 



I 



C. Aiuhrson, 
Duluth, Minn. 



1907 West Firat 



FOR SALE-SELECTED FARM LANDS 
In the agricultural sections of Northern 
Minnesota, and homesteads and timber 
claims in the timber district. Easy 
terms of payment. Correspondence so- 
licited. R. C. Mitchell. Jr., 312 and 
313 Torrey buUditig, Duluth. 

1 CAN LOCATE YOU ON RICHEST 
farm land."* In Willow river and Little 
Fork valley. New rail and county 
road.s thr.)Ui?h valley. Pat. Greaney, 
Oheen, Minn. 



LIQUOR HABIT CURED. 

""cTuARANlMOirTHrTuRi^ IN 
two weeks. No danger to health 11 1 
East Superior, tlat U. I'rof. J. B. Fiseto. 




I AS bread feeds the body. Satin skin 
!. ream supplies nourishment to the skin. 



FOR SALE— COWS. 



FOR SALE-S. M. KANER HAS A 

great number of fresh milch cowa. 
some Jerseys amonx 
Seventh street. 



them. 1219 East 



FOR SALE - LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlors: small pay- 
balance on fifteen 
h' fore privilege. Call 
pHrtment. D. & I. R. 
t,l2 Wolvin building. 



ments down and 
years' time; on or 
or address, land dt 
Rallwny company, 
nuluth. Minn. 



PATTERNS TO MEASURE. 



SPECIAL LES.SONS ON MAKING 
shlrt-wnist sult.s. etc. Also classes in 
easy method of cutting and fitting. Miss 
Gray, third floor. Gray "-•"•—• •''■ 



FOR SALE-E. CARLSON "VN-ILL AR- 
rlve with a < ar of fre.sh milch cowa 
Saturday. March 7. 'Twelfth street and 
Twenty-second uveiiue west. Zenith 
Ifol-D. 



MEDICAL^ 

.\1)IES - DR. LA FRANCO'S 

pound; safe, speedy ri^gulator; 25 
DrugKisi or mall. liooklet free 
La Franco. Philadelphia. Pa. 



COM- 

cents. 

Dr. 



-Tallant e^o. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTETT^TOnftENT- THREE ROOMS, 
furnished for light housekeeping; oii 
car line In respectabl.- locality; would 
ahara flat. X. 21. Herald. 



FOR RENT— HOUSES. 

FOirRENT^^^si>r"ROO\^^ 
convenient. F. M. Crouch. »>31 East 
Second street. Old 'phone. 1410-R. 



Trying to do business in 
Dulutli without using 



FOR SALE CHEAP - FURNISHED 

cottage. 3G15 Minnesota avenue. Park 
Point, bay side. Must be sold at 
once. Old "phone 603-K. 



FOR RENT-MODERN 
house, 1429 Jefferson 
next door. 



EIGHT 
street. 



ROOM 
Inquili' 



THE "HERALD" 



FORJAI-E— REAL^STATK^ 

^^^^ ^ LOTS. COR- 

ner Forty-first 

street, 
avenue. 



FOR SALE. CHEAP-SIX ^^.^. 

tut\ e/*^ .. -. avenue west and Fifth 

Address J. D. K.. 1186 Lincoln 

St. Paul. Minn. 




STEWART, NO-,^i.2i 
n.eets first and third 
days each month, 
Folz hall^^ 
street. 



S. C, 

We<inea* 

8 p. ni., 

116 West Superior 

James D. McGhl», 



secre- 



chief: Don Mcl>ennan, 
-tarv John Burnett, financial, 
s creiary. 413 First National 
Benefit dance for Mr*. 



Bank building- ,^ 

Dalglelsh. March 18. 1908. 



SUBORDINATE DIVI- 



FOR SALE CHEAP-A HOUSE AND 
two lots at 505 West Michigan street. 
H. M. Jo hnson. 

ROYAL LEAGUE. ^ ^ ., 
ZENITH COUNCIL. NO 161, 
Royal league, meets in Elks 
hall, first and third Monday 
evenings at 8 o'clock. Charles 
S Palmer, archon, city hall, 
Andrew Nelson, scribe. 
First National Bank building. 




309 



LOYAL GUARD, ^SL^^^....^^.-^-^^^^ ^ 

A Kalamazoo bloe;k. Mrs. 
Bertha Cameron, captain gen- 
eial H. V Holmes, paymas- 
ter '415 Fifteenth avenue e^*.J;- 
E ' F Heller, recorder. i» 
W'est Fifth street. 




IS 



I 



like digging a 

needle. 



well with 







1045. meets every first and 
third Mondays. at , GiUey s 
hall. West Duluth. Matthew 
Ettinger. commander, .08 

Eighteenth and Orje-Half 
avenue west. New phone, 
vm-S. Finarce keeper. Edward Shanits, 
^North Fifty-eighth avenue west, rec- 
ord kee'ler.C. 5. Low. 5712 Wadena 

sti ce L .__^ 

A O. U. W. 

DULUTH LODGE. NO. 10. 
meets at Odd Fellows' hall 
every Tuesday evening, at 8 
o'clock.- Andrew Hager. M. 
W ■ R G. Foote, recorder; 
T. J. St. Germain, financier, 
121 First avenue west-^ 



«°ifN''ffH"*c?.%''\f NT, NO. 
1044, meets every second 
fcurth Friday of the 
at Kalamazoo hall »■ 
mander, Cliarles B. Norman, 
K.IO Minnesota ave."ue, 
keeper arid f'"^"^^,. ^^^P^*/ 

C. H. Loomis res'deric^e 429»A Ea>t 

Fourth street. Zenith, 2J.0-Y. 



and. 
month 
Com- 
_rman| 
record - 




W^OODMEN 
ZENITH CITY 

every 











1 









I 



COURT EASTERN STAR. 
Court Eastern Star. No. 8^ 
U O F.. meets every first 
e.iid third Tue.sdays in thj 
month at Maccabee hall. 12* • 
West First street. Jamea 
Kelley. C. B., 51S Fourth 
Hvenue east. Joseph W^llde, 
.secretary, 452 Mesaba avenua. 
Harry Mlln'cs, treasur er. Office at haU. 

' OF THE WORLD. 
CAMP. NO. 6 MEETS 
second and fourth 
Wednesday at the old Ma- 
sonic temple, fifth floor, JoUa 
Haugen. O. C; A. M. Holmea, 
banker. 720 West Fifth street, 
flat E; Robert Forsyth, clerl^ 
bi7 East Second street. 




w 




■w 



ISDULUTH EVENINGHERA 




8 PAGES 



TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR 



RPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 12. 1908. 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS, 



ONE OF PROPRIETORS OF 
A FASHIONABLE BOARDING 
SCHOOL KILLS PARTNER 



She Then Sent Bullet 

Into Her Own 

Brain. 



Terrible 
acted 



Tragedy En- 
In Laurens 



School, Boston. 

Murderer Had Been In- 
mate of Sanitarium 
for Some Time. 



Boston. March 11. — A murder and 
Buicul« at the Liiurens^ school, an ex- 
c»u»ive finishing school for young wo- 
mfn, at 107 Audohon Koad, is reported 
to the p< lice. 

Thf dead women are Miss Sarah 
Chamberlain Weed of llli West Wil- 
low Grove avenue, C?hestnut Hill, Phil- 
adtlrhia. and Miss Elizabeth Bailey 
Hardee of 214 (Jwinneth street, Kust 
Maviinnah, Ga Each was about 3D 
years of age and they had been inti- 
mate friends since their graduation 
from Wellesley college. Miss Hardee 
receiving hei dip.oma in 1«I»4, while 
Mlsf? Weed received hers a year later. 
Miss Hardee was an instructor in 
mathematics at Wellesley in 189".t and 
1}«0(>. and .since that time had been 
teaching in Vermrmt. Miss Weed had 
also l>een teaching in various sections 
of the ciuiitiy. 

'»|M'n UoardiiiK ScIhk*!. 

Liast suifin.ei the two women dvcid- 
c6 to open a boarding school for girls 
on Audobou lioisd. in the Fenway. On 
Oct 1, the day upon which the Lrfiu- 
ren^ school, as they called it, was 
opened. Miss Weed broke down as a 

(Contlnimi on F.'ige 7. Tliird Column.) 

GAVE"tHE POLICE 
BATTLE OF LIVES 

Canadian Prize Fighter 

Lays Low Several 

at Minneapolis. 

Miniuart'l's. Minn. Man h 11.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— John Derosla, said to 
be a Canadian prize fighter gave the 
polJct a battlf ol thfir lives Tuesday 
nlgtit. 

He w;»s lanilcd in jull only after a 
patrolman and a detective had suffered 
broken or dislocated b<>iie:^ auil a nuini)er 
of citizens who laiiie tc> the aid ol the 
officei.v had been laid low. 

Derosi.i had «»p"ken t«> ;in operator em- 
ploytd l>v thi Twin Cuv Telephont- coni- 
pany making an untoward remark lo 
her" it is claimed. • 

An angry crowd gathered and severa. 
men sei2» ci Dt-rosia. He felled then* wUn 
his tist as fast as tiu'v came. 

Then Uffictr McljonaUl stepped in and 
got a bl«>w on the cheek for his pains. 
He giappUd witti tht man. however, and 
with tiie aiil of hystand»TS, dragged him 
to tilt ceiitr.il Station. As they entcrtd 
thf ilui:i tlu' Tag" struck the officer a 
blow that dislocated hi,s slioulder, and 
■wh< II l>eteriive .Martin.sou inlerfer»d. he 
Buttered a broken wris^l. 




GOVERNOR 
WELCOMK 

To Minnesota Thousands 

of Buttermakers From 

Every State. 

Annual Convention of 

National Society Opens 

at St. Paul. 



MESSAGE BY 
PRESIDENT 

Recommends Extension 
of Time for Reinstate- 
ment of Soldiers. 

Reports on the Browns- 
ville Affair Presented 
to the Senate. 



EVELYN N. THAW BEGINS 
ACTION FOR ANNULMENT 
OF MARRIAGE TO HARRY 



HARRY ORCHARD. 
Who Has Changed His Plea on the 
Charge of Murdering Former Gov- 
ernor Stuenenberg Frorrj Not Guil- 
ty to Guilty. He Will Be Sen- 
tenced March i8. 



THE FIRST IN 
OKLAHOMA 

Republican State Conven- 
tion Meets to Elect 
Delegates. 

Indications Are That They 

Will be Instructed 

for Taft. 



Oklahoma City, Okla , March ll.-Fjf- 
leen hundred Republicans today at- 
tended the state convention which will 
na«uc four delegates at large to the 
national convention. Th» indications 
were that the delegates would be in- 
structed for Taft for president Un- 
UHiial Interest ls» attached to thie con- 
vention, the first RciiuMlcan Ftate gath- 
ering to assemble since the admission 
of Oklahoma a*, a state. 

A few delegates who favor any candi- 
date other than Taft have- joined in an 
♦•ndeavor to pn vent an instructed cJeie- 
gation for tlic ,st-cret:iry of war while 

manv who favoi Taft ai. «i»f »'i»".K ^^^'tJ.*; 
Chairman Hunter. Hunter is a ^"oii^h 
Rider" and Hit leaders ( narge that Me 
has exvcrised undue InfUu-nc^* in the 
di.strll>ution of patronage and that he 
has tlone this while holding the ofTice 
of chrk of tlie federal court, which 
position he now occupies 

C hainnan Will Not K***'lc:". 

CiiJiiriuan Hunter has rtsisted all 
pressure brought upon liisa to resign 
imd it Is believed tie will not volun- 
tarily st.p down, altliougli it has cle- 
v»lop»d that alrt-ady many of the dele- 
gat»'S ari- opposed to him. 

All efforts of the state committee to 
aurrcc' on a trmporary organization yi s- 
l^rday and last night having faiUd It 
was .xpeited tliat two sets of officers 
would l«e presented to the convention. 

It was eontiibntiv assfrl«d tnat Sec- 
lelarv Taft would be endorsed by a 
larn." n.ajoiity .md it si-fineci settled 
that Congrvssniaii Bird S. McCiUlre 
Ki-rmcr l>el'g;tt«- Dennis Flyiin and 
James Harris would be chosen as three 
deleg.it es at large to the national con- 
vention. . . .,11. 

Who II the oth«r delegates will be can 
onlv l.> dot.riuined alter a vote Is 
taken (»nlv a ma.lorlty of the dele- 
Kites favor instructions. There are Wfi 
delegates to the <onvention and only 
;i few of this number are represented 
by proxies. 

SISTEROBJECTS 
TO ANARCHISTS 



St. Paul. Minn., March 11.— (Special to 
The Herald. •— Buttermakers from nearly 
every state in the union assembled at 
the St. Paul auditorium at lu oclock to- 
day to begin a three days' conventicm. It 
is estimated that bettveen ^.WK> and 3,(100 
butter;iiakerE will be in attendance be- 
fore toinorrc<w Of this number there 
will be representatives from every one 
ot the 1100 creameries in Minnesota. Del- 
e^'atet from Boston, New York and Phil- 
adeljiiia arrived yesterday afternoon. A 
spccitU car brought a large number Iroin 
Iowa last nignl and a carload arrived 
from South Dakota this morning. Others 
are coming from Winnipeg, the state ot 
W.'cshiiigton, Wisconsin, Illinois and sur- 
r< iinding stales. A special delegation 
huH at rived from l»es Moines. Iowa, with 
the oliject ol securing the next con- 
vention for that City and to boom Iowa 
a-! a butter state. 

WeleoiiuMl by Governor. - 

The firs; iiu.tiiig this morning began 
with an address of \ve!co:iu by Governoi 
Johnson and a respons* by H. J. Nletert 
c>r Walker, Iowa. He was followed by 
President J. J. Farrc 11 of Carver, Minn., 
who delivered his annual address and by 
H B. Shilling of Chicago, secretary anl 
treasurer, v.ho read his annual report. 
Ju.'^t before the noon adjournment vari- 
ous committees were appointed and then 
the delegates inspected the exhibits 
which have been arranged on the stag-; 
of the Auditorium, which occupies th-. 
south half of the building. 

This afternoon tne first numl>er on the 
program is an address by T. Cornelison 
ot Kau Claire, Wis., who wlii discubt^. 
•How Can a Buttermaker Hold His Pat- 
rt'nage Against Cnwladesome Competi- 
tion and Yet Get a Good Quality of 
Cream." 

M. P Mortenson of Cokato. Minn., will 
address the ccjnvention on "Starters and 
C're.im RJpeners, ' and Ralph C. H. Fow- 
ler of Moravia, N. Y., will deliver .an 
address on "Should Pasteunzailcn ol 
Milk or Cream be Made Compulsory by 



Washington, March 11.— hi connection 
with the report of the senate commltee 
on military affairs on the Brownsville 
riot, which was mad* to the senate to- 
day, the president traji«mitt#d a message 
in which he said that the f«cte set form 
in his order dismlssinfe tlie negro 
soldiers had been substantiated by the 
lestimony belore the committee. 

He recommended m hie message that 
the time for the reinstatement of tlie 
discharged soldiers, which has expired, 
be extended for a year in order to permit 
the president to reinstate any of the dis- 
charged men who did ncjt fall within the 
terms of his dismissal. 

Senator Warren pr«semed the report 
of the committee on be^lf of the ma- 
jority and Senator Foraker the views of 
the minorily. 



ROOSEVELT 
DELEGATES 

To the Number of Nine- 
ty-Five Will Appear 
at Omaha. 

Are Instructed to Vote 
for President for An- 
other Term. 



Lrfiw 



NERVE OF THREE 

(OWKTS FAILED. 

Butte. Mont.. March 11 —A dispatch to 
the Miner from Dei r Lodge says that at 
th«" toron<r's incjuest over tin- be dy iif 
I>eputy Warden John Robinson. wh>>'wa.<r< 
murdered in an atteniiit to break pri^ion 
Sunday by Convicl^; George Ro( k and 
William Hayes, it develops from the tes- 
timony of other C4)nvicts that a eonspir.'ic.v 
existed ainongr five' ccuivicts tc:i make a 
lireak, but apparently the n« rve of all ex- 
cept Rock and Hayes failed at the cru> lal 
time Ro*.k and Hayes are charged with 
the muider of Robinson by the verdict of 
the jury. 



TRAGEDY IN ADTO 
RACES B^ EGYPT 

Three Men Killed and 

Fourteen Injured by 

Runaway Car. 

Cairo, March 11.— The khedive of 
Egypt, accompanied by the duke and 
duchess of Conneaught, were present at 
Heliopolis yegterdi4y at the first auto- 
i.^obile races held in Egypt. The con- 
tests were attended by a fatal accident, 
liuring the second race one of the cars 
ran over a fallen cusUion and dashed 
out «jf the course. A policeman and 
tv.'o spectators were killed and four- 
teen persons were injured. After this 
accident the duke and the duchess left 
ana tnt; races came to an end. 

"thiriTfloors 

Of Rochester, N. Y., Schools to be 
Abandoned lintil Safe. 

Rochester. N. Y.. J4f..cvh IJ.— Mayor Jilek- 
gerlon. after a conference wMh the pres- 
ident of the board of ^ education, super- 
intendent ol city sch(»olB and the com- 
missioner ot public sa!i||jr, has ordered 
thai all ol the ih.id stc»n6f of the Roch- 
estei public sc^houls be ftbaJidoned so tar 
as the reception ol pupils Is concerned. 
Thit afTects five school buildings. 
Cbangts were also made in the heating 
apparatus of many schools, and all In- 
side opening doort; .ixe to be changed 
to open toward the outside. I'Mve drills 
iWiCe a week hereafter have been or- 
dered. 



Omaha, Neb., March 11— Delegates In 
numbers began arriving today for the 
Rejiublican state convention which will 
be held Thursday. 

There are 925 accredited delegates. Of 
this number about 750 have been in- 
structed for Taft and of the remain- 
der, 106 are Instructed for Roosevelt 
and tl-.e rest will go Into the conven- 
tion uninstructed. The principal con- 
tention on presidential preference has 
occurred in the Second district (Lin- 
colnt, where ninety-five delegates were 
Instructed to vote for President Roose- 
velt for another term. In the Fifth dis- 
trict, where La Follette had a follow- 
ing a month ago, led by Former Con- 
gressman McCarthy, a Taft delegation 
has been selected and McCarthy him- 
self has indorsed the candidacy of the 
secretary of war. 

No serious contest is expected on 
the selection of delegates at large, all 
four of whom have been practically 
agreed upon. Senator Brown and Gov- 
ernor Sheldon will lead the delegation, 
and Victor Rosewater of Omaha, and 
Allen W. Field of Lincoln are slated 
for the other two members of the at 
large delegation. There is a contest 
for national committeeman, with no 
less than three avowed candidates in 
the field. 




-T" 



NEW RURAL. ROUTE. 
Washington. March 11. — (Special to The 
Herald. I -Rural tree delivery route> No. 
3 ha« been ordered established on May 
1 at EUigle Bend, TodG county, Minn., 
serving ^» people antt eighty-hve fami- 
lies. 



ANTICIPATES 
INSANITY PLEA 

District Attorney Attempts 
to Prove Priest's Mur- 
derer Sane. 

Denver. Colo.. March 11.— Anticipating a 
plea of insanity on behalf of Giuseppe 
Alia, on trial for the murder of Father 
Leo. District Attorney Stidger has taten 
the unusual course of attempting to es- 
tablish the defendant's sajuty before it 
has been denied by his attorney. Four 
alleni.«ts testified positively yesterday thai 
m their c.plnion Alia is absolute Iv sane, 
and was so when he shot the priest ii) 
St Elizabeth s Catholic church Sunday. 
Feb 23 after receiving the sacrami-nt at 
his hands. When court reconvened to- 
da^v three other experts who have ex- 
amined the prisoner were r^dy to give 
their testimony to the same effect. 



EUGENE SCHMITZ, 
Former Mayor of San Francisco, Who 
Was Released Tuesday After Being 
in Jail for Ten Months. 



MORSE SAYS 
NOTGUILTY 

Former Banker Arraigned 
on Indictment of Twen- 
ty-Nine Counts. 

Furnished Bail in $30- 

000 and is Released 

From Custody. 



Papers Served Upon Hus- 
band and Upon His 
Mother. 

Thaw's Family Favor 

Suit and Will Provide 

for Evelyn. 

Trouble Began Year 

Ago During the 

First Trial. 



New York, March 11. — The first legal 
step was taken today by counsel for 
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw in her contem- 
plated action to secure tne annulmenlj 
of her marriage to Harry K. Thaw. 

Daniel O'Reilly, the young wife'a 
counsel, said today he has sent a clerk 
to the Matteawan asylum to serve the 
papers in the case upon Thaw, anit 
that he also has sent papers to b« 
served on Thaw's mother. He said: 

"Legally speaking, Harry Thaw is 
dead, so it is necessary to have for a 
defendant his next of kin. The mother 
will not try to make any trouble foP 
us. She is very kindly disposed to- 
ward our case, and is sympathetic with 
the attitude young Mrs. Thaw i:aa 
taken. We do not believe that wc will 
experience any difficulty in procuring 
a decision In our favor. 

"Nothing has been done in regard 



DESERTING 

THE SULTAN 

Natives Leaving Mulai 

Itafid and Going 

Back to Aziz. 

Paris. Mai eh 11.— Government advices 
received here from Moroceo indicate 
that the star of Mulai Hatid. the so- 
called sultan of the South, is waning 
fast. The repeated vietorics of tlie 
French forces, coupled willi the indif- 
ferent attitude displayed by Hatid, who 
left tile camp at Mech El Chair for u 
period of tive weeks, have created dls- 
affet tion and resentment among his fol- 
lowers. Two of the most powerful 
Raids In the South of Morocio, Cllaeul 
and MtiMigi. are reported tt) be on the 
point ot deserting ilalid and are about 
to make terms witli Abd El Aziz, the 
sultan of record. Sherc-ef El Kltanl ^^ ^j^^. ^^^.^^ ^.^^^ ^^..^^ ^jji^j ^y ^^hlef 

^i'z^''irS%'o'"h\i;V'Vei'-'oifil^":.\'sc^';^'- Of Police Sliippy, today entered a pro- 
aged at Hatids failure to appear at ] test against anarchists taking part in 
" " '" ' *' ■• " •■'" jj^^. ceremonies incidental to the re 



I JOHNSON OF MINNESOTA-DEMOCRACY'S NORTH STAR. 1 

% Danio PemcKracv: "If I C«u On'.y Keep <>« Tliiy Course, I'm Sure to Reach a Safe Port." % 



New York, March 11.— Charles W. 
Morse, the former banker, and Alfred 
H. Curtis, formerly president of the 
National Bank of North America, 
pleaded not guilty, in the United States 
circuit court, today, to a joint indict- 
ment of twenty-nine counts. Eleven 
of the counts charged them with con- 
spiracy, and eighteen charged them 
with making false entries. 

Bail was P.xed at $30,000 for Morse 
and $10,000 for Curtis. They were pa- 
roled in custody of their counsel, in 
order to secure bail, and were allowed 
three weeks to reconsider their plea. 
Both Morse and Curtis, gave bail. Mr. 
Morse, at first, demurred to the $30,000 
he was required to furnish, and said: 

"Well, I suppose I am the goat, as 
usual" 



Having Anything to Do 

With Removal of Avcr- 

busli's Body. 

Chicago. March 11.— Olga Averbush. sis- 



Fez and it is now believed that If tne 
troops of Gen. llagdanla, chief of the 
sullan'.s army, shoubl march on the 
Moorish capital tlicy would take pos- 
Bes.sion of tlie city in the name of Sul- 
tan Abd El Aziz without meeting much 
opposition. 

THE CII.\INS ON Alios 

SPUEAU CONSUMPTION. 

Chicago, March 11.— Chains on tuto- 
moblle wheels were last night accused 
of spiea.ling con.sumption. The charge 
was made at a meeting of the city 
council judiciary committee, and an 
ordinance, forbidding their use was 
discussed. Dr. J. T. Pennington, who 
appeared before the committee, said: 

"You pass a law forbidding a man 
to spit on the sidewalk, t(» curb con- 
sumption, and then you let him put a 
chain on- his automobile wheel to stir 
up the dust and germs on the street. 
As a health measure, an anti-chain 
ordinance should be passed." 

Members of the committee and Sec- 
retary Sidney S. Gorham of the (Chi- 
cago Automobile club will take an au- 
tomobile trip to test the allegation that 
chains on tires are a menace to the 
public health. 



moval of her brother's body from the 
potters field to a Jewish cemetery. The 
Jewish Free Hurial ussoelatlon, which 
has the matter In charge, declared that 
anarciiism is reprehensible to the Jewish 
race, and is forbidden by the tenets of 
their religion. ^ ^ , . ^ , 

The anarchists who had planned cele- 
brations were greatly surprised when 
told that they would not be allowed to 
be held. 

HARGIS TRIAL (iOES 

OVER INTIL JINE. 

Jackson, Ky., March 11.— Upon an af- 
fidavit tiled by the defendant, the case 
against Heech Hargis for the murder of 
his father. Judge Hargis, the feud 
leader, was continued today and set for 
the seventh day of the next term. The 
affidavit contained the statements that 
J, J. C. Haehone. attorney for the de- 
fense, is not physically able to conduct 
the trial. This postponement puts the 
trial in the June term of court. 

TO EXPKI., MOH.MON.-^. 
Munich. March 11. -The Bavarian gov- 
ernment has ordered the Immediate ex- 
pulsion of a number of American Mor- 
mon missionaries whose presence here 
Is regarded as being dangerous to pub- 
lic order. 




(Continued on page 7, third column.) 

overcomeIy 
alcohol fumes 

Firemen Have Serious 

Time in Early Fire in 

Minneapolis. 

Minneapolis. Minn., March 11.— (Special 
to The Herald..)— Six firemen were over* 
come and sixteen were made drunk by 
the fumes of wood alcohcd from a Are iQ 
the dry kiln of the Northwestern Compo- 
Board company, Lyndale and Forty-fuurill 
avenue, at 2 o'clock this morning. 

The wood was green, and owing to the 
heat there was a constant stream of 
wood alcohol fumes. 

Dr. F. O. I.,ockwood established a flc Id 
ho.spital on a pile of hose and attended 
to the sic!:. 

Joe Steffes, Will Stedblns and P. 
O'l^ughlin, foremen, are in a serious con- 
dition. 

A VICIOUS FIGHT 
IN ST. PAUL HOME 

Antonio Perro Stabbed 

and Wife Hit With Stove 

Lid. 

St. Paul, March 11.— (Special tc Th» 
Herald.)— Antonio Perro was stabbed 
In the shou.der and back, and his 
wife struck over the head with a stove 
lid in the course of a vicious fight last 

-- I night at the home of the Perros. ♦« We&t 

Schmitz, former mayor of this city, i Chicago .avenue. Rose Po"Js and An- 
- .... 1 «. lonio Bonesso are under arrest chargoa 

was released from jail yesterday aft- | tonio ^^»^^'-^^ assailants. 

ernoon, where he had been confined j Bonesso has been lodgms v.ith the 
for the past ten months, a free man I perros for some time, and reccntlv wa* 
until ho^gain ccjmes to the . bar of , n^ues^ed to leaver but refused to get. 
.lustice to face the thlrtV-nine in- j out Last^ight n ^^^^ ^^^^^ 

dictments which are still pending ■ Jo o'clock when Boness.1 went down 
against him, and upon Avhich he ; ^^^i^.^ and started a ciuairel with the 
had to furnish $345,000 bail before ! p^.^ros. . , ^ 

being released from custody. iJonesso's friends became involved ana 

Pursuant to the order of the high there was a general fight. When it was 
tribunal Judge Dunne of the su- , over. Dr. J. C. Whiiacre was c-alled and 

Srior" court, before . whom Schmitz | fl^^^f,^:^^ ^^^^ ^'^e^ 
was . tried and convicted, dismissed , '^^^esso and Pollis. 

the indictment in the extortion cases | "^ 

and ordered Schmitz discharged, but 
at the same time he directed that 
the extortion case be submitted to 
the new grand jury for the purpose 
of having a new indictment found. 

District Attorney Langdon would 
not say last night what steps would 
be taken to bring the extortion mat- 
ter to the attention of the present 
grand jury, but It is probable, in 
view of the court's suggestion, that 
it will be laid before the in- 
quisitorial body without lo.ss of time. 



SCHMITZ IS OUT 
ON $345.000 BAIL 

Released on Extortion 
Charges, But Must 
Face Many Others. 

San Francisco, March 11. — Eugene 



A CARLOAD 

OF DYNAMITE 

Let Go Near Cheyenne and 

Shakes Earth for 

Miles. 

Cheyenne, Wyo., March 11.— A carload 
of dynamite exploded at Buford, 
twenty-eight miles west of Cheyenne, 
last night. The dynamite had been 
stored in abandoned barracks to be 
used in the gravel pits of the Union 
Pacific railroad. The building caught 
fire and caused the dynamite to explode 
fifteen minutes later. The terrific ex- 
plosion shook the earth fo- miles 
around. No one was hurt. Telegraph 
poles and wires were torn down aad 
communication west practically sua- 
pended for a time. 



SAVES LIVES OF 
A WHOLE^FAMILY 

Young Girl Reaches 

Hamilton From Toronto 

Just in Time. 

Hamilton, Ohio, March ll.-The flyinff 
trip ol a young woman from Toronto to 
Hamilton on Monday, saved the lived 
of her mother, two sisters, and a cousin. 

The young girl, who lives in Toronto, 
with a married sister, while the remain- 
der of theAfamily live in Hamilton, was 
awakened fn the morning by a telepnon« 

^•■6 Esther, come to us cjulckly. ^ye'r«» 
all ciylng,. • said the mother. "Annie i« 
unconscious .and both Bella and Jeame 
a^ too sick to call the neighlwrs. c:ome 
tr quick as you can. 1 cant stand at 
the 'phone longer." 

The Etrl dre.ssed hurriedly and. with 
j-er sisters help, harnessed a horse and 
firove to the railroad station, arriving 
just m time to catch a train^ An hour 
ind a half from the tinne she rc<^eived 
the message she reached her home in 
Hamilton, and found the whole family 
un^^onsclous from coal gas. She sum- 
moned physicians and the four were re- 

vlved 

The mother d*»elares her whole action 
was carried out as though she was in a 
dream. She had no thought of calling: 
any person In Hamilton. 



1 

I 
I 



" ^ DEFECTIVE PAGE 



- -w ^p#<gHlW| 



i 



^fTMGK DULUTH EVENING 




TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR, 



SPECIAL MAIL EDITION FOR THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 12, 1908. 



(ON TRAINS, FIVE CENTS.) TWO CENTS. 



ONE OF PROPRIETORS OF 
A FASHIONABLE BOARDING 
SCHOOL KILLS PARTNER 

GOVERNOR 
WELCOMES 



She Then Sent Bullet 

Into tier Own 

Brain. 



Terrible 
acted 



Tragedy En 
In Laurens 



School, Boston. 

Murderer Had Been In- 
mate of Sanitarium 
for Some Time. 




To Minnesota Thousands 

of Buttcrmakers From 

Every State. 

Annua! Convention of 

National Society Opens 

at St. PauL 



MESSAGE BY 
PRUDENT 

Recommends Extension 
of Time for Reinstate- 
ment of Soldiers. 

Reports on the Browns- 
ville Affair Presented 
to the Senate. 



EVELYN N. THAW BEGINS 
ACTION FOR ANNULMENT 
OF MARRIAGE TO HARRY 






Hill Ph 



.Mt;iat ii 



ll'i'i IHi 






!..>.'♦ 






... . 1, . ^.: .. 

1.(1 it WitV 



til.n 



GAVE THE POLICE 
BATTLEOF LIVES 

Canadian Prize Fighter 

Lays Low Several 

at Minneapolis. 



HARRY CRCHARD. 
Who Ha^ Changed His P'.ca en the 
Charge of Murdering Former Gov- 
trnor Stuenenberg Froir, Net Guil- 
tv tc Guilty. He Will te Sen- 
ter.;.tt] March l8. 



THE FIRST IN 
OKLAHOMA 

Republican State Conven- 
tion Meets to Elect 
Delegates. 

Indications Are That They 

Will be Instructed 

for Taft. 



< I v. 
tten 



11. il 



M i 1 1 1 1 



il. 



II* 



-H'l 



;..l. IS 



Ml'W \ 



W(l' !. 



1 Mil 
Hiltl'Mil 41 



il.Mi^t a! • 



DESERTIMG 
THE 



SULTAN 



Natives Leaving Mulai 

tiatid and Going 

BacK to Aziz. 



M;,i. h U-Fit- 
huinJi»<j Hf|«ul«»»niiiK tc.Uay u<- 

..,; .1,, »t. 1. >ii.v. itHTi whiili Will 

t-gt lo th« 

( ii.ii n:iv*-iii;<u I >" »n«li<atu>ne 

Jliat tlM- il«i'|*:it( h would In iii- 

.1 fcr Tiift foi r'K'*'*^'"* ^'"" 

■ '.•.^! ic j.t;:;i«H«l t< ttiis- t"'^' 

(.1 K« I utlJciti 'Jitli- 

,.v.-vtul.lf hlucv t!.. -^- 1^ 

MiUu 'rait liavi ji>liM-<l U. j»U 
, ,ul. a ; ••• vont an iti-u m tul «»• " 

KalH.n .. H«<i«-tary «t v.-.-ir wU.- 

rn-iuv vv.iu t.oi.i Tatt iu • "H/ llL^', 

ri:;,!Vnian Uwi.t.i. Hui.: .,'*''.":' 

ami tin l.ii«l« I!- • u,.;f.. thai !• 
\.. :iHMl UTKh.t inllti'-ni* »»»''♦' 
.UMi.i.iil.on vf I'aii.iiat'. rui.l that ».. 
ha^s ,!..tt. tlils' Willi.' luiMiiip tl.< «•"' ■ 
(I. rk or '!!•• f«'il« fai 1 c ..! ! \\ III •■ 
il it'll Im IK'W lillU'!' 

t'hiUnmiii Will .Ni-; iu-i;-i> 

rinau nuiitPt lia-. T.siHtfd all I 

,.;. >.^,llr l-l. ai^hl ill'oll U'U\ to rfMKJl , 

,ial .t 1- b. li. vol tif will "•'», y^'l;'"- 1 

i.p.il thai all* inly many ' ' 
_,.tiM ar»' oiij»«.H«ti lo liii:» , , 

Ml « ttort.*' of tin xtatt loiaii.ill*' >» 
.MUI-. o oji a I. ti.voivirv ..iKarMZatioii yv S- 
I U-.,day atal la:#t tiiftH ''»\'"f- /:'>•'.<» ^^^ 
•.v:,s .xi>.. t«.l tliat iw. s.t- of i'ftU'ty 
■ v.i.ul.l !•.■ iii.s.i.;r-.l t" th. ■ ■>tl«.i> 

• M wa- .-..!, till' Ml K asy. I' ■ .»^«'< - 

Irviarv Tatt woaUl »m- .tt.i. - .. by a 

ialK'- lualolilv aa.l it K..-nK'.. S. 1 1 l.'.l 

I l<,.,.„., I'.tiMis Flvaa J.n.1 

\frMn-. i. '• !--'"^ ^'^'>'-•'' 

'i. I.f-Mt"- ■ 
I '. > U { i ■ ' a . 

Who •( tlo' oiiii; ill U>-.i'i* .- w,.; in > an 
t.mlv I.- .Ut.iuiliM.i ati.r a Vol.- i-- 
i tak.'M. nnly a tnajorUy o "»••«'•'•«; 
1 u.i.H tavor lUftriK iioiis. riu r« ai. '^.t 
I iltl'Ualos lo tin* ( otiv»tUioii jina only 

,, f.w of this numhfi ar« ni>ri»<'atn! 

)'\ i.toxl»-»- 



AVanhiupton. M:.rcn 11.— In connection 
with tilt rtpurt vi thv seiiatt tominitcf 
on military anu;rt on thf Brownsville 
riot. whicli wsa made to tht seriate tt'- 
tJay. iht ri'*"*'i<l^"t transiruttfd a jiuss.age 
ill which ht 4«aad that Iht Ibcte »et tertn 
;n his order dismissing tht netrro 
M'ldjt-rt had l>t»fn •substantiated I'y tlu 
it-»itiriu>ny I't-K'fi Ihv ft;>miaitt€f. 

Ht rfconjnicndf d in hie message that 
the time for the re5n«talement oT the 
dl.-<ch&rired »oidier?. which ha^ exrired, 
Ix 1 xteniUu for a yt^ar in order to ptrmlt 
tt.t |>iv-id«'iit tc reinstate any of the dip- 
• harKfd nit-n w'nv did 119: fall within the 
tt rriis <.• his dicmiseal. 
ravii, Minn.. Mar> h il -ibperia! tc Senator \^'un•en presented the report 

1 h« |l« raid >— t*utl« i"'.'k« rh froMi marly I of tht tommlltte on behalf of thi rna- 
.very *taie in the iuise-mUk-d at 1 f '^'ty^ ^..d Heautor Foraker the view:* ct 

tliv Sit. Paul aiiditor.aji, at H' «> i.oiK to- | * •" 

day to i>iig'.ii a lh«vt tl.iyp convention. It 

iic e-»:ii.aied that Utween ^O"" i«"d JW*** 

I iitt« r aakerg will »Ki in uitondant* l>. - 

Ion tiiiionttw 01 thlc miinlar there 

wiU he repr»iffntnt;vft« Ironi » v»ry one 
or the WK' kreainerifS in M-aix i*ota. !•*;- 

({/atet fi-uin tloMion. Nt-w V«.rk and I'hii- 

adeJi hia arrived yei^ti iday aliina.on. A 
' ^5l■. i-.nA iur hrwuiiht a lui»:« nii:iji>«i Iron. 

Iowa latst nigiit and a larioad arnvnl 

Vtom S iVilJi I'akoia thi»! inoniiatr Utherr 

ar. rfi.iin? tiim Winnipeg, th. Hta'.t id 

\N a-oh-.i^'on Wineonh.n Ill.sn'ij* and siUi- 

r- .mil '« »«lat«t. A Kperial UeUKi^tU ii 

.. ■■ . . .<d lr<>iii 1 •• *^ M«>iiH>:. lov.-ii. with 
. . .-t o! wfisi.np ti.e ntxt eon- 

\«atn<n ICi that t.ty ai,.; tv b- , .1, Iowa 

a^ i* batt'f fftatf. 

U«-l«-om«il liy <t«>\«'riior. 
. ! i s; iiit'tiaK lhi^ iiionilnfc' betraa 

u.la at. addiesis ot wt-ko.-ut L»y t;ov. rnoi 

JohJiMin and a refpon*-! by 11. J. Nltti. r! 

I t Walker, Iowa, iie was tcllowed t»y 

l'nti!«U!i! J. J. Karrell of Carver. Minn. 

who <ulJvtr«d hi!* annual ad.lross- aad by 

H H >iiiilllii»f ot t'hioaKo i?eiretary aii 1 

tit.isun; ■ • r«-ad tnh annual rtport. 

.»ii>i !•« : aoon ati.iou.'-nnient van- 

«.u^ conia.i o . ^ wen app«';nS«d and then 

the d«leKate»s .nsf-ei t« d th« ixhiblt*- 

wliii h hav»' been arranK" d on !ho si.t*?- 

4it th. Anditorlaiti. whU a onapus th- 

^oll!^l hai! <•! tlu halldlnii;. 

rtii>< atttrnotii. ti.t JirKt niinil»«r on ttif 

PioKiaiii IS an addretf by T. Corntlison 

ot I'laii I'laire. Wi><., who wui diM uc^ 

'How Can a Huttormakoi Hold Hi>* fat- 

roiiit^e Agaill^t l'nwholi-i»oiiu Coinjieti- 

tlori and Y<t <{«m a (?« od <jiiai!t\ of 

( "riaiii '■ 
M V M< ■ - "v.l. 

fuldri'Kf tho HI.'. I ut.oa oj. t=:.»i!<:.s aini 

(■r«.an Hlp< noi>. ' and Halph C H. Fow- 

j« r of Moravia, N. Y.. will dellvi-r 4xn 

hdili.i-s on "l^hoiitd Pa-steuiizatu 11 ol 

Milk ■ f '■'■-.■ \u Mad. i •;•:;<-, TV by 

l<aw 



ROOSEVELT 
DELEGATES 

To the Number of Nine- 
ty-Five Will Appear 
at Omaha. 

Are Instructed to Vote 
for President for An- 
other Term. 



TRAGEDY iN AUTO 
I RACES IN EGYPT 

Three Men Killed and 

Fourteen Injured by 

Runaway Car. 

('u:t(. ftlaiilj U— The kh. dive cf 
Ef.'ypt, artoiripanied by the dnkt and 
dui he«i8 of Conneaught. were present at 
Iltliopcditf yeettrdty at tht fiiet auto- 
i.iobilt rate** luld in Egypt. The eon- 
tf Kt!- w< r« att» ndtd l>y a fatal .u lident 
I'liiiiig thr t!ti«..iid ra« « on* <1 thv < ars- 
ran o\«.i a fallen <. ut<uion and dai;iKd 
out of the coiUX'. A pclieeiuan and 
two npeitatot> wer« kilWd and four- 
t« e:i pern'iis- w< re injuretl. Af It 1 this 
aei idtiit th« diik< and Ih« dui he»>» left 
ana tut ra(.ib latut to an end 



XERVK OF THKKK 

((>NM( IS FAILED. 

Butte Mont. Ma; 'l!^pa!ch lo 

tht Min«r fn»m I>eti Lodgt say*; ihal ar 
th« « oioni r K inqiiexr over fh« b< dy t-f 
f>«piiti- Wartb ti Jfdin Robirij-fiii. wli< wa><' 
uiuiit>r<-d in «■> atttn>2>t to Ortak pii.-ioii 
fanduy by ' '^ t>e<'rg<' K"< k and 

W;lliuni 11a: .t^vtl<.p^ frt'in tl;« tts- 

■ .»y t.t oU.' : 1. a>-j<t'- th.vt a < tinsp.iacy 
<d aiiioi'g tiv« eollvUt^ to niak< a 
i'i-.iK but aprarotitly tht ii« r\f ol al! tx- 
< • I't Hi'fk and Hayes laihd at lh« oni- la! 
tinit K(M k ami llayts ;^« ' bargt il with 
ih< n.titder cl HobiiiSt • . verdict of 

!!.• .ury. 



(tf 



TH1I{1> FKKIHS 

Hotht-^tci. X. Y,. Schools 
.\l)andoncd I utii Safe. 



to be 



Omaha NVb., March 11.— Delegates In 
numbers began arriving today for tiie 
Republican jttate «,onvention which will 
be heltl Thursday. 

There are 926 accredited delegates. Of 
tiiiK nuniber about T50 have bt en in- 
Htruettd for Taft and of tht- rtmain- 
der, lv5 aie instructed for Roosevelt 
and the reht will go intu the et)nven- 
tion unint.tru( ted. The priiu ipal con- 
tent ion on jires^idential prefeit m e ha^^ 
occiiired in tht Second di.strlct (Lin- 
coln>. where ninety-tive delegates were 
UiKtru.ted to vole ftir Tresldent Roose- 
velt for another lerm In the Fifth dis- 
t;i.t. wl.. T'. L.. FoIUtte liad a fidlow- 
ing a mcnth ago, 1'<1 l.> Former Con- 
preesman McCaiih>. a Taft delegation 
has been seie-.ttd and McCarthy him- 
self has indorsed the candid.aty of the 
tecietary of war. 

No serious eonlest is expected on 
ihe .'^election tf delegatts at large, all 
lour of whom have been prailniillv 
agreed upon. Senator Brown and Gov- 
ernor Sh« I'U n will leail the dt legation, 
and Viitor Ro.vewal« r of Omaha, ami 
Alltn W. Field of I.ln- cln are .«^lated 
for the other two members of the at 
laige d« legation. There is a con'.cst 
for national romniitteeman, with no 
less than three avowed candidates in 
the field 




Kochevrrr .N V M," . o-h Ji.— Mayor Kd- 
gerton after a cc»nference with th« pres- 
ident of tin board of education, tiuper- 
int« ndeiit ol city «"Chool* and the ck>Tn- 
nilssioner tl publu safety, haS' tirdered 
thai all ol ihr th id >!o.'r'Ji ol the Rot h- 
estn pubi.i tjchools b« abandoned so tar 
as lilt rtception ol pupils is ct ncerntd. 
Thii afftcit hve school builtlings 
Cl-aiigts wtrt also n.adt in th« hcitlng 
appJuatus of many schot>ls. and all m- 
sHi. opt iili.y door.-r are tc bt changed 
t< open toward the outsitle. Five dilUs 
iwice a ^%etk hereafter havt been or- 
dt It tl 



Ni:\'.' Ki'R.M.. RorTi:. 

\\ fishington. March ii. — (Special to The 
Heraltl t -Kuritl lre» delivery route No. 
'A hav been frd<>red eBl'.blishetl on May 
1 at K.igle Bend Todtj coun.y Minn 
serving 3ctl« ptK^>ple »nti eighty-hve tuiiil- 

litE 



ANTICIPATES 
INSANITY PLEA 

District Attorney Attempts 
to Prove Priest's Mur- 
derer Sane. 

Denver. Colt« . Minch U.— Anticipating a 
plea ol insanity on behalf of Giuseppe 
Alio, on trial for the murder of FalhiT 
Leo L>istrict Attorney Stidser has ta ■cen 
the unusual course of attempting to es- 
tablish the d< tindanfs sanity before it 
has beoTi deiiieu by his attorn.y. tour 
alM Mists tcstihetl positively jesterday thai 
m lluir opinion Alia is ab.'-f.hii. ly saiv-. 
and wa^ so wiien h. shot the priest ii) 
<?t Eliziibc'.h s Catholic chun h Sunday, 
F<b 2< after receiving the sacram: nt at 
bis hands. Wiien court reconvei.. d to- 
tlav H'lto other experts who hav- ex- 
ai'iUud tht prlst>ner wert r.'iidy lo give 
their testimony to the same eff»-ct. 



EUGENE SCHMITZ, 
Former Mayor of San Francisco, Who 
Was Released Tuesday After Being 
in Jail for Ten Months. 



MORSE SAYS 
NOTJIIILTY 

Former Banker Arraigned 
on Indictment of Twen- 
ty-Nine Counts. 

Furnished Bail in $30- 

000 and is Released 

From Custody. 



New York. March 11.— Charles W. 
Morse, the former banker, and Alfred 
H. Curtis, formerly president of the 
National Bank of North America, 
pleaded not guilty, in the T'nited .states 
circuit court, today, to a joint indict- 
ment of twenty-nine c<»unts. Eleven 
of the counts charged them with con- 
spiracy, and eighteen charged them 
with making false entries. 

Bail was fixed at $3<t.tX»o for Mors.- 
and ?10.uoO for Curtis. They wore pa- 
roled in custody of their counsel, in 
order to .•^emre bail, and were allowed 
three weeks to reconsider their plea. 
Bc»th Morse and Curtis, gave bail. Mr. 
Morse, at first, demurred to the $30,0*10 
he was retjuirod lo furnish, and said: 

••Well, I suppose I am tho goal, as 
usual" 



JOHNSON OF MINNESOTA-DEMOCRACY'S NORTH STAR. 

Ut «|> on This tcuisf. Ini Sure to 



% Hanu iKnu.tratj: "I! I Can <»n:y 



Rt-a<h a Safe Port.*' ^ 



1 



I < 

til 



M; 



.\li.i 1 .1 v II liitli'. a'.t 
lai llalitl. the .-o- 
, .^;,, South, is wanluK 

fa*; i... ......... ...- t'l- 

Fit I.' 1. 1"; '""• 

fereii! attilu.b uisiiavid by llalal. W ht> 
let I ;... . ;ru>I .' .Mi'ih I'.l Chair for a 
J,, , , !etl dls- 

jilV. <i >> -< .>.,....^ his fol- 

l,,\v wo of uost powerlul 

kaiil- .:. the Soulii '" .Uoroccti, C.laeui 
aiaf .Ml"Ugi. al.- reported to be on th'- 
j.eiiit ot <1. Strung llaiid and are about 
to make terms with -\bd i:i A/Az. Ihe 
suU.iti of ret t>ril. Sh< rt ••!' Kl Kitani. 
who has been iti.isi.r of tlit" situation al 
F.^i 15: .-.aitl Iti have beeollK- tiistour- 
ag. <l at llatids failure to api t fir at 
Fez .ind it i^^ 
t ri>ui>.« of ' 



W bell. Ved tlKll if toe I 

j^ilania, iliit f of the I 

;(.iulti march »»n the ! 

a y Woulil lake pos- i 

> in the name t>i .Sul- 

tau .\inl ki A;:i/. vvitliout lU. ' ■ 1: 

Kp^o.-iit ion. 



svilt.itTs 

M.'iTi-h 



TIIK (MAINS ON ALIOS 

SPkKAI) (ONSLMrilON. 



SISTER OBJECTS 
TO ANARCHISTS 

Having Anything to Do 

With Removal of Aver- 

bush's Body. 

Chicago. March U.-OIga Averbush. sis- 
ter of the man who was killed by Chief 
of Police Shippy. today entered a pro- 
test against anarchists taking part in 
the Ct remoni«'s incidental ttj the rc- 
nitival of her brt.thers luuly from the 
potttr's lieltl to a Jewish t < inetery. The 
Jewish Fif. Ituriiil asstHlatltm, whit ii 
has the matter in charge, declareil that 
anarchism is rt pnlienslble to Ihe Jewisii 
rjice, and is forbidibn by the tontts af 
ihir r.Ugion. ^ . . . , , 

The anaivhists who had planned ceie- 
bratituis wtte grtatly surprised when 
u.ltl that they wtiuld not be allowed to 
be belli. 



t'ii;. 

1 11 o '; • i ! 

ot" siuta.iinjjf con.samption. Tht« charge 

ua.s malt! at a met<tlng of the ciiy 

t t'lit.. ;! uitlic'u'.ry ctmimiltee, and an 
..rl n Ma". , ftirbiiiiliiii; their ust» was 
dis. 1;— I !. I>r. J. T. iV uningtoa. who 
;,1,|,. ar. .1 J- i.iro the ctinimiti''c. said: 

• Vou i'a>.>< a law forbicbliiig a man 
tti -4pit iiti the sid.walk. to .nir'> ci>ii- 
sumi'fioii, .lU'l llion yu let Im'- 
r!::tin on- )»is .•liUoinobilf v'V ■ 
!.:. ill. dust an.1 germ.« '^^tn. 

A- a health measure. ..: iiain 

ordinmce should be pass..'<l. ' 

.M'-mbi :•« of tho commit toe and .Sac- 
retary .'^i<iiu>y S. Ctorbam i>f the Chi- 
. 1! .. .Vutonioblie club will take an au- 
i..rti..bilo trip to tost the allegation that 
eli.tiiKs on tiros .are a iiieiiace t'l tiie 
public health. 



i„ ii;; '•»';.," i.st .;,«!„ .Vocr:i!iiAi!(i!s tkial litiKs 



mm I NTH. .iim: 



Jatkst.n. Kv.. .March 11.— I'pon an af- 
I ftdavit lilt <l bv the defendant, tht: case 

against Heech " Hargls for the murtler t>f 
I his talher, Jutlge Hargis, the feud 
' Katler, was tcnlintied today antl set for 

the s.venth day t>f the next li-rm. The 
ifi.lavU contaUud the statements that 

' J. C, Hachone. attorney for the tle- 

1. use, is not jihysically able t bici 

I the tii;il. This p<.stpt>m'meni ihe 

Hill in the June term of caun. 



T«> C.XrKl.. .M' »H.M»>N.-*. 
Munit h. .March 11. -The Havari^ui gov- 
eriunent has oi-.lered the Immediate ex- 
pulsion of a n;;mber of American Mor- 
mon laisslonaiit s whi>8e present-e here 
is reganled as b.-ing dangerous to pub- 
lic onler. 




Papers Served Upon Hus* 

band and Upon His 

Mother. 

Thaw's Family Favor 

Suit and Will Provide 

for Evelyn. 

Trouble Began Year 

Ago During the 

First Trial. 



New York. March 11. — The first legal 
step was taken lotiay by counsel for 
Evelyn Nesbit Thaw in her contem- 
plated action to secure the annulment 
of her marriage to Harry K. Thaw. 

Daniel i>'Ke;lly. the young wile's 
coun.sel, said today he has sent a clerfc 
to the Matteawan asylum to serve tho 
papers in the case upt.n Thaw and 
that he also has stiit paiicrK to l>« 
served on Thaw's motb.er. He said: 

••legally speaking, Harry Thaw is 
dead, so it is necessary tti havt ftii a 
defemlaiil his next of kin. The nitdl.or 
will nt)i try it) make any trtuibit loP 
us. Siie is veiT kir.dly dispost li to- 
vvaril t»ur ca.se, and is sympaihtt;< wiiU 
the attitude young Mrs. Thaw haa 
taken. We do not believe tiiat v.e will 
experience any diffi!:uUy ii pi.iisirie 
a decision in our favoi- 

"Nothing has been done iji rtgartl 



SCHMITZ IS OUT 
ON $345,000 BAIL 

Released on Extonion 
Charges, But Mml 
Face S^lany Others. 



(t'oiuinuett on page 7, ihiitl <; 1 unij 

overcomeIy 
alcohol fumes 

Firemen Have Serious 

Time in Early Fire In 

Minneapolis. 

Minneapoiifi. Minn . Marth 11 — (Fpecial 

It) The Herald •— Six hienicn wert t)Vtr» 

cttmo and sixteen wt re inadt' tlrunk by 

the fumes of wood alcoliol frc.m a Are iQ 

the dry kiln of the Ntulhwesteru Ccmpo- 
Board ctjinpany, L,yn<lal' antl F-rtr -t-ui ill 



the 

of 



Bo _ . . 

avenue, al 2 i/elofk this lutunin^!. 

The wootl was gittn and owinp tt 
htal thert was a tttiistant stita:., 
wood alcohol fuim^s. 

Dr. F. O. lyn'kwtiod cBtablisht d ■■' h- 14 
ho.'^l'ital on a pile of hos; at:<l att«ndecl 
to l.h-.- sic!:. , 

Jt.e Steffes. Will Pttdblns aim P. 
O'l-oughlin. fin men, are in a serious con- 
dition. 



A VICIOUS FIGHT 
IN SI PAUL HOME 

Antonio Perro Stabbed 

and Wife Hit With Stove 

Lid. 

St. Paul. Mai'h 11.— (SpecS:»I 1< Th» 
lit raid.)— Antonio Perro w-as slabbed 
in the shoulder and back, and his 
wife struck over the head with a stt»v« 
lid in the course of a vicious fight last 
night al the home of the Perro s, ^^^ West 
Chicago avenue. Ro.-'e PoUls and An- 
tonio Uonesso an> under arrest tfKirg»'<l 
with iHing the assailants . 

lionesso ha.-: b-en lodging \-..lh 1 "J 
IVros- for some lime, and rettnllv wa* 
r. tJueMtd lo have, bui refus^-d lo got- 
oul. Kasl night he invited three fritiitla 

10 his room and Uiey drank beer until 

11 o'cloek, wn.n Hones.s.. went down 
I ^iair« and started a tiiiarn 1 witn me 

before i.^,.j-,.os. 



San Francisco, .March 11. — Eugene 
Schniitz. ftirmer mayor of this city, 
was released from jail ytslerday aft- 
ernrtpn. where he had been confined 
for tho past un m<mihs, a free m.an 
until he again comes lo the bar «tf 
justice to f.'tte the thirty-nine in- 
diiimentr. which are still p nding \'f 
against him, and upttn Avhich he 

liad to furnish 534ri,000 bail „ terros. • , , .. 

being rel. a-a d from custody. 1 isun. s.-o's frbnds became iny'^'^l »;''« 

Pur.s-uant to the ord.-r of the high th. re was a general »'Shi. VV h.-n it was 
tribunal Jutlge Dunne of the su- over. Dr. J. C. NNhuacre was taHod an^ 
pcrio, t'tmrt. befon- whom .Schmitz -Irt^^scd ihe wounds oi .he mturtd 
was tried and ctinvicted, dismissed 



the indictment in liie extortion ca-ses 
and ordered .Schmilz discharged, but 
at the same time he directed that 
iho extortion case be submitt«>d to 
the new grand jury for the purpose 
of having a now indictment found. 

iJlstrict Attorney T.,ang<lon would 
not say la:->t night what step.s would 
he taken to bring the extortion mat- 
ter to the attention of th«^ present 
grand jury, but it is probable, in 
view of the court's suggosiion, that 
it will be laid before tht; in- 
tiui:<itorial body without loss of time. 



laier informed the poliCv 
Bone.sso and Pollis. 



and. 

stttl 



A CARLOAD 

OF DYNAMITE 

Let Go Near Cheyenne and 

ShaKes Earth for 

Miles. 

Cheyenne. Wyo.. March 11.— A carload 
of dynamite exploded at Buford, 
iwentv-eight miles west of Cheyenne, 
last liight. The dynamite had been 
stored in abantloni-d barracks to be 
used In the gravel pits of the Union 
Pacific railroad. The building caught 
lire and causoij the dynamite 10 explode 
fifteen minutes later. The terrific ex- 
plosion shook tho earth fc-- miles 
around. No one was hurt. Telegrajih 
poles and wires were torn down aad 
communication west practically sus- 
pended for a time. 



SAVES LIVES OF 
A WilOLE FAMILY 

Young Girl Reaches 

Hamilton From Toronto 

Just in Time. 

Hamilton, Oiiio, Marcrh U.-T.ie llyin« 
trip ol a young woman from Toronto to 
Hamilton on Monday, saved the lived 
uf her mother, iwo si.sit is. and a cous.n. 

Th. voting girl, who hves in Toronto, 
Willi a" married sist.r. while th«= remain- 
der ot